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The lightweight skater: Pads with less weighted gravity.

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Old
06-29-2009, 09:16 PM
  #1
Pierre Gotye
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The lightweight skater: Pads with less weighted gravity.

I'm wanting to get a little bit faster on the ice(I'm sure you are too).

I think reducing weight from your pads is really going to help.

So...let's make a list of things you can buy(any pad/skates) that are a known improvement due to their lightweightedness.

Mind you this isn't so much for the player in tight-checking hockey, but for those of us who play in adult beer leagues.

So I'll start:
Sherwood 5030 Shoulder pads:


Don't know the exact weight, but players rave about them over the current designs. You will sacrifice padding if you get hit by a puck or get a nasty check into the boards, but the traditional fit and lightweightedness will really help you move a tad quicker up the ice.

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Old
06-30-2009, 12:29 AM
  #2
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I've never seen anyone with those you posted in the first post.

I use these ... they weigh 2 lbs and cost about $140 US, I got them for $89 at my friend's pro shop. he said he got them from Dan Farrell himself as the QMJHL team Lewiston MAINEiacs wear them.

I love these, they are the best shoulder pads i have ever worn and are completely nonrestrictive in movement AND they offer great protections. Also the shoulder caps come off easily for things like men's leagues where there isn't any checking. All the plastic pads seen come off the garment and can be worn with or without.

http://www.farrellsports.com

In case you get a red x http://www.farrellsports.com/layouts..._shouldies.jpg


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06-30-2009, 01:36 AM
  #3
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Lighter shoulders don't really increase speed much. Nor do lighter pants. More mobile pants can help if yours restrict you.

What's much more important is the speed and strength of your legs. Strength you can train, I recommend going hard in open skates with ankle weights, and for speed, lighter pads and skates really do help.

So lighter shins, and lighter skates. Lighter skates will be more expensive, but for lighter shins you could go down a few sizes and wear them inside your skate (with socks done properly as a bonus), and you could also look into a lower end shin. Higher end means more protective, which usually means more weight.

Because of the principle of a lever, the further out something is the more effort it will take to move, so skates will have the most effect.


The only real advantage of shoulders like that is the weight, but not to improve skating. It allows you to move your arms a bit faster and with perhaps a bit less obstruction, depending on what you were wearing before, which might help your stickhanding and will be more comfortable.

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Old
06-30-2009, 02:01 AM
  #4
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I use the 5030s and I'm still slow as ****.

Comfy though. And it gives me the illusion that if some moron tries to crank his clapper through traffic during open hockey, it might keep my heart from seizing when it hits me in the chest.

I'm sure if you get light pads all around it might help your stamina a bit, but gaining muscle and better technique will pay off much more. If you can work on your stride and eliminate wasting energy you'll be able to move quicker and won't tire as easily.

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Old
06-30-2009, 10:00 AM
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brentbreakaway23 View Post
I'm wanting to get a little bit faster on the ice(I'm sure you are too).

I think reducing weight from your pads is really going to help.

So...let's make a list of things you can buy(any pad/skates) that are a known improvement due to their lightweightedness.

Mind you this isn't so much for the player in tight-checking hockey, but for those of us who play in adult beer leagues.

So I'll start:
Sherwood 5030 Shoulder pads:


Don't know the exact weight, but players rave about them over the current designs. You will sacrifice padding if you get hit by a puck or get a nasty check into the boards, but the traditional fit and lightweightedness will really help you move a tad quicker up the ice.
The difference in weight between the lightest shoulder pads and the heaviest (modern) shoulder pads is nominal, thanks to the lightweight synthetic materials they use. Older players are used to those thin shoulder pads and find that they can move more freely in them... it has very little to do with speed, and more to do with upper body mobility (free arms for stickhandling).

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Old
06-30-2009, 12:01 PM
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I play mens league and I don't even wear shoulder pads anymore lol. I did, but found that I didn't really need them.

