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Wrist/snap shot question for goalies

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05-19-2010, 01:52 PM
  #1
Hockeyfan68
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Wrist/snap shot question for goalies

Okay this question is for the goalies here ... doesn't matter how good or bad you are.

Last night a goalie on the other team told me a guy who shoots on our team has a fast shot and was faster than mine (wristshot or snapshot) but that mine hurt him more and said it was very heavy.

What the hell was he talking about?

How can a guy shoot faster yet have the puck not hurt as much with velocity or am I misreading what he said? I've played several games against him over the years so he knows my shot.

He told me one shot I took he could feel it through his blocker hand.

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05-19-2010, 02:20 PM
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Scotty94
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It's really a misconception. Some guys that have powerful wind-ups/form are notorious for having "heavy" shots. Such as Al MacInnis with his very high windup and wide stance when shooting. Granted, his shot was very hard/fast as well, but goalies said he had a "heavy" shot. By heavy, they mean that the puck seems to carry a lot of weight/momentum with it when they stop it, as opposed to simply a quick shot. Guys with faster wind-ups and the quickest releases are not known for having "heavy" shots: Brett Hull, Ovechkin, Sakic, Cammalleri, etc. They're known for their release speed and how quickly they get it away and while at times their actual shot speeds are probably close or even to the "heavier" shooters, it is their form that is more noticeable. Used to play with a guy whose shot was described as "heavy" by the goalies on our team. He had a very tall wind-up and visually leaned into hit shots a ton, but was beat out by several guys on our team including myself when it came time to actually testing speeds on the radar guns each season.

As I said, a misconception on the part of goalies and spectators. A quickly-released shot that catches the goalie in a bad spot on his body will be felt more obviously and they'll also tell you those shots are heavy. Naturally, faster shots hit harder when stopped by a goalie, so really anyone with a fast shot can shoot "heavy" shots.

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05-19-2010, 02:28 PM
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Jarick
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I always wondered if it had something to do with spin on the puck. But I have no idea. I think MacInnis used to put baby powder on his stick blade to REDUCE the spin on the puck because he thought it robbed him of shot velocity. But I'd think less spin would equal less velocity.

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05-19-2010, 11:21 PM
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Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty94 View Post
It's really a misconception. Some guys that have powerful wind-ups/form are notorious for having "heavy" shots. Such as Al MacInnis with his very high windup and wide stance when shooting. Granted, his shot was very hard/fast as well, but goalies said he had a "heavy" shot. By heavy, they mean that the puck seems to carry a lot of weight/momentum with it when they stop it, as opposed to simply a quick shot. Guys with faster wind-ups and the quickest releases are not known for having "heavy" shots: Brett Hull, Ovechkin, Sakic, Cammalleri, etc. They're known for their release speed and how quickly they get it away and while at times their actual shot speeds are probably close or even to the "heavier" shooters, it is their form that is more noticeable. Used to play with a guy whose shot was described as "heavy" by the goalies on our team. He had a very tall wind-up and visually leaned into hit shots a ton, but was beat out by several guys on our team including myself when it came time to actually testing speeds on the radar guns each season.

As I said, a misconception on the part of goalies and spectators. A quickly-released shot that catches the goalie in a bad spot on his body will be felt more obviously and they'll also tell you those shots are heavy. Naturally, faster shots hit harder when stopped by a goalie, so really anyone with a fast shot can shoot "heavy" shots.
Well it is a good thing I have a quick release too then, just not as quick as the other guy he was talking about.

I scored 7 goals playing defense last night, must be doing something right lol.

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05-20-2010, 05:17 AM
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Ragss
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I'm no expert on physics, but conceivably if a puck is spinning fast enough, when it hits the blocker all that force could be transferred to the blocker noticeably as the puck is forced to stop spinning. Other than that, given that the mass of the puck is constant, the velocity of the puck is the only factor in the force it delivers. The logical conclusion is that he just perceived his shot to be faster which is incorrect.

PS, 7 goals on defense? Sounds like you're playing beneath yourself.

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05-20-2010, 08:20 AM
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BadHammy*
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
I always wondered if it had something to do with spin on the puck. But I have no idea. I think MacInnis used to put baby powder on his stick blade to REDUCE the spin on the puck because he thought it robbed him of shot velocity. But I'd think less spin would equal less velocity.
Actually, spin DOES take away from velocity. I found a study on it some time ago. Though the difference is minute, we're talking 1-3% so meh.

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05-20-2010, 12:54 PM
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Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ragss View Post
I'm no expert on physics, but conceivably if a puck is spinning fast enough, when it hits the blocker all that force could be transferred to the blocker noticeably as the puck is forced to stop spinning. Other than that, given that the mass of the puck is constant, the velocity of the puck is the only factor in the force it delivers. The logical conclusion is that he just perceived his shot to be faster which is incorrect.

PS, 7 goals on defense? Sounds like you're playing beneath yourself.
I usually get like 2 and then go a game or 2 with just 1 or none but sometimes I score 4 but never 7. Thney were just going in and they did make some bad turnovers.

I play in an A men's league for that game not sure where else a 42 year old could play. I'm about average for that league anyway, good but average compared to those guys.

It was just a kooky night, we won at 16 to 3.

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