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First stick time

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Old
12-28-2008, 10:16 PM
  #26
noobman
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Learn how to stop, and try not to skate into any kids!!

Also keep an eye on your pucks... they have a tendency to disappear.

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12-29-2008, 02:15 AM
  #27
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Thanks, Im not too worried about running into people since i doubt too many people go to sticknpuck in st. louis at 11 in the morning.

Any tips on stopping?

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12-30-2008, 03:08 PM
  #28
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Originally Posted by 87vert View Post
So I went to my first "Stick time" yesterday. I wasnt planning on going since I knew it was going to be busy and I kinda wanted to be out there with only a few people for my "first time" but my wife forced me to go.

So I got to the rink, found the dressing room. Got on all my gear with only one hitch, forgot to put the cup in my shorts before pulling up my pants but that was a quick fix.

Got out onto the ice and skated around for a few mins. There was about 15-20 other people there but most were on one half playing a small pickup game with the only goalie. There was a kid and his coach on the other side. So about two other guys and I skated around center ice back and forth between the side boards.

I just shooted around a bit off the boards and practiced stick handling.

It is all harder than I thought it would be. Everything moved so fast it was hard to skate and move the puck and shoot and stop without thinking about everything I was doing. I only played for about a hour but I felt alot better leaving than I did before.

I was nervous about getting out there but now after my first time Im ready to go again. I'm on vacation from work next week so I plan on being out everyday.

Thanks for all your tips on all my questions and hopefully I will see some of you guys/girls out on the ice sometime.

Oh, I also ordered a smarthockey ball to help improve my stick handling.
I'm from Pittsburgh... but live up in Kitchener, ON for half the year (they have tons of outside rinks you can jump on at anytime - it is a beautiful thing).

I've played pickup all over Pgh since the early 90s and whenever I play with someone who is just learning like yourself, I always try to help them out with some tips and pass them the puck as much as possible.

You will find out there are a lot of experienced players who are like that... that have been playing for yrs and enjoy helping beginners.

Sometimes you have the hot dogs who are usually younger and want to show everyone how "bad ass" they are... but you just gotta ignore people like that.

I always kind of laugh to myself when I play with guys like that, because I have played all over and played with some sick talent that made me look like a scrub and I'm actually pretty good.

These guys just haven't found out that there are way better players than them out there - so I always find it a bit comical to watch them try and act like they are God's gift to hockey.

So just remember guys like that may be better than you, but I guarantee you there are players out there that would eat them up without trying.

Just have fun and enjoy yourself bro.

Also a quick tip, don't use the smart hockey ball... you have to roll your wrists differently when you stick handle a puck because it is flat... using even a weighted ball doesn't train you as well as a real puck.

Get one of these:

http://www.precisionpucks.com/index.html

Or try the Jofa puck:

http://www.kempshockey.com/street/pu...il.cfm?DID=960

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12-30-2008, 07:13 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by 87vert View Post
Got out onto the ice and skated around for a few mins. There was about 15-20 other people there but most were on one half playing a small pickup game with the only goalie. There was a kid and his coach on the other side. So about two other guys and I skated around center ice back and forth between the side boards.

I just shooted around a bit off the boards and practiced stick handling.
I'm jealous. Any stick time I've ever gone to becomes a pickup game that takes over the full rink. Most people I've played with are very forgiving of a newbie like myself but what I wanted more than anything was time to practice stickhandling on my own.

Quote:
It is all harder than I thought it would be. Everything moved so fast it was hard to skate and move the puck and shoot and stop without thinking about everything I was doing. I only played for about a hour but I felt alot better leaving than I did before.
Quote:
Oh, I also ordered a smarthockey ball to help improve my stick handling.
As good as it is that you're practicing with a stick and puck I recommend ALSO just skating -- working on your balance, stopping, starting, skating backwards, etc. The less thought you need to give to skating the more you can focus on the rest of your game. Similarly, practicing with the ball will help you build muscle memory so you'll be able to control the puck and not have it roll off the toe of your stick.

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12-30-2008, 07:24 PM
  #30
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Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
I'm jealous. Any stick time I've ever gone to becomes a pickup game that takes over the full rink. Most people I've played with are very forgiving of a newbie like myself but what I wanted more than anything was time to practice stickhandling on my own.