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06-30-2009, 12:14 PM
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noobman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HURAKAN View Post
I play mens league and I don't even wear shoulder pads anymore lol. I did, but found that I didn't really need them.
I hate it when guys do this. It just makes it harder to play against them. You're afraid to give them even the slightest bump, on the off chance that they lose their balance and go into the boards or just hit the ice.

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06-30-2009, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
I hate it when guys do this. It just makes it harder to play against them. You're afraid to give them even the slightest bump, on the off chance that they lose their balance and go into the boards or just hit the ice.
why? you shouldnt give a **** that they choose not to wear shoulder pads. I dont wear shoulders either and ive gotten roughed up before and could care less, I like a little physical play and never shy away from it even without shoulders.

as far as the OP goes I felt a little faster when I switched to lighter skates (old i think 252? Tacks to Bauer Vapors XXV's)

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06-30-2009, 01:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
I hate it when guys do this. It just makes it harder to play against them. You're afraid to give them even the slightest bump, on the off chance that they lose their balance and go into the boards or just hit the ice.

No one even notices that I don't wear shoulder pads, so I don't have that problem. I'm a big guy, massive shoulders and upper body as it is.

I play right in front of the net, too. I'm not afraid of getting shots off the chest... I just like playing hockey. Last game I was double teamed almost always when in front of the net.. screen the goalie very well, too.

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06-30-2009, 01:34 PM
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I used 5030's for a season and a half, really liked them. I moved up to Vapor XXV's though because I wanted more spine and ab protection. It made absolutely no difference in my game.

I will say if you want to get faster, train harder. Right now I weigh about 180 at 5'8" with 21% body fat, which means I've got 37 pounds of fat on my body. 37! If I lost 20 pounds of fat, I'd be down to 160 at 10% body fat. Pick up a 5 pound bag of sugar, and imagine putting four of them in your backpack and playing...big difference!

That's why I'm doing P90X right now, to drop some fat, build up some strength, and do some plyo to get more leg strength and explosiveness. If I can make my first two strides quicker and improve my fitness to play harder all game, that will do more for me than any gear in the world.

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Old
06-30-2009, 03:10 PM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HURAKAN View Post
I play mens league and I don't even wear shoulder pads anymore lol. I did, but found that I didn't really need them.
I felt that way too until I got hit in the breastbone by a half slapper that rode a Dman's shaft earlier this year.

The Farrell shouldies have minimal restriction and offer excellent protection. I am never playing without shoulder pads again. You know ... not to mention the buttwipe who decides to trip you while going into the corner hard too.

Not wearing protective equipment isn't the way to be even playing something as mundane as shinny hockey. I hung up my Louisville bulky shoulder pads and use the Farrell's.

I even starting to wear a visor after getting a puck in the eye bone the same game I injured my bicep a month ago or so. I threw my old one on for now and am buying a bauer HS22 prowave visor next week.

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06-30-2009, 03:22 PM
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
I felt that way too until I got hit in the breastbone by a half slapper that rode a Dman's shaft earlier this year.

The Farrell shouldies have minimal restriction and offer excellent protection. I am never playing without shoulder pads again. You know ... not to mention the buttwipe who decides to trip you while going into the corner hard too.

Not wearing protective equipment isn't the way to be even playing something as mundane as shinny hockey. I hung up my Louisville bulky shoulder pads and use the Farrell's.

I even starting to wear a visor after getting a puck in the eye bone the same game I injured my bicep a month ago or so. I threw my old one on for now and am buying a bauer HS22 prowave visor next week.
I'm glad somebody gets it. If guys are going out there w/o shoulder pads and then standing in front of the net it basically means that I can't shoot for the top half of the net, or take a slapshot at all. That's extremely annoying. It also means that I have to ease off in the corners, or pretty much give up despite having a half-step up on the guy in a race for the puck b/c the other guy's a hotshot and won't let up.



