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Biggest difference?

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Old
12-04-2008, 08:01 PM
  #1
Terror91
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Biggest difference?

My best friend is wanting to move from roller to ice and asked me what the biggest difference is. I had a hard time explaining it so what should I tell him? Skating is different but I always though roller is more difficult than ice and he's probably the top skater in the league roller wise. What do you guys think?

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12-04-2008, 08:05 PM
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cptjeff
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Stopping. Most roller players have no clue when they switch. In fact, unless they've ice skated there by the very nature of roller skates there is no way for them to know how.

And really, they're pretty much the same motion- neither one is more difficult. At least from my experience.

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12-04-2008, 08:50 PM
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nullterm
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Yeap, stopping. I know a few guys that have made the transition on my team and they still have trouble. They are some of the top players on the team otherwise though. But they still have trouble with stopping. Still doing it like they were playing roller and it doesn't work as well.

Have to get used to the feeling (and sound) of getting your leading skate to scrape along the surface of the ice without digging in. When I was able to glide along with most of the weight on my back leg and front skate just scraping and making that snow sound then the rest was easy. Then it was just repetition getting comfortable putting more weight onto the leading leg, then eventually getting the trailing leg into the stop too. The key was to scrape the ice, not dig in (and send myself sprawling or flying).

The flow of the game is slightly different because it is easier and quicker (atleast for me) to stop. Instead of having to slow down further away or blowing past the puck or man. Then again, I never really learned how to stop in roller anyways.

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12-04-2008, 09:23 PM
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I find roller hockey is much more...unorganized? A lot more run and gun, high scoring. Ice is more strategic.

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12-04-2008, 10:43 PM
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Elshupacabra
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Ice skating is more precise. Roller blades are like using a big tipped marker where as ice skates are like using a mechanical pencil.

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12-04-2008, 11:56 PM
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noobman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elshupacabra View Post
Ice skating is more precise. Roller blades are like using a big tipped marker where as ice skates are like using a mechanical pencil.
You've never seen me skate before

Stopping is the biggest adjustment, though I find that backwards skating on rollerblades is much different from backwards skating on hockey skates.

From a hockey perspective, he's going to have a tough time with people who use quick stops and starts to change direction.

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12-05-2008, 08:37 AM
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xstartxtodayx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShrumBlues View Post
I find roller hockey is much more...unorganized? A lot more run and gun, high scoring. Ice is more strategic.

I agree with that somewhat. From my experience I find it's always easy to pick out the roller hockey players when it comes to playing ice hockey. It doesn't have to do w/ their skating style or skill but how they play the game. I'm sure it's different now w/ the younger generation since there is more organized roller hockey leagues now w/ actual coaches and practices, but when I was growing up and roller hockey was just starting and gaining popularity there was definitely a lack of organization. All of the roller hockey teams and leagues were set up like mens leagues, meaning there were no real practices or fundamentals being taught, therefore the players never learned some basics and that is evident in watching them play ice hockey against players who have played organized and competitive hockey. But like I said, now roller hockey seems to have grown exponentially and I see there are even high school and college leagues in my area which weren't there 7-10 years ago, so I'm sure there's much organization than years past.

My opinion on the difference between roller and ice... the speed of the game is faster on ice and there is a greater advantage to being a good skater in my opinion.

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12-05-2008, 11:19 AM
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Johnny Law
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Organization is a problem, roller hockey for a long time had no real coaching or instruction so some guys don't really know what there job is. Positioning is generally the biggest problem.

Skating is different but not wildly so, anyone who puts enough effort in should have no problems. Good roller hockey skaters can sometimes be the fastest guys on the ice due in part to the fact that roller hockey skates weigh a hell of lot more than ice hockey skates. I know the first time I ice skated I felt like I was flying, couldn't stop for anything but wow where they light. Conversely a ice hockey teammate of mine spent the best part of his first roller season crashing into the end boards.

Generally roller is more open with less guys on the surface so roller players tend to hold longer and dangle more often. Additionally some don't know how to cycle or move the puck efficiently.

Regardless, roller players can succeed in ice leagues and vice-versa, like most things in life it is most dependent on how much effort you put in to it.

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12-05-2008, 11:28 AM
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vivianmb
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you can always tell the roller player by the pants!
and the fact that they don't pass, and try to outdeke whole teams.
ice is a team game , roller is like a slam dunk contest. i don't know how many roller players there are up here, but back in NY you could always tell the roller guys apart right away .even if they were decent skaters.

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12-06-2008, 12:50 AM
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Leahcim
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I switched from Ice to Roller since I moved from Toronto to California

The league I currently play in is that it has no icing, offsides and is only 4v4 so when playing roller hockey, it's a lot more opened but unorganized as others mentioned.

I'd also have to agree that stopping is a huge difference, at first when I switched to roller, I would always try to snowplow stop when I realize that it doesn't really work...I've adjust to kind of a jumping snowplow stop now.

Also roller the puck feels different because of the surface...pretty simple there.

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12-06-2008, 02:11 AM
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definitely strategy and organization

plus its easier to hide behind a good goalie in ice than it is in roller

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12-06-2008, 02:08 PM
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Terror91
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Thanks guys. I'm just going to give him the link to this page instead. It's easier.

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12-06-2008, 03:04 PM
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Devil Dancer
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One more thing: Conditioning. I found myself unprepared for the stamina requirements on ice after playing roller for a year or so. I guess that would depend on the size of the roller surface your friend is used to playing on, but I bet it isn't NHL sized.

