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Fritsche Mis-pronounciation

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11-19-2008, 02:56 PM
  #1
NYC427
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Fritsche Mis-pronounciation

Does anyone else notice, (who isen't American) the mis-pronounciation of Fritsche...Sam and Joe often say FritschE..and not the proper way of Fritsche..which is FRITSCHUH...the German E is pronounced UH..

Nothing important obviously...we have games to win!

but this is just something i noticed and was wodnering if anyone else did as well.

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11-19-2008, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by DerMann0809 View Post
Does anyone else notice, (who isen't American) the mis-pronounciation of Fritsche...Sam and Joe often say FritschE..and not the proper way of Fritsche..which is FRITSCHUH...the German E is pronounced UH..

Nothing important obviously...we have games to win!

but this is just something i noticed and was wodnering if anyone else did as well.
Except that apparently that's the way that Dan pronounces it - and the proper way to pronounce a name is the way that the named person pronounces it. At least he has maintained two syllables. Good luck getting anyone on this continent to pronounce "Porsche" properly.

Just like many North Americans, the pronunciation of his last name from the old country appears to have been lost over the years. (For example, my grandmother's maiden name was Weiss, but she didn't pronounce it like the German word for white.)

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11-19-2008, 03:07 PM
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except he isn't german, but swiss....so german pronunciation would have no impact on his last name...

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11-19-2008, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Nich View Post
except he isn't german, but swiss....so german pronunciation would have no impact on his last name...
German is the most used language in Switzerland. It's roughly 75% according to the website below, so there IS an impact.

http://www.all-about-switzerland.inf...languages.html

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11-19-2008, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by levski87 View Post
German is the most used language in Switzerland. It's roughly 75% according to the website below, so there IS an impact.

http://www.all-about-switzerland.inf...languages.html
Beat me to it!...

There is a HUGE impact in Schweiz ( Switzerland )...Do you remember the SC Bern game in the beginning of the season..and the coverage they did outside of the game?...Like I said nothing important..just wanted to see if anyone else noticed.

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11-19-2008, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by levski87 View Post
German is the most used language in Switzerland. It's roughly 75% according to the website below, so there IS an impact.

http://www.all-about-switzerland.inf...languages.html
Yeah, except Swiss German sounds NOTHING like Hoch Deutsch.

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11-19-2008, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by BrooklynRangersFan View Post
Yeah, except Swiss German sounds NOTHING like Hoch Deutsch.
Just like French Canadian is nothing like French?

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11-19-2008, 03:36 PM
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He'd hardly be the first person to abandon the traditional pronunciation.

People with Italian last names like Bates Battaglia often pronounce it with a hard G, when the actual pronunciation would be Bat-tahl-lia.

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11-19-2008, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by BrooklynRangersFan View Post
Yeah, except Swiss German sounds NOTHING like Hoch Deutsch.
yeah it's a different language basically, the pronounciation of written words though are pretty much the same

but as he is american, the german (historically certainly right) pronounciation doesn't really matter anyway

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11-19-2008, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by BrooklynRangersFan View Post
Yeah, except Swiss German sounds NOTHING like Hoch Deutsch.
Even if it's different, it's still probably similar. It's just like all of the Italians in the US who Americanize the pronunciation of their names.

Mara: M-air-uh instead of Ma-rah

Girardi: Gerr-are-dee instead of G-ear-are-dee

Ciccarelli: Sis-err-ell-ee instead of Chic-arr-ell-ee

Del Zotto: Del Z-ah-toe instead of Del Z-oh-toe

There Ciccarelli is the classic example, there are lots like that.

Monticello the cello should be pronounced like the instrument, instead people pronounce it like sello.

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11-19-2008, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by levski87 View Post
Just like French Canadian is nothing like French?
It sure isn't Cristobal Huet always pronounced his name Hu Et until he played for Montreal where they changed it to his current pronunciation of Hu-A....lol

Much the same can be said about Brooklyn(or NY) Italians and real Italians.

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11-19-2008, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by clmetsfan View Post
He'd hardly be the first person to abandon the traditional pronunciation.

People with Italian last names like Bates Battaglia often pronounce it with a hard G, when the actual pronunciation would be Bat-tahl-lia.
I was going to say the same exact thing. Another example would be Andrew Cogliano, which is really annoying when heard as KAH GLEE AH NO, when it's supposed to be pronounced KOLI-YAH-NO. And to a lesser extent, our very own Mike Del Zotto, whose name is supposed to be pronounced DELL-ZOH-TOE, not "DEL ZAH-DOE", like Joe Micheletti says.