As for when to wear what... I generally go with just a stick, gloves, and skates for pond hockey. I'll toss on a helmet for stick and puck or open ice sessions that allow you to use hockey stuff, and any other time I'm wearing full gear.

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Old
06-30-2009, 03:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
I'm glad somebody gets it. If guys are going out there w/o shoulder pads and then standing in front of the net it basically means that I can't shoot for the top half of the net, or take a slapshot at all. That's extremely annoying. It also means that I have to ease off in the corners, or pretty much give up despite having a half-step up on the guy in a race for the puck b/c the other guy's a hotshot and won't let up.



As for when to wear what... I generally go with just a stick, gloves, and skates for pond hockey. I'll toss on a helmet for stick and puck or open ice sessions that allow you to use hockey stuff, and any other time I'm wearing full gear.
I can assure you that you're in the minority. I don't have people let up when I'm racing for a puck. Every league is different. Quite a few people in my league (read: half the roster on each team nearly) don't wear shoulder pads. There is a common level of respect for each other, and no one is going to cheap shot somebody by tripping them up in the boards.

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06-30-2009, 03:51 PM
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Accidents don't pick and choose when to happen. I always wear full gear when playing with others. Even outdoor shinny I still wear elbow and shin pads.

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06-30-2009, 04:23 PM
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I figure the best way to make yourself a lightweight skater is to make yourself lightweight and work on conditioning your legs.

The player is what makes the difference, although pads and gear do make *some* difference. Even if you gave Crosby or any top-line NHL'er the baseline pads and gear from a manufacturer, they could skate circles around you if you had all the top-of-the-line gear.

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Old
07-01-2009, 03:58 AM
  #16
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Lightweight is a misnomer. Do you see every NHL player trying to drop weight to speed up? No. So how do we explain 220+ lb guys skating faster than some of those 170 lb guys? Easy, strength and good technique. Technique is so often overlooked. Get the Stamm/Glantz videos or a skating coach.

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07-01-2009, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MistaWrista View Post
Lightweight is a misnomer. Do you see every NHL player trying to drop weight to speed up? No. So how do we explain 220+ lb guys skating faster than some of those 170 lb guys? Easy, strength and good technique. Technique is so often overlooked. Get the Stamm/Glantz videos or a skating coach.
+1 I would agree that technique and leg strength is the key. Don't fall into the marketing trap of trying to get lightweight gear to make you faster.

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07-01-2009, 01:34 PM
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I'm all about freedom of movement and nonrestrictive equipment. The Farrell shouldies have that and also happen to be lightweight. You can also put them in the washing machine if you remove the removable armor and then hang dry them as they do not recommend a clothes dryer.

I love them tremendously.

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Old
07-01-2009, 06:24 PM
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how about no shoulder pads? i dont wear them some times in mens league

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07-01-2009, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
how about no shoulder pads? i dont wear them some times in mens league
Well like I mentioned above I wore none until a deflected halfg slapshot hit me in the breastbone. Not to mention some yayhoo tripping you as yoiu go hard into the corner or something.

No thanks .... I am dealing with a torn bicep and I do not need new injuries.

Also the last game for our team I injured my bicep in I got hit in the eye with the puck too .... I am buying a new Bauer HS22 Pro Wave visor at my sports shop this week.

Time to watch out for my goods ... a detached retina does not sound like a fun time for me and why take the odd chance when stuff is available to use that is not in the way like the old protective stuff used to be?

Technology has definitely come around with things like eye protection. You can wear stuff you actually forget you have anything on because of the optical technology used in them.

Anyone who plays at somewhat of a brisk pace and doesn't wear protective gear is a dolt .... like I was a few weeks ago.

No more of that stupidness for this guy.

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07-01-2009, 06:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HURAKAN View Post
I play mens league and I don't even wear shoulder pads anymore lol. I did, but found that I didn't really need them.
What he said. And I took most of the pads out of my pants as well. Just left the thigh pads.

