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All-Time Draft #12, Part VI

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Old
11-15-2009, 01:40 AM
  #201
seventieslord
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Riley Hern, G



- 5'9, 170 lbs
- Member of the HHOF
- Stanley Cup (1907, 1908, 1910)
- Four Other League Titles (1902-WPHL, 1904-USPro, 1905-IHL, 1906-IHL)
- Five-Time Postseason All-Star (1902-WPHL, 1905-INL, 1906-IHL, 1907-ECAHA, 1909-ECAHA)
- Led his league in GAA six times (1904-US/World Pro, 1905-IHL, 1907-ECAHA, 1909-ECAHA)
- 97-43-2 in 142 recorded regular season pro games (3.88 GAA)
- 10-4 in 14 Stanley Cup Games (3.86 GAA)

If you consider leading your league in GAA, being an all-star, or winning the Stanley Cup or league championship a "significant" season, then Hern had 8 significant seasons in 9 years from 1902-1910!

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Hern turned pro with the Pittsburgh Keystones of the Western Pennsylvania Hockey League in the 1901-02 season and led the league with nine victories in 14 games as the Keystones took the WPHL title. Hern's play was recognized in his selection to the league's First All-Star Team that year. The following season he led the league again, this time in losses, recording only one victory while losing ten!

He moved on to play the next two seasons with Houghton-Portage Lakes of the International Hockey League, leading them to the league title in both years as well as earning a First Team All-Star selection in 1905 and a Second Team All-Star selection the following season. Hern began the 1906-07 season with the Montreal Wanderers and would lead the Redbands to the Stanley Cup in four of the next five seasons before his retirement in 1911.

Riley Hern was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
One of the earliest superstar goalies, a player who won seven championships in his first nine seasons of hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Signed by the Montreal Wanderers in 1906-07, Hern is often credited for the team winning their first Stanley Cup championship that season. The Wanderers went on to repeat their victory in 1908 and 1919 with Riley tending the net.
Hern's GAA vs. the League Average in top-level play

Hern played 7 full seasons at the top levels (IHL, ECAHA, ECHA, NHA) - aside from his last season at age 32, he was always well ahead of the pack in GAA:

Year League Hern Avg Diff
1905 IHL 3.54 4.12 -14%
1906 IHL 3.46 4.73 -27%
1907 ECAHA 3.94 7.53 -48%
1908 ECAHA 5.12 6.77 -24%
1909 ECHA 5.03 6.9 -27%
1910 NHA 3.42 6.47 -47%
1911 NHA 5.43 5.12 6%
Totals (Weighted) 4.17 5.57 -25%

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Old
11-15-2009, 02:48 AM
  #202
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Peter McNab, F



- 6'3, 210 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1975, 1977, 1978)
- Top-20 in goals 4 times (7th, 8th, 17th, 18th)
- Top-20 in points 3 times (11th, 16th, 18th)
- Top-10 in playoff goals twice (4th, 10th)
- 2nd in Playoff assists (1978)
- 4th in Playoff points (1978)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Centre Peter McNab was blessed with quick hands and a natural feel for the game, which enabled him to play over 950 NHL games during the 1970s and '80s. A consistent producer, the 6'3" centre reached the 20-goal mark ten times in an exemplary career... He recorded a pair of 20-goal seasons for the Sabres and helped them reach the Stanley Cup finals in 1975... McNab enjoyed nearly nine full years in Beantown. He hit the 40-goal mark twice and was a key figure on the power play. His ability to hold his position in the slot and score his share of "garbage" goals was similar to former Bruins star Phil Esposito. During the late '70s, he formed an excellent forward unit with Terry O'Reilly and Rick Middleton and helped Boston reach the finals in 1977 and 1978.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
Scored 35 goals or more in 6 consecutive seasons... was a force on the power play...made the playoffs 10 seasons in a row...
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Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
Dedicated and likeable... a solid forward.
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Originally Posted by Punch Imlach: Heaven and Hell in the NHL
Although the exchange seemed fairly equal at the time, it did not turn out well for Buffalo. Savard is a strong hockey player but McNab is a fine natural goal scorer, as he has proven ever since.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeydraftcentral.com
Finished third in Boston Three-Stars Award voting for 1976-77. ... Finished second in Boston Three-Stars Award voting for 1977-78, 1978-79 and 1980-81

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Old
11-15-2009, 03:07 AM
  #203
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Wade Redden, D



- 6'2", 209 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1997)
- 5th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th in Norris voting
- 6th, 9th, 10th, 11th in All-star voting
- World Cup Champion (2004)
- Played in NHL All-star Game (2002)
- Top-15 in points by defensemen 4 times (10th, 11th, 12th, 13th)
- NHL +/- Leader (2006)
- Career adjusted +111
- 13 Points in 34 Games with Team Canada (WEC, WC, Olympics)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
The Loydminster, Saskatchewan native emerged as one of the top all-around defenceman in the NHL, posting a career high 47 points during the 2000-01 season and continues to be a leader on the ice leader with the Sens.

