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Best equipment for those on a budget

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Old
09-30-2010, 11:43 PM
  #1
pass the bisk
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Best equipment for those on a budget

This thread is going to be for those on a budget, or atleast somewhat of a budget. Hockey is a very expensive sport so it is bretty tough to find good equipment for a good price. So, without further adieu, this is the best equipment for those on a budget:

Sticks:
1. Easton S11 - $72.99
2. Easton SE6 - $69.99
3. Bauer X:40 - $99.99

These three sticks are the only sticks under 100 dollars I feel can somewhat compete with top end sticks. Seems like most sticks under 100 (rbk 5k, bauer x15, etc) just have a cheap feel to it and ultimately feel like a waste of money.

Skates:
1. Bauer ONE55 - $169.99
2. Bauer ONE75 - $234.99
3. Bauer X:30 - $179.99
4. Bauer X:40 - $329.99
5. Bauer ONE60 (2010) - $184.99

In my opinion, Bauer dominates skates. I've worn Bauer skates my whole life and I've found that they have the best price point skates. For under $250, you will not find a better pair of skates then the Bauers. If you don't want to spend a dime over $250, go with the ONE75s while they are still available. With the new Supreme line coming out, all the old models have gone on sale. The one75s are the best skates you can buy for under that $250 price range. Very protective and comfortable. If you are willing to splurge, then I would go with the Bauer x40s because they seem to be the best value for the amount of money you spend.

Protective Equipment:

Shoulder, Elbows, and Shins:
1. Reebok 3k for everything.

For $99.99 you can get the Reebok 3k shoulder pads, elbows, and shins. Reebok has always made great protective equipment and the 3k's should prove that. Unless you are playing a high level of hockey, then you should probably splurge for better protective equipment, but for anything under that, these pads will suffice.

Helmet:
1. Reebok 6k - $49.99

For 50 bucks, that is the best helmet you will find. Plain and simple.

Gloves:
1. Bauer X:20s - $39.99

They are light and very mobile. Good gloves for the price. If you are willing to spend about 75 bucks though, you can get a pro level pair from any major brand.

Pants:

Pants are the hardest thing to find on a budget. Pretty much anything under $50 will not be very protective, so you may want to invest.


Well that's about it. Feel free to add anything.

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10-01-2010, 12:32 AM
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Islander102
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This is good, also anything you can find on pro stock is usually a good value.

Its also important to identify what you are going to splurge on. If youre playing beer league you dont need the highest level of protection on your body because guys arent going to be slashing you at every turn, and piledriving you into the boards. Save money on those kinds of things. Gloves - No need to be the jackass with the Eagle's at your beer league. They look nice and all, but nobody is going to be slashing your wrists all day like they would be in high end high school, juniors, college and pro hockey. The difference between a reliable pair of mid range Bauer gloves, and the Eagle's or Warrior's that are going to draw oohs and aahs in the locker room is protection that you will never need. The difference in $ would probably be enough to tape your sticks and socks for a couple of seasons.

At the same time, dont nickel and dime things like your skates, and your helmet. Having better skates (and by better, I mean high mid range skates, you dont need pro level skates unless youre a pro) will give you better balance and support, and you wont be going into school/work the next morning with feet that you feel are going to die. You will also learn to be a better skater faster, with skates that allow your feet more flexibility and mobility. Not something to look for a bargain on. Not much more can be said about the helmet. I dont care what sport at what level you are playing. Head injuries are serious stuff. Dont buy a cheap helmet.

Sticks. My advice for sticks, is to go to one extreme or the other. If you dont have the proper shot mechanics, use a woody. Theyre cheap, and if you dont have the right mechanics, youre going to break a lot of sticks. $25 is a lot easier on your heart than $200. Also, if you dont have the proper mechanics down pat, youre not going to get any of the benefits to a high end composite. Avoid mid range composites like the plague. They are nothing more than glorified wood sticks with fancy graphics and miserable balance. The cheapest woody will have better balance for less than half the price of a mid range composite. There is nothing about your shot on a $70-$90 composite that you cant do with wood, and the puck feel with wood will be far superior.