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07-01-2009, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
I'm glad somebody gets it. If guys are going out there w/o shoulder pads and then standing in front of the net it basically means that I can't shoot for the top half of the net, or take a slapshot at all. That's extremely annoying. It also means that I have to ease off in the corners, or pretty much give up despite having a half-step up on the guy in a race for the puck b/c the other guy's a hotshot and won't let up.



As for when to wear what... I generally go with just a stick, gloves, and skates for pond hockey. I'll toss on a helmet for stick and puck or open ice sessions that allow you to use hockey stuff, and any other time I'm wearing full gear.

If I'm standing in front of the net in full gear with a full face mask on and you take a slap shot above my knees I'm going to let you have it. Tipping or deflecting a chest high shot in front of the net is almost impossible. If you want the puck to go in the net keep your shot down. And I never ask anyone to play differently because of gear that I'm not wearing. If you change how you play because of that then that's your own deal. If guys are on the ice without gear it's by choice and they know the consequences. Just play your game................But remember, head high shots don't go in!!!

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07-01-2009, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
If I'm standing in front of the net in full gear with a full face mask on and you take a slap shot above my knees I'm going to let you have it. Tipping or deflecting a chest high shot in front of the net is almost impossible. If you want the puck to go in the net keep your shot down. And I never ask anyone to play differently because of gear that I'm not wearing. If you change how you play because of that then that's your own deal. If guys are on the ice without gear it's by choice and they know the consequences. Just play your game................But remember, head high shots don't go in!!!
The problem is too many guys don't wear their gear properly or not enough of it.

They will wait until they get an eye injury and have surgery to re-attach a retina before they wear an eye shield.

They will wait until that one goober who does shoot at people's heads takes out 8 of their front teeth before they wear something to protect themselves.

YOU'RE PLAYING ICE HOCKEY .... things happen even in a gentleman's men's league playing with 50 year olds.
This is why I have stopped being a moron and am now going to wear all of my gear including a visor I am buying this week for $60.

I got my eyebrow split in half on OUTDOOR ice with just myslef and two friends, a frozen twig in the ice caused the puck to go straight up in the air and hit me in the face. Nobody wears protective gear outdoors because you really can't.
INDOORS THOUGH .... there is NO excuse.

Stuff happens. Please don't wait until you lose an eyeball because you assumed or hoped someone wouldn't be stupid enough to shoot a throat high slapshot.

How many men's league guys can even shoot well and shoot wristshots at other's heads by accident sometimes even trying to pass the puck because thewy can't skate or whatever?

I've seen it enough times to wear my gear ... all of it.

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Old
07-02-2009, 03:12 AM
  #24
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There was a guy in my league who is around 6'5" and took a nasty shot to his chest in a game(I wasnt there) and had a green/purple bruise for awhile, after that he wears a chestguard. I dont understand why you would not wear a chestguard or a decent amount of protection, I do not understand compromising protection for a insignificant amount of weight reduction, it wont screw your game up that bad. I learned quick after I had a few wild high slapshots that I need to keep it lower to avoid any unescessary high hits. Not to say that at some points I wont hit it high again but I definitely try and keep them much lower now.
I can not guarantee there wont be a random shot that manages to go waste high or above at times either just being my fault or a random deflection that goes high, either way it will hurt. If you play hockey and dont prepare for the randomness of players and the puck flyin around then I really want to say it is your own fault if you get hurt due to not having proper protection. If someone ever came up to me *****in cause I had a shot that went high, then Id prob just tell em "ITS HOCKEY DEAL WITH IT". I started the game fully aware of the randomness of it, you CAN NOT always completely control the situation, mistakes or fluke stuff happens.

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Old
07-02-2009, 03:22 AM
  #25
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In an ice hockey league, only a fool would avoid wearing a face shield and chest pads. Wait until somebody you know cracks ribs, breaks a clavicle etc. We're adults with bills to pay, hospitals cost big money.

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