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11-19-2008, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by PruBlue25 View Post
Even if it's different, it's still probably similar. It's just like all of the Italians in the US who Americanize the pronunciation of their names.

Mara: M-air-uh instead of Ma-rah

Girardi: Gerr-are-dee instead of G-ear-are-dee

Ciccarelli: Sis-err-ell-ee instead of Chic-arr-ell-ee

Del Zotto: Del Z-ah-toe instead of Del Z-oh-toe

There Ciccarelli is the classic example, there are lots like that.

Monticello the cello should be pronounced like the instrument, instead people pronounce it like sello.
Nope. Although the written language is pretty much identical (except for some the substitution of some words, similar to the way Brits say "lift" instead of "elevator") the spoken language is WILDLY different - it's literally like another language. There is no exact parallel in English - the closest I can think of is perhaps trying to understand a Scot from the furthest highlands, but even that example doesn't do it justice.

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11-19-2008, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by BrooklynRangersFan View Post
Nope. Although the written language is pretty much identical (except for some the substitution of some words, similar to the way Brits say "lift" instead of "elevator") the spoken language is WILDLY different - it's literally like another language. There is no exact parallel in English - the closest I can think of is perhaps trying to understand a Scot from the furthest highlands, but even that example doesn't do it justice.
The spoken language also tends to mix Italian and French, which is probably why it sounds different. Go to each region of Italy. There are dialects over there that sound nothing like Italian. Each region and even different towns have different dialects. However, when you see a name, you usually tend to pronounce it pretty properly. The name Fritsche probably got changed when the family came to the US, like many other names.

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11-19-2008, 04:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PruBlue25 View Post
Girardi: Gerr-are-dee instead of G-ear-are-dee
So should Girardi properly be spellt Ghirardi?


Finnish names are consistently brutalised by NHL announcers:

Lauri Korpikoski's first name should be pronounced with the same sound as in "out", not "aught."

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11-19-2008, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by 007 View Post
So should Girardi properly be spellt Ghirardi?


Finnish names are consistently brutalised by NHL announcers:

Lauri Korpikoski's first name should be pronounced with the same sound as in "out", not "aught."
I think it's less about "brutalization" and more about "Americanizing" the names (though I guess you can call that brutalization if you want".

You could also say that announcers in other leagues (like the KHL) "brutalize" the names of North American players who are playing there.

At any rate, Fritsche is American and not German, so no, his name is not mispronounced at this point.

edit: who the hell pronounces Girardi with a hard G sound? Everyone pronounces it with the soft, J sound

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11-19-2008, 04:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 007 View Post
So should Girardi properly be spellt Ghirardi?


Finnish names are consistently brutalised by NHL announcers:

Lauri Korpikoski's first name should be pronounced with the same sound as in "out", not "aught."
No, his name is spelled fine. It's the way it's pronounced.

His name is Italian and in Italian the letter I is pronounced as you say the letter E in English.

So the first I in the name would be pronounced the exact same way as the second I in the name, as an E. The English pronunciation is more of a dulled E. So you hear more of a Ger like Ranger instead of Geer like Cheer or Jeer.

Phonetically:
G - J (like the English J sound)
I - E
R - R (more rolling type of R)
A - Ah
R - R same as above although more dull.
D - D (same as Enlgish)
I - E Same as above.


Last edited by WhipNash27: 11-19-2008 at 04:56 PM.
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11-19-2008, 05:02 PM
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And Porsche is pronounced Porsh-uh. This is America. There is a long history of names getting butchered from the olden immigration days. If we are pronouncing it the way Dan does then it's just one of those things you'll have to live with.

The Girardi pronounciation is right because G = G but Gi = J like Gianduja or how Gian Carlo is pronounced almost like Jon Carlo. Just like Ci = Ch like in Ciao but stays like a K by itself.

Did you know that Godiva is supposed to be pronounced Go-dee-vah? Who cares?

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11-19-2008, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by vipernsx View Post
It sure isn't Cristobal Huet always pronounced his name Hu Et until he played for Montreal where they changed it to his current pronunciation of Hu-A....lol

Much the same can be said about Brooklyn(or NY) Italians and real Italians.
Yes, but his point was that Swiss German is almost a completely different language, which it isnt. There might be a few changes in pronounciation, but other than that its relatively close.

