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How to play wing

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Old
12-27-2009, 10:33 PM
  #1
HannaColts
 
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How to play wing

This might sound like a dumb question but literally, whats your goal in the offesnive and defensive end, besides score goals and preventing shots.

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12-28-2009, 12:34 AM
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Originally Posted by HannaColts View Post
This might sound like a dumb question but literally, whats your goal in the offesnive and defensive end, besides score goals and preventing shots.
You need to hold the boards on the breakout and play more disciplined, e.g. the center can float up or down more, depending on the play. In the d-zone, you can generally cover one of the defenseman and try to force a turnover for a breakaway when that chance arises. Basically, wing= play near the boards more than center...

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12-28-2009, 12:46 AM
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offensively is pretty much the same as any other position. dont feel like you have to stay on your side. especially through the neutral zone. you should be moving without the puck if you dont have it and not necessarily in a straight line. in other words dont feel like you have to stay on the exact wing you are playing offensively. defensively djohnsons got it. i might add to keep your head on a swivel. you have to stay on your point but you cant be right next to him because you have to help prevent cross ice passes but keep track of your defenseman incase he pinches

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12-28-2009, 12:50 AM
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One thing I forgot to mention is that if you're a more advanced player or know your teammates really well, you can swap positions with the center through the breakout or in the offensive zone. Just think of this as rotation, because you should eventually end back up in your proper position.

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12-28-2009, 12:57 AM
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Stay along your side in the defensive zone. If your team plays the trap (doubt it does, but still) and you are LW you need to be positioned very well. Also, go to the net and set up a screen.

This is what I would do.

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12-28-2009, 07:40 AM
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Defensive - cover the point man on your side, don't get sucked down too low, when in doubt just stay within a stick length of him, be ready for a breakout pass along your boards

Offensive - forecheck hard when the puck is in your corner, get yourself open for a pass (i.e. not standing behind their guys), make a good pass if you don't have a shooting lane, take a quick shot if you do

That's about it. The most important thing I want my wingers to do is to cover their point man so he is not a shooting option, break out the puck, and get in on the forecheck as fast and hard as possible so we can pressure them and establish the zone.

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12-28-2009, 08:58 AM
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Resist the temptation to chase opponents below the circles in your own zone

Be ready to criss-cross with your center on breakouts, try not to skate in a single lane up and down the ice

Try to skate circles in the o-zone to get open, but do so that you're always facing the puck so that you can be aready

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12-28-2009, 10:35 AM
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ALWAYS cover the point man

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01-24-2010, 06:36 PM
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I dont want to jack someones thread, but do any of you wingers out there wingers criss cross with the other winger? I noticed only certain players do that. I remember back in high school everyone did that. But I not see it that often. I know the center and the winger swap all the time, but rarley do I see the two wingers swap sides anymore.

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01-24-2010, 07:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by major league View Post
I dont want to jack someones thread, but do any of you wingers out there wingers criss cross with the other winger? I noticed only certain players do that. I remember back in high school everyone did that. But I not see it that often. I know the center and the winger swap all the time, but rarley do I see the two wingers swap sides anymore.
Guys you play with need to be awake and notice you switched sides because the reason you see guys criss cross is that one guy noticed the other guy did for some reason to create flow to a play.

Situational positioning is what I call it.

A winger covering for a dman who pinched in fits into this category as well. Guys you play with need to know what they are doing for plays like this to happen.

Wingers can also cover for the center if he got caught fighting for the puck down low behind the goal or something. Rarely do people do it properly in a beer league type deal.

I am used to people not doing what they are supposed to so I make sure I do at least. Because many do not know what they are doing you won't see too many of these criss cross plays like you mentioned in a beer league game.

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02-04-2010, 12:20 AM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HannaColts View Post
This might sound like a dumb question but literally, whats your goal in the offesnive and defensive end, besides score goals and preventing shots.
Well, you have asked a mouth full. As a winger in your defensive zone, play your position. Here is a picture that shows positional zones within your defensive zone. I call them sub-zones.

