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I feel "heavy" on the ice (even though I'm not)

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08-19-2009, 05:27 PM
  #1
koh19
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I feel "heavy" on the ice (even though I'm not)

I'm 5'11'', 176 lbs, been training all summer (since April really), gained a whole lot of strength, followed a strict training plan (lifting, running, HIIT, speed training, plyometrics, stick handling exercises, mobility workouts for hips, legs) ate healthily, didn't party too much and cut down the fat, I'm lean, have a good six pack (which indicates that my bf % is low). Honestly, I gave 100% for my conditionning. I'm one of the ones that trains the most and that takes hockey the most seriously (In terms of conditionning, I'm pretty sure I'm top 5 in fitness on the team).

So I had my first practice last night and I felt "heavy" on the ice. At the beginning I felt ok, fairly fresh, did some good accelerations. But I felt absolutely drenched at the end of the practise (lasted 1h15). I dunno if it's because it's been months since I've been on the ice, if it was the first time that my legs made the specific movement of skating or what but I was disappointed.

What the hell happened?

Now I have a game on Friday and I'm pretty god damned scared. Sounds idiotic but my stomach hurts ( it's stress I'm guessing) because I feel it'll happen again. My confidence is very low.

Help!

Help!

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08-19-2009, 06:50 PM
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Timmer44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koh19 View Post
I'm 5'11'', 176 lbs, been training all summer (since April really), gained a whole lot of strength, followed a strict training plan (lifting, running, HIIT, speed training, plyometrics, stick handling exercises, mobility workouts for hips, legs) ate healthily, didn't party too much and cut down the fat, I'm lean, have a good six pack (which indicates that my bf % is low). Honestly, I gave 100% for my conditionning. I'm one of the ones that trains the most and that takes hockey the most seriously (In terms of conditionning, I'm pretty sure I'm top 5 in fitness on the team).

So I had my first practice last night and I felt "heavy" on the ice. At the beginning I felt ok, fairly fresh, did some good accelerations. But I felt absolutely drenched at the end of the practise (lasted 1h15). I dunno if it's because it's been months since I've been on the ice, if it was the first time that my legs made the specific movement of skating or what but I was disappointed.

What the hell happened?

Now I have a game on Friday and I'm pretty god damned scared. Sounds idiotic but my stomach hurts ( it's stress I'm guessing) because I feel it'll happen again. My confidence is very low.

Help!

Help!
When was the last time you actually SKATED??? Skating is a different animal and is really hard to replicate the movements without actually going on the ice. Your summer workouts will be hugely beneficial to your on-ice conditioning but there are likely a lot of muscles you haven't used in a while. Also, did you train with 30LBs of equipment on?

The good news is that because you have trained so hard, you will resume your skating in no time. Try to go for a couple skates between now and your game if possible to get your "skating" legs back.

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08-19-2009, 07:49 PM
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koh19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmer44 View Post
When was the last time you actually SKATED??? Skating is a different animal and is really hard to replicate the movements without actually going on the ice. Your summer workouts will be hugely beneficial to your on-ice conditioning but there are likely a lot of muscles you haven't used in a while. Also, did you train with 30LBs of equipment on?

The good news is that because you have trained so hard, you will resume your skating in no time. Try to go for a couple skates between now and your game if possible to get your "skating" legs back.
Last time I skated was about 4 months ago. I hope it's because it was the first time.

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08-20-2009, 07:57 PM
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AIREAYE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmer44 View Post
When was the last time you actually SKATED??? Skating is a different animal and is really hard to replicate the movements without actually going on the ice. Your summer workouts will be hugely beneficial to your on-ice conditioning but there are likely a lot of muscles you haven't used in a while. Also, did you train with 30LBs of equipment on?

The good news is that because you have trained so hard, you will resume your skating in no time. Try to go for a couple skates between now and your game if possible to get your "skating" legs back.
Are equpiment seriously 30 lbs? wow, but this is interesting because since you trained so hard, there shouldn't be a HUGE difference such as you experienced in your practise...odd

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08-20-2009, 08:23 PM
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cptjeff
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Unless you're a goalie using old horsehair and leather pads, no, equipment is not 30 pounds. 10 at the most would be my guess.

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08-21-2009, 03:59 PM
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4 months of not skating will really mess you up for the first couple times back out on the ice

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09-09-2009, 04:53 PM
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adaminnj
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check the depth of the blade sharpning you last had done.

I changed the depth from 1/2 in, to 5/8 and it makes a huge diff as to how a feel on ice.

