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Old
11-09-2009, 12:24 PM
  #1
alphahelix
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Shot Blocking

Apparently, Quinn specifically tells some of our players not to go down to block shots. This is a stark contrast from the prior regime. Anyone else have a problem with this? I have seen a few times this year where shots have been allowed through by players opting to scarecrow as opposed to block (as they would have in previous years), allowing the puck through and resulting in a rebound goal against. Shot blocking works.

Thoughts?

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11-09-2009, 12:40 PM
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Stoneman89
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Shot blocking can be a skewed stat at best. If a guy, or a team is crappy at clearing the puck, or spends a lot of time in their end because of these reasons, a player can block a lot of shots by default (puck hitting him) or be forced to block more than others due to these inefficencies. Say hello to Steve Staois.

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Old
11-09-2009, 06:04 PM
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nullterm
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Depends on who the "some" that he is telling.

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Old
11-09-2009, 06:05 PM
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sync
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when you are going to down to block it with your face...yeah, you should probably rethink that.

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Old
11-09-2009, 06:11 PM
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Valic
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The way I interpreted the Quinn comments were not nessesarily he was against blocking shots, he was against blocking shots with your face exposed. The comments about Moreau seemed to be more directed this his constant uneffective defensive plays and coverage, ie diving down before the shot is even close to commited to.

Also, I don't want my two defenceman on the ice blocking shots, they are best served playing an opposition players body infront of the net and being ready for rebounds. Forwards on the other hands should be the ones that actually go down to block a shot.

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Old
11-09-2009, 06:21 PM
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoneman89 View Post
Shot blocking can be a skewed stat at best. If a guy, or a team is crappy at clearing the puck, or spends a lot of time in their end because of these reasons, a player can block a lot of shots by default (puck hitting him) or be forced to block more than others due to these inefficencies. Say hello to Steve Staois.
Gilbert leads us in blocked shots, thus your stat definition is correct.

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Old
11-09-2009, 06:32 PM
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alphahelix View Post
Apparently, Quinn specifically tells some of our players not to go down to block shots. This is a stark contrast from the prior regime. Anyone else have a problem with this? I have seen a few times this year where shots have been allowed through by players opting to scarecrow as opposed to block (as they would have in previous years), allowing the puck through and resulting in a rebound goal against. Shot blocking works.

Thoughts?
He doesn't like it because it takes players out of the play when they lay down. I can't say that I like it but I don't mind it.

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Old
11-09-2009, 06:50 PM
  #8
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Seems to me this might be a timing message as well.

When half your team is out for injury or alledgedly suffering the flu it doesn't seem the best of times to be shot blocking which regardless how well its done still exposes one to potential injuries and/or banged up legs and subsequent missed shifts shaking off owies...

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11-09-2009, 07:27 PM
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Everest
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There are many things I AGREE with Don Cherry on but one thing I do not agree with him on is his classic rant about getting sticks in the way of shots.

Contrary to what Don says...the stick IS the best anti-shot weapon a skater has. Not your body.

I prefer to see defenders take a passive angle on an attacking play...mirroring the puck handlers stick as close as possible while tracking with constant skating.

This enables the defender to tip or deflect shots & passes without having to 'freeze' his skating direction.

Obviously there are times when a full body block is there for the taking & its neccesary...but the best mind-set is this:



Shade the angle with your stick first...but continue to close on the puck (thus increasing the amount of angle your body will eliminate as you close in).

A sliding block should be used only in emergency situations...because it DOES take a player off the play.

I know some people will say stick blocking is as much a problem as it is a solution...but I'm telling you right now...thats a myth!

With strong positioning, eye-hand touch and timing...the stick stops way more passes AND shots than skates or shin pads ever will.

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Old
11-09-2009, 09:34 PM
  #10
thadd
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If you don't know how to block shots properly, don't do it.

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Old
11-09-2009, 10:39 PM
  #11
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This was the main thing I noticed right at the beginning of the season...I would watch entire games and see an Oiler go down to block a shot maybe once or twice in a game, if at all.