Following the NHL lockout of 2004-05 the Senators re-signed the defenceman. Over the next three seasons, Redden would anchor the club's blueline and contribute offensively. In 2006-07, Redden and the Senators came within three wins of capturing the Stanley Cup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
He proved himself a true young star in the league and a player the Senators would need if they were going to win in the playoffs. Big, tough, and unflappable, Redden led the defense by example. He never panicked and never tried to do too much. The result was that he became a natural team leader.
Quote:
Originally Posted by THN
Plays with ice water in his veins and never gets rattled. Is extremely durable, a good skater and fine passer. Owns an accurate point shot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by canoe.ca
McCrimmon describes Redden as unassuming and modest; a player who doesn't impress with flashiness but wows with poise under pressure.

"His panic point is very low," he explained. "He makes the right decisions under pressure, and makes it look easy."

Team captain Daniel Alfredsson describes Redden as a quiet, funny guy who likes his privacy but always shows up with a smile.

"He's not the most vocal guy, but he really leads by example. He's got the respect of all the guys," he said. "He mingles with everyone and goes to dinner with different people. I don't think he's a very good cook, so I don't think he eats at home very much."

Coach ******* ****** says Redden has earned that respect from his teammates with character, values and commitment to the game. He plays smart, is a tremendous passer and understands hockey; but there's maybe room for more aggression.

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Old
11-15-2009, 03:13 AM
  #204
Dreakmur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Wade Redden, D
"Big, tough, and unflappable".... Really?

Redden is one of the softest players I have ever seen.

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Old
11-15-2009, 03:44 AM
  #205
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreakmur View Post
"Big, tough, and unflappable".... Really?

Redden is one of the softest players I have ever seen.
It's a quiet toughness...

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11-15-2009, 03:48 AM
  #206
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
It's a quiet toughness...
He's quietly as tough as Tomas Kaberle.

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11-15-2009, 04:05 AM
  #207
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreakmur View Post
He's quietly as tough as Tomas Kaberle.
You can't be serious.

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Old
11-15-2009, 04:11 AM
  #208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
You can't be serious.
He probably pulled the shoot more often than Kaberle does....

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Old
11-15-2009, 05:35 AM
  #209
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreakmur View Post
He's quietly as tough as Tomas Kaberle.
Is that more or less tough than a wet paper bag with noodles in it?

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Old
11-15-2009, 10:58 AM
  #210
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luckily my d has plenty of toughness so kaberle can cocnetrate on offense from the blueline with utilizing his breakout speed and superior puck possession skills while also executing pin point tape to tape passes to break our speedsters our of our teams end deep into territory where puckhounds like to roam

BTW He is the leading defensive point getter this season so far!


Last edited by Leaf Lander: 11-16-2009 at 01:47 AM.
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Old
11-15-2009, 04:29 PM
  #211
seventieslord
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Redden is not tough in the "punishing hitter/fighter" style. "Tough" may even be taking it too far - but if one of my favourite sources says that, who am I to argue? Redden is not A Kaberle-style softie. He covers the front of the net much better. He will take the body when needed. He blocks shots twice as often and is credited with about 20% more hits than kaberle usually is. You don't reach the level Redden did (top-10 defenseman in the world) for as long as he did (5 years) if you're a big softie.

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11-15-2009, 04:43 PM
  #212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Redden is not tough in the "punishing hitter/fighter" style. "Tough" may even be taking it too far - but if one of my favourite sources says that, who am I to argue? Redden is not A Kaberle-style softie. He covers the front of the net much better. He will take the body when needed. He blocks shots twice as often and is credited with about 20% more hits than kaberle usually is. You don't reach the level Redden did (top-10 defenseman in the world) for as long as he did (5 years) if you're a big softie.
Redden in his prime never hesitated to go into the corner and take a hit to make a play, which may be the single biggest area where a defenceman needs to be tough. It's true that at times he relied on the stick where he should have taken the body, and he never went out of his way to make a hit, but for the most part I think he was tough enough.

