HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Biomechanics of Ice Hockey Slap Shots: Which Stick Is Best?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
11-16-2009, 10:35 AM
  #1
Mathletic
Registered User
 
Mathletic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: St-Augustin, Québec
Country: Canada
Posts: 12,807
vCash: 500
Biomechanics of Ice Hockey Slap Shots: Which Stick Is Best?

http://www.thesportjournal.org/artic...ich-stick-best

Abstract

Cutting-edge technologies and space-age synthetics are dramatically recreating ice hockey sticks today. But how does current scholarship view these high-priced innovations, particularly during performance of the slap shot, hockey’s most explosive maneuver? This literature review on both slap shot biomechanics and technological developments in ice hockey sticks suggests that player technique and strength exert much greater influence on slap shot puck velocity than does stick composition. Moreover, this study illuminates how stick flexibility, rather than composition, should be the key mechanical consideration in stick selection, since highly flexible sticks can enhance both stick deflection and strain energy storage, two important variables in the velocity of slap shots.

Biomechanics of Ice Hockey Slap Shots: Which Stick Is Best?

At its historical core, hockey is a game rooted in the natural environment. First played on the frozen lakes and rivers of upper North America, ice hockey—begun as the Native American game of shinny—featured carved wooden poles as sticks and hand-sewn fabrics as balls (Oxendine, 1988). As Europeans took up the game, they applied their technologies to this traditional equipment, gradually yet substantially changing the hockey stick by constructing it out of multiple pieces of wood, curving the stick blade, and wrapping the stick in fiberglass and laminate plastics to increase its durability and performance (Pearsall, Montgomery, Rothsching, & Turcotte, 1999).

Now, however, burgeoning technologies are virtually recreating hockey sticks with each passing day. Wood sticks, once the paragon of the sport, have largely been replaced by high-tech—and high-priced—graphite and composite models. Because of the seeming popularity of these “one-piece” composite sticks amongst professional players, hordes of youth and high-school-age hockey participants are now outfitting themselves with these technological marvels, much to the delight of proliferating hockey equipment companies. Certainly, the need for scholarly research on hockey technology has never been greater: Thousands of participants in the sport stand to benefit from a deeper understanding of the new developments in hockey stick technology.

This paper, then, provides a scholarly education on hockey sticks, both by analyzing the biomechanics of ice hockey shooting and by investigating the extant literature on hockey stick research. In particular, this essay explores the implications of stick technologies and biomechanics for the hockey slap shot, presenting the stick selections and key bodily mechanics that stand to enhance performance of this complex and critical hockey skill.

Mathletic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2009, 02:51 PM
  #2
AIREAYE
Moderator
 
AIREAYE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Country: China
Posts: 3,874
vCash: 500
Wow, Im very interested in the 'science' behind hockey, especially the technology behind sticks and other equipment. Im only in highschool so I would love to look into this further. Im considering materials enginerring in university (Ontario)

AIREAYE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2009, 03:14 PM
  #3
Devil Dancer
Registered User
 
Devil Dancer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 12,549
vCash: 500
So, whippier is better. That's not exactly surprising.

Devil Dancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2009, 04:26 PM
  #4
Redden Hogalot*
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Guelph
Country: Christmas Island
Posts: 5,724
vCash: 500

Redden Hogalot* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2009, 05:40 PM
  #5
Heat McManus
Registered User
 
Heat McManus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Alexandria, VA
Country: United States
Posts: 10,407
vCash: 500
wood sticks flex throughout the entire length. it's better for slap shots.

comp sticks have a better pop which is better for snap, wristers.

Heat McManus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2009, 07:18 PM
  #6
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
The big "secret" of that article, the big diff in "elite" and novice players was how long the blade contacted the puck. It's just about snapping your wrists, it's an instant 10mph gain for someone who has never done it before. As your blade starts to contact the ice, begin to snap your wrists in a motion similar to a wrist shot. As your blade begins to leave the ice, finish the motion, same as the wrister.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2009, 11:51 PM
  #7
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
I shoot hard slapshots and there is a different feel with composites as opposed to wood with respect to slapshots BUT I prefer the composite for consistency.

I know that guy plays in the NHL and all but he should know that there are several different sticks with different kickpoints.

I have 2 bauer shafts that are mid kickpoint just about where the lower hand is and you get monster slapshots because the kickpoint is about just under where the hand is. I also loved aluminum shafts for slapshots those things really launched a good puck, I do not hear anyone discussing those any longer.

