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A few noob questions from a beginner

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Old
05-17-2010, 11:28 AM
  #1
jlnjcb
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A few noob questions from a beginner

Hi all:

Well, if you read my other thread you understand that I am going to start playing in a 3 on 3 hockey league during the summer .

I have a few newbie questions:

1. What do I wear underneath all that equipment? How do you get "dressed"?


Full hockey equipment isn't required for the stick and puck sessions I go to so I not much people really get "dressed" for hockey (and plus I wouldn't watch guys change). I don't really know how to get dressed for hockey.... can you wear a regular t-shirt and shorts underneath?

Also, what is the standard "procedure" to put on hockey equipment?

2. What should I do to please/not annoy the coach and players?

I've played enough street hockey to know that nobody likes a ball hog. But what other things should I not/do to please the coach and players? Other then the obvious things like skate hard and never stop working....

The last thing I want is for the coaches and other players to be annoyed at me.

3. Should I just get rid of the puck the first few games?

Because I'm a beginner, I'm afraid I'll make a completely bone-headed play. Should I just pass the puck to people and just stay under the radar for the first few games?

4. For line changes, is it totally noobish if you use the door instead of just climbing over the boards?

5. I'm playing 3 on 3, is there anything different I should do from playing 5 on 5? What differences should I expect?

6. Will it roller blading make my ice skating worse?

I was planning to practice skating forwards and backwards (not turning or stopping) on roller skates on days I can't get to the ice. Even though I won't be practicing turns I was hoping that forwards and backwards skating would translate on the ice (making my stride more powerful, smoother etc.)

Is this a bad idea?

7. Do any of you know any good dvds, books, websites, threads that can help with my shooting, passing, skating, general hockey sense?

That's all the questions I have for now, but I'm sure I'll think of something later on. Any answers would be really helpful.

Thanks!

EDIT:

Hi again guys,

Okay now I've got a problem. A friend of a friend said that he tried out 3 on 3 and it was MURDER. He apparently puked on the first day.

Now I have an option of playing 5 on 5. What would you recommend for a beginner?

EDIT: May 20, 2010

New question:

ARGH!!!!

I just found out that the 3 on 3 league im going to is open to all levels. Not only beginners. The coordinator says that although its just "for fun" it is still mostly filled with AA and AAA players. Should I still go? Opinions anyone?

I should probably post this on a new thread or something, but do any of you guys know a good place to play around the Vancouver B.C area? Minor hockey is closed for the season so i need a place with summer leagues.

EDIT: May 25, 2010

Edit: New Question

Do any of you guys know where to get cheap hockey gear? all my local stores are selling them for pretty expensive. Im looking online, but im not sure which sites have the cheapest prices. I've looked at hockeymonkey and hockeygiant so far. Any suggestions?

Edit: New Question

Do any of you guys know where to get cheap hockey gear? all my local stores are selling them for pretty expensive. Im looking online, but im not sure which sites have the cheapest prices. I've looked at hockeymonkey and hockeygiant so far. Any suggestions?

EDIT: May 26, 2010

Edit: New Question

Well this league I'm playing in is a no checking league, my question is:
Does this mean that I shouldn't "play the body" and just play the puck?


Last edited by jlnjcb: 05-26-2010 at 12:53 PM. Reason: A new question
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Old
05-17-2010, 01:17 PM
  #2
Axxion89
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I am a former noob, I now consider myself a beginner/intermediate but I can answer a few of these questions:

1- For getting dressed, I wear a guinea tee and my underwear underneath all my equipment. I put my equipment on in the following order:

Jock
Hockey Socks*
Skates*
Shin Pads* (shin pads on, pull socks up over pads and tape on)
Pants*
Shoulder Pads
Elbow pads
Jersey
Helmet Gloves