Once you have the mechanics down pat, while a lot of money, going from a woodie to a high end composite (One of each manufacturer's top 2 sticks) be it a one or a two piece, will give you a noticable difference in play. You must have the mechanics down pat though. If you dont, you may as well flush a lot of coin down the drain because youre going to get the same performance as you would from your wood stick, and youll probably break it. If youre playing rec league, a high end comp will last you years if you can handle it right.

Once you feel like you achieved the proper shooting mechanics and want to take the next step in equipment BUT you are on a tight budget, keep using your woody, and place some money in your stick jar. It is much more worth it to save up for a few months/a year and get something like a X60 or a U+CL, than to get something like a Warrior Syko or an Easton SE6 immediately. And when you finally get enough. Read online reviews, and test them out at hockey shops before buying online. Its a lot of money, be confident in your purchase. A final tip would be if available, get last year's marked down model of whatever the highest end stick was instead of the new one with the shiny new graphics. 90% of the time the new stick is last years with a cooler paint job.

Hope I helped at all.

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10-01-2010, 12:35 AM
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Re: shoulder/elbow/shin pads, I agree that going cheap on shoulder and shin pads is totally fine, but for elbow pads I think it's worth spending a bit more to get good mobility, I hate elbow pads that overly restrict my range of motion. After hating virtually every pair of elbow pads I've ever owned I finally splurged on some Bauer x60s, and they're awesome, very comfortable and nice mobility (for my arms at least). Tried on the x40s too, and they felt quite good too, probably a solid slightly cheaper option?

Good thread idea btw, agree with most of your picks.

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10-01-2010, 12:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islander102 View Post
If you dont have the proper shot mechanics, use a woody. Theyre cheap, and if you dont have the right mechanics, youre going to break a lot of sticks.
Really? I generally find that the better your mechanics, the MORE sticks you break, as better mechanics generally means way more force/flex. Beginners often just swipe at the puck instead of really flexing the stick, and you're pretty much never gonna break a stick that way.

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10-01-2010, 02:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Really? I generally find that the better your mechanics, the MORE sticks you break, as better mechanics generally means way more force/flex. Beginners often just swipe at the puck instead of really flexing the stick, and you're pretty much never gonna break a stick that way.
I think he's talking more about people TRYING to get that force/flex but instead of loading the stick then releasing they end up whacking the ice too early/hard and having the stick/blade explode on them.

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10-01-2010, 03:18 AM
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Originally Posted by kr580 View Post
I think he's talking more about people TRYING to get that force/flex but instead of loading the stick then releasing they end up whacking the ice too early/hard and having the stick/blade explode on them.
Exactly. A lot of beginners (and I work at a rink so I see this all the time, and collect the broken sticks which make perfectly good shafts at the end of each week) flex the stick at the wrong time, and often hit the ice way too early leading to countless cracked blades. Or they dont have their hands held properly and they apply the pressure to the wrong point of the shaft, usually too high up on the shaft, and it snaps there. Another common one you see is guys lacking the coordination to line up the puck right on the sweet spot, and taking slappers with max torque and the puck hitting the weakest part of the toe, and the blade going flying. Everyone thats starting out, and has any type of strength, make these mistakes on a woodie, dont flush hundreds of dollars down the drain. Unless of course, you play at my rink, in which case continue to be very loose with your money and leave free shafts for me all over the place.

If you have everything down pat there are only a few ways youre going to break a stick.

1) consciously using a flex too low for you. Some players (see Ovechkin) use sticks too whippy for them which enables them to snap off shots very quickly and have the power of a fully loaded shot. The trade off, of course is when you use a stick like that, there is only a certain number of times you can fully lean into one without the stick snapping. If youre a rec league player, and you can shoot well, this is the most common way that sticks break.

2) Playing the puck after damage has been done in an on ice battle. This hardly ever happens in beer league hockey or anything below that, but in higher levels, during the course of a game your stick can get slashed hard enough or the puck gets shot right off your shaft creating an internal fracture. The next time you apply pressure to the stick to make a play... snap. This most commonly occurs a few inches below the "fuse point" in the case of stick slashes, and somewhere in the shaft in the case of puck damage.

