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Let's say you're god-awful at hockey. What do you do?

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Old
01-25-2009, 06:41 AM
  #1
octopi
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Let's say you're god-awful at hockey. What do you do?

I'll admit it. I'm not very good at ice hockey, or in my case, shinny. I'm slow. I can't recieve passes. I'm not very agile on blades. I played about 30-50(once 80) times a year in a clinic called "Shinny hockey for beginners, and adding in pickup games. I did this from the ages of 20-28. I'd also play the occasional game of pond hockey, or go to a nearby rink and practice by myself.I don't do either anymore. I love playing hockey like nothing else,but except for the one game of pickup I played on someone's backyard rink, I can't remember playing at all since then.I'm now 35, and would love to go back.My options:

1; Play beginner shinny again. Probably impossible because of my job/other commitments.

2. Play pickup, with all skill levels. This is infuriating, I've found, to the more skilled players(everyone else). I've got horrible co-ordination and can't take a pass in a game, am not as fast as other people and can't cross over well(Spinal curvature really affects this,as it gives me uneven gait, even though its pretty much unnoticable in regular life)

3. Play pickup at outdoor rinks., This is somewhat plausible because young adults occasionally do this, although I'd feel ridiculous playing with some little kids that show up there.i think this ship sailed hen I hit 30, even if I usually look like I'm in my mid-20s.

4. Practice before dawn,or when kids are at school. Maybe not a bad idea, but not safe if I somehow injure myself, Not very challenging either.

5. Stay in retirement, Peter Forsberg.

What would you do?

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01-25-2009, 07:13 AM
  #2
mattihp
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Hockey is to fun not to play.

I am the worst skater I've ever seen. I still shinny-type hockey in my college's sport club, just for fun.

Practice skating every chance you get, and just do the thing that you think is the most fun.

I scored my first goal last thursday, and everyone (even on the opposite team) rejoiced xD

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01-25-2009, 08:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by octopi View Post
I'll admit it. I'm not very good at ice hockey, or in my case, shinny. I'm slow. I can't recieve passes. I'm not very agile on blades. I played about 30-50(once 80) times a year in a clinic called "Shinny hockey for beginners, and adding in pickup games. I did this from the ages of 20-28. I'd also play the occasional game of pond hockey, or go to a nearby rink and practice by myself.I don't do either anymore. I love playing hockey like nothing else,but except for the one game of pickup I played on someone's backyard rink, I can't remember playing at all since then.I'm now 35, and would love to go back.My options:

1; Play beginner shinny again. Probably impossible because of my job/other commitments.

2. Play pickup, with all skill levels. This is infuriating, I've found, to the more skilled players(everyone else). I've got horrible co-ordination and can't take a pass in a game, am not as fast as other people and can't cross over well(Spinal curvature really affects this,as it gives me uneven gait, even though its pretty much unnoticable in regular life)

3. Play pickup at outdoor rinks., This is somewhat plausible because young adults occasionally do this, although I'd feel ridiculous playing with some little kids that show up there.i think this ship sailed hen I hit 30, even if I usually look like I'm in my mid-20s.

4. Practice before dawn,or when kids are at school. Maybe not a bad idea, but not safe if I somehow injure myself, Not very challenging either.

5. Stay in retirement, Peter Forsberg.

What would you do?
2. Play Pick up. Tell the infuriated players to get a life (or go back to the NHL where they obviously belong)

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01-25-2009, 08:23 AM
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just because youre bad at hockey does not mean you arent given the right to play. i'd say pick up some instructional DVDs and books, get some tips from better players and learn how to do things the right way. and then from there, practice practice practice until you feel you can atleast hold your own in a pickup game.

best of luck

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Old
01-25-2009, 10:05 AM
  #5
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I can relate, since 2 weeks into this past session of roller hockey at the rink that I play at, the non-house team that the staff put me on "released" me and went back to their old goalie. Yeah, I'm extremely inconsistent, as one week I could winning end of a 10-8 game and the next week, I could be on the losing end of a 14-1 game. The team tried trading me (and not even letting me know that they were thinking about trading me) to one of the bottom-of-the-division-dwelling house teams. In Week 1, we lost 6-5 in OT, and in Week 2 we lost 4-2 to a team that is one of the worst teams in the league season after season. I'll admit that I kinda stunk it up, but it was so dang important for them to win that they RELEASED/CUT me from the team? I couldn't believe it. I was just like "GET OVER YOURSELVES AND LIGHTEN UP! IT'S AN ADULT REC ROLLER HOCKEY LEAGUE!", but a lot of them treat it like it's the NHL.

