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Old
10-07-2009, 12:41 AM
  #1
hemsky88
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Slapshots

Am i the only one here who can't slapshot to save his life? I swear i've seen crappier players then me who aren't good skaters and puck handling but they are able to slap the puck and i've been practicing but still no luck. Its quite frustrating since it limits my options . Any tips? I've watched many youtube videos on it but its just not working.

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10-07-2009, 12:50 AM
  #2
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Originally Posted by hemsky88 View Post
Am i the only one here who can't slapshot to save his life? I swear i've seen crappier players then me who aren't good skaters and puck handling but they are able to slap the puck and i've been practicing but still no luck. Its quite frustrating since it limits my options . Any tips? I've watched many youtube videos on it but its just not working.
Slapshots are about body and arm rhythm. Strength comes from the legs, hips and back. Lean into it.

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10-07-2009, 03:14 AM
  #3
night-timer
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Just keep practicing. I hardly ever do slapshots in games, yet I know guys who line up a whole bunch of pucks during practice and hit one after another slapshots at the goalie.

Practicing slapshots that way is not ideal, in my opinion. The player is standing still, lining up the puck, then looking up at the goalie, then looking back down at the puck, getting everything perfect, and then letting rip.

Does it ever happen that way in a game?

Maybe in golf.

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10-07-2009, 05:07 AM
  #4
nullterm
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As don said, lean into it. And rotate your body through so your chest turns toward the target and your stick ends up pointing where you want the puck.

Make sure you drop your weight DOWN into the ice, not through the puck along the ice, almost like you're trying to punch down with your bottom hand. And make sure your blade impacts the ice a few inches behind the puck, not right next of it. Do it right, then your stick does most of the work for you because it flexes and then whips the puck forward.

I'm bad for this, make sure the blade hits the puck about one quarter of the way from the heel to the toe. So closer to the heel, where the blade is flatter. If it's closer to the toe you'll waffle.

As for accuracy, well I think that comes down to repetition.

And if all else fails, stick with wrist and snap shots. Not as dynamic, but more accurate and will score you alot more goals.

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10-07-2009, 08:05 AM
  #5
jbennardo
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I've always been of the opinion to use the shot that gets it on net or goes where you want it to. I've seen guys that can slap a ton, but it goes high or 30 feet wide. Make the goalie play it. Just a thought...

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10-07-2009, 08:57 AM
  #6
pfloyd75
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Slapshots are overrated. As a goalie I would rather face a slapshot than a good snapper or wrist shot.

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10-07-2009, 09:58 AM
  #7
SouthpawTRK
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Great recommendations to this topic by fellow board members on slap shot techniques! I too am lacking with the slap shot department. I know that my technique is poor, but with the tips that I've read on this thread, talking to other players and lots of practice; I'm determined to have a respectable slapper. My biggest problem right now with the slap shot is getting some height on the puck; usually it's a little below knee height. The other problem is getting enough power to shoot from greater distances. I've seen guys at my local rink that smoke slap shots from the blue line and hit the twine right below the top bar (that's my long term goal). I realize that slap shots are not always effective as a good wrist shot or snap shot, but I still would like to have it be in my wheelhouse.

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10-07-2009, 10:16 AM
  #8
jbennardo
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I agree Southpaw. While I may favor a certain shot type, I'd never exclude anything from my skill set.

Regarding technique, so many new players think that it's all upper body strength. They don't know how to address the puck correctly - skate through the shot and (as others have mentioned) transfer weight/power through the hips. Some people are so freakishly strong that even without all that they still manage to get a good shot off

I will definitely be re-reading some of the tips for myself and so I can pass them on to others. You can always learn something!

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10-07-2009, 10:37 AM
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pfloyd75 View Post
Slapshots are overrated. As a goalie I would rather face a slapshot than a good snapper or wrist shot.

I think that matters what level your playing at. If your playing a lower level where guys wind up and swing mightily but barely move the puck then yeah I agree with you. But guys who can actually shoot you would think would be a different story. I'm not a goalie and never have been so mabye I'm way off base here. It just seems that wrist and snapshots are alot easier to telegraph where the shot is going just by watching the player's eyes/windup. Slapshots explode off the stick and I would think would be alot harder to predict where they are going because alot of time the player has no idea where it's going.

I'm a believer that if you have time and a lane from the point you should take a slapper. It just has much more velocity and unpredictability than other shots. To me it produces more rebounds as well.

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10-07-2009, 10:54 AM
  #10
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Yeah, a good slapshot is about being able to get it off more than it is about speed. I can get mine off from either foot and with barely any windup. But I understand a goalie loving a guy that has to set his weight and fully wind.

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10-07-2009, 10:57 AM
  #11
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You sure about this? I've always felt the slapshot is the easiest shot by far. Find someone who skates with you that has a good slapshot and emulate them. Then practice.

