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Composite vs. Wood: A two-stick setup

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Old
10-23-2009, 05:40 PM
  #26
Tuggy
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I have wood.

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Old
10-23-2009, 05:43 PM
  #27
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My assumption was right though.

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Old
10-23-2009, 05:45 PM
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parineum View Post
Agreed. I'm certainly not advocating a switch but I do think that it wouldn't be a as hard as some people seem to believe. I think that they are thinking what it would be like for them to do that in the middle of a game right now but these players would presumably be practicing that way.

Like switching from a wedge to an iron...

But, like I said, I think composite sticks are not just an advantage in the shooting department but also on defense.
Have you done it? That's not a change you make in game. Even if you practice with both extensively, there is still a little awkwardness when switching from one to the other. Like was said before, it's certainly not something you would want to do in a crucial moment in a game.

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Old
10-23-2009, 05:54 PM
  #29
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composite sticks are lighter, better for shooting, and in my opinion easier to control than wooden sticks

however i do wonder why certainb players don't learn to play with multiple styles of sticks

for instance tobias enstrom uses a very long stick to extend his reach and make up for his lack of size but then he can barely take a shot on the powerplay. seems like using a shorter version of the same stick he normally uses during the powerply only could rectify this situation.

as someone who isn't nearly good enough at any aspect of hockey to appreciate how minor differences can affect your shot i'm sure this is actually much harder to do than it sounds. generally as long as it's a left-handed stick i can use it. but i guess these guys get very used to their sticks after using the same style for their whole careers and just don't like to change anything about them

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Old
10-23-2009, 06:08 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
Composite sticks are superior in every way to wood.
Puck feel with particular wood sticks can't be beat, though.

Other then puck feel and durability, comps are superior, agreed.

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Old
10-23-2009, 06:33 PM
  #31
Zih
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I've never played hockey, but from what I understand...

Wood sticks degrade rather rapidly and must be frequently replaced, but they almost never break catastrophically when you least expect it. Composite sticks retain their properties for longer than wooden sticks, but when they break they break catastrophically while you're on the ice.

So while composite sticks will last longer than wooden sticks, the wooden sticks don't break on you in the middle of play.

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Old
10-23-2009, 07:56 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
Composite sticks are superior in every way to wood.
wrong.

one of the common misconceptions is that your slap shot will be better with a composite stick. Wood sticks actually are better for slap shots in terms of velocity because it will flex throughout the entire shaft. The majority of comps don't flex very well at the top of the shaft.

it's science!

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Old
10-23-2009, 09:18 PM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
wrong.

one of the common misconceptions is that your slap shot will be better with a composite stick. Wood sticks actually are better for slap shots in terms of velocity because it will flex throughout the entire shaft. The majority of comps don't flex very well at the top of the shaft.

it's science!
With a stiff flex or xstiff flex there is more potential for power then the flex of wood.

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Old
10-23-2009, 09:22 PM
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SupersonicMonkey View Post
Puck feel with particular wood sticks can't be beat, though.

Other then puck feel and durability, comps are superior, agreed.
The biggest problem with wood is that it gets soft, depending how much you play/how many shots you take, this could happen quite fast. It is hard to tell if woodies are less durable, because usually the stick becomes a back up or useless before it breaks. Blades on woodies get mangled pretty quick too it you play frequently.

I will break more OPS then woodies, but i will go through more woodies then OPS over a season.

The only thing i perfer woodies for is the feel of the puck.

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Old
10-23-2009, 10:46 PM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
wrong.


Puck feel is more of a personal thing. I don't feel the puck any better when I use my two piece with a wood blade. Then again I never played past high school so maybe I'm not the best judge. Either way, the pros seem to have made their choice.

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Old
10-23-2009, 10:53 PM
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zih View Post
I've never played hockey, but from what I understand...

Wood sticks degrade rather rapidly and must be frequently replaced, but they almost never break catastrophically when you least expect it. Composite sticks retain their properties for longer than wooden sticks, but when they break they break catastrophically while you're on the ice.

So while composite sticks will last longer than wooden sticks, the wooden sticks don't break on you in the middle of play.
Well, I still have 8 wooden sticks from almost 8 to 10 years ago (they were in steady rotation at the time) that still work well, whereas I have broken 3 of the TPS onepiecers since the beginning of last season (just coaching, btw). I like how light they are, but the onepiecers are garbage imo.

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Old
10-23-2009, 10:57 PM
  #37
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Not to sound like a dick, but if you've been using the same wooden sticks for a decade, you probably don't have much of a shot. Otherwise, you'd notice how your wood sticks no longer have a kick.