Notice that I have placed both defensive sub-zones and offensive sub-zones. Notice that both winger sub-zones go deep just past the hash mark in the defensive zone. This is to allow you to come down low and puck support the defensemen during the breakout. If your defensemen has the puck, don't hang out at the point with the defensemen on the other team. If fact, it would be better if you stay about two stick lengths away from the point man, but allow your body to be in position between the puck and the point man.

Now, look at this next picture. This is known as skating lanes.

As you can see, there are three skating lanes. If you go up straight up the ice in your skating lane, this is known as linear hockey. With this type of hockey it's very easy for you to be covered or played by the other team as you attack.

However, if you cross skating lanes, then you ad an extra dimension to the game. Instead of letting the defensemen cover you with ease, now the defensemen is going to wonder if the puck carrier is going to pass, dump, drop...etc.

Now, you just don't go over into skating lanes because it looks like fun or you feel like it. The lane change is determined by the puck carrier. If you have the puck and you are moving into the neutral zone, the first thing you do is change lanes to the next lane towards center.

Important: The player without the puck goes behind the player with the puck!
ALWAYS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Not maybe.....ALWAYS!!!!!!! This is going to keep you from running into each other, but it send a message to the whole team what's going on.

Now just before you get to the blue line, I want you to make sure that you enter the attacking zone on your off wing...more on that later. If you get to the blue line and the defensemen is controlling the gap...what do you do? If you are at a time crunch, dump and change!

If you are gap controlled, turn back into the neutral zone, send the puck back to your defensemen, regroup in the neutral and restart your attack. Here is a picture of regrouping in the neutral zone.

Notice that I have left winger rushing up against the boards to control the puck. The rule of regrouping goes like this...."If you have the puck and the puck goes to the defense, the puck must be moved "D to D"! The person that passes the puck back to the defense is the "Start Man". He is the first player to move into the first lane over. That center moves in the same direction, one lane over and the near winger, moves to the far lane.

Ok, let say you have the puck in the neutral zone and you have a turn over. Now what do you do? Yes, you can chase down the puck and force the puck carrier to cough up the puck. But there are easier ways to do this and save energy instead of starting and stopping all of the time.

Let's look at this picture below.

Notice that I have the pucl turned over to the left winger on the other team. The first thing he should do is move the puck back to the defense and regroup. I don't know how many time I see player grap the puck along the boards, each player rushing to control the puck, only to get there and throw the puck to the other team trying to advance the puck like they are playing Football hoping that they will gain 10yards and get some type of point...NOT!

So the turn over should go right back to the defensemen so that the attacking line can regroup. However, some teams just don't know how to regroup. Notice that regrouping for your team is exactly the same way as if you have sent the puck back to your own defensemen.

Notice that the right winger, who was covering the left winger, is now moving one lane over. Remember the rule: The key is the direction of the "D to D" pass. This means that the center skating lane player move over one lane towards the outside and that far player move across the neutral zone and picks up the left winger with fast choppy crossovers.

Notice that the puck in moving in the other direction. So the two short lane changes is more important. The off wing coming across the neutral zone will now have his stick blade into position to receive the pass to intercept. And yes, once he gets it...he passes it back to the defensemen and regroups and moves one lane over...get it!

How, when you get to the blue line with the puck, it's best to attack the blue line on your off wing. What! What does this mean? Once you cross the line the best place to shoot the puck is from within the slot. If you enter the zone on your "On Wing" you will be forced to move out side the shooting zone and towards the board.

See this picture below.

Notice the near winger overloading the zone. What this is going to do is two things. One, it's going to force the two point defensemen to see him and move off the line. Two, it's going to allow that player to enter the attacking zone on his off wing.

Why the off wing? If you picture your self shooting right and you enter on the left, and you turn toward open ice towards the center, the puck will be on the outside of your body...protected. Plus, then you will also have the shot on your forehand in which you will be able to travel down what is known as a shooting alley.

Here is a picture of a shooting alley. Sorry it's in the other direction...but you get the picture.

Notice that the puck is to the outside protected. Plus there is nothing in the world that says you have to go around the defensemen. In fact, at this point, it better to use the defensemen as a screen.

