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Old
03-03-2010, 03:03 PM
  #1
Perfect Body
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Hockey Training Articles

This thread is for hockey players (and their parents) that take the sport seriously and are trying to be the best they can be on the ice.

I will post a number of articles related to dry land training and nutrition designed specifically for hockey players.

If you have any questions, ask away.

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03-03-2010, 03:04 PM
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Exercises for Power

Exercises For Power

Hockey is a physically demanding sport. The players of today must train on and off the ice year round to keep up or stay ahead of the competition. In this article I will discuss 2 exercises that will help build core and leg strength. In today’s game a powerful core and legs will give you faster reaction time for lateral movement and make it much more difficult for the opposition to knock you off the puck.

1. Hockey Squat Jump:

• Start by getting into hockey stance - feet shoulder width apart, legs bent, chest and head up.
• While keeping your head and chest up, squat down so that your upper legs are parallel to the floor.
• Launch/jump up as high as possible, getting full leg extension.
• Land in hockey stance, absorb the landing.
• Immediately lower yourself down to parallel and repeat.
• Perform the exercise in 3 sets of 15 repetitions.
o Increase the level of difficulty by wearing a weighted vest

2. Lateral Stride Jumps: (mimics the hockey skating stride)

• Start by getting into hockey stance - feet shoulder width apart, legs bent, chest and head up.
• Transfer your weight over to your right foot, the left foot off the ground and behind you as if being in the middle of a stride. Sit into it by trying to get your right upper leg parallel to the floor.
• Jump to the left as high and as far as possible.
• Land on your left foot, and absorb the landing.
• Without letting your right foot touch the floor, launch yourself back to the right side using the same mechanics.
• Perform the exercise in 3 sets of 15 jumps each way (3 sets of 30 total jumps)
• This is a difficult exercise that takes a lot of core and leg strength to maintain balance. Practice will perfect this exercise, and results will quickly show up on the ice as your stride will become faster and more powerful.
o Increase the level of difficulty by wearing a weight belt

These two exercises should be performed twice (spaced 3 days apart) per week on a regular basis.

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03-03-2010, 03:16 PM
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In Season Training

In Season Training

The off season is typically the time to do your heavy mass and strength gain training. Doing so during the hockey season is not wise as it may lead to: fatigue, injuries and illness. Over training will surely lead to a drop in on ice performance. So what can you do during the season to maintain strength and conditioning? That’s what this article is all about.
Four simple exercises with 5 solid meals per day and minimum 8 hours of sleep can be the recipe for success in your strength and conditioning goals.
Exercise 1. The Stationary Bike.

Perform this exercise 3 to 4 times per week with moderate tension on the bike.
• 1 minute at a moderate pace (approximately 85RPM)
• 10 seconds at maximum speed
• 50 seconds at slow speed (approximately 50RPM)
• Repeat 20 times

This exercise mimics the cardio requirements of an extreme game situation. We are training the heart to recover to resting rate sooner. This will result in you being recovered and ready to go out for your next shift and perform at 100% when your opposition will be on their bench still tired from the last shift.

Exercise 2. Push Ups.

Perform up to 200 push ups, spread out thru-out the day. Do 75% of the push ups will normal hand placement (about shoulder width apart) and the other 25% with your hands about 12 inches apart. Variations in hand placement insure that the triceps, shoulders and chest get adequate stimulation.
Do this exercise 2 times per week.
Exercise 3. Sit Ups / Crunches
Perform up to 200 sit ups, spread out thru-out the day. This exercise is great for developing core strength which results in more stability and increased mobility in game action.
Do this exercise 2 times per week.

Exercise 4. Squats.

Perform up to 200 squats, spread out thru-out the day. This exercise is great for developing leg and core strength which results in raw power, speed and agility on the ice.
Start the exercise by getting into hockey stance. While keeping your head and chest up, slowly lower your body by bending the knees until your upper legs are parallel to the floor then push back up to the hockey stance. You can increase the difficulty by wearing a weighted vest or holding a weight in front of your body.
Do this exercise 2 times per week.

I advise to not do any of these exercises on a game day as you will be fatigued and lower your ability to perform at 100%.
Many elite hockey players use this style of in season training and get great results.
Train hard, eat lots of healthy food and get lots of rest.

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03-03-2010, 03:25 PM
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Trouble Gaining Weight?