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Old
10-23-2009, 11:01 PM
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post
Not to sound like a dick, but if you've been using the same wooden sticks for a decade, you probably don't have much of a shot. Otherwise, you'd notice how your wood sticks no longer have a kick.
They're still more than serviceable. I haven't played that regularly in the last 10 years after graduating university, so each stick has pretty "low mileage" I guess you could say. But somehow I kept collecting sticks. Started using the one piecers while coaching/playing for the past 5 years in Japan (obviously didn't bring any of my sticks with me), came back and tried a couple of my old wooden ones last month. They're not too bad.

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Old
10-23-2009, 11:03 PM
  #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohashi_Jouzu View Post
They're still more than serviceable. I haven't played that regularly in the last 10 years after graduating university, each stick has pretty "low mileage" I guess you could say. But somehow I kept collecting sticks. Started using the one piecers while coaching/playing for the past 5 years in Japan, came back and tried a couple of my old wooden ones last month. They're not too bad.
I see. I'm a bit of a priss when it comes to my stick so if everything isn't in order my shot will suffer. Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks.

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Old
10-23-2009, 11:11 PM
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohashi_Jouzu View Post
Well, I still have 8 wooden sticks from almost 8 to 10 years ago (they were in steady rotation at the time) that still work well, whereas I have broken 3 of the TPS onepiecers since the beginning of last season (just coaching, btw). I like how light they are, but the onepiecers are garbage imo.
Which TPS "onepiecers" ?

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Old
10-23-2009, 11:48 PM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
Which TPS "onepiecers" ?
I broke a Tkachuk R8 playing recently, and 2 of the Nash R4s coaching/playing (don't know why I like those slight heel curves. Have since the blue fibreglass Christians way back). Lower end, I know, but again, I was mostly coaching and hardly ever playing.

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Old
10-23-2009, 11:54 PM
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohashi_Jouzu View Post
I broke a Tkachuk R8 playing recently, and 2 of the Nash R4s coaching/playing (don't know why I like those slight heel curves. Have since the blue fibreglass Christians way back). Lower end, I know, but again, I was mostly coaching and hardly ever playing.

R4 is a decent stick, awesome back up.

All my Nash curves were mid-toe

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Old
10-24-2009, 02:22 AM
  #43
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Originally Posted by Islander102 View Post
Anyone who says that woods are better OR more durable than composites has never played hockey. Pretty much the only way to break a composite is to slash it in half, which will either snap it right there, or fracture it so that on the next shot it snaps. If that doesnt happen you can take about 500 slepshots with it, and on shot #501 it will still feel like new. With a wood stick after about 20 shots for a normal person, and about 5 for an NHL player, the blade softens, and the stick develops internal fractures, and even though to the naked eye it looks the same, the stick is for all intents and purposes useless on the ice. The only reason people say that composites break more, is because when a composite breaks, it explodes, and when a wood stick loses its shelf life of about 10 minutes of NHL ice time, only the player using the stick notices.

And this doesnt even include the advantages in terms of weight, puck control, puck feel, quicker release, and higher accuracy that composite sticks have over wood. And not by a smidge either, by a mile.
Hahaha... I don't even know what exactly to say to this. I've had teammates leave the ice pissed because their composite stick broke within the first 30 minutes of using it on the ice.

You are like a god damn marketer for composite sticks or something. Both have their disadvantages. Saying that a wood stick is "for all intents and purposes useless on the ice" after 20 shots for a "normal person" is ****ing moronic. Also, puck control, puck feel,and higher accuracy? I don't think you have ever actually used a wooden stick in your life.

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Old
10-24-2009, 02:41 AM
  #44
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Originally Posted by FootKnight View Post
Hahaha... I don't even know what exactly to say to this. I've had teammates leave the ice pissed because their composite stick broke within the first 30 minutes of using it on the ice.

You are like a god damn marketer for composite sticks or something. Both have their disadvantages. Saying that a wood stick is "for all intents and purposes useless on the ice" after 20 shots for a "normal person" is ****ing moronic. Also, puck control, puck feel,and higher accuracy? I don't think you have ever actually used a wooden stick in your life.
I probably can really load maybe 50-60ish times before the stick is garbage.


Wood is better then low end OPS, Mid to High end OPS is better then wood. I love wood sticks but its just the way it is.

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Old
10-24-2009, 02:55 AM
  #45
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Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
I probably can really load maybe 50-60ish times before the stick is garbage.


Wood is better then low end OPS, Mid to High end OPS is better then wood. I love wood sticks but its just the way it is.
No doubt that a composite will be better than woody, there's a reason they are more expensive, but 20 shots and it's completely useless on the ice? Please... they work for a lot longer than that. Yes, they wear down and yes, they will lose some feel, but it seemed like that guy was trying to say that woodies are complete garbage and won't even make a shot after a single warm-up session for a beer-leaguer or something. Woodies work for a long time. They'll lose a bit after a while, but they don't become ****ing firewood after 20 shots.