3) Taking too many shots. If youre practicing taking shots, and you take in the hundreds a week at practice/stick and puck. It's simple science that your blade wont be able to take it. For this reason I ALWAYS use a two piece setup (I usually pay for tapered blades, and cut tapered shafts out of the oodles of one pieces broken at the blade I accumulate) when taking my practice shots. I never use my go to game sticks (Rbk 10K and CCM U+CL one piece)for repetitive practice shots, and I dont suggest anyone else use a one piece for this either. Game wear only (5-15 shots a game) shouldnt damage your blade for years. Obviously if you play in a pro league and have a stick contract you can use whatever the hell you want, whenever and not worry about breakage.

4) You get a lemon. It happens. And it sucks. Thankfully this is usually within the warranty period.

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10-01-2010, 10:36 AM
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I'll go with "best value" over lowest price. Usually it's one or two models down from the top. And IMO it's not worth buying cheap new gear for the sake of buying cheap new gear.

Helmet - DON'T SKIMP, but fit is far more important than fancy features IMO
- Bauer 5100, CCM V08, Easton S9, avg $65

Skates - DON'T SKIMP, go with the second from the top models as they have most of the technology but at half the price
- Bauer X40, Bauer One70, Reebok 8k, CCM U+09, Easton S12, avg $300

Gloves - DON'T SKIMP, cheap gloves = broken and bruised fingers and dislocated thumbs
- Bauer 4-Roll, CCM 4-Roll, TPS R8, avg $90

Pants - used or clearance are best, but decent new ones:
- Bauer One55, CCM Fit07, Reebok 7k, avg $72

Shoulders - if you're a forward, you can get away with:
- Sherwood 5030, Bauer Classics, avg $30
If you block shots or need extra protection:
- RBK 4k, Easton ST6, CCM Fit07, avg $62

Elbows - a little more goes a long way:
- CCM Fit07, Easton ST16, Bauer One55, Reebok 6k, avg $40

Shins - spend a bit more the low end ones aren't great:
- CCM Fit09, Bauer One75, Reebok 6k, avg $65

Sticks - if you want serious durability, go with a 2-piece made for durability:
- Harrow 300, Bauer One95, Easton ST, avg $150
If you want great performance, go with the second from high end models:
- Reebok 8k, Vapor X:50, Easton EQ40, avg $150
Clearance models and pro stocks are the best for high end performance at lower prices...or if you're really broke go with a standard taper shaft off Craiglist and a wood blade, usually runs about $60 or less.

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10-01-2010, 11:20 AM
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Re: the bad shooting form/stick breaking debate, I've never had those experiences myself, I feel like over the years me and my teammates have inflicted more and more damage on sticks the better my/our form has got, but by starting hockey at age 8 I guess myself and most teammates were going through these "bad form" stages while not fully grown/not that strong, not to mention often using wood sticks. Definitely trust your opinion as you must see it all the time working at a rink!

So for the off topic derailment, back to cheap equipment!

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10-01-2010, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
I'll go with "best value" over lowest price. Usually it's one or two models down from the top. And IMO it's not worth buying cheap new gear for the sake of buying cheap new gear.

Helmet - DON'T SKIMP, but fit is far more important than fancy features IMO
- Bauer 5100, CCM V08, Easton S9, avg $65

Skates - DON'T SKIMP, go with the second from the top models as they have most of the technology but at half the price
- Bauer X40, Bauer One70, Reebok 8k, CCM U+09, Easton S12, avg $300

Gloves - DON'T SKIMP, cheap gloves = broken and bruised fingers and dislocated thumbs
- Bauer 4-Roll, CCM 4-Roll, TPS R8, avg $90

Pants - used or clearance are best, but decent new ones:
- Bauer One55, CCM Fit07, Reebok 7k, avg $72

