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Old
11-11-2009, 01:17 AM
  #1
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OT: Remembrance Day...

In Flanders Fields
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/flanders.htm

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11-11-2009, 01:24 AM
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We actually had to say that prior to Rememberance Day when I went to school. The poem was written on a big paper and pasted on the door.

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11-11-2009, 01:24 AM
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I could not honor their sacrifice as well as the following:

http://www.youtube.com/user/Veterans.../5/FEa9Y6G8QtU

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/general/

...

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11-11-2009, 01:31 AM
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nvan97
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This is from an e-mail I received from a friend a few years back. Stand up, show respect and remember the sacrifice and nobility of the Canadian Military.


This is from a British newspaper, funny how it took someone in
England to put it into words...

Sunday Telegraph Article

From today's UK wires: Salute to a brave and modest nation Kevin Myers, The Sunday Telegraph

LONDON - Until the deaths last week of four Canadian soldiers accidentally killed by a U.S. warplane in Afghanistan, probably almost no one outside their home country had been aware that Canadian
troops were deployed in the region. And as always, Canada will now bury its dead, just as the rest of the world as always will forget its
sacrifice, just as it always forgets nearly everything Canada ever does. It seems that Canada's historic mission is to come to the
selfless aid both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored. Canada is the perpetual wallflower that stands on the edge of the hall, waiting for someone to come and ask her for a dance. A fire breaks out, she risks life and limb to rescue her fellow dance-goers, and suffers serious injuries. But when the hall is repaired and the dancing resumes, there is Canada, the wallflower still, while those she once helped glamorously cavort across the floor, blithely neglecting her yet again. That is the price Canada pays for sharing the North American continent with the United States, and for being a selfless friend of Britain in two global conflicts. For much of the 20th century, Canada was torn in two different directions: It seemed to be a part of the old world, yet had an address in the new one, and that divided identity ensured that it never fully got the gratitude it deserved. Yet its purely voluntary contribution to the cause of freedom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any democracy. Almost 10% of Canada's entire population of seven million people served in the armed forces during the First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great Allied victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops, perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order of battle. Canada was repaid for its enormous sacrifice by downright neglect, its unique contribution to victory being absorbed into the popular Memory as somehow or other the work of the "British." The Second World War provided a re-run. The Canadian navy began the war with a half dozen vessels, and ended up policing nearly half of the Atlantic against U-boat attack. More than 120 Canadian warships participated in the Normandy landings, during which 15,000 Canadian soldiers went ashore on D-Day alone. Canada finished the war with the third-largest navy and the fourth-largest air force in the world. The world thanked Canada with the same sublime indifference as it had the previous time. Canadian participation in the war was acknowledged in film only if it was necessary to give an American actor a part in a campaign in which the United States had clearly not participated - a touching scrupulousness which, of ourse, Hollywood has since abandoned, as it has any notion of a separate Canadian identity.
So it is a general rule that actors and filmmakers arriving in Hollywood keep their nationality - unless, that is, they are Canadian.
Thus Mary Pickford, Walter Huston, Donald Sutherland, Michael J.Fox,
William Shatner, Norman Jewison, David Cronenberg, Alex Trebek, Art Linkletter and Dan Aykroyd have in the popular perception become American, and Christopher Plummer, British. It is as if, in the very act of becoming famous, a Canadian ceases to be Canadian, unless she is Margaret Atwood, who is as unshakably Canadian as a moose, or Celine Dion, for whom Canada has proved quite unable to find any takers. Moreover, Canada is every bit as querulously alert to the achievements of its sons and daughters as the rest of the world is completely unaware of them. The Canadians proudly say of themselves -and are unheard by anyone else - that 1% of the world's population has provided 10% of the world's peacekeeping forces. Canadian soldiers in the past half century have been the greatest peacekeepers on Earth - in 39 missions on UN mandates, and six on non-UN peacekeeping duties, from Vietnam to East Timor, from Sinai to Bosnia. Yet the only foreign engagement that has entered the popular on-Canadian imagination was the sorry affair in Somalia, in which out-of-control paratroopers murdered two Somali infiltrators. Their regiment was then disbanded in disgrace - a uniquely Canadian act of self-abasement for which, naturally, the Canadians received no international credit. So who today in the United States knows about the stoic and selfless friendship its northern neighbour has given it in Afghanistan? Rather like Cyrano de Bergerac, Canada repeatedly does honourable things for honourable motives, but instead of being thanked for it, it remains something of a figure of fun. It is the Canadian way, for which Canadians should be proud, yet such honour comes at a high cost. This week, four more grieving Canadian families knew that cost all too tragically well.

