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Old
07-24-2008, 09:30 AM
  #26
Nordique
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Originally Posted by forktie View Post
I hear ya, but I imagine if CBJ hockey was anywhere near the monster that Ohio State football (and college football in general) is, we would see a little more flexibility there.... but who knows.
This is where I feel Hitch seperates himself from alot of coaches. He has an ideal that he will hold the team and himself to at all cost. Even if it means sacrificing success in the immediate future in order to build a lasting culture of hard work, defense first hockey.

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Old
07-24-2008, 10:00 AM
  #27
forktie
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Originally Posted by Halfboard View Post
You mean the "monster" that beats up on sisters of the poor like Akron & then chokes in national championship games???
that's the one!

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Old
07-24-2008, 12:50 PM
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palinka View Post
Gettysburg was the Union equivalent of the Battle of Midway. A whole lot of real bizarre things occurred, both before and during the battle, that hadn't happened before and ended up costing the juggernaut the battle, the momentum, and the war.

Gettysburg would have been a decisive Confederate victory if Jackson were still alive.
Hitch is equilvant to a military General imo, an older General though. One who I think struggles a bit with change-but overall I'm glad we have him. If the Jackets can be turned around he can do it.

Your correct about Jackson-the battle would have been decided at dusk the first day had he been there (Culps Hill). You know your history!

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07-24-2008, 05:59 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nordique View Post
This is where I feel Hitch seperates himself from alot of coaches. He has an ideal that he will hold the team and himself to at all cost. Even if it means sacrificing success in the immediate future in order to build a lasting culture of hard work, defense first hockey.
Do you like Hitch? Because what you just wrote reads like a pat condemnation of a messianic madman who proves maladaptive in the face of innovation and change.


Last edited by Pluckfur: 07-24-2008 at 06:15 PM. Reason: Making it easier for Timeless and his dictionary. Only so many hours in a day, yanno.
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Old
07-24-2008, 06:03 PM
  #30
Timeless Winter
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brb to get my dictionary

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Old
07-24-2008, 06:24 PM
  #31
Jaxs
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I like Hitch and what he stands for. How he holds players accountable and demands two way play. Hitch may not take the Jackets to the promised land, but i think he was the perfect hire at the time he was hired. Slowly creeping out of Columbus are the days when free agents could sign here to put forth little effort, cash their paychecks, with not much criticism.

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07-24-2008, 06:53 PM
  #32
Palinka
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Originally Posted by Pluckfur View Post
Do you like Hitch? Because what you just wrote reads like a pat condemnation of a messianic madman who proves maladaptive in the face of innovation and change.
"I don't want to go on a rant, here, but America's foreign policy makes about as much sense as Beowulf having sex with Robert Fulton at the first battle of Antietam. I mean when a neo-conservative defenestrates it's like Raskolnikov filibuster deoxymonohydroxinate."


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Old
07-24-2008, 06:54 PM
  #33
Pluckfur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaxs View Post
I like Hitch and what he stands for. How he holds players accountable and demands two way play. Hitch may not take the Jackets to the promised land, but i think he was the perfect hire at the time he was hired. Slowly creeping out of Columbus are the days when free agents could sign here to put forth little effort, cash their paychecks, with not much criticism.
Excellent call, Jaxs. I can't disagree - not even a little bit.

It benefits both our team and Hitch that they both have something to prove - actually, the same thing to prove - that they belong in the new NHL.

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Old
07-24-2008, 06:59 PM
  #34
Palinka
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Originally Posted by Robert View Post
Hitch is equilvant to a military General imo, an older General though. One who I think struggles a bit with change-but overall I'm glad we have him. If the Jackets can be turned around he can do it.

Your correct about Jackson-the battle would have been decided at dusk the first day had he been there (Culps Hill). You know your history!
The success of Lee and Jackson as a tandem, in my opinion, is less related to their individual abilities and more a natural result of the two basically being of the same heart and mind. Lee was a brilliant (and often underrated) tactician; Jackson in the field was literally a mobile Lee. He was able to correctly read the flow of battle, deduce the Union's next move and the move after that, and react in a manner that Lee would given the situation.

Gettysburg was an inevitability after losing Jackson. Stuart was nowhere to be found at first, Johnston's normally brutal phalanx was tied up (almost as if Johnston were spiting Lee by moving at an agonizingly slow pace), and there ended up being no coordination or really a decisive plan of battle as a result.

In relation to what I mentioned earlier about Midway, it was like Nimitz telling Theobald "Here is exactly where the Japanese are going to attack, here is what their strength is, here is exactly what they're going to do", and then seeing Theobald squat over 600 miles away from where he should have been (allowing the Japanese to take Kiska and Attu unmolested, which then necessitated a bloodbath to re-take a year later).

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Old
07-24-2008, 07:24 PM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palinka View Post
"I don't want to go on a rant, here, but America's foreign policy makes about as much sense as Beowulf having sex with Robert Fulton at the first battle of Antietam. I mean when a neo-conservative defenestrates it's like Raskolnikov filibuster deoxymonohydroxinate."

I lost the facial hair and went for the full body wax.

I remain Bill Mahr's boy toy, however.

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Old
07-24-2008, 07:42 PM
  #36
Matthew
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Originally Posted by Pluckfur View Post
I lost the facial hair and went for the full body wax.

I remain Bill Mahr's boy toy, however.
Maher*

Nice try, poser.

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Old
07-24-2008, 07:49 PM
  #37
Pluckfur
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Originally Posted by Matthew View Post
Maher*

Nice try, poser.
damnit!

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Old
07-24-2008, 08:47 PM
  #38
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I'd say he's fat to. . . quite fat. He also would love to win hockey games 0 to -1, if that were a possibility.