Shoulders - if you're a forward, you can get away with:
- Sherwood 5030, Bauer Classics, avg $30
If you block shots or need extra protection:
- RBK 4k, Easton ST6, CCM Fit07, avg $62

Elbows - a little more goes a long way:
- CCM Fit07, Easton ST16, Bauer One55, Reebok 6k, avg $40

Shins - spend a bit more the low end ones aren't great:
- CCM Fit09, Bauer One75, Reebok 6k, avg $65

Sticks - if you want serious durability, go with a 2-piece made for durability:
- Harrow 300, Bauer One95, Easton ST, avg $150
If you want great performance, go with the second from high end models:
- Reebok 8k, Vapor X:50, Easton EQ40, avg $150
Clearance models and pro stocks are the best for high end performance at lower prices...or if you're really broke go with a standard taper shaft off Craiglist and a wood blade, usually runs about $60 or less.
I disagree about gloves and shin guards, you can find low end gloves and shins that are both comfortable and protective.

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10-01-2010, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Re: the bad shooting form/stick breaking debate, I've never had those experiences myself, I feel like over the years me and my teammates have inflicted more and more damage on sticks the better my/our form has got, but by starting hockey at age 8 I guess myself and most teammates were going through these "bad form" stages while not fully grown/not that strong, not to mention often using wood sticks. Definitely trust your opinion as you must see it all the time working at a rink!

So for the off topic derailment, back to cheap equipment!
That is what leads to it. The kids go through the bad form when they really dont have enough strength to break anything. Theyre shooting the puck 20 MPH if that when they start out, and theyre putting next to no pressure on their sticks. If they play semi regularly, by the time they hit puberty and actually start growing some muscle mass, they usually have everything down pat.

With adults youre talking putting hundreds of pounds worth of power where its not supposed to go. If an 8 year old takes a slapshot with the wrong mechanics (which they usually do) theyre putting like 50 pounds worth of pressure on the stick. When an adult does it youre talking anywhere from 100-200 pounds either being flexed in the wrong spot, or slammed into the ice and puck.

Also, a lot of my rink's hockey beginners are rich snobby people from the upper west side of Manhattan, who insist on buying the nicest stuff, even when they have no clue how to reap the benefits. Nothing more priceless than seeing a guy dressed like an NHL player strutting out onto the ice and flailing about.

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10-01-2010, 02:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
I disagree about gloves and shin guards, you can find low end gloves and shins that are both comfortable and protective.
Actually I do think you've got a point on the shins, I just bought some but I wanted great calf protection, that's why I listed those, but I recall my first shins weren't bad and were only $40.

I can't get down with cheap gloves though...I've had two pairs of gloves that were cheaper (Vapor Apollos and One75's, even though those aren't cheap but they lacked protection) and sustained a lot of injuries and close calls with them.

The cheapest gloves are okay only for pond shinny IMO...they don't even have lock thumbs so if you fall or go into the boards funny, you can dislocate and sprain your thumb...extremely painful.

The next gloves have lock thumbs but usually only foam in the fingers and backroll. That's okay if you're playing friendly games and no-slappers, but if there's any chippiness or slashes or slappers that can catch you, they will hurt like hell. I bruised a thumb so badly on a draw that I could barely move it for a week. I've also bruised fingers on slappers that deflected off sticks and slashes.

For league play, gloves with plastic inserts are almost a must-have. Most gloves over $100 will have plastic inserts and dual density foams as well as higher quality palms.




But what I'm talking about is best bang for the buck, equipment you buy and don't have to replace the next year, and stuff that will give very good protection.

I also don't have anything against guys that outfit themselves in top end gear even if they can't play. Sure, it's good for a chuckle, but I don't have any resentment or chirp them for it. Some guys make a lot of money and like nice things, far be it from me to judge them for that. Hell, I barely make ends meet and still squirrel enough money away for nice equipment.

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10-01-2010, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Re: shoulder/elbow/shin pads, I agree that going cheap on shoulder and shin pads is totally fine, but for elbow pads I think it's worth spending a bit more to get good mobility, I hate elbow pads that overly restrict my range of motion. After hating virtually every pair of elbow pads I've ever owned I finally splurged on some Bauer x60s, and they're awesome, very comfortable and nice mobility (for my arms at least). Tried on the x40s too, and they felt quite good too, probably a solid slightly cheaper option?