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11-11-2009, 01:32 AM
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11-11-2009, 01:37 AM
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Happy Remembrance Day!!


Last edited by Rin: 11-11-2009 at 01:43 AM.
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Old
11-11-2009, 01:45 AM
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Most Canadians have no idea the freedoms we have due to the fluke of being born in the land of plenty...

Nor appreciate the sacrifice our soldiers (and family) have given to make the world a better place.


Until the day I die, I will remain in awe of those who gave their life for others........

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11-11-2009, 04:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nvan97 View Post
This is from an e-mail I received from a friend a few years back. Stand up, show respect and remember the sacrifice and nobility of the Canadian Military.


This is from a British newspaper, funny how it took someone in
England to put it into words...

Sunday Telegraph Article

From today's UK wires: Salute to a brave and modest nation Kevin Myers, The Sunday Telegraph

LONDON - Until the deaths last week of four Canadian soldiers accidentally killed by a U.S. warplane in Afghanistan, probably almost no one outside their home country had been aware that Canadian
troops were deployed in the region. And as always, Canada will now bury its dead, just as the rest of the world as always will forget its
sacrifice, just as it always forgets nearly everything Canada ever does. It seems that Canada's historic mission is to come to the
selfless aid both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored. Canada is the perpetual wallflower that stands on the edge of the hall, waiting for someone to come and ask her for a dance. A fire breaks out, she risks life and limb to rescue her fellow dance-goers, and suffers serious injuries. But when the hall is repaired and the dancing resumes, there is Canada, the wallflower still, while those she once helped glamorously cavort across the floor, blithely neglecting her yet again. That is the price Canada pays for sharing the North American continent with the United States, and for being a selfless friend of Britain in two global conflicts. For much of the 20th century, Canada was torn in two different directions: It seemed to be a part of the old world, yet had an address in the new one, and that divided identity ensured that it never fully got the gratitude it deserved. Yet its purely voluntary contribution to the cause of freedom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any democracy. Almost 10% of Canada's entire population of seven million people served in the armed forces during the First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great Allied victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops, perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order of battle. Canada was repaid for its enormous sacrifice by downright neglect, its unique contribution to victory being absorbed into the popular Memory as somehow or other the work of the "British." The Second World War provided a re-run. The Canadian navy began the war with a half dozen vessels, and ended up policing nearly half of the Atlantic against U-boat attack. More than 120 Canadian warships participated in the Normandy landings, during which 15,000 Canadian soldiers went ashore on D-Day alone. Canada finished the war with the third-largest navy and the fourth-largest air force in the world. The world thanked Canada with the same sublime indifference as it had the previous time. Canadian participation in the war was acknowledged in film only if it was necessary to give an American actor a part in a campaign in which the United States had clearly not participated - a touching scrupulousness which, of ourse, Hollywood has since abandoned, as it has any notion of a separate Canadian identity.
So it is a general rule that actors and filmmakers arriving in Hollywood keep their nationality - unless, that is, they are Canadian.
Thus Mary Pickford, Walter Huston, Donald Sutherland, Michael J.Fox,
William Shatner, Norman Jewison, David Cronenberg, Alex Trebek, Art Linkletter and Dan Aykroyd have in the popular perception become American, and Christopher Plummer, British. It is as if, in the very act of becoming famous, a Canadian ceases to be Canadian, unless she is Margaret Atwood, who is as unshakably Canadian as a moose, or Celine Dion, for whom Canada has proved quite unable to find any takers. Moreover, Canada is every bit as querulously alert to the achievements of its sons and daughters as the rest of the world is completely unaware of them. The Canadians proudly say of themselves -and are unheard by anyone else - that 1% of the world's population has provided 10% of the world's peacekeeping forces. Canadian soldiers in the past half century have been the greatest peacekeepers on Earth - in 39 missions on UN mandates, and six on non-UN peacekeeping duties, from Vietnam to East Timor, from Sinai to Bosnia. Yet the only foreign engagement that has entered the popular on-Canadian imagination was the sorry affair in Somalia, in which out-of-control paratroopers murdered two Somali infiltrators. Their regiment was then disbanded in disgrace - a uniquely Canadian act of self-abasement for which, naturally, the Canadians received no international credit. So who today in the United States knows about the stoic and selfless friendship its northern neighbour has given it in Afghanistan? Rather like Cyrano de Bergerac, Canada repeatedly does honourable things for honourable motives, but instead of being thanked for it, it remains something of a figure of fun. It is the Canadian way, for which Canadians should be proud, yet such honour comes at a high cost. This week, four more grieving Canadian families knew that cost all too tragically well.
As a Canadian living in London I am amazed at how a few the legit papers actualy brings up what Canada does.