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01-25-2009, 10:07 AM
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Just relax and play pickup, be as bad as you want to. No one in their right mind would care about things like that in informal, non-professional events.
The more you play, the better you get - and even if you don't, then what. There's never enough players anyway.

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Old
01-25-2009, 10:30 AM
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Low level men's leagues are not an option then? Because an adult C league would probably be your best option.

I would just play pickup. Any decent group will play with you, and the ones that aren't happy about it can suck it.

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01-25-2009, 10:41 AM
  #8
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outdoor pick-up game seems to me te best option. You can learn a few things, work a lot, and everyone is tere to have fun. Add to this you will find sometimes a nice level of competition once the kids are gone later in the night.

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01-25-2009, 10:42 AM
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I know there are beginner women's leagues in Calgary that they teach you the skills before you go into full games.

My cousin and I did this since we hadn't played hockey in about 5 years because of other sports, and the girls really improved.

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Old
01-25-2009, 10:53 AM
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by octopi View Post
I'll admit it. I'm not very good at ice hockey, or in my case, shinny. I'm slow. I can't recieve passes. I'm not very agile on blades. I played about 30-50(once 80) times a year in a clinic called "Shinny hockey for beginners, and adding in pickup games. I did this from the ages of 20-28. I'd also play the occasional game of pond hockey, or go to a nearby rink and practice by myself.I don't do either anymore. I love playing hockey like nothing else,but except for the one game of pickup I played on someone's backyard rink, I can't remember playing at all since then.I'm now 35, and would love to go back.My options:

1; Play beginner shinny again. Probably impossible because of my job/other commitments.

2. Play pickup, with all skill levels. This is infuriating, I've found, to the more skilled players(everyone else). I've got horrible co-ordination and can't take a pass in a game, am not as fast as other people and can't cross over well(Spinal curvature really affects this,as it gives me uneven gait, even though its pretty much unnoticable in regular life)

3. Play pickup at outdoor rinks., This is somewhat plausible because young adults occasionally do this, although I'd feel ridiculous playing with some little kids that show up there.i think this ship sailed hen I hit 30, even if I usually look like I'm in my mid-20s.

4. Practice before dawn,or when kids are at school. Maybe not a bad idea, but not safe if I somehow injure myself, Not very challenging either.

5. Stay in retirement, Peter Forsberg.

What would you do?
Find a men's league, or a group that rents out weekly ice. Groups like that are always looking for new people, and you almost always find varying skill levels.

Remember that it's about having fun, first and foremost. Find a non-competitive setting where you are at least on-pace with everybody else.

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01-25-2009, 11:08 AM
  #11
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hna.com has a program for beginning adults. I myself am joining this in St.Louis since I have never played organized hockey and want to learn to play. I have heard nothing but good things about this program. It is expensive but worth it to get the maximum enjoyment out of the the greatest game in the world.

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01-25-2009, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by octopi View Post
I'll admit it. I'm not very good at ice hockey, or in my case, shinny. I'm slow. I can't recieve passes. I'm not very agile on blades. I played about 30-50(once 80) times a year in a clinic called "Shinny hockey for beginners, and adding in pickup games. I did this from the ages of 20-28. I'd also play the occasional game of pond hockey, or go to a nearby rink and practice by myself.I don't do either anymore. I love playing hockey like nothing else,but except for the one game of pickup I played on someone's backyard rink, I can't remember playing at all since then.I'm now 35, and would love to go back.My options:

1; Play beginner shinny again. Probably impossible because of my job/other commitments.

2. Play pickup, with all skill levels. This is infuriating, I've found, to the more skilled players(everyone else). I've got horrible co-ordination and can't take a pass in a game, am not as fast as other people and can't cross over well(Spinal curvature really affects this,as it gives me uneven gait, even though its pretty much unnoticable in regular life)

3. Play pickup at outdoor rinks., This is somewhat plausible because young adults occasionally do this, although I'd feel ridiculous playing with some little kids that show up there.i think this ship sailed hen I hit 30, even if I usually look like I'm in my mid-20s.

4. Practice before dawn,or when kids are at school. Maybe not a bad idea, but not safe if I somehow injure myself, Not very challenging either.

5. Stay in retirement, Peter Forsberg.

What would you do?
Exactly what Ti-Girl said, there are developmental programs all over the place. Ask the hockey director at your local rink about an adult skills development program.