His bigger weakness may be a lack of footspeed. This wasn't a big problem during the dead puck era where forwards could be hooked and held. It may hurt him more at this level.

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11-15-2009, 05:18 PM
  #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Redden is not tough in the "punishing hitter/fighter" style. "Tough" may even be taking it too far - but if one of my favourite sources says that, who am I to argue? Redden is not A Kaberle-style softie. He covers the front of the net much better. He will take the body when needed. He blocks shots twice as often and is credited with about 20% more hits than kaberle usually is. You don't reach the level Redden did (top-10 defenseman in the world) for as long as he did (5 years) if you're a big softie.
I would argue that Kaberle's been a top-10 defenseman over the last 5 years or so.....

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Old
11-15-2009, 11:06 PM
  #214
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Suggestion: That the deadline to submit votes for the regular season rankings be at 11:59 p.m. EST on Thursday, November 19.

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11-15-2009, 11:48 PM
  #215
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Originally Posted by God Bless Canada View Post
Suggestion: That the deadline to submit votes for the regular season rankings be at 11:59 p.m. EST on Thursday, November 19.
Does that give us enough to to assassinate everyone's teams?

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Old
11-15-2009, 11:50 PM
  #216
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Does that give us enough to to assassinate everyone's teams?
I'll be done Tuesday. Everybody isn't going to evaluate everyone's teams. But the draft finished last Thursday, so a week should be plenty of time to get a good grasp on the entries.

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11-16-2009, 01:32 AM
  #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Ryan Getzlaf View Post
I would argue that Kaberle's been a top-10 defenseman over the last 5 years or so.....
I might be tempted to agree, when I watch him carry the puck. But he just has too many holes in his game. He's submissive physically, he too often is seen right next to the guy who taps the puck in the Leaf net, playing him too softly.

He's so smooth with a puck, a great PP presence (now that he has finally learned how and when to shoot), and has this great knack for covering up his own puck mistakes when he makes them. (i.e. recovering the puck and making the correct decision the next time) - but he is too mediocre in his own end for me to say he's top-10, or that he's ever been. Overall package, though: close to top-10.

Despite his last few great seasons, he's only attained an 11th and 13th in Norris voting, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by God Bless Canada View Post
I'll be done Tuesday. Everybody isn't going to evaluate everyone's teams. But the draft finished last Thursday, so a week should be plenty of time to get a good grasp on the entries.
I want to do some reviews and I am sure some others do, too. Let's give it a few more days than that, provided the assassination thread is still moving along.

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11-16-2009, 02:35 AM
  #218
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Originally Posted by overpass View Post
Redden in his prime never hesitated to go into the corner and take a hit to make a play, which may be the single biggest area where a defenceman needs to be tough.
That's exactly what I was talking about..... Redden is terrified of getting hit.

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11-16-2009, 02:44 AM
  #219
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That's exactly what I was talking about..... Redden is terrified of getting hit.
Yes, I've seen that more recently. He didn't play scared when he was good.

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11-16-2009, 02:49 AM
  #220
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That's exactly what I was talking about..... Redden is terrified of getting hit.
Except what overpass said is that Redden didn't hesitate...

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Old
11-16-2009, 03:07 AM
  #221
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Except what overpass said is that Redden didn't hesitate...
Which is why I posted my opinion that he was wrong.....

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11-16-2009, 03:17 AM
  #222
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Originally Posted by Dreakmur View Post
Which is why I posted my opinion that he was wrong.....
I thought Redden was fine going into the corners in his prime.

He was excellent with his stick, and could use it to win the puck and put it on a teammates stick with deceptive ease. However, I thought he tended to rely on his stick a little too much and not use the body in puck battles, and many fans thought so too. That's where the "soft" tag originally got attached to him, but he was still very effective, IMO. He just could have been more effective if he was a bit tougher.

In the last three years, as his game has deteriorated, his lack of speed has become far more of a liability and he has definitely avoided physical play more. I agree with you that he's been soft over that time period, to the point of being a weak defensive player.

