HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Business of Hockey
The Business of Hockey Discuss the financial and business aspects of the NHL. Topics may include the CBA, work stoppages, broadcast contracts, franchise sales, and NHL revenues.

WADA updates list of prohibited list of substances

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
09-21-2009, 09:09 AM
  #1
LadyStanley
Elasmobranchology-go
 
LadyStanley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: North of the Tank
Country: United States
Posts: 53,563
vCash: 500
WADA updates list of prohibited list of substances

http://www.ctvolympics.ca/news-centr...tml?cid=rsstsn

Pseudoephedrine (a decongestant - available in Benadryl and Sudafed products) is now on the prohibited list. Salbutamol (for asthma) is now allowed (under certain dosage), when declared. Supplemental oxygen now allowed; and there's been a clarification on "blood spinning" (injection person's own blood back in) - allowed in some cases (with declaration), prohibited in others.

This obviously impacts Olympic athletes. Unclear how/if this will affect NHL (or other league) testing/reporting.

LadyStanley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-21-2009, 01:51 PM
  #2
Kritter471
Registered User
 
Kritter471's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dallas
Country: United States
Posts: 7,679
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Kritter471
Pseudoephedrine is in a ton of the more effective allergy medicines because it's the best of the decongestants that are cheaply available. It's also notoriously been abused in professional sports (sudafed popping and greenies in baseball). It's an interesting decision to ban it outright and not allow it in certain amounts when it's declared.

Kritter471 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-21-2009, 02:06 PM
  #3
Wetcoaster
Registered User
 
Wetcoaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Out There
Posts: 53,256
vCash: 500
Here is an article referencing an SI report on the use of Sudafed by NHL'ers.
http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/article/33513

Note that pseudoephedrine was removed from the banned substances list just prior to the last Winter Olympics and is now being re-instated:
Quote:
Pseudoephedrine, the stimulant found in the cold remedy Sudafed (The NHL's Dirty Little Secret from a 1998 Sports Illustrated article), is no longer on WADA's banned list. Apparently, after years of being deemed performance enhancing, it no longer is. Dr. Christiane Ayotte, who analyzes the NHL's drug test out of her IOC-approved lab in Montreal, for one, was extremely disappointed when the stimulant was removed from the WADA list. What a happy coincidence that pseudoephedrine was removed from the WADA list just as the NHL finally was implementing a drug program.

"I was strongly opposed to this," Ayotte told the Sun of the decision to remove pseudoephedrine from the WADA list, adding that she still believes the drug to be potentially dangerous. Ayotte insists there are "less potent" stimulants still on the banned list.
http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Columnists...12575-sun.html

Wetcoaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-21-2009, 02:37 PM
  #4
kdb209
Global Moderator
 
kdb209's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 12,169
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wetcoaster View Post
Here is an article referencing an SI report on the use of Sudafed by NHL'ers.
http://www.sportsbusinessdaily.com/article/33513

Note that pseudoephedrine was removed from the banned substances list just prior to the last Winter Olympics and is now being re-instated:

http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Columnists...12575-sun.html
Yup. For a long time Sudafed was one on the leagues dirty little secrets.

You can find that SI piece here: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/fea.../nhlstory.html

Going back to one of the Dick Pound (<insert juvenile joke from one of the main boards here>) threads:

Quote:
Originally Posted by kdb209
I think many NHL fans are naive in thinking that somehow hockey is more pure than baseball/football/etc.

Just go back to some of the Dick Pound threads.

http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?p=4472898

Quote:
Originally Posted by kdb209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wetcoaster
Actually he never accused the NHL of steroid abuse. What he said was:
Quote:
"I spoke with Gary [NHL commissioner Gary Bettman] and he said 'We don't have the problem in hockey,'" Pound said Thursday in an interview with the London Free Press. "I told him he does. You wouldn't be far wrong if you said a third" of hockey players are gaining some pharmaceutical assistance.
Exactly. This needs to be repeated. He DID NOT claim that 1/3 of players were using Steroids - he claims that 1/3 of players were using some form of performance enhancing drug ("You wouldn't be far wrong if you said a third of hockey players are gaining some pharmaceutical assistance)".

Performance enhancing drugs are a VERY broad category, especially if you go by IOC/WADA definitions. My guess is that by far the most common drugs are not steroids, but stimulants. I've read numerous reports over the years - Sudafed is one of the league's dirty little secrets.

Just Google "Hockey Players Sudafed":

http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Columnists...6/1325061.html

Quote:
Aside from a few tough guys, hockey players simply wouldn't benefit enough from steroid use.

