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Positioning in Inline

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07-16-2008, 01:32 AM
  #1
Sean Garrity
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Positioning in Inline

So, I played my first competitive hockey since i was around 10(I'm 20 now), and let me tell you it wasn't pretty. First off, we had 6 guys, and I am in no condition to play 20 minutes of hockey, yet alone probably the 25 or 30 that I ended up playing, but i can work on that. My skating was not great, but i can work on that. The biggest thing was my positioning without the puck i felt was horrendous. I would sit on the half boards waiting for a pass, and then my teammate would skate right at me, and i had no idea whether to just sit there or drive down the boards or to the middle. Any help with positioning at all would be great.

PS, I scored so atleast there was 1 positive to take away.

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07-16-2008, 01:44 AM
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raygunpk
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Hey you scored so that's awesome!

I would like some positioning tips too. One thing I know is to watch for rushing D and stay back at the point if they decide to rush in.

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07-16-2008, 07:29 AM
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Still Naive
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the obvious questions are:

are you playing o or d (up or back, depending on what your team calls it)?

what level are you playing? (gold, silver, bronze or a b c, depending on your league) i assume you're playing a men's league, and if that's the case, it tends to change based on your skill level for inline.

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07-16-2008, 08:04 AM
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Synergy27
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Are you playing 4 on 4? If so, you should basically never be standing still. Assuming you are playing on a normal sized rink, there is simply too much space to cover with only 8 guys skating around. Roller hockey is all about finding open spaces and one on one rushing (it's hard to breakout systematically with so few players involved), so you really need to be moving at ALL times.

This is definitely true in ice hockey as well, but even moreso in roller imo. Whether you should be crashing the net or getting open for a pass depends more on the style of your teammate with the puck, but either way, you should always be doing one of those things if your team is on the offensive.

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07-16-2008, 11:24 AM
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Bluelineswinships
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find open ice when your team has the puck
if your teammate cant make the pass support him
its pretty simple

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07-16-2008, 12:28 PM
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Sean Garrity
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluelineswinships View Post
find open ice when your team has the puck
if your teammate cant make the pass support him
its pretty simple
maybe it's simple to you, but not to some of us.


Yes it is 4 on 4 on a normal size rink Intermediate men's league, there were only 6 of us so we were rotating constantly, basically i question positioning more on the forward side, because I wont be playingn too much defense.

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07-16-2008, 02:43 PM
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Terror91
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I was the same way going back to forward after playing goalie for a while. Always keep your feet moving. Never, EVER, stand in one place. If you can't find an open lane, move. Your offensive line mate, his style of play helps you to figure out where you should be. If he is a pass first kind of guy, get to the open lane. If he likes to shoot, try and open a lane for him.

It was said before but if your skating in with your D stick back at the point if your other forward is ahead of you. If you all three move in and there is a turn over. Easy 2on1. But stick with the basics for now. Keep moving. Always look for the open lane. And from experience. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR HEAD UP.

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07-16-2008, 09:39 PM
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Nosebleed Section
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Skate to the open spots and give your team mates the option to pass to you. If they elect to carry it themselves then move yourself into another position to get the pass.

In the scenario you described one fault I can imagine is that when the play was developing you need to anticipate and predict the flow. For example if he is coming with a head of steam from behind your net down the same wing your on you need to get moving to either a) be ahead of him to give you a straight forward pass or b) cut to the middle for a break pass or cut wide to the far boards to develop a 2 on 1 or 2 on 2.

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07-16-2008, 10:28 PM
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Sean Garrity
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nosebleed Section View Post
Skate to the open spots and give your team mates the option to pass to you. If they elect to carry it themselves then move yourself into another position to get the pass.

In the scenario you described one fault I can imagine is that when the play was developing you need to anticipate and predict the flow. For example if he is coming with a head of steam from behind your net down the same wing your on you need to get moving to either a) be ahead of him to give you a straight forward pass or b) cut to the middle for a break pass or cut wide to the far boards to develop a 2 on 1 or 2 on 2.
thanks, I guess i can do both which was my question as to what is better. But I guess i just need to read the play and tendencies of the defense in order to decide which one to do.

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07-17-2008, 08:22 PM
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JLHockeyKnight
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Thing with roller hockey is you have to keep moving to keep open. Thats just how the game is, because there are less options then in ice hockey. Lateral movements help. Continually rotating laterally in the neutral zone during breakouts is a good idea (preferably between the center line and your blue line) then crashing the net, moving up the boards, or moving across the opposing blue line are good moves when the play moves forward.

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