As good as it is that you're practicing with a stick and puck I recommend ALSO just skating -- working on your balance, stopping, starting, skating backwards, etc. The less thought you need to give to skating the more you can focus on the rest of your game. Similarly, practicing with the ball will help you build muscle memory so you'll be able to control the puck and not have it roll off the toe of your stick.
I always hope that "stick time" turns into informal pickup hockey. The arena I go to is always packed during holidays though... so you can barely find room to move. The last time I went this one guy insisted on spending 30 minutes working on deflections in front of the net

When I cant find room I usually work on stickhandling, saucer passing, and working the puck along the boards with the occasional shot.

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12-31-2008, 01:35 PM
  #31
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I'm jealous. Any stick time I've ever gone to becomes a pickup game that takes over the full rink.
Theres a bunch of signs that say no pickup games around the rink but I guess no one really cares. LOL

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Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
As good as it is that you're practicing with a stick and puck I recommend ALSO just skating -- working on your balance, stopping, starting, skating backwards, etc. The less thought you need to give to skating the more you can focus on the rest of your game. Similarly, practicing with the ball will help you build muscle memory so you'll be able to control the puck and not have it roll off the toe of your stick.
I usually go to public sessions 2 or 3 times a week to practice skating.

Thanks for the help everyone

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12-31-2008, 04:19 PM
  #32
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Just got back from my first stick and puck ever and woah was it packed. At first I couldn’t remember how to skate and sucked it up but at the end I was skating around ok. But damn is it harder than roller hockey.


When you are doing a hockey stop do you pick your feet up or just turn?

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12-31-2008, 04:35 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by DrTurkelton View Post
Just got back from my first stick and puck ever and woah was it packed. At first I couldn’t remember how to skate and sucked it up but at the end I was skating around ok. But damn is it harder than roller hockey.


When you are doing a hockey stop do you pick your feet up or just turn?
Just turn

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Old
01-01-2009, 12:28 PM
  #34
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Just turn
When ever I try to do that I end up actually turning or spinning around instead of stopping.

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01-01-2009, 10:07 PM
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Originally Posted by DrTurkelton View Post
When ever I try to do that I end up actually turning or spinning around instead of stopping.
Keep your shoulders/upper body aimed where you were skating at, but turn your lower body into the stop.

I was told that the Friday stick and puck sessions are a tad more competitive than the tuesday and thursday sessions. I went to my first session this past Tuesday and there were 9 of us, no goalie, and we just warmed up then broke into a 4 on 4 game. I'm a beginner, but the guys were awesome with me, not taking it too seriously. That said, should I even bother to show up tomorrow knowing it might get nasty towards me because I suck?

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01-01-2009, 11:40 PM
  #36
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Keep your shoulders/upper body aimed where you were skating at, but turn your lower body into the stop.

I was told that the Friday stick and puck sessions are a tad more competitive than the tuesday and thursday sessions. I went to my first session this past Tuesday and there were 9 of us, no goalie, and we just warmed up then broke into a 4 on 4 game. I'm a beginner, but the guys were awesome with me, not taking it too seriously. That said, should I even bother to show up tomorrow knowing it might get nasty towards me because I suck?
You have as much a right to be there as anybody else. If you want to go then GO!

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01-01-2009, 11:47 PM
  #37
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Originally Posted by wcb231 View Post
Keep your shoulders/upper body aimed where you were skating at, but turn your lower body into the stop.

I was told that the Friday stick and puck sessions are a tad more competitive than the tuesday and thursday sessions. I went to my first session this past Tuesday and there were 9 of us, no goalie, and we just warmed up then broke into a 4 on 4 game. I'm a beginner, but the guys were awesome with me, not taking it too seriously. That said, should I even bother to show up tomorrow knowing it might get nasty towards me because I suck?
Not sure where you're from, but down here in Texas it seems like all the players are just happy to have another person interested in starting to play. I just recently started playing myself, and everyone is so welcoming and you can tell they "take it easy" on you until you start to get comfortable.

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01-02-2009, 01:34 AM
  #38
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Originally Posted by DrTurkelton View Post
When ever I try to do that I end up actually turning or spinning around instead of stopping.
turn, and then when you are sideways add pressure, bend your knees. Once you learn it will become almost habitual and you wont even think about it. I learned from watching the motions in the video game nhl 2004. Im not kidding, I went to the ice to repliate it. Then when i had it down on my dominate side, I spent the next 5 pickups FORCING myself to only stop on my left side, even if it put me more out of position, and now I work my edges a lot better and I would consider myself an above average skater now.