Of course, stimulants, like Sudafed, are a whole different story.

It's been well documented that some players have popped the cold pills like candy in the past. Maybe some still are.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/fea.../nhlstory.html

A long SI piece written before the Nagano games:

Quote:
Hockey's Little Helpers

The legal drug of choice in the NHL is Sudafed—not for cold relief, but for the on-ice boost it offers

...

At 6:30 on game nights in Montreal, as the fans start streaming into the Molson Centre, as the TV sportscasters fidget while waiting to deliver their live reports, as the hot dogs grill in the press lounge, Canadiens goaltender Andy Moog goes through his pregame routine in the dressing room. He takes two Sudafed tablets and washes them down with a cup of water—it is not a question of health but of habit. Moog took Sudafed for the first time six or seven years ago, when he was with the Boston Bruins, because he had a terrible head cold. Since then, his remedy has become his ritual. Four other Canadiens also reach regularly for Sudeys, as they sometimes call them, to kick-start their motors, to get ready to play. For these men a game face includes an open mouth and a couple of hockey's little helpers.

A similar scene is being played out in dressing rooms throughout the NHL. The exact number of players who use Sudafed, a nonprescription drug that contains the stimulant pseudoephedrine, in an effort to boost their performance on the ice, is unclear. Two NHL trainers estimate that before a game 20% of the league's players routinely take over-the-counter medications that contain pseudoephedrine, not to combat the sniffles, as the manufacturers intended, but to feel a little buzz. The NHL, however, disputes that figure, saying the percentage of players using drugs such as Sudafed is much lower and that they use them for medicinal purposes only.

...

It's the NHL's dirty little secret, and with the Olympics imminent, it is of great concern to the league because although Sudafed is legal, it is on the Olympic list of banned substances. Consider the following:

—Anecdotal accounts of Sudafed abuse in the league abound. A former coach says one of his players built up such a tolerance to the medication that he had to gobble 20 pills to get the desired boost.

"There are all kinds of overdose stories—guys not being able to finish the first period because they get the shakes, paranoia, anxiety," says Detroit Red Wings athletic trainer John Wharton, who's been with the club since February 1991. "There are some guys who have been able to tolerate [large doses of pseudoephedrine]. The most I've seen a player take is eight pills. That dose would put some people in the hospital." Wharton says he has seen four or five abusers in the last seven years.

—Jari Kurri, the respected 17-year veteran right winger of the Colorado Avalanche, says some of the dirty play in recent years might be a result of players having had something more than the usual competitive juices flowing through their systems. He suggests a link between the use of pseudoephedrine and the increasing lack of respect NHL players have shown each other in this decade. "You take it, you get hyped up," says Kurri, who also says that he took Sudafed once before a game last season when he was with the Anaheim Mighty Ducks. "I don't know if the stickwork, the dirty hits, are because of that, but I think it's something the league should look into."

Montreal right wing Mark Recchi sees no correlation between pseudoephedrine and dirty play but doesn't deny that Sudafed gets him going. "You get a bit of an upper from it," says Recchi, who no longer takes the medication but admits that at one time he used it every 10 or 15 games. "You get pretty wired up. Sometimes it gets you a little emotional on the ice, a little too fired up."

—Brian Savage, a left wing on the Canadiens, takes two Sudafeds before every game at roughly the same time as Moog. Savage says he started the routine three years ago, his second season in the league. "I'm not sure if it pumps me up anymore," he says, "[but] if I'm a little groggy, it brings me up." Sometimes the trouble is coming down. After a game that ends at about 10:15 p.m., Savage can't fall asleep until 2 or 2:30 a.m. "I go out for dinner, have a glass of wine," he says. "Then I can fall asleep."

...

According to players and medical personnel, Sudafed began to appear in NHL dressing rooms in the mid-to-late 1980s. The approach to the medication at the time was surprisingly relaxed on some teams. When Wharton joined the Red Wings as their strength and conditioning coordinator, he says, Sudafed tablets sat on the table in the dressing room "like a bowl of fruit. But we got rid of them right away." He estimates that three quarters of the Detroit players at the time used Sudafed before a game.

"[When I played for Edmonton], I remember somebody walking [from the back of the dressing room] with a little jar, and he used to rattle it, and it sounded like a snake," says Moog, who spent five full seasons with the Oilers, from 1982-83 to '86-87. "We used to call [the tablets] 'rattlers.' [He'd say,] 'Anybody want a rattler?'"
http://www.cbc.ca/story/sports/natio...ook050321.html

Quote:
Tough guy says stimulants a problem for hockey
WebPosted Mon, 21 Mar 2005 14:56:52 EST
CBC Sports

While the media spotlight has focused squarely on the use of steroids in baseball, a former NHL tough guy says hockey has its own doping problem.