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11-16-2009, 03:35 AM
  #223
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Boris Mayorov, LW/RW



- 5'9", 160 lbs


Domestic:
- Member of Russian Hockey HOF
- Soviet League Champion (1962, 1967, 1969)
- Soviet League All-Star (1959, 1962, 1966*, 1967, 1968*, 1969*) *-2nd/3rd team
- Top-5 in Soviet League Scoring 7 Times (2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 5th)
- 255 Goals in 400 Soviet League Games

International:
- Member of the IIHF Hall Of Fame
- Olympic/WC Gold (1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968)
- Was Soviet National Team Captain (1963-1968)
- World Championship Top Forward (1961)
- 1st in scoring at 1961 Worlds, 2nd in 1964
- 30 goals, 32 assists, 62 points in 50 major international games (Starshinov had 48-20-68 in these games)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
captain Mayorov was key to six world championships for the Soviet Union in the 1960s, leading the tournament in scoring in '61 when he was named the tournament's best forward. He won the gold at both the '64 and '68 Olympics and played on a line with ******* ******* and Vyacheslav Starshinov.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings Of the Ice
The Starshinov line was distinguished by its synchronous actions and total reciprocal awareness. Boris played LW and the center slot was filled by Starshinov... Boris was able to end his career with the national team with dignity. Before the 1969 Worlds, he was straightforward at a meeting with his teammates, telling them honestly that due to injuries he would be unable to play at his best in all the games... Boris Mayorov was a natural-born leader, and Starshinov cited him as a prime mover and innovator.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings Of the Ice
Starshinov lost count of the goals he scored on passes from Boris Mayorov. These passes, according to Starshinov, were extremely opportune and proved totally unexpected for the opposition. His opponents were familiar with Mayorov's style of play, but somehow he always managed to fool them and alert Starshinov through a shared sixth sense when a pass was coming.
While being the best forward and scoring leader in the 1961 worlds, Boris found time to do something rather Canadian:

Quote:
Originally Posted by War on Ice
Dave Rusnell and Boris Mayorov drew fighting majors.


Last edited by seventieslord: 11-17-2009 at 08:00 PM.
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Old
11-16-2009, 12:23 PM
  #224
Dreakmur
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Originally Posted by overpass View Post
I thought Redden was fine going into the corners in his prime.

He was excellent with his stick, and could use it to win the puck and put it on a teammates stick with deceptive ease. However, I thought he tended to rely on his stick a little too much and not use the body in puck battles, and many fans thought so too. That's where the "soft" tag originally got attached to him, but he was still very effective, IMO. He just could have been more effective if he was a bit tougher.

In the last three years, as his game has deteriorated, his lack of speed has become far more of a liability and he has definitely avoided physical play more. I agree with you that he's been soft over that time period, to the point of being a weak defensive player.
I remember laughing at him when my Leafs kept beating the Senators in the play-offs. That was half the fun of watching those playoff matches!

Me and my old man would keep track of which Senators avoided the most hits, and Redden was usually among the leaders. Good times....

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11-16-2009, 04:02 PM
  #225
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Pete Peeters, G



- 6'1", 195 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1980)
- Canada Cup Champion (1984)
- Vezina Trophy (1983)
- NHL 1st All-Star Team (1983)
- Hart Trophy Runner-up (1983)
- Also 4th, 4th, 5th, 5th in All-Star Voting
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1980, 1981, 1983, 1984)
- Top-5 in sv% 5 times (2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 5th)
- Top-5 in Playoff sv% 4 times (1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th)
- 8th all-time in adjusted GAA - based on goalie's GAA vs. league average

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
To hear Pete Peeters speak is to hear the voice of a laid-back man who appreciated the sport of hockey but didn't always like the idea of it completely taking over his life.

...In 1979-80, the Flyers and their goaltender got so hot that they set a league record unbeaten streak of 35 games. By season's end Peeters and his mates went toe-to-toe with the powerful New York Islanders in the Cup finals only to lose out four games to two.

Peeters played two more seasons in Philly but found the experience to be less than satisfying. The club used a three-goalie system that reduced Peeters' ice time and put a form of pressure on him that he didn't like. In 1982, the Flyers found themselves in need of a solid blueliner while the Boston Bruins were desperate for a new backstopper. A deal was worked out that sent Peeters to Boston for Brad McCrimmon.

In Beantown, Peeters got all the ice time he could handle. He found the atmosphere to be sufficiently relaxed to bring out the best in his game. By season's end, he corralled the most wins (40) and a Vezina trophy as the league's top stopper. He was voted the second-most valuable player behind Wayne Gretzky and came within one game of tying his coach, Gerry Cheevers', record of 32 straight appearances without a loss.

After such a momentous season, it became difficult for Peeters to have any hope of topping his own standard. He performed for parts of three more seasons with the Bruins but gradually lost the razor-sharp edge he'd originally brought to town.