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Old
10-24-2009, 03:14 AM
  #46
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smyth still uses a wood stick with no curve. How many other NHL'ers still use wood?

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10-24-2009, 03:38 AM
  #47
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i liked it when Aucoin was with the Flames, every year he won the hardest shot in the skills competition. then he'd grab a mic and tell the crowd that his wooden stick cost $20 at Canadian Tire, which got a loud cheer from all the hockey parents in attendance

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10-24-2009, 03:58 AM
  #48
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Originally Posted by lcarnegie View Post
smyth still uses a wood stick with no curve. How many other NHL'ers still use wood?

As far as i know Spezza was the last player to use wood, and it was just the blade. Smyth just uses/used a wood blade.

2007ish there were 18 players using wood (full sticks or blades).

2008 there were 10 guys i think? Most with just wood blades

Stastny actually might still, he was one of the last wood users (full stick)


Last edited by CanadaBacon: 10-24-2009 at 04:15 AM.
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Old
10-24-2009, 04:04 AM
  #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FootKnight View Post
No doubt that a composite will be better than woody, there's a reason they are more expensive, but 20 shots and it's completely useless on the ice? Please... they work for a lot longer than that. Yes, they wear down and yes, they will lose some feel, but it seemed like that guy was trying to say that woodies are complete garbage and won't even make a shot after a single warm-up session for a beer-leaguer or something. Woodies work for a long time. They'll lose a bit after a while, but they don't become ****ing firewood after 20 shots.

Unless you are really loading the s*** out of em. Like i mean really loading them. I agree 20 shots is not accurate. Not everybody loads every shot either, hell, some people dont really even load. Its the loading that kills the stick not the shot itself.

A wood will last me 3-4 (5-6 at the most) games before it is a noodle. Maybe 8ishgames till the blade is mangled. But not everyone is the same, im really hard on my shaft ( ) each game. Some people could get 10-20-30 games before it loses its flex. Its all about what works for the individual using the product.

Me personally, it saves me money getting 2 or 3 (usually only go through 2 TPS R10's a season) top end OPS a season then 15ish woodies (between league, shinny, buddies renting the ice etc etc)

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Old
10-24-2009, 02:06 PM
  #50
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Personally these wood vs composite threads are annoying after the first 5 of them.

Wood loses every time .... the guys who play know this.

I am 41 and am taking a second to speak to my fellow old people.

Give it up ... wood sucks. It splits, absorbs water, loses flex from normal use (gets rubbery), the blade gets "puck pocket" from shooting.

Composites .... none of this happens and the composite stick lasts literally 1,000% longer (or more) than wood. It stays performing like NEW until it eventually breaks a year or two after you buy it. This is much cheaper than wood sticks that do not last very long (if you know how to shoot that is).

yes it can be slashed and broken ( hasn't happened to me yet in one year since switching and playing 2 times a week or more) .... so can wood. How many times did a guy you faced off against step on your WOOD blade on purpose to break it so you were stuck out there stickless while killing a penalty? Ever snap a shaft in half on a faceoff with wood? YUP!

Basically though the performance of composite materials completely belittles wood sticks.

Wood after all is natural organic material subject to the luck of draw on whether or not the wood grain will hold up or not. Composites .... you get the same stick every time.

Okay seriously though just use your noggin even if you have never played hockey to figure this stuff out on your own okay?

Golf .... they no longer use wood for a reason.
baseball ... they no longer use wood unless it is MLB ball and people who worry about stats and nostalgia of the game refuse to allow wood bats to be replaced but all agree there are other materials SUPERIOR than wood that would inflate stats if allowed.

I mean seriously people just use common sense about this issue.

NHL guys break many sticks for different reasons, some recurve their sticks by heating them up anyway even though they get them with their patterns already ... well because they are strange people.

Ovechkin breaks a lot of them because he uses a whippier low flex too low for his strength and body weight. he doesn't care cuzz he has a million of them on the bench. Phil Kessel is another one who does that.

But in any case some people will argue this into eternity.

I was a wood proponent who bashed composites .... until I actually used them and actually saw what they offer when compared to wood. The sweetspot is way better when shooting with composites and the feeling when launching a great onetimer is no where near what you get from wood sticks.

If you set up your stick properly with the correct LIE, length and flex for your body weight you will NOT be breaking sticks all over the place. You need to know how to shoot for one thing and well ... honestly if you shoot like ass just use a wood stick because you won't reap the benefits of a composite anyway other than passing feels better using a lighter stick.

Well whatev .... this is bludgeoning the ignorant with this post response and honestly I doubt anyone will read it and change their mind .... so buy a composite stick and try one out for yourself for a few sessions.


Last edited by Hockeyfan68: 10-24-2009 at 02:12 PM.
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