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Two general hockey questions

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02-06-2010, 09:17 PM
  #1
geehaad
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Two general hockey questions

You'll hear this disclaimer often from me, but I should make it known that I've never played hockey before asking these questions.

1. Occasionally the talking heads will make reference to the need for a right shot or left shot for a given position. In fact, I read an article earlier in the season about too few RH defensemen (not sure if the link was posted here or not). It seems that the idea of switch hitting in hockey would be easier than in baseball, and might have some value, but I've never heard of a player who swings from either side. Would this not be valuable enough to develop, or is it more difficult than I'm making it out to be? I'm not thinking of it as an in-game switch (because of the curve of the stick blade), but more something that would be possible from game to game, where lineup changes are necessary.

2. In a faceoff, when an infraction occurs but the puck has already been dropped, the refs/linesmen call for a re-do. If the refs see that the team that was "cheated on" wins the faceoff, why don't they allow play to continue? It's mostly aggravating to watch your team win a faceoff, then have the whistle blow and the faceoff redone because the other team's infraction, and then your team loses the ensuing faceoff. Why not play the advantage?

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02-06-2010, 10:20 PM
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Boom Boom Anton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geehaad View Post
You'll hear this disclaimer often from me, but I should make it known that I've never played hockey before asking these questions.

1. Occasionally the talking heads will make reference to the need for a right shot or left shot for a given position. In fact, I read an article earlier in the season about too few RH defensemen (not sure if the link was posted here or not). It seems that the idea of switch hitting in hockey would be easier than in baseball, and might have some value, but I've never heard of a player who swings from either side. Would this not be valuable enough to develop, or is it more difficult than I'm making it out to be? I'm not thinking of it as an in-game switch (because of the curve of the stick blade), but more something that would be possible from game to game, where lineup changes are necessary.

2. In a faceoff, when an infraction occurs but the puck has already been dropped, the refs/linesmen call for a re-do. If the refs see that the team that was "cheated on" wins the faceoff, why don't they allow play to continue? It's mostly aggravating to watch your team win a faceoff, then have the whistle blow and the faceoff redone because the other team's infraction, and then your team loses the ensuing faceoff. Why not play the advantage?
My $0.02.

1. I think trying to switch from right to left (or left to right) is almost impossible in hockey. Hockey players spend 100% of the time they are playing with a stick in their hand. Baseball players spend maybe 5% of the time they play with a bat in their hand. The other 95%, they are fielding, running, throwing (and standing around ). Also, when a baseball player is batting, he is stationary and his only task is to hit the ball. In hockey, that is rarely the case. He is usually moving and since the game has so much flow, he has to be aware of multiple factors at all times.

If I was going to make an analogy to baseball, I would say it would be like a baseball player both batting and throwing opposite hand.

I have played both sports since I was young. Although not super effective, I can bat left handed and feel pretty comfortable doing it. I could never switch to the other side in hockey..very uncomfortable.

2. I tend to agree with you..but I think the issue is simply reaction time. The linesman makes a decision on the faceoff and it just takes time to blow the whistle and stop the play. In that time, one team may have won the faceoff, but he had made the decision to blow it dead before that, but the reaction time delay makes it seem like he made the decision after the outcome of the faceoff was decided.

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02-07-2010, 01:23 AM
  #3
vwg*
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1. It's just too hard to learn how to shoot effectively from both sides. You might be able to get by (if you're an NHLer) shooting from both sides if a pick up game or something, but it's just too hard to shoot from both sides in a NHL game. I experimented a little bit with switch hitting in high school baseball, but even that's a lot different than switch "shooting" in hockey. I'm right handed but I shoot left in hockey and can barely wrist shot with a right handed stick. It's just a lot harder to shoot the other way even if you are fairly ambidextrous like I am.

2. I used to ref local youth games around here, but I'm not an NHL ref (of course), but in ref clinics I took, we were always told to use some discretion in faceoffs. You have about a second (or less) to call an infraction on faceoffs, so the team being infracted upon needs to very clearly and quickly win the faceoff or I usually will re-do the faceoff.

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