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Becoming a Goalie?

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10-29-2008, 12:46 PM
  #1
psukan
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Becoming a Goalie?

I play oldtimers and we are always short on goalies. The other day I decided to look into the logistics of becoming a goalie. I looked at a few hockey shops online and on e-bay at equipment and found some solid deals that would work for me. What I am wondering about is if anyone has any advice? I have never used goalie skates before so I am wondering about the transition, is it hard to learn to use goalie skates? What other considerations should I make before becoming a goalie? As for equipment, what are some things I should be looking out for or staying away from? Any info would help me decide. Thanks in advance!

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10-29-2008, 12:58 PM
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Gunnar Stahl 30
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1. figure out your identity, butterfly, standup, hybrid. i recomend a hybrid style because its fun and less strenuous then a pure butterfly.

2. dont buy goalie skates. if you are used to player skates, just use them. if you already bought goalie skates or are going to buy them anyway, know that the ENTIRE blade touces the ice, not just the center like with player skates. the skates should not be sharp. they shouldnt be very very dull but not sharp at all. if you get them sharpened, dull them out on a wooden bench or on the ice.

3. learn to how to use the T slide and when to use it.

4. most importantly, the basics. stick in your five hole, glove up, stay square to the shooter. playing good positionally is the most important part

as far as equipment. how tall are you? im about 6'4 and use 34" pads. i dont like really big pads. i tried using 38" and they were HUGE. i couldnt move in them. and like i siad before, you dont really need goalie skates if its just a mens league. also you dont need goalie if you already have pants

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10-29-2008, 01:34 PM
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First thing you need to do is decide if the cost is worth the return for you. If you're only going to play goal maybe 2 or 3 times a year it might not be worth the money to shell out money for gear. However if it's something you seriously want to try and have fun with I definitely say go for it.

Unlike the other poster, I HIGHLY recommend getting goalie skates from both a protection and mobility stand point. I started out playing goal in player skates when I was 13 and it was not a pleasant experience. Players skates are rockered while goalie skates are more flat. You get much better balance in goalie skates and don't feel constantly off balance. They are also made with better protection to prevent shots from hurting your feet. I was trying out for my highschool team in player skates, the coach skated in and let loose a slapshot from the point. The shot hit me directly in the toe and I thought I lost a limb it hurt so ******* bad. That night when my mom picked me up I remember her arguing with me to wait and see if I was going to be playing enough to warrant them. I told her "F that, I'm getting goalie skates and I'll find anyway to pay you back" and I showed her my toes. There was no more arguing after she saw how red, black and blue my toes were. What size shoe are you? I have an old pair of goalie skates in pretty good shape I'd let go for fairly cheap.

As for pads, you want to measure from the middle of your ankle bone on the inside of your leg up to the middle of your knee cap. I suggest sitting down to get the measurement. This is your Ankle-to-Knee measurement or ATK and this is the best way to size goalie pads. Getting the right size pad is crucial. If you get the wrong size pad you are not going to have as good mobility nor protection. If a pad is too big or too small your knee won't land in the right place and you could constantly be hitting it on the ice.

Do NOT skimp on a mask. You don't need to go out and buy a pro mask, but at the same time do not go out and buy a $100 special or worse don't use a street hockey mask. I've seen it happen and it's not something you want to risk.

Once you have your gear you might want to invest a $100 in taking beginner goalie classes at your local rink. Most rinks have someone there that can teach you to play, but before signing up make sure that the person instructing you is an actual goalie. Some rinks have beginner classes that are being taught by regular players and these really won't benefit you much.

Feel free to ask me any other questions on here or you are more then welcome to PM me.

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10-29-2008, 01:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
1. figure out your identity, butterfly, standup, hybrid. i recomend a hybrid style because its fun and less strenuous then a pure butterfly.

2. dont buy goalie skates. if you are used to player skates, just use them. if you already bought goalie skates or are going to buy them anyway, know that the ENTIRE blade touces the ice, not just the center like with player skates. the skates should not be sharp. they shouldnt be very very dull but not sharp at all. if you get them sharpened, dull them out on a wooden bench or on the ice.

3. learn to how to use the T slide and when to use it.

4. most importantly, the basics. stick in your five hole, glove up, stay square to the shooter. playing good positionally is the most important part

as far as equipment. how tall are you? im about 6'4 and use 34" pads. i dont like really big pads. i tried using 38" and they were HUGE. i couldnt move in them. and like i siad before, you dont really need goalie skates if its just a mens league. also you dont need goalie if you already have pants
Really? I'd buy goalie skates for protection and mobility.