Naturally Enhancing Your Appetite


Many guys seem to have a problem of eating enough calories to help them grow. Training/lifting doesn’t seem to be a problem, neither does taking supplements. Knowledge of supplements is so prevalent on the message boards that anyone can easily get the info they need with a simple click of the mouse. Nutrition on the other hand, is the most difficult aspect of bodybuilding. It takes up hours of your day, every day. It is also the most neglected aspect of our sport because it is: time consuming, expensive and let’s face it, boring.
The guys that take this sport seriously all realize that consuming enough good calories is what separates the men from the boys. There is no humanly possible way that a man can add 30 or more pounds of lean body weight to his frame without eating high calorie multiple meals thru-out the day.
Most guys will admit that it is a daunting task. “How can I continue to eat when I feel full or not hungry at all?” Well, that is what this article is all about. I will let you in on a time proven method of increasing your appetite that is 100% natural, no supplements or pharmaceuticals are necessary.

The trick is in knowing how to make you hungry. If you have to force yourself to eat when you don’t feel hungry, it becomes a burden and you will certainly fail.

Don’t be fooled by Gimmicks

Many companies offer expensive supplements or pharmaceuticals to enhance your appetite, but my method is offered here for free. It is GUARANTEED to work. My method has been used by collegiate and professional football players, strength athletes, body builders, numerous world champions of various sports.

You MUST be prepared for being hungry all the time. Many people fail to have food ready, good food. If you are hungry, but did not have meals prepared ahead of time, you will be wasting your time. Be ready to spend an hour every day, preparing your meals for the following day. Many people use Tupperware or Rubbermaid dishes to contain their 5 to 7 meals. Having food ready means you can be prepared for most things that would normally have interrupted or delayed prepping a meal thru-out your busy day.

Step 1

Forget about the traditional way of eating. Three meals per day just won’t cut it (unless you are one of the genetically gifted few). A minimum of 6 meals will soon become your habit.

For the first 4 days, I want you to eat every hour. YES EVERY HOUR!!! It’s not as bad as you think. Not full meals every hour, but small portions of anything.
Example:
1 apple, ½ peanut butter sandwich, ½ protein shake, chocolate bar, banana.
Quality of the foods you eat in these 4 days is not as important as the fact of actually eating something. It must be small enough to not fill you, even if you are still hungry, don’t eat. Let your stomach get used to the small hourly snack/feeding. By the 3rd or 4th day you find yourself starving, craving for that snack. Your metabolism will also start to adjust to your new eating habit. Rather than storing calories to hold you over till you’re next feeding in 5 to 8 hours (like you used to do), it will come to expect another feeding in a short period. Thus, send more calories to be burned for energy, or for muscle recuperation from your work outs. This also creates the right environment for body fat reduction.

Step 2

Now that you have your body used to the hourly feedings you are going to find yourself hungry just about all the time. The logical step for the next 4 day period is to start eating more at each snack time. But rather than eating every hour, spread the time out to every 90mins (1 ½ hour) or 105mins (1 hour 45mins).

Continue with this process of 4 day periods until you are eating a full meal every 2 ½ or 3 hours minimum.

Eating a lot is not easy. Food preparation of your 6 or more daily meals takes up a lot of time. Granted, 1 or 2 of those meals will probably be a protein shake but the amount of calories we are forced to eat would turn the average lazy Joe into a 300 pound tub of lard in less than a year.
Workout hard, sleep as much as you can, drink the well dry of water, take your supplements and EAT.

Now that you have a solution to your appetite problem, I expect to see you walking around with 20 new pounds of mass within the next 4 months.

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03-03-2010, 03:37 PM
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The Importance of Hydration


Here are some indications:

• History of heat cramps
• Consume inadequate sodium - eat a salt-restricted diet
• Sweat profusely early in activity
• Have poor hydration habits during exercise
• Sweat is heavy in salt, stings eyes, tastes salty

Let’s learn a few things. What proportion of our body does water make up?

• 66% of a person’s total bodyweight is from water
• 65% of total body water is intracellular
• 35% of total body water is extracellular
• Well hydrated muscles are about 75% water
• Bones are about 32% water
• Fat is basically anhydrous having only about 10% water content
• Blood is about 93% water

And if the above didn’t make you understand the relevance of hydration:

• Average males are about 60% water weight
• Average females are about 50% water weight
• Athletes are about 70% water weight

Keeping you hydrated thru-out the day is very important. Simply drinking a lot of water during exercise is a waste of time as your body can’t utilize it. Stay well hydrated every day. Replace your electrolytes during exercise with small consistent sips of a quality energy drink watered down to 75% water – 25% energy drink.
Cramping will dramatically decrease for most people.
Workouts will become much more effective and efficient.

During a game, take sips of water every time you finish a shift. Being properly hydrated can keep you playing at 100% from your first shift to the last shift in over time.

Let’s face it folk, sport hydration is a science.
If hockey is a low priority hobby for you, have fun with it and take it easy.
If your hockey is serious, or athletic performance is of high priority, hydration is as important as the food you put in your mouth.

