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Playing outdoors -> cold

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Old
12-30-2009, 05:17 AM
  #1
eNTe17
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Playing outdoors -> cold

So, recently I`ve been experiencing some troubles actually getting it together, and going out to play, just because of the (to me) low temperatures we`re experiencing...

Would minus 20 c (-4 f) stop you from going out to put some pucks to the net ?

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12-30-2009, 06:33 AM
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Gino 14
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I play at an outdoor rink and will see temps down to 0F. If it gets much colder than that I tend to shy away from playing, but if it's a one week thing, suck it up and play. Just make sure everyone else realizes that everyone needs to have short hard shifts to allow everyone an opportunity to stay warm and active.

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12-30-2009, 08:11 AM
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noobman
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I was thinking of going down to play some pond hockey tonight... only going down to -3C!

I find it's hard to go out and practice shooting in cold weather... but once you're well dressed and skating hard you can handle *any* weather. Don't be afraid to don a ski mask!


The worst thing might actually be your feet... since it's hard to wear extra socks in properly fitted skates. Hockey gloves are surprisingly warm, but if it's not enough the dollar store black gloves always help.

I work out in my garage, and it gets REALLY cold in there.

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12-30-2009, 08:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
I was thinking of going down to play some pond hockey tonight... only going down to -3C!

I find it's hard to go out and practice shooting in cold weather... but once you're well dressed and skating hard you can handle *any* weather. Don't be afraid to don a ski mask!


The worst thing might actually be your feet... since it's hard to wear extra socks in properly fitted skates. Hockey gloves are surprisingly warm, but if it's not enough the dollar store black gloves always help.

I work out in my garage, and it gets REALLY cold in there.
Hand warmers in the palms baby!

Also, I skate barefoot except for ankle guards so bring on that cold! My feet are gonna be black by the end of winter, at which point I will have frostbite and have them surgically replaced by prosthetic feet with hockey blades built in

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12-30-2009, 09:43 AM
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Jarick
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Coldest I've tried was probably -15 to -20 F (-25 to -30 C?)...I think I lasted about 10 minutes. My feet froze when I changed from shoe to skate and never warmed up, it was just bitter cold, and I couldn't stop coughing. I like a Minnesota winter, but not that cold...

Nowadays, I try and stick between 10 to 30 F (-12 to 0 C). That's usually a good temp, comfortable when you get moving, ice holds up well. Otherwise it's just too cold or hot to be worth it.

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12-30-2009, 09:56 AM
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Areid1990
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I'll stay away if it gets colder then - 20 ish or so Celsius and the only reason is your feet don't warm up once you go from shoe to skate. The only thing that ever really gets cold is my feet the rest of my body is toasty warm if I have a toque on to cover my ears

Last night it was -13ish and I was sweating buckets!

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12-30-2009, 02:33 PM
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The cold doesn't really bother me; -30C/-22F is nice because you usually have the whole rink to yourself. I do generate a lot of heat and sweat, though... after warming up, I often take off my jacket and just play at that temperature in a t-shirt and/or a hockey jersey and it doesn't phase me that much. I'm convinced I'm a mutant or something.

I do think -10C/14F to -20C/-4F is the sweet spot, though, at least judging from feedback from my friends.

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12-30-2009, 03:06 PM
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NigelSPNKr
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-4? really? come on, get into the -30's then start thinking about being to cold.

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12-30-2009, 03:15 PM
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Ragss
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I play shinny when its -30 to -40, but the ice gets really bad at those temps.

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12-30-2009, 04:51 PM
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Crosbyfan
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Quote:
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I play shinny when its -30 to -40, but the ice gets really bad at those temps.
things I find makes a huge difference if it's really cold:

1. a balaclava- that can go right over your nose and mouth that you can breath through. It will take the ge off the cold air and preheat it as you first inhale from a little of the heat from the previous exhale
(oversize helmet can go over top for protection or a monster balaclava can go over the whole thing)

2. Outdoor skates a half size bigger for thicker socks- don't tighten them as much as usual. On the outdoor ice they generally don't need to be as sharp and you can save your "game" skates for indoor games and practices.

3. Multiple layers including the legs

4. Windbreakers/outershell if it is windy (again including for the legs)

5. Thin gloves inside your hockey gloves or just warmer insulated gloves

6. Thermos of hot liquid

7. Don't get cold, it's really hard to "catch up', but also don't sweat. That's where the layering and outershell balance gets tricky.

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12-30-2009, 04:56 PM
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NigelSPNKr
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I mostly stick with a long john layer, a thermal top, a one-sy, jeans, hoodie, hockey sweater, toque and gloves under my gloves. Two pairs of thin socks do the trick for me and a bottle of whiskey.

We all handle the cold differently so some may need more layers some may need less, it is easy to keep warm once you start skating hard though.

I perfer when it is in the -20 to -25 region, only the die hards come out and you get a good game in.

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Old
01-01-2010, 12:17 AM
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Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eNTe17 View Post
So, recently I`ve been experiencing some troubles actually getting it together, and going out to play, just because of the (to me) low temperatures we`re experiencing...

Would minus 20 c (-4 f) stop you from going out to put some pucks to the net ?
I've played outdoors at 0 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit and it was only doable when it wasn't breezy out for me.

I wear a face covering knitted thing with eyeholes in it and dress in plenty of layers. The only troubles I had were cold feet even with doublethick socks and my hands would get frozen fingertips in regular hockey gloves until i had a sweat going then it was okay. basically the main trouble was with the feet.

I do not tighten my laces as tightly as I would indoors as the circulation is cut off just enough to create a frostbite problem which I did experience once. It took the black spot on the end of my big toe months to heal and for about 3 weeks the end of my sock would have a blood stain from the dead black flesh bleeding.

Eventually my toe was normal again but I learned a lesson which is I am not going to play outdoors unless there is a warming shack to take my skates off and warm my feet up every once in a while.

it was a painful and not very fun experience. NOW I have a pair of skates I use only for outdoor ice which is one half size too big for me so I can wear thick socks and not have the circulation cut off. This has been successful and i recommend it if one can buy extra pair just for that purpose.

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