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10-07-2009, 12:05 PM
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hemsky88 View Post
Am i the only one here who can't slapshot to save his life? I swear i've seen crappier players then me who aren't good skaters and puck handling but they are able to slap the puck and i've been practicing but still no luck. Its quite frustrating since it limits my options . Any tips? I've watched many youtube videos on it but its just not working.
Slapshots are all leg drive and weight transfer (mechanics).

Arm strength has not much to do with it honestly, we have all seen little guys that have a great slapshot as well as big guys that do. I am a big guy with a great slapshot that breaks some plexi every year.

Blade patterns don't matter, stick brands don't matter etc.

This is a video I made about my healing bicep, I am not shooting as hard as I can. If I can do this with a WOOD cheap $7 clearanced stick like you see in the video AND with a not yet healed bicep tear ANYONE can shoot a slapshot if they work at it.

I prefer this setup in the backyard. This was my first day shooting pucks after tearing the bicep 2 months prior. I can shoot normally now but have not made a new video so this was all I had on the Youtube account. The last 4 or 5 shots I let up a bit because I felt a twinge in the injury and was pushing it a bit too soon.

Maybe you can pick up something from it or maybe not, it isn't an instructional video or anything but whatev. Good luck anyway .... just shoot puck after puck. John Leclair who played in the NHL for a while and had a great shot said in an interview that he shot tennis ball after tennis ball growing up at the back of a barn.


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10-07-2009, 01:45 PM
  #13
NigelSPNKr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Slapshots are all leg drive and weight transfer (mechanics).

Arm strength has not much to do with it honestly, we have all seen little guys that have a great slapshot as well as big guys that do. I am a big guy with a great slapshot that breaks some plexi every year.

Blade patterns don't matter, stick brands don't matter etc.

This is a video I made about my healing bicep, I am not shooting as hard as I can. If I can do this with a WOOD cheap $7 clearanced stick like you see in the video AND with a not yet healed bicep tear ANYONE can shoot a slapshot if they work at it.

I prefer this setup in the backyard. This was my first day shooting pucks after tearing the bicep 2 months prior. I can shoot normally now but have not made a new video so this was all I had on the Youtube account. The last 4 or 5 shots I let up a bit because I felt a twinge in the injury and was pushing it a bit too soon.

Maybe you can pick up something from it or maybe not, it isn't an instructional video or anything but whatev. Good luck anyway .... just shoot puck after puck. John Leclair who played in the NHL for a while and had a great shot said in an interview that he shot tennis ball after tennis ball growing up at the back of a barn.

Looks like a skinner Lou Ferrigno taking slappers

Dont think anyone has touched on this yet, you got to hit the ice with your blade. Just enough to load, dont go crazy and bust your stick.

I find heel curves allow me to get off a good slapper with less effort then a toe or a big mid.

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10-07-2009, 02:04 PM
  #14
jbennardo
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The only thing I got from that video is, "why don't I have that set-up in my back yard"



Seriously, good stuff though.

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10-07-2009, 03:49 PM
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As a beer leaguer with a pretty good slapshot, I'd say the most important thing is the transfer of weight from your back leg to your front leg. This assume that you have the time and space to take a proper slapshot.

It's more about form than strength. Al MacInnis was far from the biggest or strongest guy (6'0, 180 IIRC).

That being said, it certainly doesn't hurt to have upper body strength.

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10-07-2009, 04:09 PM
  #16
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If you do get the slapper down and use it often buy a two-piece and be prepared to break your blades...alot....atleast thats how it seems to goe for me =[

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10-07-2009, 04:17 PM
  #17
Serenity19
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Also, pay close attention to where the puck is in relation to his body in Hockeyfan68's video. There's a sweet spot, and most people who are learning line up the puck poorly. Also, make sure you have the correct lie on your stick for taking slapshots, as well as the proper stick length. Remember that when you lean into a shot, you are actually shorter than when you are standing up. Other than that, the other suggestions in this thread are really good.

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10-07-2009, 04:31 PM
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Cripes, that's a wicked slapper.

I have a decent off-ice slapshot (for a lower level player) but I can't get it off on the ice. It hurts me big time when I'm playing defense. What's weird (or not) is that my one-timers are better than my slapshots.

I have admittedly spent most of my time on my snapshot, slapshot, and backhander.

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10-07-2009, 05:31 PM
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TheSandman
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I think getting height on slapshots has to do with getting some flex in that stick (hitting the ice with your blade an inch or so behind the puck) and where on your stick blade the puck is at the point of contact (closer to the tip will get it higher, closer to the heel keeps it lower).

Also, sometimes it helps me to aim the stick blade towards that top corner.

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10-07-2009, 06:01 PM
  #20
IniNew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by night-timer View Post
Just keep practicing. I hardly ever do slapshots in games, yet I know guys who line up a whole bunch of pucks during practice and hit one after another slapshots at the goalie.

Practicing slapshots that way is not ideal, in my opinion. The player is standing still, lining up the puck, then looking up at the goalie, then looking back down at the puck, getting everything perfect, and then letting rip.

Does it ever happen that way in a game?