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10-29-2008, 01:47 PM
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I agree with the last poster that you really should invest in goalie skates if you end up serious about it. Don't skimp on a mask. But also don't invest alot of money in the equipment unless you are sure you want to be a goalie. The rest will be just trial and error as the type of goalie you become. Position is the biggest thing to start. Don't be too aggressive and try to do too much. Just stop the puck! A style/technique will come with practice and experience.

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10-29-2008, 02:34 PM
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no, if he is going to just be playing a rec league its not worth buying goalie skates. i didnt used goalie skated teh first couple years i played goalie, mostly because they are expensive and i alreadu had skater skates. they offer a little more protection, but unless you turn your foot to make a save with the side of your skate it shouldnt be a problem. the shots that hit your toes sting like a ***** with either player skates or goalie skater, but hurt less with goalie skaters, still its not a big enough difference to invest in alot of extra money in goalie skates.

not to mention, its SOOOOOOOOO much different skating in goalie skates to skater skates, like i said the entire blade touches the ice and if you are playing in a rec league you wont get used to it for a while.

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10-29-2008, 02:59 PM
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If buying used go for the goalie skates, they will depreciate very little if you change your mind anyways. Funny enough this would come up as based on some recommendation from others I'm considering getting my Goal skates profiled. But I also like my skates freshly sharpened and not dulled being a butterfly goalie and looking for pushing power when down.

That said I don't think it's the skates that will be the big thing to get used to, but rather just wearing and moving in all the gear.

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10-29-2008, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
no, if he is going to just be playing a rec league its not worth buying goalie skates. i didnt used goalie skated teh first couple years i played goalie, mostly because they are expensive and i alreadu had skater skates. they offer a little more protection, but unless you turn your foot to make a save with the side of your skate it shouldnt be a problem. the shots that hit your toes sting like a ***** with either player skates or goalie skater, but hurt less with goalie skaters, still its not a big enough difference to invest in alot of extra money in goalie skates.

not to mention, its SOOOOOOOOO much different skating in goalie skates to skater skates, like i said the entire blade touches the ice and if you are playing in a rec league you wont get used to it for a while.
I can't even imagine playing without goalie skates.

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10-29-2008, 03:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murderin Murphy View Post
I can't even imagine playing without goalie skates.
then imagine playing forward in forward skates. it will probably be like that for this guy that wants to play goalie with goalie skates. he if wants to be able to stand and move and isnt serious about playing goalie, dont buy goalie skates.

i played defense, then i switched to goalie. i played goalie for about 8 years and then i switched to forward and goalie. it was difficult getting used to goalie skated after playing with skater skates. it was also difficult going from goalie skates to skater skates. its probably like half of hte blade touching the ice compared to the goalie skates

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10-29-2008, 03:43 PM
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Wow. Gunnar, I'll respect your choice not to wear goalie skates, but seriously... don't try and push this school of thought on new goalies.

Goalie skates are a must. If you're merely interested in the position and want to try things out a couple games, maybe you'll get away with player skates. But if you're looking to become even just a part-time goalie, invest in them. Even entry-level skates like the RBK 5K are light years ahead in protection over player skates. After I decided I was going to play goal full-time in mens leagues, I invested in a pair of Graf 750's... pro level skates.

It doesn't matter if it's NHL or men's league or oldtimers. In any of these leagues guys can wind up and let one rip (accuracy, on the other hand...). Protection is needed. Furthermore, the near-flat blades offer more blocking area, lets you push off with more power, and give you ankle flexibility. All of these will help your game.

I didn't find the transition to goalie skates isn't too difficult. It'll feel weird for the first few laps around the ice, but after that it's natural. If you're concerned, take them out for a public skate beforehand.

Three other important pieces of equipment: the mask, the dangler, and the jock. You shouldn't skimp on the mask or jock, and it's my school of thought (others may disagree) that danglers are a must. And before Gunnar says he plays with a player's jock, let me say this: A goalie jock is a must.

There is a lot of other advice in another thread on this board: http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=561149. There are links there that will introduce you to goaltender techniques, equipment information, and much more.

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10-29-2008, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
then imagine playing forward in forward skates. it will probably be like that for this guy that wants to play goalie with goalie skates. he if wants to be able to stand and move and isnt serious about playing goalie, dont buy goalie skates.

i played defense, then i switched to goalie. i played goalie for about 8 years and then i switched to forward and goalie. it was difficult getting used to goalie skated after playing with skater skates. it was also difficult going from goalie skates to skater skates. its probably like half of hte blade touching the ice compared to the goalie skates
I've played forward before, for a few years. Not only is not using goalie skates a protection issue, its hard to maintain balance.

