HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

workout routine to boost muscle and reduce fat and help with hockey skills

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
08-16-2008, 07:27 PM
  #1
trueblue9441
Registered User
 
trueblue9441's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bronx, NY
Country: United States
Posts: 3,479
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to trueblue9441
workout routine to boost muscle and reduce fat and help with hockey skills

hey im just looking for some advice on a workout routine that will lose the fat ive gained over my freshman year lol and build muscle once i get back to school.. im planning on getting protein and creatine powder supplements and i was wondering if that would be a good idea considering i want to build a good amount of muscle as well... any help and ideas would be appreciated.. thanks

trueblue9441 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-16-2008, 09:43 PM
  #2
Blueshirt24
 
Blueshirt24's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 284
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by trueblue9441 View Post
hey im just looking for some advice on a workout routine that will lose the fat ive gained over my freshman year lol and build muscle once i get back to school.. im planning on getting protein and creatine powder supplements and i was wondering if that would be a good idea considering i want to build a good amount of muscle as well... any help and ideas would be appreciated.. thanks

I'm no expert but I'm entering my final year of college hockey and when I wanted to gain muscle I never implemented creatine or even extra protein beyond what was in my normal diet. Really, I see a lot of these posts asking for tips on "losing fat" "gaining muscle" and helping with hockey and to me, it's a bit silly. The best way to lose fat is to stay away from most red meat, eat lots of fruits and vegetables and lean meats and not grab a bag of chips at every lunch or a soda every time you're thirsty. I'm a college senior and the only things I drink are pretty much water, orange juice and beer. Soda and energy drinks and all that crap are just empty calories. Same with most snack foods; I eat like a horse sometimes (ribs, nachos, fried chicken - you name it) but I stay away from dorritos and oreos and crap like that.

As for adding muscle, just pick up a basic routine and hit the gym. I put a pull-up bar in my doorway when I moved off-campus and cranked out 20 pull-ups every morning. I do 65 pushups every other day, 100 situps every night, and I try to some kalistenic (sp) workouts when I have the time, but for the most part my "in home" routine takes less than 5 minutes (and it's just maintenance). I try to hit the gym a minimum of 3 times a week and usually aim for 5. I just go through a rotation, working on all the muscle groups on different days; I never targeted anything specifically hockey related. Fit is fit, and my workouts aren't just supposed to help my ice time, but are intended to keep me in better shape overall.

As for helping your hockey skills, personally I don't believe that any exercise that doesn't involve skating or stick-handling is going to do that. Sure, you can increase your stamina or explosive speed, but those aren't really "hockey skills" so much as they are signs of fitness. Working out your forearms isn't really going to make your shot better. Shooting is going to make your shot better. Get all the ice time you can and put in 110% at practice. Yes, going to practice SUCKS. We practice 11pm-1am four nights a week and I have a 7:30 class three days a week this semester, but you go put in the work instead of coasting through practice wishing it was over and it not only ends up going by faster, but you get more out of it.

I'm a division III player and might be the best on my team, but despite being in good athletic shape and having done very well for the level that I play at, I'm still not half the hockey player (or man, for that matter) that I want to be. My plan is to just adjust my diet permanently (as I have slowly been doing over the last year or so) to the point where I am just living healthy, and then to add an exercise and workout routine to that lifestyle that keeps me in shape (once I get to where I want to be) without making me feel like the demands on my time are so great that I don't have time for fitness. At the end of the day though, there is no great "plan" to make you a leaner, stronger athlete; being an athlete or a fit human being is a lifestyle, and the key to attaining your goals is adjusting your lifestyle to accomodate them.

Blueshirt24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-16-2008, 10:25 PM
  #3
HockeyThoughts
Delivering The Truth
 
HockeyThoughts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ottawa
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,469
vCash: 500
I'd try some nice HIIT training. Works wonders for shedding fat, should try to do it 2-3 times a week.

You can complete in doing anything: Biking, running, skating, treadmill, rowing..etc

Google it or use search function of "HIIT".

HockeyThoughts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-19-2008, 03:04 PM
  #4
rye&ginger
Registered User
 
rye&ginger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 6,156
vCash: 500
Spend the money on a trainer rahter than supplements, if anything. The supplements are just expensive food.

I agree, HIIT is a good idea to start. You want to get strong, not big. Difference.

rye&ginger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-19-2008, 03:13 PM
  #5
Sony Eriksson*
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: N. Dallas/NYC
Country: Faroe Islands
Posts: 13,583
vCash: 500
Do at least 30 min a day of HIIT 4-5 times a week. Combine that with weightlifting for 45min-1hr 4-5 times a week and a balanced diet you will loose fat and gain muscle. Remember to take a protein shake or something high in protein with 20 min of your workout to replenish the protein you muscles burned during the workout.

here is a great website with a lot of different workout regiments:
http://www.muscleandstrength.com/forum/

Sony Eriksson* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-19-2008, 04:10 PM
  #6
deanosaur
Registered User
 
deanosaur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: AB/MB
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,090
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by rye&ginger View Post
Spend the money on a trainer rahter than supplements, if anything. The supplements are just expensive food.