About a year ago--they compared how Canadians react to when their soldiers die and how the UK does.

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Old
11-11-2009, 05:41 AM
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I quote Rommel

Give me British Officers
Canadian Troops
And American Supplies
And he claims he would have conquered the world.

My Dad spent 4 years in Europe during World War II, fighting for $40.00 a month, of which he would send $20.00 home. He rarely spoke about the war, but every Remembrance Day, he'd sit up to watch the late news, and the special about the war on CBC. Funny how a guy remembers those things.

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11-11-2009, 06:26 AM
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Happy Remembrance Day!!
is it supposed to be?

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11-11-2009, 06:31 AM
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For me it's remembering True Courage, Lest We Forget.

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11-11-2009, 08:49 AM
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Lest We Forget...Always Remember

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11-11-2009, 08:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nvan97 View Post
This is from an e-mail I received from a friend a few years back. Stand up, show respect and remember the sacrifice and nobility of the Canadian Military.


This is from a British newspaper, funny how it took someone in
England to put it into words...

Sunday Telegraph Article

From today's UK wires: Salute to a brave and modest nation Kevin Myers, The Sunday Telegraph

LONDON - Until the deaths last week of four Canadian soldiers accidentally killed by a U.S. warplane in Afghanistan, probably almost no one outside their home country had been aware that Canadian
troops were deployed in the region. And as always, Canada will now bury its dead, just as the rest of the world as always will forget its
sacrifice, just as it always forgets nearly everything Canada ever does. It seems that Canada's historic mission is to come to the
selfless aid both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored. Canada is the perpetual wallflower that stands on the edge of the hall, waiting for someone to come and ask her for a dance. A fire breaks out, she risks life and limb to rescue her fellow dance-goers, and suffers serious injuries. But when the hall is repaired and the dancing resumes, there is Canada, the wallflower still, while those she once helped glamorously cavort across the floor, blithely neglecting her yet again. That is the price Canada pays for sharing the North American continent with the United States, and for being a selfless friend of Britain in two global conflicts. For much of the 20th century, Canada was torn in two different directions: It seemed to be a part of the old world, yet had an address in the new one, and that divided identity ensured that it never fully got the gratitude it deserved. Yet its purely voluntary contribution to the cause of freedom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any democracy. Almost 10% of Canada's entire population of seven million people served in the armed forces during the First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great Allied victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops, perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order of battle. Canada was repaid for its enormous sacrifice by downright neglect, its unique contribution to victory being absorbed into the popular Memory as somehow or other the work of the "British." The Second World War provided a re-run. The Canadian navy began the war with a half dozen vessels, and ended up policing nearly half of the Atlantic against U-boat attack. More than 120 Canadian warships participated in the Normandy landings, during which 15,000 Canadian soldiers went ashore on D-Day alone. Canada finished the war with the third-largest navy and the fourth-largest air force in the world. The world thanked Canada with the same sublime indifference as it had the previous time. Canadian participation in the war was acknowledged in film only if it was necessary to give an American actor a part in a campaign in which the United States had clearly not participated - a touching scrupulousness which, of ourse, Hollywood has since abandoned, as it has any notion of a separate Canadian identity.
So it is a general rule that actors and filmmakers arriving in Hollywood keep their nationality - unless, that is, they are Canadian.
Thus Mary Pickford, Walter Huston, Donald Sutherland, Michael J.Fox,
William Shatner, Norman Jewison, David Cronenberg, Alex Trebek, Art Linkletter and Dan Aykroyd have in the popular perception become American, and Christopher Plummer, British. It is as if, in the very act of becoming famous, a Canadian ceases to be Canadian, unless she is Margaret Atwood, who is as unshakably Canadian as a moose, or Celine Dion, for whom Canada has proved quite unable to find any takers. Moreover, Canada is every bit as querulously alert to the achievements of its sons and daughters as the rest of the world is completely unaware of them. The Canadians proudly say of themselves -and are unheard by anyone else - that 1% of the world's population has provided 10% of the world's peacekeeping forces. Canadian soldiers in the past half century have been the greatest peacekeepers on Earth - in 39 missions on UN mandates, and six on non-UN peacekeeping duties, from Vietnam to East Timor, from Sinai to Bosnia. Yet the only foreign engagement that has entered the popular on-Canadian imagination was the sorry affair in Somalia, in which out-of-control paratroopers murdered two Somali infiltrators. Their regiment was then disbanded in disgrace - a uniquely Canadian act of self-abasement for which, naturally, the Canadians received no international credit. So who today in the United States knows about the stoic and selfless friendship its northern neighbour has given it in Afghanistan? Rather like Cyrano de Bergerac, Canada repeatedly does honourable things for honourable motives, but instead of being thanked for it, it remains something of a figure of fun. It is the Canadian way, for which Canadians should be proud, yet such honour comes at a high cost. This week, four more grieving Canadian families knew that cost all too tragically well.
That, is a good read. Canada does stand for so much more than just hockey, but lets face it, hockey is our outlet, for what we stand for. Thats why were passionate about it, and thats why Canadians always stand up when were needed. To all our war vets, past and present, thank you for the way of life I enjoy. Little do we realize just how much the vets really did give up, and how much soldiers today are giving up. Unless your in the military, you can never really know. But we should all appreciate.