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Old
07-24-2008, 09:14 PM
  #39
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"He only wears blue shirts on the bench. He looks like a penguin in white."

These are his words, as stated to a group of hockey mom's at Nationwide last spring.

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Old
07-28-2008, 04:47 PM
  #40
FlaggerX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palinka View Post
The success of Lee and Jackson as a tandem, in my opinion, is less related to their individual abilities and more a natural result of the two basically being of the same heart and mind. Lee was a brilliant (and often underrated) tactician; Jackson in the field was literally a mobile Lee. He was able to correctly read the flow of battle, deduce the Union's next move and the move after that, and react in a manner that Lee would given the situation.

Gettysburg was an inevitability after losing Jackson. Stuart was nowhere to be found at first, Johnston's normally brutal phalanx was tied up (almost as if Johnston were spiting Lee by moving at an agonizingly slow pace), and there ended up being no coordination or really a decisive plan of battle as a result.
I don't know. Jackson disappeared during the Peninsular campaign, as highly emotional men occasionally do. I think the Southern defeat at Gettysburg had far more to do with Stuart's absence until after battle lines were formed and the outstanding performance by John Buford (and John Reynolds) in preserving the Union's ability to fight from superior terrain. Stuart might have kept Lee well enough informed to gain a better battlefield. Terrain matters, particularly when facing a competent defender like Meade.

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Old
07-28-2008, 05:16 PM
  #41
Tad Mikowsky
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Festively Plump

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Old
08-01-2008, 02:10 PM
  #42
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Originally Posted by Palinka View Post
The sort of teacher who you only like and appreciate 10 years later.
What a great comparison !!!

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Old
08-02-2008, 02:52 PM
  #43
Robert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlaggerX View Post
I don't know. Jackson disappeared during the Peninsular campaign, as highly emotional men occasionally do. I think the Southern defeat at Gettysburg had far more to do with Stuart's absence until after battle lines were formed and the outstanding performance by John Buford (and John Reynolds) in preserving the Union's ability to fight from superior terrain. Stuart might have kept Lee well enough informed to gain a better battlefield. Terrain matters, particularly when facing a competent defender like Meade.
Buford deciding to draw the line on Chambersburg Pike did secure the high ground, but in the end it was his two dismounted Brigades of carbine's that did it. Instead of 2,000 muskets he gave fire equal to 6,000. I bet Harry Heth and even Hitch would agree.

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Old
08-02-2008, 07:33 PM
  #44
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I think Ken Hitchcock would be very proud to know that his Jackets' fans are discussing Civil War history. (I'm being entirely serious with this comment by the way.)

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Old
08-02-2008, 11:48 PM
  #45
Robert
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Originally Posted by cbjgirl View Post
I think Ken Hitchcock would be very proud to know that his Jackets' fans are discussing Civil War history. (I'm being entirely serious with this comment by the way.)
I agree, he is a Union reinactor. I've met several in my day and they take it very seriously and love nothing better than to discuss it and teach it. He probably could teach a college course on the subject.

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Old
08-04-2008, 08:10 AM
  #46
Inquiring Minds
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I agree, he is a Union reinactor. I've met several in my day and they take it very seriously and love nothing better than to discuss it and teach it. He probably could teach a college course on the subject.
Gentlemen, I am humbled.
I've read Foote, Johnson and numerous other respected historians on the Civil War. I thought I knew Gettysburg pretty well, but you've made me realize I need to go back and review everything.
Well done.

(And I would agree that Stewart put Lee at a disastrous disadvantage - possibly fatal.)

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Old
08-04-2008, 08:36 AM
  #47
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Some of the posts in this thread remind me of that scene in "Airplane" when the wacky air traffic control guy is asked to describe the plane and he says that "it's a big pretty white plane with red stripes, curtains in the windows and wheels and it looks like a big Tylenol."

I think that the teacher reference earlier in the thread is probably a pretty good comparison. I had an algebra teacher in high school who was the tough and demanding type; while it sucked to be in his class at the time, the discipline and mental toughness I gained from being in his class made me a much better student.

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Old
08-04-2008, 09:49 AM
  #48
pete goegan
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Originally Posted by Inquiring Minds View Post
Gentlemen, I am humbled.
I've read Foote, Johnson and numerous other respected historians on the Civil War. I thought I knew Gettysburg pretty well, but you've made me realize I need to go back and review everything.
Well done.

(And I would agree that Stewart put Lee at a disastrous disadvantage - possibly fatal.)

You're right, IM, the discussion has been very instructive. For any follower of military history, a visit to the field at Gettysburg is one of the most useful, enlightening, and moving experiences one can have. I waited until I was almost 60 to make the trip and I regret not having done it sooner so I could have more time to return, research, and digest the lessons on display there.

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Old
08-05-2008, 07:37 AM
  #49
Inquiring Minds
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Originally Posted by pete goegan View Post
You're right, IM, the discussion has been very instructive. For any follower of military history, a visit to the field at Gettysburg is one of the most useful, enlightening, and moving experiences one can have. I waited until I was almost 60 to make the trip and I regret not having done it sooner so I could have more time to return, research, and digest the lessons on display there.
One of the very best trips my family has ever taken. Being on the field made history come alive. As we were standing on Little Round Top and looking down on the Peach Orchard I explained to my kids how the Union General Sickle abandoned his position to go down to lower ground to "get into the fight." My son thought for a second, then mumbled "Idiot."

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Old
08-08-2008, 07:02 AM
  #50
forktie
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I wonder how Hitch got so into the civil war stuff, like when in his life did he really dive into the whole thing... cuz I can only assume there wasn't a lot of civil war education in the canadian public school system.

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