I agree, HIIT is a good idea to start. You want to get strong, not big. Difference.
Not every trainer is good for you...

deanosaur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-19-2008, 04:13 PM
  #7
Sony Eriksson*
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: N. Dallas/NYC
Country: Faroe Islands
Posts: 13,583
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by deangamblin View Post
Not every trainer is good for you...
Agreed.....If you can't learn to do it on your own it will never work. you have to have self discipline if you want ot loose fat and put on Muscle. I used a trainer for 6 months and lost 40lbs. I have been doing it for over a yr by myself and have lost a total of 83lbs. My waist went down 10 inches and i put on 30-35lbs of muscle in the process. Also remember its not all about the weight you lose its the inches that is more important.

Sony Eriksson* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-19-2008, 05:11 PM
  #8
Kamus
Registered User
 
Kamus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 456
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by trueblue9441 View Post
hey im just looking for some advice on a workout routine that will lose the fat ive gained over my freshman year lol and build muscle once i get back to school.. im planning on getting protein and creatine powder supplements and i was wondering if that would be a good idea considering i want to build a good amount of muscle as well... any help and ideas would be appreciated.. thanks
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=543170

Kamus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 08:54 AM
  #9
lemieux32*
 
lemieux32*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Country: United States
Posts: 1,280
vCash: 500
HIIT is not a good way to start. A good way to start is to build up fitness before you do any HIIT. I you do HIIT without a quality base of fitness you will only injure yourself.

lemieux32* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 10:17 AM
  #10
Pepper
Registered User
 
Pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 14,416
vCash: 500
Remember that unless you're really overweight, it's nearly impossible to lose weight and gain lean muscle mass at the same time without the use of steroids.

First of all, get a proper trainer to make you a plan and stick to it.

If you want to gain lean muscle mass, you need to eat more calories than you consume. If you want to lose weight, you need to consume more calories than you get from food.

Carbonhydrates are bad in general (when it comes to losing weight) but you need some unless you want to blow your organs. Get most of your calories from proteins, because it takes lot of energy to turn extra protein in to fat meaning excess calories (those you don't burn) don't get stored as fat in your body. Body doesn't need that much energy to store excess carbs and fat.

Make sure the carbs you consume are so-called "slow" carbs which take time to get processed and keeps your metabolism more steady. Dark bread, dark pasta etc. Avoid sugar and white bread.

Forget creatin and other stuff unless you train really hard, it's useless.

Pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 10:29 AM
  #11
Sony Eriksson*
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: N. Dallas/NYC
Country: Faroe Islands
Posts: 13,583
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper View Post
Remember that unless you're really overweight, it's nearly impossible to lose weight and gain lean muscle mass at the same time without the use of steroids.

First of all, get a proper trainer to make you a plan and stick to it.

If you want to gain lean muscle mass, you need to eat more calories than you consume. If you want to lose weight, you need to consume more calories than you get from food.

Carbonhydrates are bad in general (when it comes to losing weight) but you need some unless you want to blow your organs. Get most of your calories from proteins, because it takes lot of energy to turn extra protein in to fat meaning excess calories (those you don't burn) don't get stored as fat in your body. Body doesn't need that much energy to store excess carbs and fat.

Make sure the carbs you consume are so-called "slow" carbs which take time to get processed and keeps your metabolism more steady. Dark bread, dark pasta etc. Avoid sugar and white bread.

Forget creatin and other stuff unless you train really hard, it's useless.

That is not true....HIIT and lifting weights will do exactly that. Remembering to eat your daily allowance of Protein will help aid the grown of lean muscle.

Sony Eriksson* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 10:39 AM
  #12
cuzza
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 38
vCash: 500
To lose weight/gain muscle clean up your diet. Eat LOTS of red meat and fish and eat the majority of your carbs in morning/afternoon and around exercise time.

High intensity cardio is good.

For the workout, just a standard weightlifting routine incorporating a lot of compound moves. Focus on squatting, deadlifting and benching for the majority of your moves. Gain strength and the muscle will come.

cuzza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 10:45 AM
  #13
nni
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,715
vCash: 500
is this a contest to see who can give the worst advice? scary stuff, anyway...

OP if you want to gain mass and lose fat, then you need to decide which one is your focus. it is extremely difficult to do both. i would suggest keeping your diet around 500 calories above surplus in a 40/40/20 ratio. 40% of your cals from protein, 40% from carbs and 20% from fat. do not worry about supplements as you need to focus on diet and routine which are more important, when this is set, then move onto supplements (and nothing beyond creatine).

as for routine, if you are new to lifting, then i would look into ripptoe's workout plan, it is good for beginners and is loaded with compound movements. i would supplement with hiit on off days, or sprints your call (hill sprints are preferred to flat sprints).

with this laid out you should recomp a bit, especially if you do well with the cardio. good luck.

nni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 10:45 AM
  #14
Pepper
Registered User
 
Pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 14,416
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addiction View Post
That is not true....HIIT and lifting weights will do exactly that. Remembering to eat your daily allowance of Protein will help aid the grown of lean muscle.
For normal people who don't train in Ivan Drago-like laboratory conditions, it's extremely hard. I guess you can say it's possible in theory but extremely hard, especially if you have a regular job or you're a full-time student.

