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Learning to stop in one direction

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02-22-2009, 07:31 PM
  #1
JLHockeyKnight
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Learning to stop in one direction

So I've only been playing for about a year and a half now of ice hockey (I'm 23). I can move, and I feel I'm fairly decent, but I've got one small problem that I can't figure out and if I can figure it out I'd be a heck of a lot better.

When I stop, I stop by turning to my right. I can't stop for the life of me turning to the left. I try to mask it and just can't get the balance and stop down properly. Are there any tips to cure this? I think I would really up my game if I could figure this out. Thanks in advance.

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02-22-2009, 07:34 PM
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BadHammy*
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLHockeyKnight View Post
So I've only been playing for about a year and a half now of ice hockey (I'm 23). I can move, and I feel I'm fairly decent, but I've got one small problem that I can't figure out and if I can figure it out I'd be a heck of a lot better.

When I stop, I stop by turning to my right. I can't stop for the life of me turning to the left. I try to mask it and just can't get the balance and stop down properly. Are there any tips to cure this? I think I would really up my game if I could figure this out. Thanks in advance.
Truth is, EVERYONE has a weak stopping/turning side. You will even notice it among top NHL players, even though there's isn't as bad as yours or mine. The only thing you can do is try to make sure your technique is right, then practice little by little. If you overdo it, you might create a whole new set of problems.

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02-22-2009, 07:37 PM
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do what i do, smash the boards lol. im serious i cant stop to my left either.

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02-22-2009, 07:46 PM
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cptjeff
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Practice is the only way to fix that. Start slow and build up speed as you get more confident stopping on that side.

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02-22-2009, 08:10 PM
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the_speedster
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First: You shouldn't be stopping by TURNING. I assume you've had some experience rollerblading/roller hockey by this though.

The best tool I've ever had to teach people to hockey stop is the snow plow stop. (A hockey stop is essentially "half" a snow plow".)

Everyone has a weak side to begin with. In time your brain will adjust and you'll become more comfortable stopping both ways

One drill that I use to help this process is to have a skater line with their "Strong" foot against the wall (in this case your right) skate at a gentle pace along side it (With one hand placed slightly on the wall as reassurance), then repeatedly snow plow. First with both feet, then only with the left.

Remember in order to snow plow you don't turn your body first, .. your point your toes in, with knees bent of course, and the friction should cause you to come to a stop.

go around the rink a couple of times like that and in no time you'll be comfortable enough to ignore the hand on the wall and do it with no "Safety wires/hands"

Once you're comfortable at one speed, increase it etc.

good video with some of the same principles I use (ignore the cheesy music though )



good luck

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02-22-2009, 08:19 PM
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I had a similar problem until I realized that my problem was with the outside edge of my right skate.


See when you stop you're either using the inside edge of your dominant skate (parallel stop) or the inside edge of one skate and the outside edge of the other (two footed stop).

My problem with stopping left was that the outside edge of my right skate would dig into the ice and throw me off balance. I tried a one-footed stop with my left skate and voila.... almost a perfect stop!


Learn about your edges, and try using the inside left and inside right edges in isolation for a stop. You could also try isolating your outside edges for a stop too... but I must warn you that it's pretty difficult!

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Old
02-22-2009, 11:40 PM
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adaminnj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_speedster View Post
First: You shouldn't be stopping by TURNING. I assume you've had some experience rollerblading/roller hockey by this though.

The best tool I've ever had to teach people to hockey stop is the snow plow stop. (A hockey stop is essentially "half" a snow plow".)

Everyone has a weak side to begin with. In time your brain will adjust and you'll become more comfortable stopping both ways

One drill that I use to help this process is to have a skater line with their "Strong" foot against the wall (in this case your right) skate at a gentle pace along side it (With one hand placed slightly on the wall as reassurance), then repeatedly snow plow. First with both feet, then only with the left.

Remember in order to snow plow you don't turn your body first, .. your point your toes in, with knees bent of course, and the friction should cause you to come to a stop.

go around the rink a couple of times like that and in no time you'll be comfortable enough to ignore the hand on the wall and do it with no "Safety wires/hands"

Once you're comfortable at one speed, increase it etc.

good video with some of the same principles I use (ignore the cheesy music though )

*vid removed*

good luck
By far the worst Vid on hockey stops I have ever seen. excluding the C-rapy porno music. hahaha

do a search for "hockey stop" on this forum and there is a string that has several opinions of how to stop.

knees bent start with foot placement / | then / \ then / / Stopped to the left. then start again
foot placement | \ then \ \ stopped to the right.

remember knees bent weight on your toes.

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