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10-29-2008, 03:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
then imagine playing forward in forward skates. it will probably be like that for this guy that wants to play goalie with goalie skates. he if wants to be able to stand and move and isnt serious about playing goalie, dont buy goalie skates.

i played defense, then i switched to goalie. i played goalie for about 8 years and then i switched to forward and goalie. it was difficult getting used to goalie skated after playing with skater skates. it was also difficult going from goalie skates to skater skates. its probably like half of hte blade touching the ice compared to the goalie skates
Wow. You found it hard to skate in the proper equipment, so you gave up on it?

It's hard to get used to skating around with 12" pads on my legs. I get hot wearing a C/A. This mask is too heavy on my head. I know, I'll wear all player gear and let guys fire pucks at me!


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10-29-2008, 03:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by densetsu View Post
Wow. Gunnar, I'll respect your choice not to wear goalie skates, but seriously... don't try and push this school of thought on new goalies.

Goalie skates are a must. If you're merely interested in the position and want to try things out a couple games, maybe you'll get away with player skates. But if you're looking to become even just a part-time goalie, invest in them. Even entry-level skates like the RBK 5K are light years ahead in protection over player skates. After I decided I was going to play goal full-time in mens leagues, I invested in a pair of Graf 750's... pro level skates.

It doesn't matter if it's NHL or men's league or oldtimers. In any of these leagues guys can wind up and let one rip (accuracy, on the other hand...). Protection is needed. Furthermore, the near-flat blades offer more blocking area, lets you push off with more power, and give you ankle flexibility. All of these will help your game.

I didn't find the transition to goalie skates isn't too difficult. It'll feel weird for the first few laps around the ice, but after that it's natural. If you're concerned, take them out for a public skate beforehand.

Three other important pieces of equipment: the mask, the dangler, and the jock. You shouldn't skimp on the mask or jock, and it's my school of thought (others may disagree) that danglers are a must. And before Gunnar says he plays with a player's jock, let me say this: A goalie jock is a must.

There is a lot of other advice in another thread on this board: http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=561149. There are links there that will introduce you to goaltender techniques, equipment information, and much more.
no i use goalie skates, i didnt when i first started out. which is pretty much what i reccomended for this guy. its not worth spending an extra 200+ $ to just realize, you dont want to play goalie. Its not like he is playing juniors. he siad that their goalie doesnt show up so he wants to try it out. obviously if he is going to continue to play goalie i reccomend getting them.

btw, i also have the graf 750s i love them

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10-29-2008, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by densetsu View Post
Wow. You found it hard to skate in the proper equipment, so you gave up on it?

It's hard to get used to skating around with 12" pads on my legs. I get hot wearing a C/A. This mask is too heavy on my head. I know, I'll wear all player gear and let guys fire pucks at me!

what?????

i said I PLAYED DEFENSE FIRST, then i SWITCHED TO GOALIE, i used ALL GOALIE EQUIPMENT INCLUDING GOALIE SKATES BUT FOUND IT DIFFICULT TO GET USED TO GOALIE SKATES. just recently i started playing forward again and FOUND IT DIFFICULT GOING FROM GOALIE SKATES TO SKATERS SKATES.

btw 12" pads are illegal in most leagues

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10-29-2008, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
no i use goalie skates, i didnt when i first started out. which is pretty much what i reccomended for this guy. its not worth spending an extra 200+ $ to just realize, you dont want to play goalie. Its not like he is playing juniors. he siad that their goalie doesnt show up so he wants to try it out. obviously if he is going to continue to play goalie i reccomend getting them.

btw, i also have the graf 750s i love them
Fair enough, must have missed that. Though you still get stingers on the toes in them, what with Graf's huge elf toes? Do you have open-toe pads?

I too wore player skates for the first 5 - 6 games when I started playing again, and as long as he knows the risk and just wants to see what the position is like, go for it. Butterfly and even hybrid style rarely see pucks hit the foot.

But if you've played enough games and decided you like the position, get goalie skates! Because eventually you'll take one on the foot, and when you do...

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10-29-2008, 04:00 PM
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I've played goalie my whole life, and I ref now as well. Use standard skates for reffing and goalie skates for goalie, there is not THAT MUCH of a difference as far as skating. If you can skate in one you can skate in the other, it's not like you're going to put on goalie skates and fall all over the place and not be able to skate at all. It may feel foreign to you for the first game, but you'll hardly notice the difference after that. If you plan on playing more than a couple games, goalie skates are a must.