I had to start one because three guys wanted help. Today we have over 30 adults in this skills development program on Saturday morning at 8:00 AM.

If the hockey director doesn't know there is interest, he will not have a program. So, the squeeky wheel gets the grease....ask!

Head coach

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Old
01-25-2009, 12:41 PM
  #13
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around here, just go to a park, lace up the skates, grab your stick and play. no matter what age or skill level.

i've seen 5 on 5 on outdoor park rinks with players aged 8 - 65+

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Old
01-25-2009, 12:59 PM
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here's the bottom line if the guys that play pickup or rat or shinny, at your local rink are jerks, if you can find another rink. in my experience the only guys that are good and get pissy are those that are still young enough to think their getting scouted playing pick up. guys our age whether they have played their whole loves or only since last year dont care how good you are just that your not a dick. have fun try hard take polite coaching,help whatever. someone said earlier try to get as game smart as you can. hustle(no matter how slow you are) and trying to be in the right place in relation to the play goes a long way to make up for skill with the oldtimers. this game is too much fun to worry about B.S. go out skate, have fun, get some exercise.

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Old
01-25-2009, 02:46 PM
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I wouldn't worry much about that, everyone is eligible to play pro hockey if they work hard. What makes you any different from becoming really good at hockey? It just takes practice and much work, if you bring your kids along with you, they will also motivate you to play harder, and worker harder by looking at the joy they whence they play.
If they don't like hockey, I suggest you introduce them to it.

No lies here, if it's possible, it's attainable.
You're 35, and that's not a problem, you are still young, even Chelios is still young at 48, it depends how you play, your style makes you more susceptible to injuries. Playing smart hockey is one thing, and playing aggressively is another, just look at all these kids getting injured because they aren't vigilant.

As for your gosh-awfulness at hockey, what I want you to do is build a hockey rink in your backyard, make sure your backyard is big, and practice your skating, find your strengths, whilst identifying your weaknesses. (This option is if you feel like you hold back when you are at the local pond, at the cost of shyness).

If you have no problem doing a bit more work, write down what you want to achieve, or even copy the list of achievements from your favorite hockey player, and check mark the ones you achieve.

Also, make sure you are warming up, stretching, or doing laps around the pond for 5 minutes before commencing.

If that were not enough, eat healthy it will increase your stamina once you combine it with elliptical workouts, make sure you work your core (ab crunches) which is the most important part in hockey, it will make you faster, and more agile. Muscle development also increases your speed, it replaces the fat that's good for nothing except for burning when you play hockey, and use up all your carbohydrates.

This is probably difficult for you, since you must raise kids, and pay the bills, work, etc, but there is always a way to make it work, it just takes dedication. IT IS NEVER TOO LATE

Don't play with strangers, play with your friends, because the people that don't know you will easily get frustrated with your lack of skills at the beginning, this will dissuade you to pursue your dream further, try to stay in a positive environment.
Screw all naysayers, the people you play with that constantly get frustrated are failures, and are sour because they couldn't make the NHL.

Source:
I want to play professional hockey once I finish 8 years of University.
I am a fast **** because I did cardio 3 hours a day in 8th grade, back then I was just working for my 'health' (girls).


Last edited by PhysicalTorque: 01-25-2009 at 02:53 PM.
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Old
01-25-2009, 04:30 PM
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhysicalTorque View Post
I wouldn't worry much about that, everyone is eligible to play pro hockey if they work hard. What makes you any different from becoming really good at hockey? It just takes practice and much work, if you bring your kids along with you, they will also motivate you to play harder, and worker harder by looking at the joy they whence they play.
If they don't like hockey, I suggest you introduce them to it.

No lies here, if it's possible, it's attainable.
You're 35, and that's not a problem, you are still young, even Chelios is still young at 48, it depends how you play, your style makes you more susceptible to injuries. Playing smart hockey is one thing, and playing aggressively is another, just look at all these kids getting injured because they aren't vigilant.

As for your gosh-awfulness at hockey, what I want you to do is build a hockey rink in your backyard, make sure your backyard is big, and practice your skating, find your strengths, whilst identifying your weaknesses. (This option is if you feel like you hold back when you are at the local pond, at the cost of shyness).

If you have no problem doing a bit more work, write down what you want to achieve, or even copy the list of achievements from your favorite hockey player, and check mark the ones you achieve.

Also, make sure you are warming up, stretching, or doing laps around the pond for 5 minutes before commencing.