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12-06-2008, 04:57 PM
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SJGoalie32
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Obviously stopping is the biggest difference, but I'll give you my own list of secondary, but important, differences:

Lateral movement - Like stopping, it is much easier on ice for players to make directional adjustments. There is a tendency in roller hockey for a player (whether a puck carrier or a backchecking defenseman) to get caught in the railroad tracks and be stuck going straight forward or backward. Pros: It's a little bit easier on ice to corral that pass that's just a little behind you or that gets caught in your skates. It's also easier to transition from skating forward to backward. Cons: That little head fake deke move you give to shake a defenseman in a 1-on-1 battle won't work quite so well on ice where the defender can change direction, too. Also, skilled stickhandlers can make a lot more directional changes on ice that you wouldn't normally expect from a guy in roller hockey (whether that's a pro or a con depends on whether you're the guy with the puck or you're the defender).

Weight of the puck - As a goalie, this was one of the bigger adjustments I had to make. In roller, I only had to make contact with a puck in order to direct it wide of the net. On ice, it wasn't enough. A puck would hit me and still often go in. Now, that won't necessarily be a huge deal for a forward, but it does mean that your wrist shots and slap shots won't have as much velocity on them. You'll have to follow through a lot more on your shots to elevate and pinpoint your shots (a quick flick of the wrist won't be enough to roof a puck). You'll also have to cradle a hard pass more carefully in order to cleanly receive and control it. On the plus side, the puck will slide a lot more cleanly while you are stickhandling, and it won't bounce or roll on it's edge quite as much as in roller (even when it does, ice pucks are easier to flatten). Oh, and you might want to reconsider standing or sticking certain unprotected body parts in front of an ice hockey slapshot.

Slick surface - Again, not nearly as big a deal for a forward as a goaltender, but it can be critical in one area. When you drive the net in roller hockey and you either lose your edge or get tripped up, usually the friction of the surface will bring you to a complete stop within 10-15 feet, even if you were skating and full tilt. On ice, notsomuch. What this means is you can lose an edge or get tripped up 10, 20, even 30 feet from the boards, and still crash into the end boards at near full speed. This isn't a major difference in game play, but many players at many levels (myself included) have suffered many injuries (or even just really nasty close calls) that never happen in roller hockey because the playing surface has no friction. Just something to be mindful of.

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12-06-2008, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oshniak View Post
My best friend is wanting to move from roller to ice and asked me what the biggest difference is. I had a hard time explaining it so what should I tell him? Skating is different but I always though roller is more difficult than ice and he's probably the top skater in the league roller wise. What do you guys think?
Well, as you can see within this thread, everyone is saying...stopping!

However, if you ask me and you kind of did by placing this question, I wish I had more roller players on my Ice hockey team. Why you ask?

Roller hockey players can't stop for ****! But, stopping is really over rated. Yes it's good that you don't run into the boards. But, keeping your feet moving and cycling is more important too me then any thing else.

It hard to teach players to stop stopping to get the puck, when they should have the cycling player in his or her line to pick it up instead.

If you have three lines and they are always moving and passing the puck to where the player is going to be and not where he's currently at, you will make better passes and keep the other team guessing.

I have found that roller hockey kids, because they can't stop, have a tendency to read and react better to the play and can see scoring lanes open up better then my normal hockey players.

Head coach

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12-06-2008, 10:44 PM
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WhipNash27
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Stopping, but also skating on ice is different because of the speed you can change directions. Making sharp cuts and such. Also, I feel that you can get a more powerful stride on ice because your blade will cut into the ice when you push off on the ice whereas on a hard ground, your wheels won't do that as well.

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12-07-2008, 06:47 AM
  #17
nullterm
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Fewer equipment issues. Not having to deal with wheels and bearings makes life simpler. And potentially cheaper, depending on how often you get your skates sharpened. Replacing wheels ain't cheap.

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12-07-2008, 01:25 PM
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HerrAlex
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ice is just easier

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12-07-2008, 08:08 PM
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Vinegar Strokes
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Weight of the puck was a big problem for me, mostly when recieving passes.

I'm really glad I switched, as I find ice a lot more fun. However, i'm glad I started in roller, since it really helped me with puckhandling, and deking.

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12-08-2008, 11:56 AM
  #20
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Head coach summed it up nicely. Some of the best players who have played for me actually came from inline. As many have said, stoppng is the biggest skill they need to pick up, but they are always moving which is good.

There are some fundamental rule differences that nobody has mentioned. It usually takes a few games of them getting called for these infractions before they finally catch on. Once they do they typically are great additions to the team. Anyway, the rules they will inevitably mess up for the first month are:
  • Offsides - They will be down by hash marks before the puck is near the zone or they just won't completely come out of the zone when the puck does
  • Icing - While this one doesn't occur quite as often as the off sides, they will tend to ice the puck more during regular play. Like I said, it doesn't happen as much as the offsides since they like to carry the puck, but it does happen.

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Old
12-08-2008, 03:05 PM
  #21
triggrman
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I agree on the icing too however, a defenseman that started in inline hockey has that knack for the long breakout pass too.

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Old
12-09-2008, 01:48 AM
  #22
nullterm
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A few inliners got alot of offside calls when my team started, but they learned in a couple games and hasn't been an issue since.

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Old
12-09-2008, 02:05 AM
  #23
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Just a suggestion...this worked for me, may not be for everyone.

I play goal now, but when I used to play foward...I played both roller and ice hockey. Stopping and other skating issues were the biggest problem for me.

I got myself a set of inline racing wheels- they are a lot harder than regular hockey wheels (also a lot more expensive. They were...12 bucks a piece or something like that, but worth every penny) Its hard to describe why I liked them so much...but basically, it felt more like ice when I was stopping. They slid a bit more when I wanted, but also gripped really well when accelerating.

I should tell you that you can't use these wheels on any rough surface like asphalt though. It will just rip the wheels apart and you'll waste your money. I used them on a wooden indoor surface and they worked great.

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