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Old
11-10-2009, 11:11 AM
  #12
Tedi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
There are many things I AGREE with Don Cherry on but one thing I do not agree with him on is his classic rant about getting sticks in the way of shots.

Contrary to what Don says...the stick IS the best anti-shot weapon a skater has. Not your body.

I prefer to see defenders take a passive angle on an attacking play...mirroring the puck handlers stick as close as possible while tracking with constant skating.

This enables the defender to tip or deflect shots & passes without having to 'freeze' his skating direction.

Obviously there are times when a full body block is there for the taking & its neccesary...but the best mind-set is this:



Shade the angle with your stick first...but continue to close on the puck (thus increasing the amount of angle your body will eliminate as you close in).

A sliding block should be used only in emergency situations...because it DOES take a player off the play.

I know some people will say stick blocking is as much a problem as it is a solution...but I'm telling you right now...thats a myth!

With strong positioning, eye-hand touch and timing...the stick stops way more passes AND shots than skates or shin pads ever will.
Don't know many goalies do you. I will agree that if a stick can be put in early to deflect or hinder a shot then by all means go for it. Trying to stop the puck with your stick while the shot is enroute to the net is a bad play and should be avoided by dmen. And I also disagree that a stick can stop more pucks than shin pads and your skates combined. A sliding shot block is very effective at taking away point shots when done correctly.

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Old
11-10-2009, 11:38 AM
  #13
OILW30
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Originally Posted by sync View Post
when you are going to down to block it with your face...yeah, you should probably rethink that.
Unless your Shawn Horcoff and your doing it in a clutch playoff game...

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Old
11-10-2009, 11:40 AM
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valic View Post
The way I interpreted the Quinn comments were not nessesarily he was against blocking shots, he was against blocking shots with your face exposed.
No, he's said it several times since the beginning of the season. He just doesn't like guys going down to block shots. He thinks it takes you out of the play.

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Old
11-10-2009, 04:31 PM
  #15
Gord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
There are many things I AGREE with Don Cherry on but one thing I do not agree with him on is his classic rant about getting sticks in the way of shots.

Contrary to what Don says...the stick IS the best anti-shot weapon a skater has. Not your body.

I prefer to see defenders take a passive angle on an attacking play...mirroring the puck handlers stick as close as possible while tracking with constant skating.

This enables the defender to tip or deflect shots & passes without having to 'freeze' his skating direction.

Obviously there are times when a full body block is there for the taking & its neccesary...but the best mind-set is this:



Shade the angle with your stick first...but continue to close on the puck (thus increasing the amount of angle your body will eliminate as you close in).

A sliding block should be used only in emergency situations...because it DOES take a player off the play.

I know some people will say stick blocking is as much a problem as it is a solution...but I'm telling you right now...thats a myth!

With strong positioning, eye-hand touch and timing...the stick stops way more passes AND shots than skates or shin pads ever will.
and how many goals against do we have because of a stick block as opposed to a proper block or letting the goalie clearly see the shot? quite a few so far I think, that have cost us points.

I do agree about the useless flopping that takes a player out of the play.

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Old
11-10-2009, 04:41 PM
  #16
Everest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gord View Post
and how many goals against do we have because of a stick block as opposed to a proper block or letting the goalie clearly see the shot? quite a few so far I think, that have cost us points.

I do agree about the useless flopping that takes a player out of the play.
We seem to have a penchant for blocking shots right in front of the goalie and the puck drops into a forest of feet & sticks...its those types of shots that our forwards need to be taking away by tipping them up & out of play or into the corner.

Its a subject that you have to avoid generalizing with... players need to have a strong intuition because every shot is different.

It comes down to being able to think a step ahead of the puck...and thats NOT something this team has been doing.

If a winger or a D-man makes the right read...the shot blocks are easier...but if 3 or 4 guys are all watching the puck instead of reading where the puck is about to go...then shot blocks are futile no matter what technique your trying to use.