Next here is a picture of how to set up in a shooting triangle.

Notice that the puck carrier enter the zone and made a hard turn towards center. The player within that center lane needs to understand that once the puck carrier moves across the blue line, that he will need to protect the puck. Once he crosses, the centerman right away need to move over into that same lane, allowing the winger to move into his lane.

Once the switch has been made the now winger needs to rush the net. This will allow the puck carrier to have the freedom to shoot. If the defensemen does not pick up the winger going to the net, then then puck carrier pass the puck to the rushing winger. Oh, and by the way....this is why they call it a team sport...pass the puck! If you don't want to pass the puck, go play chess!

Last thing is called an "Inverted triangle". This is what you get into when the goalie had made the save into the corner.

You will see that the player are in a shooting triangle. Once the puck goes into the corner, the closest player to that corner goes in to retrieve the puck. The off winger in the triangle needs to set up behind the net as a "Safety Relief Valve" man. This guy is going to keep the defensemen from shoveling the puck around behind the net towards the weak side.

Once the defensemen shovels the puck behind the net. the winger head back to his spot in the triangle.

he the winger heads back, expect a pass from behind the net. Oh by the way...Have your stick on the ice please, because it coming to you. Once you get it, the chances are really good that the goalie will be up aginst the post. So don't try and be the hero to see if you can thread the needle. Just pass it to the other winger waiting on the other side with the open net. remembers, this isn't chess!

Hope this helps
Head coach

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Last edited by Headcoach: 02-04-2010 at 09:18 AM.
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02-04-2010, 12:31 AM
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That is a hell of a lot of info

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02-04-2010, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanadaBacon View Post
That is a hell of a lot of info
Sorry, I added more!

Head coach

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04-01-2010, 04:45 PM
  #14
Kjell Dahlin
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Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Well, you have asked a mouth full. As a winger in your defensive zone, play your position. Here is a picture that shows positional zones within your defensive zone. I call them sub-zones.

Notice that I have placed both defensive sub-zones and offensive sub-zones. Notice that both winger sub-zones go deep just past the hash mark in the defensive zone. This is to allow you to come down low and puck support the defensemen during the breakout. If your defensemen has the puck, don't hang out at the point with the defensemen on the other team. If fact, it would be better if you stay about two stick lengths away from the point man, but allow your body to be in position between the puck and the point man.

Now, look at this next picture. This is known as skating lanes.

As you can see, there are three skating lanes. If you go up straight up the ice in your skating lane, this is known as linear hockey. With this type of hockey it's very easy for you to be covered or played by the other team as you attack.

However, if you cross skating lanes, then you ad an extra dimension to the game. Instead of letting the defensemen cover you with ease, now the defensemen is going to wonder if the puck carrier is going to pass, dump, drop...etc.

Now, you just don't go over into skating lanes because it looks like fun or you feel like it. The lane change is determined by the puck carrier. If you have the puck and you are moving into the neutral zone, the first thing you do is change lanes to the next lane towards center.

Important: The player without the puck goes behind the player with the puck!
ALWAYS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Not maybe.....ALWAYS!!!!!!! This is going to keep you from running into each other, but it send a message to the whole team what's going on.

Now just before you get to the blue line, I want you to make sure that you enter the attacking zone on your off wing...more on that later. If you get to the blue line and the defensemen is controlling the gap...what do you do? If you are at a time crunch, dump and change!

If you are gap controlled, turn back into the neutral zone, send the puck back to your defensemen, regroup in the neutral and restart your attack. Here is a picture of regrouping in the neutral zone.

Notice that I have left winger rushing up against the boards to control the puck. The rule of regrouping goes like this...."If you have the puck and the puck goes to the defense, the puck must be moved "D to D"! The person that passes the puck back to the defense is the "Start Man". He is the first player to move into the first lane over. That center moves in the same direction, one lane over and the near winger, moves to the far lane.

Ok, let say you have the puck in the neutral zone and you have a turn over. Now what do you do? Yes, you can chase down the puck and force the puck carrier to cough up the puck. But there are easier ways to do this and save energy instead of starting and stopping all of the time.

Let's look at this picture below.

