HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie
Notices

The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Great Snapshot and Scoring Video

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
05-19-2010, 09:29 AM
  #1
Jarick
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 25,251
vCash: 500
Great Snapshot and Scoring Video

While we've got a lot of videos, thought I'd share one of my favorites.

This summer, my goal was to improve my quick release on my shots. All the guys on my team say I have a great shot, but a lot of them get blocked or give the goalie too much time to make a save. I'd say in a given game, I attempt probably 10-12 shots but only 3-5 get through on the goalie and I average less than a goal per game.

I've been watching this video a few times a week and before I play, and it's making a big difference so far. Last night I had three goals in a higher tempo pickup game, two of them directly as a result of the video.



To be honest, I'm not even looking for openings on the goalie anymore. One goal I was coming down the off wing with speed, defender was in the middle lane, just got over the puck, leaned into it, and let it go. Goalie barely had time to react, just started to drop when it went in. Had a few more shots like that, two the goalie barely made a stop, and two went a bit wide (new curve that I didn't like) but really hit the boards/glass with power and had some good feedback from the other guys. Had comments on how hard my shot was and how quick they were.

Another goal was a rebound that I created, we had a 2-on-4 (!), guy made a nice pass while I drove to the net, I caught it on my backhand like the two-touch in the video, shot as quick as possible and the goalie made a great save, but the rebound dropped in front of his pads by only a couple inches, maybe a foot from the goal line, somehow managed to roof it. Again, I just went on pure instinct, shoot the puck as quick as possible. Had another chance just like that, practically empty net but the puck went just wide (stupid new curve).

Anyways, moral of the story is the video is the first I've seen with an actual NHL'er showing useful game situation scoring techniques. It's a bit advanced, not for those who are just learning, but I think there's good takeaways for everybody. I highly recommend learning to take the proper old-fashioned wrist shot, but more and more I don't think it has much of any use in a high tempo game situation since a quick release is so much more important than pure power in almost all situations.

The big things I took away were:

- shooting in stride by putting the body weight over the stick and leaning into it

- get the shot off before you have time to think about it

- catch passes off the inside of your body rather than the outside

- make sure shoulders are in position for shooting (need to work on this still)

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-19-2010, 12:03 PM
  #2
Mithrandir
I only own my mind..
 
Mithrandir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Texas
Country: United States
Posts: 11,946
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post

To be honest, I'm not even looking for openings on the goalie anymore. One goal I was coming down the off wing with speed, defender was in the middle lane, just got over the puck, leaned into it, and let it go. Goalie barely had time to react, just started to drop when it went in. Had a few more shots like that, two the goalie barely made a stop, and two went a bit wide (new curve that I didn't like) but really hit the boards/glass with power and had some good feedback from the other guys. Had comments on how hard my shot was and how quick they were.

Another goal was a rebound that I created, we had a 2-on-4 (!), guy made a nice pass while I drove to the net, I caught it on my backhand like the two-touch in the video, shot as quick as possible and the goalie made a great save, but the rebound dropped in front of his pads by only a couple inches, maybe a foot from the goal line, somehow managed to roof it. Again, I just went on pure instinct, shoot the puck as quick as possible. Had another chance just like that, practically empty net but the puck went just wide (stupid new curve).
Let you in on a little secret... most of the time, the pros aren't picking spots either. It may have told you that in the video - I don't have time to watch it but I bookmarked it. With the tempo of the game, it's all about throwing it at the net hard and quick. Look at Crosby's comments after the gold medal goal "I just threw it at the net". How many times do you hear that after a goal? Yes, it's partially modesty - they often have an idea of where they want to put the puck - but only on wide open snipes are they really concentrating on putting it there... it's all about getting the puck to the net without giving the goalie time to react. The reason you see pucks get shot straight into goalies' gloves sometimes is because the player is just putting everything he's got into putting it on net in the blink of an eye, rather than making sure to stick it just inside the post, and the goalie ends up being able to get it to it because it's close to the middle of the net. This is how we were coached in college and this is how my buddies who have gone on to higher levels tell me they've continued to be coached (though when you reach a certain point of understanding, it becomes clear which shots were just thrown at the net and which weren't anyways). Ultimately, I'd say there's a higher percentage of goals resulting from doing what you've discovered than from trying to pick a spot on the goalie every time.

Edit: also, I fully agree about the usefulness of the wristshot. You will always find a situation to use it, but for the more advanced player, it's use is limited. I wanted to make that comment in some of the recent snapshot threads that have been popping up but it didn't seem relevant, but since you mentioned it, I thought it was worth noting that I wholeheartedly agree... the snapshot is by far the most important shot in my arsenal.

Mithrandir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-19-2010, 12:15 PM
  #3
Scotty94
Registered User
 
Scotty94's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 25
vCash: 500
I've actually watched that video a number of times before and enjoyed it. A lot of it is stuff you pick up gradually along the way while playing hockey for a while, maybe without even realizing you do it. I tend to get a lot of my goals while streaking down the wing and shooting off a hard snap-wrister to the far side in stride. Hiding that release is great and nearly always gains you just a hair of extra time in goalie reaction. Got one last week where I beat the goalie high short side from the top outside of the circle as I came down the wing and he wasn't even ready for it. The tip about catching passes is also a good one, as a lot of people just try to catch it anywhere in front of them and stop it.

I'll also agree that most pros say that they aren't picking their spots either. I've seen videos/interviews with people like Brett Hull, Modano, and Zetterberg who will openly say that they most often just try to get it on the net, but try to do so very quickly. Without taking anything away from the skill level of NHLers, many of the snipe shots you see from them are simply luck of getting a quick shot on net that happens to hit a very small spot. This thought, as I said before, has been echoed by NHLers themselves. It just takes getting a knack down for taking a shot without thinking about it that will be just under the bar, just off the ice 5-hole, barely over the pads and inside the post, etc. The more you practice, the more thoughtless it comes to snap off a shot from anywhere on the ice into certain spots of the net without even trying to think, "Okay, follow through high because I'm trying to tuck this one just into the upper corner". Enough practice and you just start doing it while just trying to get the shot off quickly without thinking.

Scotty94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-19-2010, 01:38 PM
  #4
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Thanks for posting that jarick, I saw a couple of things I don't do and will work on it. I can do the stuff that is shown but I do not currently do them so thanks.

Years ago I knew a guy who could break glass with a wrister and hurt goalies from center ice with a wrist snap shot. I never could, man it would be great to do that so I am going to work on this so thanks for posting that.

I score a lot though with a quick release as it is so this stuff should be relatively easy for me to adjust to in the video to be even better. I can see times where I took a second too long to unload the shot so the goalie had a split second extra to make the save on me and the video shows me my mistakes.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-19-2010, 02:56 PM
  #5
HowToHockey
Registered User
 
HowToHockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Huntsville, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 465
vCash: 500
Awesome post, thanks!

That video gives you a lot of things to try and work on. My favourite thing to do that the video shows is shooting without breaking stride. If you can do it well you surprise a lot of goalies. It is even better when you do it at full speed

HowToHockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:09 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. @2017 All Rights Reserved.