This being said i can shoot with either type of kickpoint and so far it really has not mattered much at all and the sweet spot feels better with a composite because unlike wood the entire shaft is consistent and wood has wood grain and differences so each wood stick that has the same brand and model are never the exact same.

I'm sold on composites and they perform extremely well, I have used wood for 35 years or so and composites for almost a year now and I absolutely prefer composites for slapshots. But that is my opinion and everyone seems to have a different one. I believe one can either shoot or they cannot and what they are using really does not matter all that much other than a preference of feel.

I have nothing against guys who prefer wood .... personally I do not like how many I went through because I can shoot well. The guy in that video broke one or stated it lost its oomph which happened to me a lot.

I save tons of money using composites strictly out of how much longer they last me even though they cost more.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 12:41 AM
  #8
NigelSPNKr
#SavetheGoons
 
NigelSPNKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,696
vCash: 164
I have had a couple beers so im not sure i read this right:

What it is saying is that a lower flex leads to faster/harder slappers?

NigelSPNKr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 04:12 AM
  #9
cptjeff
[insert joke here]
 
cptjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington, DC.
Country: United States
Posts: 8,936
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
I have had a couple beers so im not sure i read this right:

What it is saying is that a lower flex leads to faster/harder slappers?
It's really just the whole "you have to be able to flex it pretty well" thing. Basically, use a flex appropriate to your height, weight and strength.

Pretty much absolutely nothing that everyone here didn't already know, and it's quite simplified. In my quick skim I saw nothing about kickpoint for example, and blade curves and shapes were really not addressed.

cptjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 12:13 PM
  #10
StrykerB
 
StrykerB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 66
vCash: 500
In my opinion, too much flex can also work against you, especially if you hold your hand at the midpoint of a stick when taking a slapshot. It's all a timing thing. If you overflex your stick, it will not have enough time to properly recoil and put that stick energy back into your shot.

StrykerB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 08:18 PM
  #11
Jarick
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 25,007
vCash: 500
Most of us aren't strong enough to flex a normal stick...if the average NHL'er of 6' and 200 lbs uses a 100 flex stick, most of us who are a couple inches shorter and probably have 30 pounds less muscle should be in 75 flex, 85 max.

I watch the Brett Hull shooting DVD when I need inspiration...5'10 200 lbs and used a 65 flex! What technique and release...

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 09:29 PM
  #12
NigelSPNKr
#SavetheGoons
 
NigelSPNKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,696
vCash: 164
There is a big difference between a 100-110 stiff flex and 80-95 reg flex. There is a reason why the reg flex's are the most widely used.
If you weight 160-180 lbs, you should have no trouble getting a flex out of a 80-90 flex stick. If you are 140-150ish you should be using a whip. If you are 6 foot, you really shouldnt be less then 160 lbs.

On average, not for every single individual.

NigelSPNKr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 10:07 PM
  #13
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Complicating matters, however, are the authors’ conclusions that the benefits of utilizing a flexible stick did not extend to slap shots, where “it is the athlete and not the equipment influencing shot speed"

Whipper= better for quick shots, use the max flex that you can still get an inch of flex on with max effort for strongest slap and one-timers, I can say 100% this is true for most people.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 11:11 PM
  #14
NigelSPNKr
#SavetheGoons
 
NigelSPNKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,696
vCash: 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
Complicating matters, however, are the authors’ conclusions that the benefits of utilizing a flexible stick did not extend to slap shots, where “it is the athlete and not the equipment influencing shot speed"

Whipper= better for quick shots, use the max flex that you can still get an inch of flex on with max effort for strongest slap and one-timers, I can say 100% this is true for most people.

Could you explain this to me? im not sure i understand what you are saying.

Thanks

NigelSPNKr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2009, 11:24 PM
  #15
StrykerB
 
StrykerB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 66
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
There is a big difference between a 100-110 stiff flex and 80-95 reg flex. There is a reason why the reg flex's are the most widely used.
If you weight 160-180 lbs, you should have no trouble getting a flex out of a 80-90 flex stick. If you are 140-150ish you should be using a whip. If you are 6 foot, you really shouldnt be less then 160 lbs.

On average, not for every single individual.
You're right on the money. Height is a huge factor in this equation.

StrykerB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 03:07 AM
  #16
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
Could you explain this to me? im not sure i understand what you are saying.