as for going when there are a lot of good people do it. Here, everyone is welcoming unless its those teenage kids who feel like they have something to prove. Im 19 myself and got out of that age fast as I realized the adults were a lot cooler and friendlier. Plus playing with better players makes you play harder and better. I would have a 3 hour break between my university classes in the morning so I would head to the stick and pucks. It was always roughly the same guys and we know each other by name and what not. I guess I would be considered a "ringer"(though I dont see myself as such) out of the group, though the skill level ranges. And its neat seeing guys improving over the course of the year, as well as yourself. People also learn your tendencies so it makes me be more creative and in turn expands my game. You will notice that a lot of beginners like to pass to the really good players because they feel like they need to, so I like sending the pass right back. I mean I dont mind stickhandling around with the puck but what do I have to prove? It pisses me off seeing guys who feel the need to try end to end rushes and the like instead of involving beginers cause I remember when I was in that position and hated not being passed to. You will only learn if you are involved, which is why I try and include everyone.


Like I said, i found that most adults are really laid back and like to involve everyone. A lot of kids are like that too, but you always get the travel player who thinks he is trying out for the pros and flips **** if the pass isnt directly on his tape, so just ignore them!

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01-02-2009, 12:28 PM
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wcb231 View Post
Keep your shoulders/upper body aimed where you were skating at, but turn your lower body into the stop.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSM12 View Post
turn, and then when you are sideways add pressure, bend your knees. Once you learn it will become almost habitual and you wont even think about it. I learned from watching the motions in the video game nhl 2004. Im not kidding, I went to the ice to repliate it. Then when i had it down on my dominate side, I spent the next 5 pickups FORCING myself to only stop on my left side, even if it put me more out of position, and now I work my edges a lot better and I would consider myself an above average skater now.
thanks for the advice,I promise this is my last question. when your stopping, should one foot be behind the other or can they be next to each other?

so like - - or = if each dash represents a foot?


Oh and I second the playing with older players part, when I went to stick and puck yesterday there were some punk teenagers always trying to deke it around me even though there were only like 5 people on the entire rink, the older guys there were all welcoming and gave me advice.

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01-02-2009, 12:40 PM
  #40
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Originally Posted by DrTurkelton View Post
thanks for the advice,I promise this is my last question. when your stopping, should one foot be behind the other or can they be next to each other?

so like - - or = if each dash represents a foot?


Oh and I second the playing with older players part, when I went to stick and puck yesterday there were some punk teenagers always trying to deke it around me even though there were only like 5 people on the entire rink, the older guys there were all welcoming and gave me advice.
Both are valid ways. The -- method is harder, but stops you faster because you're using both blades. When you do the = method, your weight is only on the front foot and that's what you use to stop.

Not many people use the -- method, which is a shame because it looks really cool. Old posed action photos of players pretty much always involved the player stopping like that. Looks great.

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01-02-2009, 12:48 PM
  #41
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Originally Posted by DrTurkelton View Post
thanks for the advice,I promise this is my last question. when your stopping, should one foot be behind the other or can they be next to each other?

so like - - or = if each dash represents a foot?


Oh and I second the playing with older players part, when I went to stick and puck yesterday there were some punk teenagers always trying to deke it around me even though there were only like 5 people on the entire rink, the older guys there were all welcoming and gave me advice.
That sounds like me


As for your question... either method works. I'd recommend the = method while you're still learning how to stop. That method only uses one blade (the outside blade). Once you're proficient at stopping, with one blade, you can start using the - - method to stop even faster.

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01-02-2009, 03:25 PM
  #42
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That sounds like me
Next time dont knock me on my ass

why is the = method easier? for me I think the = is hard because when i bring my right foot in front of my left I turn left. the other one your feet stay in the same place just rotate. I spin around when I try the = stop. Am I not turning fast enough? Do you pick your foot up and place it in front of the other while turning the back one or something?

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01-02-2009, 05:05 PM
  #43
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Congrats on going to your first SNP. I hope you stick with hockey for your lifetime, but remember, hockey takes a lot of time. Just to learn a good proper slapshot on the ice can easily take someone 6 months. Good backwards skating? Several months or more. Try to take on one or two things at a time in practices and at home, work on them primarily for a few months (while playing regular games too) before moving on.

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01-02-2009, 05:53 PM
  #44
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Next time dont knock me on my ass

why is the = method easier? for me I think the = is hard because when i bring my right foot in front of my left I turn left. the other one your feet stay in the same place just rotate. I spin around when I try the = stop. Am I not turning fast enough? Do you pick your foot up and place it in front of the other while turning the back one or something?


I don't knock people over very often... most of the time it's when me and another person turn at the same time and somehow turn into each other.