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11-11-2009, 09:14 AM
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I live in the States and many cars/trucks have ribbons on them saying "Support Our Troops". I put one on my car and very intelligent friends of mine who are Americans asked what troops I was supporting and what Canada was doing in all this. I could not believe they did not even know what Canada was doing to fulfill our NATO promises.....

No offense meant to my American friends but Canada does get very little respect.

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11-11-2009, 09:24 AM
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11-11-2009, 09:50 AM
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I live in the States and many cars/trucks have ribbons on them saying "Support Our Troops". I put one on my car and very intelligent friends of mine who are Americans asked what troops I was supporting and what Canada was doing in all this. I could not believe they did not even know what Canada was doing to fulfill our NATO promises.....

No offense meant to my American friends but Canada does get very little respect.
That's why, as an American, I wear a Poppy to commemorate what Canada has contributed and sacrificed...It is sad that many Americans don't know/care about our neighbour to the North.

Count me as an "AmerCanadian"

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11-11-2009, 09:52 AM
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It is unfortunate how little the younger generations know about the sacrifices and heroic gestures this country has made over the years. We are taught about them but for some reason don't seem to truly hear. I've been guilty of this myself. These men and women, past and present deserve our sincere respect and gratitude. Thanks for everything.

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11-11-2009, 10:09 AM
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It is unfortunate how little the younger generations know about the sacrifices and heroic gestures this country has made over the years. We are taught about them but for some reason don't seem to truly hear. I've been guilty of this myself. These men and women, past and present deserve our sincere respect and gratitude. Thanks for everything.
TORONTO -- At least eight out of 10 Canadians believe that all elementary and high schools should be legally required to hold Remembrance Day ceremonies annually, a poll says.

The VoxPop Remembrance Day study by Marketing Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA), which governs Canada's survey research industry, polled 1,002 Canadian adults last week and found Canadians feel strongly about the importance of Remembrance Day.

According to the poll, 87% of Canadians believe schools should be mandated to observe Remembrance Day.

The number is even higher for foreign-born Canadians -- 91% of whom said schools should be obligated to mark Nov. 11.