Thanks
My point is this, for mostly wrist shots, use a stick you can get 1-1.5" of flex with easily, but for slap shots, use the stiffest flex you can and still get 1" of flex. That will give you the best results for that specific type of shots. For instance, I do best on wristers with a 90-95 but have a better slapper with 100-105 flex.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 09:20 AM
  #17
Jarick
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 25,007
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
There is a big difference between a 100-110 stiff flex and 80-95 reg flex. There is a reason why the reg flex's are the most widely used.
If you weight 160-180 lbs, you should have no trouble getting a flex out of a 80-90 flex stick. If you are 140-150ish you should be using a whip. If you are 6 foot, you really shouldnt be less then 160 lbs.

On average, not for every single individual.
Average NHL player: 6'1 195
Average American male: 5'9

And the height is way more important than weight, because your average beer leaguer who weighs 200 with a gut probably doesn't have the strength of even a college player who might weigh 185.

So giving up 4" and maybe 20-30 pounds of lean muscle, that's why I'd say most guys should be closer to 75 flex. There's a reason we see guys getting so much flex on stiff sticks in the NHL...

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 11:22 AM
  #18
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Average NHL player: 6'1 195
Average American male: 5'9

And the height is way more important than weight, because your average beer leaguer who weighs 200 with a gut probably doesn't have the strength of even a college player who might weigh 185.

So giving up 4" and maybe 20-30 pounds of lean muscle, that's why I'd say most guys should be closer to 75 flex. There's a reason we see guys getting so much flex on stiff sticks in the NHL...
About the height, very good point. That's a huge factor. Little guys who are around 5'6 and really built, say, 180, have huge problems with getting the right flex

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 11:37 AM
  #19
NigelSPNKr
#SavetheGoons
 
NigelSPNKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,696
vCash: 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Average NHL player: 6'1 195
Average American male: 5'9

And the height is way more important than weight, because your average beer leaguer who weighs 200 with a gut probably doesn't have the strength of even a college player who might weigh 185.

So giving up 4" and maybe 20-30 pounds of lean muscle, that's why I'd say most guys should be closer to 75 flex. There's a reason we see guys getting so much flex on stiff sticks in the NHL...
Actually that is wrong. 205 is the league average.

If you are 185 lbs, whether you are "ripped" or not, you should have no problem using your weight and leaning on your stick to load a 90 flex. Doesnt matter if that means you need a 80-85 flex and cut down a little or a 75-77 flex and cut down a lot.


Last edited by NigelSPNKr: 11-18-2009 at 11:46 AM.
NigelSPNKr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 11:38 AM
  #20
NigelSPNKr
#SavetheGoons
 
NigelSPNKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,696
vCash: 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
My point is this, for mostly wrist shots, use a stick you can get 1-1.5" of flex with easily, but for slap shots, use the stiffest flex you can and still get 1" of flex. That will give you the best results for that specific type of shots. For instance, I do best on wristers with a 90-95 but have a better slapper with 100-105 flex.

cant argue with that.

NigelSPNKr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 12:04 PM
  #21
Jarick
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 25,007
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
Actually that is wrong. 205 is the league average.

If you are 185 lbs, whether you are "ripped" or not, you should have no problem using your weight and leaning on your stick to load a 90 flex. Doesnt matter if that means you need a 80-85 flex and cut down a little or a 75-77 flex and cut down a lot.
Well we're arguing a different version of the same thing...I'm talking about the pre-cut flex of the stick.

When I use 75 flex sticks, they get cut down to about 90 flex, and when I use 65 flex stick, they're cut down to about 75-80 flex. Usually I feel more comfortable when the final flex is about 80-85, although my weight doesn't have anything to do with it (used the same flex when I was 165 as I did when I was 190).

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 12:32 PM
  #22
NigelSPNKr
#SavetheGoons
 
NigelSPNKr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hamilton
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,696
vCash: 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Well we're arguing a different version of the same thing...I'm talking about the pre-cut flex of the stick.

When I use 75 flex sticks, they get cut down to about 90 flex, and when I use 65 flex stick, they're cut down to about 75-80 flex. Usually I feel more comfortable when the final flex is about 80-85, although my weight doesn't have anything to do with it (used the same flex when I was 165 as I did when I was 190).
If you could flex a 80-85 at 165lbs (as you should be able to), you could flex a 90-95 at 190lbs.

But if you are more comfortable at 80-85 flex when you can use 90-95 flex that is all that really matters i guess.

Im 6'2, 197lbs. I could/have used stiff flex's without any problem but perfer a 90-95

NigelSPNKr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2009, 09:40 PM
  #23
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
One thing I never see anyone mention that is actually very beneficial that you can't teach, having a longer torso. It leads to more cross-core rotation, as I call it, which generates a lot of the power on a slapper. Guys with a longer upper body should focus more on the slap shot, as they will get more out of it.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:53 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2015 All Rights Reserved.