To answer your question... I'm not sure. The only thing I can think of that's causing you problems is that you're not turning your feet fast enough. A hockey stop requires a sudden shift in force. If you make that shift too gradually, you'll just end up turning.

In addition to rotating your feet, you'll also need to use your leg muscles to push into the stop.

Suppose you're skating this way....
--------->

...and you want to stop. Your feet look like this as you're skating in that direction:

=
----->

When you turn to make the top, your feet will look like this:

||

as you're turning to make that stop, you need to use your leg muscles to push yourself in the opposite direction, which will try to force your momentum back the way you came from.


----> push in this direction....
||
<--- ...forcing your body this way

I recommend using the parallel stop because it puts you in a better position to make a quick start forward in the opposite direction. After you make the stop, the foot you stopped with should cross-over your support foot and start your stride in the opposite direction.

If you do the double-blade stop, you'll have to do an awkward hop off of your front foot, or slide your front foot back before skating forward. The double-blade stop leaves your feet in a good position to start doing backwards crossovers.



Sorry that was kind of long and confusing, but I hope it helps. The short version is that the double blade stop is better for transitioning into a backwards stride, whereas the traditional hockey stop is better for transitioning into a forward stride. You never really "stop" in hockey... you're just changing direction very quickly. The only time you'll really want to stop and stay still is when you're heading to the bench, or stopping in front of the net.

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01-02-2009, 05:59 PM
  #45
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Theres a bunch of signs that say no pickup games around the rink but I guess no one really cares. LOL


I usually go to public sessions 2 or 3 times a week to practice skating.

Thanks for the help everyone
You should ask the marshalls to have people change direction every so often. Everybody has a strong and weak side for skating... most people are stronger going counter-clockwise (aka turning left) so the skate always ends up going that way. If I'm ever the first person on the ice I just start skating on my weak side right away and hope that everybody else follows suit.

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01-02-2009, 09:16 PM
  #46
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Originally Posted by DrTurkelton View Post
why is the = method easier? for me I think the = is hard because when i bring my right foot in front of my left I turn left. the other one your feet stay in the same place just rotate. I spin around when I try the = stop. Am I not turning fast enough? Do you pick your foot up and place it in front of the other while turning the back one or something?
I find = easier because you'll need to shift your weight from your front to your back to keep from falling.

Best analogy for stopping I can give is sliding across a linoleum or hardwood floor in stocking feet. You run forward and when you're ready to slide:
1. you bend your knees and transfer about 70% of your weight to what will be your back leg (once you've pivoted).
2. you quickly pivot 90-degrees on the balls of your feet. Your hips turn but your shoulders do not.
3. Slide, DiMaggio!! Once you've pivoted you'll want to get your heels back in contact with the ice. Also, as you stop your upper body will still want to go forward. Keep your center of gravity low (bend knees) and lean back a bit. Your back leg will be like the kickstand of a bike supporting you so you don't fall backward onto the ice. BTW, I tried two slides across my kitchen floor to make sure I had the mechanics right and fell backwards on the second pass. Scared the crap out of my wife.

Like noobman said the -- stop isn't as much a stop as it is a way to change directions quickly. The backstep to balance you after you've stopped is actually the first step to skate in the other direction.

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01-03-2009, 07:11 PM
  #47
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You should ask the marshalls to have people change direction every so often. Everybody has a strong and weak side for skating... most people are stronger going counter-clockwise (aka turning left) so the skate always ends up going that way. If I'm ever the first person on the ice I just start skating on my weak side right away and hope that everybody else follows suit.

I usually try to go Mid day if I have the day off, last time I went there were me and 2 other people there for 2 hours.

Otherwise during normal times that is a good idea to get to change directions.

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01-04-2009, 12:23 AM
  #48
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Emptynetter and noobman: Thanks for all the advice, you guys are great. It helped alot and im gonna be practicing almost every day trying to get it down(and sliding across the kitchen floor) I cant wait to try out all you advice

Thanks guys

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01-05-2009, 04:44 PM
  #49
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Out here in southern cali its called Stick Time at one rink and Puck Play another rink.

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01-06-2009, 08:54 PM
  #50
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i went to public skating last Saturday to start skating again and did pretty good so i decided to go to "stick practice" that's what they call it in northern mass and i had the ice to myself. I had the hardest workout in a year, skating hard and shooting. I haven't sweat so much in my life which was good. I am now planing to do an adult beginners hockey training class, all i have to do is buy some pads.

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