As well, 78% of the respondents said they wear a poppy to remember Canada's war dead, 67% said they regularly observe a minute of silence on Remembrance Day, and 47% said they make an effort to personally attend a ceremony.

"A striking finding is that Canadians strongly believe that young people and immigrants to Canada should be educated about Canada's military history and our veterans' defence of democracy as a key preserver of our freedom," added Brendan Wycks, executive director of MRIA.

"Almost 9-in-10 Canadians -- 87% -- believe that educators should do more to teach Canada's military history in schools. And 84% of respondents, including 83% not born in Canada, think our military history should be taught in the course given to immigrants seeking citizenship."

A total of 72% of respondents said the stretch of Hwy. 401 between CFB Trenton and Toronto, named the Highway of Heroes to commemorate the Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan, is an important symbol of recognition for Canada's war dead.

http://www.calgarysun.com/news/canad...94471-sun.html

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11-11-2009, 10:10 AM
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I'm tearing up watching this ceremony...I've never felt so proud, even though I am not yet Canadian

This is why I studied the history.

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11-11-2009, 10:24 AM
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Great thread.

Lest we forget.

I am truly proud of the sacrifices that were made many generations ago and the ones that are still made today. Whether or not you agree with any such "war" going on we have the lives that we have today because of the fallen women and men.

Eventhough my work has made me come in today, I will be taking a minute of silence at 11:00 today to honour the fallen.

Long live the poppy.

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11-11-2009, 10:38 AM
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I'm tearing up watching this ceremony...I've never felt so proud, even though I am not yet Canadian

This is why I studied the history.
I'm watching the History Channel... They are showing an interesting perspective on Vimy Ridge....

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11-11-2009, 10:40 AM
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I'm watching the History Channel... They are showing an interesting perspective on Vimy Ridge....
There were many epic battles fought and led by the Canadian forces. But Vimmy Ridge is probably the one that I will never forget. It is truly a peice of history that makes me proud to be a Canadian.

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11-11-2009, 10:46 AM
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I could not honor their sacrifice as well as the following:

http://www.youtube.com/user/Veterans.../5/FEa9Y6G8QtU

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/general/

...
http://remember.sympatico.ca/home.html

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Old
11-11-2009, 10:49 AM
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There were many epic battles fought and led by the Canadian forces. But Vimmy Ridge is probably the one that I will never forget. It is truly a peice of history that makes me proud to be a Canadian.
"The historical reality of the battle has been reworked and reinterpreted in a conscious attempt to give purpose and meaning to an event that came to symbolize Canada's coming of age as a nation."

It's part of the Founding Mythos of our Great Nation, it makes me very proud as well. All Volunteers remember, fought for what they thought was right. True Courage.

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11-11-2009, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Live Breathe Hockey View Post
TORONTO -- At least eight out of 10 Canadians believe that all elementary and high schools should be legally required to hold Remembrance Day ceremonies annually, a poll says.

The VoxPop Remembrance Day study by Marketing Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA), which governs Canada's survey research industry, polled 1,002 Canadian adults last week and found Canadians feel strongly about the importance of Remembrance Day.

According to the poll, 87% of Canadians believe schools should be mandated to observe Remembrance Day.

The number is even higher for foreign-born Canadians -- 91% of whom said schools should be obligated to mark Nov. 11.

As well, 78% of the respondents said they wear a poppy to remember Canada's war dead, 67% said they regularly observe a minute of silence on Remembrance Day, and 47% said they make an effort to personally attend a ceremony.

"A striking finding is that Canadians strongly believe that young people and immigrants to Canada should be educated about Canada's military history and our veterans' defence of democracy as a key preserver of our freedom," added Brendan Wycks, executive director of MRIA.

"Almost 9-in-10 Canadians -- 87% -- believe that educators should do more to teach Canada's military history in schools. And 84% of respondents, including 83% not born in Canada, think our military history should be taught in the course given to immigrants seeking citizenship."

A total of 72% of respondents said the stretch of Hwy. 401 between CFB Trenton and Toronto, named the Highway of Heroes to commemorate the Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan, is an important symbol of recognition for Canada's war dead.

http://www.calgarysun.com/news/canad...94471-sun.html
This is obviously something this nation feels strongly about and hopefully our education systems nation wide try to do a little more to get students educated and involved.

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