In late 1985, he was traded to the Washington Capitals where he continued to play solidly between the pipes, especially during the 1987-88 season when he led the league with a 2.78 goals-against average. In 1989-90, Peeters went full circle by returning to the Philadelphia Flyers where he rounded out his career in 1991.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
..The Flyers must have thought they had the second coming of Bernie Parent based on the way Peeters started that year. He went 22-0-5 before losing his first game of the season on February 19th!... Peeters finished the year with a record of 29-5-5 with a 2.73 GAA, earning him an All Star game nod.

In June 1982 the Flyers traded Peeters to Boston in exchange for stud defenseman Brad McCrimmon. Both teams fared well in the trade, especially Boston in that first season. Peeters had perhaps his best year, playing in a career high 62 games, posting an amazing record of 40-11-9 with 8 shutouts and a NHL best-of-the-decade 2.36 GAA. At one stretch he went 31 games without a loss. Not surprisingly Peeters was awarded the Vezina Trophy as top goalie and named to the NHL's First All Star Team. Almost as impressive was the fact that Peeters finished 2nd in the entire league in Hart Trophy voting as league MVP in a time when the award was basically owned by the great Wayne Gretzky.

Again Peeters was faced with the unenviable task of living up to his previous years performance. And again he would not be able to live up to the gaudy expectations. He played two more years in Beantown while his GAA inflated the numbers in the L column increased. Though his critics skepticism grew, he remained a top goalie in most minds in the NHL. He was invited to Team Canada for the 1984 Canada Cup, one of his greatest honours, but sprained his ankle. Still he was able to play in the final game against Sweden and clinch the championship. He was also the goalie in the dramatic 3-2 OT win against the Soviets. The game, considered by many to be one of the greatest of all time, was the highlight of his career.

...After a slow start to the 1985-86 season, Peeters was traded to the Washington Capitals in exchange for goaltender Pat Riggin. Obviously the Caps were counting on Peeters' track record of great performances when placed in a new environment, though that never really panned out in Washington. Instead Peeters supplied the Caps with solid but not spectacular goaltending for the next 5 seasons. But he was never able to find any playoff success with the Capitals either.

Peeters retired with 246 wins, 155 losses and 51 ties in 489 career games. He posted 21 career shutouts and had a career GAA of 3.08, a very respectable number for the high scoring 1980s... If you take the highlights of Pete Peeters' career, you could mistake him as one of the greatest goaltenders of all time. He had some great highs, such as 1979-80 in Philadelphia, 1982-83 in Boston and the 1984 Canada Cup. But because of his team's frequent failures in the playoffs and the fact he rarely played 2/3rds of the schedule like most top goalies, Peeters isn't really remembered as one of the top goalies of the 1980s that he actually was.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Greatest Moments and Players Of the Philadelphia Flyers
The goal won the Islanders their first Stanley Cup and sent the Flyers packing. But not Peeters. The Edmonton native had completed his first full season in Philadelphia and to suggest that he was outstanding would be an understatement.

His goaltending style was clean and efficient... he refined a puckhandling style to near perfection.

There are some in Philadelphia who still argue that Peeters was made the scapegoat for the upset under the orchestration of coach Bob McCammon. That was the spring during which McCammon had humorously alluded to the smaller Broadway Blueshirts as "smurfs". it enraged and inspired the New Yorkers, and Peeters was the most noticeable victim. In retrospect, Peeters once recalled in GOAL Magazine, "Mccammon didn't play me much toward the end of the season, Then he said that he would be sticking me into the playoffs. it was as if he was saying, 'Well, Pete, bring us to the Stanley Cup and you have a job. Otherwise, you're gone.'" And he was.

"The thing that always worked against me in terms of my Flyers career was that rookie season. My performance and my numbers were always compared to that year. When I fell back a bit it wasn't acceptable."

"Getting Peeters was the greatest trade Harry Sinden ever made", said then-Bruins coach Gerry Cheevers. "We couldn't ask for anything more than we got out of Pete. Even when he lets in a goal, it doesn't bother him."

Peeters' thoughts on goaltending: "When you're at the NHL level, it's a mental game. It's all confidence, and when your confidence is soaring, you don't think. you just react. That's the key for any goalie."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Park
Pete controlled the puck as well as the best of the goaltenders. He reminded me of Eddie Giacomin. He was the best at clearing the puck because he could shoot it the length of the ice and he could thread a needle when he cleared it. Plus, he was fearless. Eddie never thought there was a puck he couldn't get to first and clear. Pete was just like that. Plus he could skate well. He was very sure on his feet, even when he came out of the net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philadelphia Flyers Encyclopedia
Pete Peeters had stiff goaltending competition within the archives of Philadelphia hockey and still manages to stand out as one of the greats behind the mask.

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