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11-19-2008, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by levski87 View Post
Yes, but his point was that Swiss German is almost a completely different language, which it isnt. There might be a few changes in pronounciation, but other than that its relatively close.
no, it is pretty much completly different language. an average german doesn't understand much if someone talks swiss german, and that's not only because of the pronounciation, but also because they have quite a few different words.
however, the written language is afaik mostly high german

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11-19-2008, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by n8 View Post
And Porsche is pronounced Porsh-uh. This is America. There is a long history of names getting butchered from the olden immigration days. If we are pronouncing it the way Dan does then it's just one of those things you'll have to live with.

The Girardi pronounciation is right because G = G but Gi = J like Gianduja or how Gian Carlo is pronounced almost like Jon Carlo. Just like Ci = Ch like in Ciao but stays like a K by itself.

Did you know that Godiva is supposed to be pronounced Go-dee-vah? Who cares?
I personally don't care. It was the point that many names are butchered or changed. Some worse than others. Girardi's name is pretty close. Plus it's not the G sound, it's the ir that people turn into errrr that's the difference in the name. I could care less. I'm not going to go around and pronounce his name like I'm off the boat because no one else does and I'd sound weird being the only one pronouncing his name that way.

Oh and many people I know pronounce it Porsh-uh

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11-19-2008, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by jniklast View Post
no, it is pretty much completly different language. an average german doesn't understand much if someone talks swiss german, and that's not only because of the pronounciation, but also because they have quite a few different words.
however, the written language is afaik mostly high german
dialect. There's probably many places throughout Germany which don't sound very German. Doesn't mean that when it comes to their names they don't pronounce them in proper German.

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11-19-2008, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by PruBlue25 View Post
I personally don't care. It was the point that many names are butchered or changed. Some worse than others. Girardi's name is pretty close. Plus it's not the G sound, it's the ir that people turn into errrr that's the difference in the name. I could care less. I'm not going to go around and pronounce his name like I'm off the boat because no one else does and I'd sound weird being the only one pronouncing his name that way.

Oh and many people I know pronounce it Porsh-uh
You must live in an enlightened community. That, or a multi-ethnic metropolis.

I sounds like you are talking about the difference between J'rardi and Jr'ardi. When you say either fast enough, it sounds the same. So Fristche is Fristcheee right?

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11-19-2008, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by PruBlue25 View Post
dialect. There's probably many places throughout Germany which don't sound very German. Doesn't mean that when it comes to their names they don't pronounce them in proper German.
Hahahaha. Pru, I can't figure out why you are so insistent on trying to say that it's just a dialect of German. Swiss German has less in common with High German than Middle English does with Modern English. Swiss German itself has distinct dialects - that's how different it is from German.

It's hard to comprehend, because there is no parallel in English.

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11-19-2008, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Levitate View Post
I think it's less about "brutalization" and more about "Americanizing" the names (though I guess you can call that brutalization if you want".

You could also say that announcers in other leagues (like the KHL) "brutalize" the names of North American players who are playing there.

At any rate, Fritsche is American and not German, so no, his name is not mispronounced at this point.

edit: who the hell pronounces Girardi with a hard G sound? Everyone pronounces it with the soft, J sound
Admittedly, Finnish is difficult to pronounce for the average English speaker, and most Finns (especially Teemu Selänne), are good sports about this.

I do get slightly piqued, though, when announcers take something easy to pronounce, like Lauri, and still get it wrong. Most Americans recognise the last name "Lowry", well it's pronounced the same way.

I wouldn't for a minute pretend that I think the same thing doesn't happen in other countries and languages, but I compare it to soccer, where the announcers, both Americans and Brits, in general, take more care with their pronunciation (I'd say the Americans do a better job, while some Brits are worse than any NHL announcer). The contrast can be interesting: announcers call Pavel Nedvěd "Nedvyed", but Petr Nedvěd is just "Nedved."

The only one that used to really bother me was to hear Sam and JD talk about "Radek Devorak", while the radio plays pieces by Antonín Dvořák ("Dvorjak").

In all honesty, I don't think it's Sam or Joe's fault entirely. I know they ask the players how to pronounce their names and I think that if the players make a big deal about it, they try.

About Girardi: I misread PruBlue's post, which I thought indicated that Girardi should be pronounced with a hard G, which would mean that it is spellt Ghirardi in Italian (like Ghirardelli chocolate should be pronouced with a hard G).

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