Here's a short article about it http://www.intense-workout.com/same.html

What you want to do is to first build up your muscle mass because the more muscle mass you have, the bigger your base consumption (i.e how much calories you burn by watching tv on a couch).

Pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 11:19 AM
  #15
Sony Eriksson*
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: N. Dallas/NYC
Country: Faroe Islands
Posts: 13,583
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper View Post
For normal people who don't train in Ivan Drago-like laboratory conditions, it's extremely hard. I guess you can say it's possible in theory but extremely hard, especially if you have a regular job or you're a full-time student.

Here's a short article about it http://www.intense-workout.com/same.html

What you want to do is to first build up your muscle mass because the more muscle mass you have, the bigger your base consumption (i.e how much calories you burn by watching tv on a couch).


When i started working out i weighed about 305. Im 6'5 so 300 is overweight yes but it wasn't obvious that i was that heavy. I am now down to 228lbs and have put on around 30lbs of muscle in the process. A good base can be if you are currently or have been athletic in the past. I played hockey for 20+ yrs and stopped due to surgeries i had and i got fat. The base was still there and muscles has a ton of memory when you start lifting again. If you have never competed in sports as a teenager then yes it will be tough to cut fat and put on muscle. However if you have been active then all of a sudden in a few yr span packed on the pounds it wont be to hard to get back down.

Sony Eriksson* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 11:34 AM
  #16
Pepper
Registered User
 
Pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 14,416
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addiction View Post


When i started working out i weighed about 305. Im 6'5 so 300 is overweight yes but it wasn't obvious that i was that heavy. I am now down to 228lbs and have put on around 30lbs of muscle in the process. A good base can be if you are currently or have been athletic in the past. I played hockey for 20+ yrs and stopped due to surgeries i had and i got fat. The base was still there and muscles has a ton of memory when you start lifting again. If you have never competed in sports as a teenager then yes it will be tough to cut fat and put on muscle. However if you have been active then all of a sudden in a few yr span packed on the pounds it wont be to hard to get back down.
Did you measure your fat-% before and after you started working out? How did you measure the 30lbs of lean muscle mass?

Weighing 305 is clearly overweight and explains how you were able to shed off weight while seemingly gain muscle mass. 305-228 = roughly 80 lbs. Add the 30lbs of muscle gained and you lost 110lbs of fat. That's 50kg which is a LOT of fat.

So I still stand by my original claim, you can't gain lean muscle mass and lose weight unless you're clearly overweight which you were.

Pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 11:39 AM
  #17
Sony Eriksson*
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: N. Dallas/NYC
Country: Faroe Islands
Posts: 13,583
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper View Post
Did you measure your fat-% before and after you started working out? How did you measure the 30lbs of lean muscle mass?

Weighing 305 is clearly overweight and explains how you were able to shed off weight while seemingly gain muscle mass. 305-228 = roughly 80 lbs. Add the 30lbs of muscle gained and you lost 110lbs of fat. That's 50kg which is a LOT of fat.

So I still stand by my original claim, you can't gain lean muscle mass and lose weight unless you're clearly overweight which you were.
My body fat was around 28 and now its down around 16. My trainer has some caculation that shows the muscle gained.

Sony Eriksson* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-20-2008, 12:40 PM
  #18
nni
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,715
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper View Post
Did you measure your fat-% before and after you started working out? How did you measure the 30lbs of lean muscle mass?

Weighing 305 is clearly overweight and explains how you were able to shed off weight while seemingly gain muscle mass. 305-228 = roughly 80 lbs. Add the 30lbs of muscle gained and you lost 110lbs of fat. That's 50kg which is a LOT of fat.

So I still stand by my original claim, you can't gain lean muscle mass and lose weight unless you're clearly overweight which you were.
its very possible, but very difficult. most lifters call it recomping.

nni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-26-2008, 09:32 AM
  #19
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 24,109
vCash: 500
I'd say Zet40 up top has probably got some of the most realistic advice. Clean up your diet because it's important. And exercise to gain strength or lose fat. But those two alone won't improve your hockey skills, just give you a better fitness base to build on.

If you play hockey quite a bit, you're already doing HIIT. Jump on the ice for 45 seconds, skate hard, then jump off and rest for a minute. That's HIIT. I wouldn't jump right into full bore dryland interval training, but you should be able to build up to it in a few weeks.

Sprints are excellent in the offseason for improving aerobic conditioning as well as building speed and strengthening your groin and hip flexors. Exercise bikes are great during the season as they are low impact and low risk for injury but still help condition.

As for gaining muscle and losing fat and the same time, you can do it if you are in very poor shape, but if you're already active, it will be next to impossible unless you've got the genes for it. I would focus on one or the other. Usually I see people drop the fat first (more cardio, fewer calories) and then put on the muscle (more strength training, more calories).

Check out an e-book called Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle. It's a pretty good collection of information on the subject. I knew most of the stuff inside, but it took years of reading tons of books and articles, so for me I'd say it's worth the price.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:25 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.