As far as actually playing goalie, in Rec leagues tending goal is 95% position, 4% rebound control, and 1% stamina. Spend a good amount of time working on your position, and always knowing where you are in relation to the goal without having to look behind you. Make your home base the center of the net, with the center of your back resting against it. Anytime the puck is not in your zone return to this position and stay there until you need to come out to challenge the shooter. It's a small piece but it goes a LONG way to keeping your position, nothing makes you feel like a bigger fool than when you are standing way out of net and the shooter comes in with you way out of position and has half the net wide open for a goal.

Once you are getting comfortable with positioning, start working on rebound control. Start by simply directing shots to the corners, pucks in the corners won't score, pucks laying in front of the net will. Always try to have 2 items making the redirect (i.e. stick in front backed up by skate/pad) in case the puck somehow makes it under your stick or skips up abruptly. Once you have the redirects down, work on stopping the puck in front of you and pouncing on the rebound, get used to using your stick to fish in that close rebound and get it under your glove.

If you got any specific questions toss them out.

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10-29-2008, 04:05 PM
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I'll also note that I found these two books useful when I got back into the game after 10+ years off:

http://www.amazon.com/Hockey-Goalies...5310654&sr=8-2
http://www.amazon.com/Hockey-Goalten...5310654&sr=8-6

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10-29-2008, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
no i use goalie skates, i didnt when i first started out. which is pretty much what i reccomended for this guy. its not worth spending an extra 200+ $ to just realize, you dont want to play goalie. Its not like he is playing juniors. he siad that their goalie doesnt show up so he wants to try it out. obviously if he is going to continue to play goalie i reccomend getting them.

btw, i also have the graf 750s i love them
me too, they are more comfortable than my shoes.

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10-29-2008, 06:42 PM
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what?????


btw 12" pads are illegal in most leagues
NO, that is incorrect.

USA and Canadian Hockey has NOT made that switch. From NCAA/Junior AND ABOVE the 11" width applies. I do not know about the European youth hockey systems but I have yet to hear of any that have adopted the NHL guidelines.

If you want the best of both worlds find a place that has a radius bar. Have either a 28 or 30' (foot) radius profile done with the center point slightly shifted more to the toe than a player skate. Its an amazing difference.

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10-29-2008, 06:44 PM
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There is nothing better than Graf 750's in my opinion.

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10-29-2008, 07:05 PM
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NO, that is incorrect.

USA and Canadian Hockey has NOT made that switch. From NCAA/Junior AND ABOVE the 11" width applies. I do not know about the European youth hockey systems but I have yet to hear of any that have adopted the NHL guidelines.

If you want the best of both worlds find a place that has a radius bar. Have either a 28 or 30' (foot) radius profile done with the center point slightly shifted more to the toe than a player skate. Its an amazing difference.
I'm pretty sure 12" are also illegal in ACHA also

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10-29-2008, 07:34 PM
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Thank for all the great information! I was thinking goalie skates are a good investment based on safety.....I'd hate to start out and get a shot of the toe and then get a bit "scared" of the next shot.

As for the mask, I was looking at a helmet, a la Chris Osgood. I have an old one and I was going to use a cage, similiar to wha Osgood used in the WJC a few years back. Any negatives to that idea? The helmet would also benefit me in the safety department!

Also, I am 6'2". I was looking around and told a 37" pad is not a bad idea......to tall for me?

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10-29-2008, 07:47 PM
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Thank for all the great information! I was thinking goalie skates are a good investment based on safety.....I'd hate to start out and get a shot of the toe and then get a bit "scared" of the next shot.

As for the mask, I was looking at a helmet, a la Chris Osgood. I have an old one and I was going to use a cage, similiar to wha Osgood used in the WJC a few years back. Any negatives to that idea? The helmet would also benefit me in the safety department!

Also, I am 6'2". I was looking around and told a 37" pad is not a bad idea......to tall for me?
Probably a bit tall, try this out:

http://www.vaughnhockey.com/sizing/sizing.htm

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10-29-2008, 09:34 PM
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Probably a bit tall, try this out:

http://www.vaughnhockey.com/sizing/sizing.htm
yea, i agree. it also depens which brand they are and if they have a plus 1 or 2 or whatever. like i said, im 6'4 and tried 38 inch pads but didnt like them and actually went all the way down to 32" which was about a 4inch difference from my old heatons which were 32" also

i guess we all like those graf 750s, 4 us of have them

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10-29-2008, 10:58 PM
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If you want the best of both worlds find a place that has a radius bar. Have either a 28 or 30' (foot) radius profile done with the center point slightly shifted more to the toe than a player skate. Its an amazing difference.
I concur. Sharp on the toe, slightly dull the rest of the way back is the way to go for sharpening goalie skates.

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