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Old
11-10-2009, 04:44 PM
  #17
Everest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedi View Post
Don't know many goalies do you. I will agree that if a stick can be put in early to deflect or hinder a shot then by all means go for it. Trying to stop the puck with your stick while the shot is enroute to the net is a bad play and should be avoided by dmen. And I also disagree that a stick can stop more pucks than shin pads and your skates combined. A sliding shot block is very effective at taking away point shots when done correctly.

Im not taking about reaching into mid-air & trying to swat a shot down. I'm talking about jamming the stick right onto the release point of the shot so it goes into row 19.

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Old
11-10-2009, 04:45 PM
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
There are many things I AGREE with Don Cherry on but one thing I do not agree with him on is his classic rant about getting sticks in the way of shots.

Contrary to what Don says...the stick IS the best anti-shot weapon a skater has. Not your body.

I prefer to see defenders take a passive angle on an attacking play...mirroring the puck handlers stick as close as possible while tracking with constant skating.

This enables the defender to tip or deflect shots & passes without having to 'freeze' his skating direction.

Obviously there are times when a full body block is there for the taking & its neccesary...but the best mind-set is this:



Shade the angle with your stick first...but continue to close on the puck (thus increasing the amount of angle your body will eliminate as you close in).

A sliding block should be used only in emergency situations...because it DOES take a player off the play.

I know some people will say stick blocking is as much a problem as it is a solution...but I'm telling you right now...thats a myth!

With strong positioning, eye-hand touch and timing...the stick stops way more passes AND shots than skates or shin pads ever will.
i kinda disagree a lot with you, passive play isn't strong play. exhibit A, the edmonton oilers. we are always so passive and we've been a very poor defensive team. getting in the faces of the opposition is much more effective than a passive stick, this isn't mens league hockey with no body checking

second, slide blocking is the most effective form of blocking when done correctly, and i agree with a posters comments from above that mentioned that blocking with your face, or laying down before the shot is being taken is not effective slide blocking.

now the one thing i do agree on, is that slide blocking should be used sparingly, if you're able to get into the shooting lanes and go directly at the puck/stick vs the player, you'll have a very strong chance at blocking with your shinpads, but its not nearly as effective as the slide block when done correctly

just my 2 bits

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Old
11-10-2009, 04:53 PM
  #19
Everest
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Originally Posted by Live Breathe Hockey View Post
i kinda disagree a lot with you, passive play isn't strong play. exhibit A, the edmonton oilers. we are always so passive and we've been a very poor defensive team. getting in the faces of the opposition is much more effective than a passive stick, this isn't mens league hockey with no body checking

second, slide blocking is the most effective form of blocking when done correctly, and i agree with a posters comments from above that mentioned that blocking with your face, or laying down before the shot is being taken is not effective slide blocking.

now the one thing i do agree on, is that slide blocking should be used sparingly, if you're able to get into the shooting lanes and go directly at the puck/stick vs the player, you'll have a very strong chance at blocking with your shinpads, but its not nearly as effective as the slide block when done correctly

just my 2 bits
I have no idea what a 'passive' stick is. The stick is intended to be used on the puck.

I think 'pasive play' is idling in a condensed area of the D-zone and waiting for the puck to be shot into you.

Active sticks and good defending come wingers from getting out...AWAY...from the scoring so the shots are taken under closeing pressure as much as possible.

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Old
11-10-2009, 06:15 PM
  #20
Gord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everest View Post
We seem to have a penchant for blocking shots right in front of the goalie and the puck drops into a forest of feet & sticks...its those types of shots that our forwards need to be taking away by tipping them up & out of play or into the corner.

Its a subject that you have to avoid generalizing with... players need to have a strong intuition because every shot is different.

It comes down to being able to think a step ahead of the puck...and thats NOT something this team has been doing.

If a winger or a D-man makes the right read...the shot blocks are easier...but if 3 or 4 guys are all watching the puck instead of reading where the puck is about to go...then shot blocks are futile no matter what technique your trying to use.

cool, man.
you do make good points.

I guess I just see all the time the lazy wave at the puck with the stick causing bad deflections for the goalie as the oilers often seem to be standing still or chasing ghosts.

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