I might be way off base but it's the only think I can think of that makes me feel "Heavy on ice"

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09-09-2009, 05:07 PM
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LyNX27
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Someone was right before, skating is hard to replicate and the only way to stay fresh (From one goalie to another) is training but still skating, getting in a Open Hockey game occasionally just to flex out and use your... "Goalie Muscles" The people will the best reflexes in the world still might not be the best goalies.

Just make sure to get yourself some time on the ice and you'll be fine in a week or two.

Even for your game make sure to do a few up downs, get the "Goalie Muscles" back into it and you should be fine.

Playing goal isn't about your total fitness, although that is important, technique is the hardest part to fix and personally the one that has a bigger effect on the game.

Not to say your conditioning was for nothing since conditioning will certainly help you out, but in summary what im trying to say is.

NOTHING will help you become a better goalie except playing in the net and working on your technique. Like i mentioned don't feel anxious for your next game, you face a shot or two and your adrenaline will kick in and you'll feel right at home.

I had this exact scenario happen to me a while ago.

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09-09-2009, 05:11 PM
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BadHammy*
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1) You haven't skated in so long, you're going to need at least 2-3 weeks to get it back.

2) You might want to use a shallower hollow, eg move to 5/8ths if you used a 1/2 or try 1/2 if you had a 3/8ths. 30-40 lbs will definitely make that difference.


Last edited by BadHammy*: 09-09-2009 at 05:28 PM.
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09-09-2009, 06:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LyNX27 View Post
Someone was right before, skating is hard to replicate and the only way to stay fresh (From one goalie to another) is training but still skating, getting in a Open Hockey game occasionally just to flex out and use your... "Goalie Muscles" The people will the best reflexes in the world still might not be the best goalies.

Just make sure to get yourself some time on the ice and you'll be fine in a week or two.

Even for your game make sure to do a few up downs, get the "Goalie Muscles" back into it and you should be fine.

Playing goal isn't about your total fitness, although that is important, technique is the hardest part to fix and personally the one that has a bigger effect on the game.

Not to say your conditioning was for nothing since conditioning will certainly help you out, but in summary what im trying to say is.

NOTHING will help you become a better goalie except playing in the net and working on your technique. Like i mentioned don't feel anxious for your next game, you face a shot or two and your adrenaline will kick in and you'll feel right at home.

I had this exact scenario happen to me a while ago.

I dont think the OP is a goalie.

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09-09-2009, 08:18 PM
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The biggest fact to remember is that being in "good shape" by regular workout standards does not mean you are in good hockey shape whatsoever. The reason is because hockey is such a compound exercise, with multiple muscle groups being involved. It's a muscle and cardio workout. I've seen several guys who had great endurance, top level players, that looked to be either as skinny as crackheads or just your average couch potato. You don't need a 6 pack and having very low body fat is not necessarily a good thing in the world of hockey... Padding when you go down is very helpful. It's about striking a balance and the key to being in good hockey shape is... playing lots of hockey. I know, I know, that's a shocker...

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09-09-2009, 08:46 PM
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josra33
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Well if you skated your hardest for an hour and fifteen minutes then you should feel absolutely drained. You should never leave the ice feeling like you could go for another game or another period. You did you job.

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09-10-2009, 12:07 PM
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EmptyNetter
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Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
The biggest fact to remember is that being in "good shape" by regular workout standards does not mean you are in good hockey shape whatsoever. The reason is because hockey is such a compound exercise, with multiple muscle groups being involved. It's a muscle and cardio workout. I've seen several guys who had great endurance, top level players, that looked to be either as skinny as crackheads or just your average couch potato. You don't need a 6 pack and having very low body fat is not necessarily a good thing in the world of hockey... Padding when you go down is very helpful. It's about striking a balance and the key to being in good hockey shape is... playing lots of hockey. I know, I know, that's a shocker...
This.
I've been reading Peter Twist's book, Complete Conditioning for Hockey and it's kind of an eye opener. There's a distinction between your anaerobic and your aerobic energy system and you need both systems to not get gassed. All jogging and no sprinting during training is great for cardio but could give you that "dead man skating" feeling when you're trying to hit top speed or do a lot of stops and starts. Does it take you longer than usual to get your wind back after finishing a shift or a drill?

Also, keep in mind that muscle weighs more than fat. Your body fat percentage may have dropped but maybe you've added weight. Maybe you added too much bulk to your upper body, forcing your legs to carry more.

Anyway, whatever your current condition don't let it throw off your mental game. If you have a chance to skate before tomorrow get out on the ice. Find your balance. Tonight eat a good dinner, get lots of sleep and hydrate tomorrow. Do your best.

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