Dave Morissette, who played a handful of games for the Montreal Canadiens during the 1999-2000 season, claims the use of stimulants is rampant in hockey.

Morissette alleges hockey players abuse ephedrine-based, over-the-counter drugs such as Sudafed and Ripped Fuel in a book by journalist Mathias Brunet. Mémoires d'un Dur à Cuire (Memories of an Enforcer), which chronicles the tough guy's 12-year hockey career, hit the shelves Monday.
http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/2004/0904/bents.htm

Quote:
Ephedrine, Pseudoephedrine, and Amphetamine Prevalence in College Hockey Players

Most Report Performance-Enhancing Use

Lt Col Robert T. Bents, MD; Maj John M. Tokish, MD; Linn Goldberg, MD

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 32 - NO. 9 - SEPTEMBER 2004

..

RESULTS: More than half (58%) of the 122 college hockey players who completed the survey reported past or present use of the specific stimulants. Almost half (46%) reported pseudoephedrine use to enhance performance, including 24% who indicated current use, and 38% reported ephedrine use, including 11% who admitted current use. Stimulant users had good knowledge about the potential side effects of ephedrine, including sudden death, hypertension, and insomnia. Nearly all (92%) stimulant users were aware of the current NCAA ban of ephedrine. Over 33% stated they would use a banned substance if it would help them get to the National Hockey League.
No, I don't have a hard time beleiving Pounds 1/3 estimate.
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=259211

Quote:
Originally Posted by kdb209
Quote:
There were no positive drug tests among the 1,406 administered under the NHL's new anti-doping program, which targets steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs but not stimulants.
...
The NHL did not test for the drugs on WADA's list of banned substances that are prohibited only during competition, such as stimulants. Some cold remedies that contain stimulants, such as ephedrine, are suspected to be widely used by hockey players.
Sudafed - hockey's dirty little (but very well known) secret. Popped like candy in NHL locker rooms.

And it's not like hockey is the only sport where athletes used uppers. Just look at the Jason Grimsley revelations in MLB - before there was testing for amphetamines, clubhouses had coffee urns marks leaded & unleaded - with and without uppers.

kdb209 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
09-21-2009, 03:06 PM
  #5
SJeasy
Registered User
 
SJeasy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: San Jose
Country: United States
Posts: 11,820
vCash: 500
Lots of interesting stuff. Although I am sure they are/have been abused, epinephrine and pseudoephedrine have a use as a vasoconstrictor (stops or slows bleeding). Epinephrine is found in many of the local anesthetics that dentists use for dental work, just for its vasoconstrictive properties. Wonder what they are supposed to do for that emergency dental work between periods?

I did run into an instance where my child was tested. At the time, caffeine was on the banned substances list. Some of the listed items are very pervasive and in this instance, avoiding caffeine before the test was difficult.

IMO, there needs to be some balance in the testing where there is some recognition of the pervasiveness of some of these drugs and recognition for legitimate uses of the same.

SJeasy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-21-2009, 05:54 PM
  #6
Poignant Discussion
I tell it like it is
 
Poignant Discussion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Gatineau, QC
Country: Canada
Posts: 6,752
vCash: 1400
Send a message via MSN to Poignant Discussion Send a message via Yahoo to Poignant Discussion
Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan124 View Post
Sorry, but this list is a total joke. The effect from sudafed is likely largely placebo, it's not like players are doing lines of coke before games (anymore, THEO).
I think you are completely wrong, maybe read up a little on the subject and get back to us when you are more educated on the matter

Poignant Discussion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-21-2009, 06:24 PM
  #7
kdb209
Global Moderator
 
kdb209's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 12,169
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Titan124 View Post
Sorry, but this list is a total joke. The effect from sudafed is likely largely placebo, it's not like players are doing lines of coke before games (anymore, THEO).
You do know that the active ingredient in real Sudafed (pseudoephedrine) is an ingredient used in making Meth, and that in some states (Oregon) is available only by prescription and that there are federal limits on the quantity purchased (and pharmacies are required to get ID for you to purchase it) - but I guess you're right it's only a placebo. What do those Meth dealers know anyway?

kdb209 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
12-22-2011, 04:24 PM
  #8
sbtatter
Registered User
 
sbtatter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,153
vCash: 500
Does anyone know if weed is on the banned substance list for NHL'rs?

sbtatter is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:14 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.