Notice that I have the pucl turned over to the left winger on the other team. The first thing he should do is move the puck back to the defense and regroup. I don't know how many time I see player grap the puck along the boards, each player rushing to control the puck, only to get there and throw the puck to the other team trying to advance the puck like they are playing Football hoping that they will gain 10yards and get some type of point...NOT!

So the turn over should go right back to the defensemen so that the attacking line can regroup. However, some teams just don't know how to regroup. Notice that regrouping for your team is exactly the same way as if you have sent the puck back to your own defensemen.

Notice that the right winger, who was covering the left winger, is now moving one lane over. Remember the rule: The key is the direction of the "D to D" pass. This means that the center skating lane player move over one lane towards the outside and that far player move across the neutral zone and picks up the left winger with fast choppy crossovers.

Notice that the puck in moving in the other direction. So the two short lane changes is more important. The off wing coming across the neutral zone will now have his stick blade into position to receive the pass to intercept. And yes, once he gets it...he passes it back to the defensemen and regroups and moves one lane over...get it!

How, when you get to the blue line with the puck, it's best to attack the blue line on your off wing. What! What does this mean? Once you cross the line the best place to shoot the puck is from within the slot. If you enter the zone on your "On Wing" you will be forced to move out side the shooting zone and towards the board.

See this picture below.

Notice the near winger overloading the zone. What this is going to do is two things. One, it's going to force the two point defensemen to see him and move off the line. Two, it's going to allow that player to enter the attacking zone on his off wing.

Why the off wing? If you picture your self shooting right and you enter on the left, and you turn toward open ice towards the center, the puck will be on the outside of your body...protected. Plus, then you will also have the shot on your forehand in which you will be able to travel down what is known as a shooting alley.

Here is a picture of a shooting alley. Sorry it's in the other direction...but you get the picture.

Notice that the puck is to the outside protected. Plus there is nothing in the world that says you have to go around the defensemen. In fact, at this point, it better to use the defensemen as a screen.

Next here is a picture of how to set up in a shooting triangle.

Notice that the puck carrier enter the zone and made a hard turn towards center. The player within that center lane needs to understand that once the puck carrier moves across the blue line, that he will need to protect the puck. Once he crosses, the centerman right away need to move over into that same lane, allowing the winger to move into his lane.

Once the switch has been made the now winger needs to rush the net. This will allow the puck carrier to have the freedom to shoot. If the defensemen does not pick up the winger going to the net, then then puck carrier pass the puck to the rushing winger. Oh, and by the way....this is why they call it a team sport...pass the puck! If you don't want to pass the puck, go play chess!

Last thing is called an "Inverted triangle". This is what you get into when the goalie had made the save into the corner.

You will see that the player are in a shooting triangle. Once the puck goes into the corner, the closest player to that corner goes in to retrieve the puck. The off winger in the triangle needs to set up behind the net as a "Safety Relief Valve" man. This guy is going to keep the defensemen from shoveling the puck around behind the net towards the weak side.

Once the defensemen shovels the puck behind the net. the winger head back to his spot in the triangle.

he the winger heads back, expect a pass from behind the net. Oh by the way...Have your stick on the ice please, because it coming to you. Once you get it, the chances are really good that the goalie will be up aginst the post. So don't try and be the hero to see if you can thread the needle. Just pass it to the other winger waiting on the other side with the open net. remembers, this isn't chess!

Hope this helps
Head coach
I was looking for a picture of the hash marks (my first language is French and I was not sure if I understood correctly what the hash marks were!) and I stumble onto your post; thanks for the read!

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04-01-2010, 05:39 PM
  #15
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This article provides an in-depth explanation of the role of a winger in hockey

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04-01-2010, 10:47 PM
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Wow I thought I could add some insight to this question, but I think head coach said it all! Thanks for posting that, I would love to use some of those images on my blog.

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04-06-2010, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavboyz View Post
Wow I thought I could add some insight to this question, but I think head coach said it all! Thanks for posting that, I would love to use some of those images on my blog.
That's fine, just a http://www.passthepuck.net link to the web site, and then you can use them.

Head coach

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