Maybe in golf.
This is true after you've mastered the technique behind the slapshot. If you can't do it to begin with, then practicing one timers is going to lead to nothing but frustration.

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10-07-2009, 06:48 PM
  #21
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This is true after you've mastered the technique behind the slapshot. If you can't do it to begin with, then practicing one timers is going to lead to nothing but frustration.
I also could do one-timers well before slappers. It's very rare apparently?

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10-07-2009, 07:04 PM
  #22
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Originally Posted by pfloyd75 View Post
Slapshots are overrated. As a goalie I would rather face a slapshot than a good snapper or wrist shot.
I'm a goalie as well and agree 100%.

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10-07-2009, 07:29 PM
  #23
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If you look at Hainsey's legs, they basically do what everyone is saying...just a helluva lot better than I can do



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10-07-2009, 07:58 PM
  #24
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
Cripes, that's a wicked slapper.

I have a decent off-ice slapshot (for a lower level player) but I can't get it off on the ice. It hurts me big time when I'm playing defense. What's weird (or not) is that my one-timers are better than my slapshots.

I have admittedly spent most of my time on my snapshot, slapshot, and backhander.
Well if it matters to anyone I work on my wristers a lot because they are mediocre, they are decent but nothing exceptional .... seems everyone has ONE good shot and the rest are always being worked on.

Sounds like you would do very well with the wristers and stuff, better than I with them probably.

I have a good snap shot and shoot it on the wrong leg like Messier did.

I certainly am not a gifted hockey player but love to play as much as other guys who are really good. I am a checking line type, heavy shot and no hands.

We rule it because we work hard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serenity19 View Post
Also, pay close attention to where the puck is in relation to his body in Hockeyfan68's video. There's a sweet spot, and most people who are learning line up the puck poorly. Also, make sure you have the correct lie on your stick for taking slapshots, as well as the proper stick length. Remember that when you lean into a shot, you are actually shorter than when you are standing up. Other than that, the other suggestions in this thread are really good.
You are pretty observant, I have a couple of wrong LIE blades I bought on clearance for cheap as backups. I use a 6 LIE or a 5.5 .... a 5 and i catch too much toe which adds a slight wobble in shots.

LIE is THE most important thing for shooting a good slapshot honestly. I can still shoot decently with the wrong LIE but I can feel I am not sweet spotting it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrydanish View Post
If you do get the slapper down and use it often buy a two-piece and be prepared to break your blades...alot....atleast thats how it seems to goe for me =[
I will have to disagree with this statement. I rarely break a stick blade and use 2 piece sticks ... if one uses wood they will make a puck pocket which cracks into the blade but composites are solid and should not break a lot on you. Obviously they do break once in a while but for the most part they are made well now and not like the earlier ones from a few short years ago where guys would check their blade with a flex test after every shot or stolen hard pass.

I play at least twice a week in the summer and more in the winter and have broken ONE RBK prostock blade since december when I switched to composites. I broke mine one a onetimer that I caught too much of the toe on and it was a knuckle type shot because the puck was fluttering on edge.

I am a very firm believer that if one is breaking blades a lot they are either shooting poorly, using junk or they have the wrong setup like their stick is too short or the wrong LIE.

One very common thing youngsters do is buy a 100 flex stick and then cut a foot (or whatever) off of it so their flex is ridiculously high. Almost always they will break the blade up by the hosel if a two piece or where the heel is or not far above it with a one piece as the stick is not flexing to absorb the energy.

I say youngsters not to be derrogatory towards youth, I mean that grownups do not have to cut their sticks so short like smaller teens do.

Think of it as when a baseball player breaks a bat because they caught the pitch on the end of the bat or on the handle. The bat does not flex enough to absorb the energy tranfer and the bat breaks.

Composite sticks today are all pretty much good enough to rarely break with normal use .... the guy who slashes your shaft though is another story


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 10-07-2009 at 08:14 PM.
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Old
10-07-2009, 08:20 PM
  #25
Hockeyfan68
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If you look at Hainsey's legs, they basically do what everyone is saying...just a helluva lot better than I can do


That is a great video ... I wish I could still do that. I lost a bit of my shot now being over 40 years old.

I hate to admit it but it is true, I remember when I would shoot around 100 (never speed gunned it so I do not know) and I am probably around 80+ to 90ish now. It hurts to admit it trust me and honestly I did not have to but felt the need to.

I remember one time in warmups around 1990 I took a shot and three teamates laughed and joked about my shot with comments like "ridiculous" or 'man, uneblievable do it again". While I still get the look from others that want to see what I am using because it is a good shot it is not what it used to be. I still chuckle at the looking to see what I use because it honestly doesn't matter much the video I posted above is one of those cheap plywood shaft type CCM cheapies with Joe Thorton's name on it I bought for $7 on clearance at a Walmart. Also got a pair of CCM 492Tacks gloves for $9 that were $30 so go figure on Walmart even having hockey stuff.

Hey what can you do about getting old really. Someday i won't even be able to shoot one so I will enjoy it now I guess.

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