If that were not enough, eat healthy it will increase your stamina once you combine it with elliptical workouts, make sure you work your core (ab crunches) which is the most important part in hockey, it will make you faster, and more agile. Muscle development also increases your speed, it replaces the fat that's good for nothing except for burning when you play hockey, and use up all your carbohydrates.

This is probably difficult for you, since you must raise kids, and pay the bills, work, etc, but there is always a way to make it work, it just takes dedication. IT IS NEVER TOO LATE

Don't play with strangers, play with your friends, because the people that don't know you will easily get frustrated with your lack of skills at the beginning, this will dissuade you to pursue your dream further, try to stay in a positive environment.
Screw all naysayers, the people you play with that constantly get frustrated are failures, and are sour because they couldn't make the NHL.

Source:
I want to play professional hockey once I finish 8 years of University.
I am a fast **** because I did cardio 3 hours a day in 8th grade, back then I was just working for my 'health' (girls).
I hate to break it to you, but there is a time...

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01-25-2009, 04:38 PM
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PhysicalTorque
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I hate to break it to you, but there is a time...
Well, maybe when you're a paraplegic.

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01-25-2009, 05:27 PM
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find somebody to help you accepting basses and just play pickup. playing with people better tahn you will make you alot better

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01-25-2009, 05:33 PM
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Well, maybe when you're a paraplegic.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sledge_hockey

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01-25-2009, 05:58 PM
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I was in a similar position and decided to hang up the blades and join a ball hockey league. For me, the big problem isn't shooting or passing, my skating is terrible because I never played in a league as a kid because of asthma.

I had the same experience playing drop-in hockey, I was usually the worst person on the ice and didn't like the experience of being the guy who got the "pity passes" where they all tried to set me up for a goal. I find that as a ball hockey player, I'm not at a disadvantage even against guys who grew up playing the game. It's still a great cardio workout and it's also a lot cheaper than ice times.

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01-25-2009, 08:19 PM
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Got any friends who like hockey? Go with them to pick up games... if you know someone to talk to/poke fun at yourself/get advice from it won't be as bad.

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01-25-2009, 08:33 PM
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It seems there are no limits to what one can do if they put their mind to it, there truly is no reason to give up, if those who have been struck by misfortune can compete, it's anyone's game to play.

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01-25-2009, 09:16 PM
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octopi
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I know there are beginner women's leagues in Calgary that they teach you the skills before you go into full games.

My cousin and I did this since we hadn't played hockey in about 5 years because of other sports, and the girls really improved.
I once went to a tryout for a beginner's woman's team, and I could tell right away I wasn't good enough.

Not that it matters, because it would be too hard for me to play unless on a preset day, which is why I was in beginner shinny. For 8 years. And never got very much better. I'm too slow ,clumsy and uncoodinated to compete except with others who started playing as adults. Obviously, I'm too big and strong and fast to play with 8 year olds(Otherwise, thats my skill level)

I did play pickup for a number of years with the attitude of " its a meaningless pickup game, if you're junior A and playing drop in, expect to have to deal with people who aren't so good" But I think i'd find it difficult to be that flippant now.

I could do that again, if I really didn't care who I cheesed off. Maybe I could just tell them I'm horrible and I only want 15 minutes, and then I'll leave.

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01-25-2009, 09:41 PM
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You've gotta keep playing. Even the best of us look lost out there sometimes, no way to improve other than to keep going at it... keep the chin up and remember to always learn from those who are good at the game .

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01-26-2009, 07:43 AM
  #25
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I remember a coach once saying, and I'm sure it came from an older saying "If you're thinking about quitting, then you already have." Yeah, it sounds cliche, but it is true.

I'm in the same boat. 35, closing in on 36 quicker than I'd like to believe, and I'm no longer the same player I was 10 years ago. Because of knee issues from years of general wear and tear, I'm finally realizing that I don't have the legs to get up ice quicker than everybody else, and that my hands have slowly turned to stone.

However, look for positives in your game. If you're a good passer, focus on passing. Think you have a hard accurate shot? Try to make that a point in your game to use it more often. Better at playing D than forward? Maybe that's an option, becoming a shutdown defenseman. The one thing I noticed last night when I skated was although I'm no longer the fastest (or even within the top 3 or 4 who were there last night), I can still put a pass on anybody's stick, regardless of where I am on the court.

There come a point where you just might need to adjust your game. I've seen other people do it with successful results.

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