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03-03-2010, 04:53 PM
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Very helpful and informative! This is exactly what I have been looking for to increase my performance. Thank you

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03-03-2010, 05:57 PM
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Thanks, keep it up.

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03-03-2010, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Sweat profusely early in activity
Just something minor here but many exercise's physiology infos are saying that early sweating is in fact a characteristic of well-trained persons. The major function of sweat is to cool off your body temperature so sweating early during exercise is good for you.

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03-04-2010, 02:59 AM
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Great topics and articles so far! Thank you. Do you happen to have any off-ice drills and skill shapers?

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03-04-2010, 03:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Shaw View Post
Naturally Enhancing Your Appetite



Eating a lot is not easy. Food preparation of your 6 or more daily meals takes up a lot of time. Granted, 1 or 2 of those meals will probably be a protein shake but the amount of calories we are forced to eat would turn the average lazy Joe into a 300 pound tub of lard in less than a year.
Workout hard, sleep as much as you can, drink the well dry of water, take your supplements and EAT.
Damn straight it isnt, it took me a lot of time and A LOT of money to gain weight in high school. I have a naturally fast metabolism though, I eat twice as much as my friends who weigh twice as much as me. Being athletic helps I guess

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03-04-2010, 03:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloPoErich View Post
Great topics and articles so far! Thank you. Do you happen to have any off-ice drills and skill shapers?
Hey I know of some good off ice drills, I could scan them for you. What sort of stuff are you looking for? I have a bunch that are just for building foot speed, no equipment needed

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03-04-2010, 03:46 AM
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Thanks for posting these, some great stuff!

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03-04-2010, 04:27 AM
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Great stuff. Keep em coming.

beavboyz, I'd be interested in off ice foot speed drills.

Thanks.

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03-04-2010, 01:22 PM
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Here is an instructional video of the Hockey Squat.
Its one of the many exercises that will help with foot speed and over all power on the ice.



Last edited by Perfect Body: 03-04-2010 at 01:28 PM.
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03-04-2010, 08:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pasztor View Post
Great stuff. Keep em coming.

beavboyz, I'd be interested in off ice foot speed drills.

Thanks.
K give me some time, I will have to scan them.

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03-04-2010, 10:57 PM
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No offense, but this is some very subpar stuff.

For example, why would someone do hockey squats at relatively high repetitions to gain speed, power and strength? Why would they not instead do real squats at low repetitions to gain strength (and size) as well as add in some explosive movements like a speed box squat or a clean and jerk? How would the exercise that's not at all adapted to your objectives be desirable?

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03-05-2010, 03:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty hates Sergei View Post
For example, why would someone do hockey squats at relatively high repetitions to gain speed, power and strength? Why would they not instead do real squats at low repetitions to gain strength (and size) as well as add in some explosive movements like a speed box squat or a clean and jerk? How would the exercise that's not at all adapted to your objectives be desirable?
It all depends. We are not the same genetically, not everything works, what the books will tell you.

And btw according to theory:
- low rep (1-5) + high weight -> strength gain
- mid rep (8-12) + mid weight -> size gain

BUT, after 10 years in the gym I know that my legs react only to very high reps (20+), no matter what everyone told me, that's what works for my system.

I also do not believe that heavy lifting is very important for hockey strength, as those fibers are slow (red), while to be explosive we need the white (fast) ones, to work at their optimum. But clean and jerk is def the best what a hockey player can use, not just because of the legs, but because it's a complete exersize, involving the whole body. Repetition count is another matter though.

Depending on muscle composition (red/whote/fast/slow twitch) you might need differing exersizes to get optimum results.

I am always happy to try new training methods, because you always find something effective. Also you should surprise your body as often as possible, because it will adapt very fast to the same old routine, and you will plateau.

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03-05-2010, 11:54 AM
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Perfect Body
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty hates Sergei View Post
No offense, but this is some very subpar stuff.

For example, why would someone do hockey squats at relatively high repetitions to gain speed, power and strength? Why would they not instead do real squats at low repetitions to gain strength (and size) as well as add in some explosive movements like a speed box squat or a clean and jerk? How would the exercise that's not at all adapted to your objectives be desirable?
Thanks for the reply.

When you are working out with the end goal of developing functional strength (strength and power that transfers directly to game play capability) there are 100's of various exercises that can and should be employed. Various ranges of repetitions must also be considered.

A 1000 page book could be written on the exercises and strategies to be employed for hockey related dryland training, and one could still find more information to add after the book was finished.

Not saying you are wrong in employing heavy squats or box squats or clean and jerk into your training regime, they are great lifts that will produce results.

The few exercises that I have listed above will result in improved on ice performance. There is nothing sub - par about them. They are basic exercises that can be done at home with very little to no typical gym equipment.


Last edited by Perfect Body: 03-05-2010 at 12:00 PM.
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