Good thread idea btw, agree with most of your picks.
I agree with you 100% on the elbow pads. I tried to go on the cheap with these and ended up just wasting money. I bought some $25 Itechs and they sucked. They were very hard and restrictive and they seemed to slip down my arms. I decided I had enough and I splurged on some $60 Warrior Hustler's and they are awesome. I tried on some Easton S19s that were nice too, but the Hustler's felt great and they were $10 cheaper.

According to the original OP I think I did pretty well with my equipment shopping, below is my set up and I am really happy with it. The best advice I can give to anyone is go try the stuff on and then wait for internet close outs b/c you will save a ton. Most of my stuff was bought on closeout from hockeymonkey.com after I had tried it on somewhere else first. I am very weary of buying any equipment before it is tried on.

Helmet: Easton S9 (comfy, protective, and pretty low profile)
Shoulder Pads: Nike Bauer Classic (super cheap and lightweight)
Elbow Pads: Warrior Hustler (most comfortable ones I tried on)
Gloves: Reebok 6k (love these gloves)
Pants: CCM Vector 08 (closeout on Hockey Monkey, comfy with a lot of protection)
Shin Pads: Bauer Vapor XXXX (another closeout, can't complain)
Skates: Bauer Vapor X30s (good skate, better price)
Stick: Easton SE6 Int. (good stick with a good amount of whip)

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10-05-2010, 12:08 AM
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Just bumping thread really to get more peoples input on gloves. I'm trying to find a pair that are pretty cheap but will offer good protection and decent quality. I do know you get what you pay for, but what i can pay for isn't much right now so ill have to make do. They will just be used for practice for that I'm just starting to get on the ice.

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10-05-2010, 02:54 AM
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I've been playing hockey for 16 years, have always used somewhat cheap to midrange gloves, and never had a problem with injuries through the gloves or with comfort/feel. You should be able to find gloves that are comfortable and protective in the $60 range IMO, especially if you keep your eyes peeled for sales. But always try them on in the store first, after trying on a bunch of pairs you'll know what's comfortable (hold sticks with them and fake stickhandle/shoot), and it's also pretty clear if they offer good protection (thumb that won't bend back, cuffs that aren't too short, solid amount of padding).

My current gloves are some cheap/midrange CCMs that I got on sale for even cheaper. Pretty sure they're Vector 5s, no idea what year, they look just like this:

http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brows....jsp?locale=en

Had them for a couple years, comfortable and good protection, palms are starting to wear slightly thin but not all the way through yet. Couldn't be happier with them, will wear them till the palms die, then buy another $60ish pair.

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10-05-2010, 04:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Swat Ultra View Post
Just bumping thread really to get more peoples input on gloves. I'm trying to find a pair that are pretty cheap but will offer good protection and decent quality. I do know you get what you pay for, but what i can pay for isn't much right now so ill have to make do. They will just be used for practice for that I'm just starting to get on the ice.
I'm a beginner as well and really i've taken a deep liking to collecting gloves on a budget. I don't know about your preference of used or not, but there are some deals to be had if you have a second-hand sports shop nearby or an active craigslist. I've never spent more than $60 on gloves - either 2nd hand or brand new from Hockey Monkey.
- Eagle PPF -$40 [Next to Brand new - palms were like fresh from the factory]
- Eagle X80 - $20 [Most used of my gloves - but perhaps my most comfortable as they are broken in]
- Nike Bauer XXV - $50 [More form fitting than the others and VERY comfy] - New
- Warrior Pro Bully -$60 - New

It also depends on what kind of glove you find most comfortable - form fitting like Bauer X series or loose fitting 4-rolls from several companies?

