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Development for my 4 yr old

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Old
08-07-2009, 10:43 AM
  #26
Tackleberry
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Thanks to all for the above advice.

If anyone else has anything please add in.

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08-07-2009, 12:50 PM
  #27
dick341
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Originally Posted by Tackleberry View Post
I started to take him to Lightning games and he got hooked. My son also hits the plastic puck in the house. We have the hard Pero-style floors. Puck mooves nice and fast. I started getting him skating lessons when he was 2 or 2.5 yrs ol. I tried to skate with him but he did better with an instructor. He wanted to goof around with me too much. After several Learn to Skate classes, he finally got the hang of skating. He was also motivated by skating with a boy who's dad plays for the Lightning. They are about the same age and of course, being the son of an NHL'er, he skated really well. That motivated my son even more to try hard in practice. Try to find some kid about his age that plays hockey or rollerblades.

When he was 3, I got him some roller-blades. They are of descent quality and are adjustable. He will be able to wear them for a couple years. Ironically, it is hard to find roller-hockey rinks in the Tampa area. Go figure? He loves to play with the older kids. I also bought him all the pads, sticks, and pucks for roller-hockey. Sometimes I take him to one of the larger parks in the are that has long (and paved) nature trails. He forgets about "skating" and enjoys the outdoors/nature while skates.

My biggest drawback is my wife. She doesnt understand the sport, let alone know how to put on his gear. She is always complaining about he costs associated with hockey. "Blah, blah blah, you picked the most expensive sport for him to get in to". Well, it is the funnest and requires the most skill. Besides, I like the fact that I can go indoors and avoid the 95 degree heat and 95% humidity.

If you dont have smooth floors, you may want to research synthetic ice. It costs about 9$ per sq ft. Rather expensive, but he can practice shooting and skatiing. A lot of people do their garage. You can still park your car on it. Just keep a pan under your car in case of oil leaks. I am still trying to talk my wife into getting some, but she wants a new kitchen. She doesnt have her priorities straight.

I also go to the library and get kids books about hockey. He loves hearing me read stories about hockey. My sister has also bought him The Mighty Ducks I and II movies.

Any of you Northerners or Canadians have any good Hockey movies for kids? Please let me know.

That is where I am at now. My son is all excited about hockey camp (Paul Cohen Camp) starting on Monday.
ive taken him to a couple of kings games already and he has loved it. he even hangs out with me when i watch hockey on tv. i guess im lucky because my wife and i met through hockey and we have played together before, so she understood when she was pregnant that our kid would play hockey(actually she buys more hockey stuff for him than i do.)

thank you all for all of your input

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08-07-2009, 04:10 PM
  #28
vyktor
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Luckily for me my wife is as big a hockey fan as i am(our first date was a Pens game)

I too had to get lessons for my son, he just won't listen to dad. Now he has private lessons because in group lessons there was too much distraction, which wasn't as much of a problem for the 5 or 6 year olds but his attention span is short. The main thing is that I didn't want him to develop bad habits, that he would have to unlearn later.

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08-07-2009, 04:27 PM
  #29
Korkki
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Sorry vyktor, but I just can't understand your point of private lessons. The one aspect of fun is taken away if you can't learn and compare things with your friends. Hockey (as every other sport) should be fun until you're around 15.

Another thing (in some earlier post) what I can't understand is why you are using full equipment when you are skating or drilling alone (or in a small group). I think that only helmet and gloves (+ skates ofcourse) are needed when there is no game going. Less wear means also less weight...

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08-07-2009, 07:34 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Korkki View Post
Sorry vyktor, but I just can't understand your point of private lessons. The one aspect of fun is taken away if you can't learn and compare things with your friends. Hockey (as every other sport) should be fun until you're around 15.

Another thing (in some earlier post) what I can't understand is why you are using full equipment when you are skating or drilling alone (or in a small group). I think that only helmet and gloves (+ skates ofcourse) are needed when there is no game going. Less wear means also less weight...
I absolutely recommend this, from experience, with kids and any adults for that matter learning to skate. They will learn way faster if they are doing drills involving falling 50 times an hour than trying to avoid it. I actually cheer them for effort when they fall (at least the kids under 10), and we have drills with knee drops and rolls that you would never do without gear.

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Old
08-07-2009, 09:17 PM
  #31
vyktor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Korkki View Post
Sorry vyktor, but I just can't understand your point of private lessons. The one aspect of fun is taken away if you can't learn and compare things with your friends. Hockey (as every other sport) should be fun until you're around 15.

Another thing (in some earlier post) what I can't understand is why you are using full equipment when you are skating or drilling alone (or in a small group). I think that only helmet and gloves (+ skates ofcourse) are needed when there is no game going. Less wear means also less weight...
The private lessons are for skating, he does games and drills with other kids but skating is so fundamental and he was already learning bad habits in group skating lessons. Learning by imitation doesn't work when the kids you are imitating aren't doing it right, in the private lessons the teacher can focus him and focus on him.

As for practicing in pads, they play in full gear, may as well get used to it from the beginning.

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Old
08-08-2009, 08:02 PM
  #32
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I've found teaching learn-to-skate that kids who are on the ice for the first or second time sometimes do have an easier time with just the gloves and helmet (we don't require the rest until they're in the learn-to-play clinic). I think a lot of times what happens is the parents figure they'll get the equipment a size big so it will fit for another year, and putting too-big equipment on a kid who's just learning to skate is not helpful. If you really can't stomach the idea of shelling out for equipment in the correct size, just get the gloves and helmet and wait on the rest until it's required.

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Old
08-11-2009, 02:59 PM
  #33
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I would just continue to give him the opportunity to play as often as HE wants. My son started hockey at 3 playing against 5 and 6 year olds. At five he was leading point getter on team. At 6 he was bored in his league scoring at will. I was able to move him up to play with 8 year olds where he finished 3 rd in scoring to 2 AAA 8 year olds. I put him in AAA spring hockey with kids his own age and tried to give him every opportunity to continue playing as long as he wanted. His last tournament was in June and he cried when it was all over because he wanted more! I feel its important to give them a break so they become hungry again at the beginning of the hockey season because up here its a long one.

Every chance we get in the hockey season, I ask him if he wants to go for a skate, if he says yes, then we are out there with sticks and pucks. Working on new skills and building on his skating and balance.
There is no gauge to say where your child should be at 6 years old. Every kid develops at a different speed. I am just trying to provide my child with every opportunity possible while he still loves the game. As long as he is having fun, he will improve!

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