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10-05-2010, 02:43 PM
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Thanks for the input, yeah Iíve been going around to every sporting store I can think of trying on the gear and trying to find deals, went to play again sport enjoyed looking at all the gear, but most of the used gear is beat to hell and not even close to being well priced , (Portland ME). Doing the whole craiglist thing right now too, not too active here in northern New Hampshire. So Iím just keeping my eyes open, there are so many to chose from and being new to playing donít really know what the right feel is, and on top of that I just left the military and I am in school so Iím broke.

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10-05-2010, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Swat Ultra View Post
Thanks for the input, yeah Iíve been going around to every sporting store I can think of trying on the gear and trying to find deals, went to play again sport enjoyed looking at all the gear, but most of the used gear is beat to hell and not even close to being well priced , (Portland ME). Doing the whole craiglist thing right now too, not too active here in northern New Hampshire. So Iím just keeping my eyes open, there are so many to chose from and being new to playing donít really know what the right feel is, and on top of that I just left the military and I am in school so Iím broke.
My advice would be to go to your sports store, try on the gear, flex the sticks try on the skates, and what you like, look for on ebay.

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10-05-2010, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by pass the bisk View Post
Sticks:
1. Easton S11 - $72.99.
EASTON S11'S ARE 73 BUCKS?!?!?!?! Dang!! With the number of guys running around with s7's I thought that anything above it was alot of money....

Too bad I'll never buy a Easton again....

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10-18-2010, 07:38 PM
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http://www.hockeymonkey.com/ccm-hock...us-pro-sr.html

Would these be the best skates to get on a budget? ($200)

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10-18-2010, 07:54 PM
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if they fit, then go for it

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10-18-2010, 08:37 PM
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if they fit, then go for it
Sorry, should have premised my question with that I've never played ice before, so I don't think I would know the "proper" fit.

It's been so long since I played inline as a kid that I don't remember how skates are supposed to fit in general.

I have relatively normal size feet, possibly slightly narrower than average.

I will bake any skates I get.

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10-18-2010, 10:06 PM
  #22
AIREAYE
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whao, buying skates online without prior fitting experience is risky. If you get them and they don't fit, you're SOL. Then again, you shouldn't go to your LHS and waste their time by getting something fit and going off to buy it online.

If you're a beginner, it's common knowledge that you will not experience the full performance capabilities of a top-end skate. Many people recommend going middle-of-the-line with perhaps the X:30, or One60. However, at that price, if they fit, go for it.

With fit being the problem here, the U+ Pros have a very narrow arc to the sole of your feet. It's hard to describe, but if you have a wide foot, you're generally going to find them too narrow, even on EE width. Best bet is to perhaps find someone who has a pair and try on the general feel.

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10-18-2010, 10:55 PM
  #23
blueberrydanish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Islander102 View Post

Its also important to identify what you are going to splurge on. If youre playing beer league you dont need the highest level of protection on your body because guys arent going to be slashing you at every turn, and piledriving you into the boards. Save money on those kinds of things. Gloves - No need to be the jackass with the Eagle's at your beer league. They look nice and all, but nobody is going to be slashing your wrists all day like they would be in high end high school, juniors, college and pro hockey. The difference between a reliable pair of mid range Bauer gloves, and the Eagle's or Warrior's that are going to draw oohs and aahs in the locker room is protection that you will never need. The difference in $ would probably be enough to tape your sticks and socks for a couple of seasons.
I kinda disagree here in a way of I guess it depends on your beer league. I get slashed and hacked few times a game in my league and even had to buy some longer elbow pads for better protection on my wrists. Only takes 1-2 nice whacks to the wrists that leave some nice bruises before ya get tired of em.

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Old
10-20-2010, 11:41 AM
  #24
Injektilo
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I found a $50 one piece to be a huge improvement on my usual $30 wood sticks. I don't have the shot to worry about having a $200 stick, but there's no way I'm ever going back to wood.

If you're a complete beginner, there won't be much of a difference for you, but after a year, you may wanna take a chance on a cheap one piece and see how it feels.

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Old
10-20-2010, 11:44 AM
  #25
Jarick
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With some input from some of you guys, I revised my buyers guide to include beginners and intermediate players:

Updated Buyers Guide

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