The reason * is put after Socks, Skates, Pads and Pants is because the order changes depending if you tuck your shin pads under your skate toungue or over it. I have done both but now tuck it under the shin pad because IMO it keeps my skate on tighter and I get more protection (And i bought 15" pro stock shins that are huge and fit only that way ) So if you wear your pads with the toungue under the pad, follow my way above but be careful that when u put the skate thrugh the pants you dont not cut the pants!!! If you tuck the shin under the tounge then the * order would be:

Shin Pads
Socks
Pants
Skate

2- Play like a team player, if you have the shot, take the shot, if you don't have the shot, pass it if the pass is there. Don't feel obligated that because you're new you have to pass to make friends. Play good defense and don't camp the blueline too much waiting for that breakaway pass, thats what always ticks me off

3- Do what you gotta do! From my learning stages playing open hockey, my passes have been intercepted more than my shots. I have a good wrist shot so if im 50-50 whether to shoot, pass, or dump the puck, I'll either shoot or dump it

4 - Yea you might get a few hecklers for that but I'll do it now and then out of laziness or if my legs are sore

5 - Probably more open ice and a different defensive strategy

6 - Other posters will tell you that roller blading will make you worse because of the edge feel. I have no opinion since I never played roller hockey enough to remember what its like

7 - Read the Rink threads around here, howtohockey.com is good, and youtube and the interwebs! And what I like to do is ask player on the bench for some info and pointers and they always (from my experience) are willing to help you out

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05-17-2010, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by jlnjcb View Post
3. Should I just get rid of the puck the first few games?

Because I'm a beginner, I'm afraid I'll make a completely bone-headed play. Should I just pass the puck to people and just stay under the radar for the first few games?
Actually I'm going to suggest the opposite. As a relative newbie myself, my tendency STILL is to pass the puck off as soon as I get it. The hardest thing for me to have is patience... You have time, look around, and find where you can go with it, or who is the best person to pass it off to. Don't just throw it to the nearest teammate and hope he knows what to do with it been there done that, and my goalie hates me for the turnovers I have caused doing that.

Especially if you're playing 3 on 3, there will be a lot of room. Use it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jlnjcb View Post
4. For line changes, is it totally noobish if you use the door instead of just climbing over the boards?
Generally there is a flow. Guys coming onto the ice jump the boards, because guys coming off the ice are using the door.

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05-17-2010, 02:14 PM
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predfan24
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[QUOTE=jlnjcb;25867967]

1. What do I wear underneath all that equipment? How do you get "dressed"?


Personally I wear just my underwear underneath my equipment. A lot of guys like to wear shirts of some kind Underarmor etc. But I just get way too hot on the ice to wear any shirt.

Don't worry about how you put on your equipment. There is no right way. A lot of guys just do their own routine. Just to give you a outline however I go:

Jock
Shin pads
Socks
Pants
Skates
Elbows
Shoulder

[
6. Will it roller blading make my ice skating worse?

The same basic movements are used in skating forward and backwards and crossovers in ice and roller skating. I don't see why it wouldn't help. I will say it does usually take awhile to be able to seamlessly transition between the two. It took me along long time before I was able to switch back and forth without carrying bad habits. I play roller hockey some these days but I hate roller skating.

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05-17-2010, 02:30 PM
  #5
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1. What do I wear underneath all that equipment? How do you get "dressed"?


IMHO there is no 'right' way to suit-up... trial and error is how I learned. FWIW I:

Jock, Under Armour/Reebok Compression shirt (stay away from cotton shirts and go with something that wicks moisture and is light weight) and in-skate socks are put on before I go to the rink for ease and speed...

1. Pants (leave untied)
2. Socks (up around knee or upper calf - basically outta the way)
3. Skates (after skates I pull my socks down over the top of my skates prior to #4)
4. Shin guards (then pull socks over guards)
5. Pull pants down/pull up socks and Velcro to jock
6. Shoulder/chest pads
7. Elbow pads
8. Jersey
9. Helmet
10. Gloves


2. What should I do to please/not annoy the coach and players?

Be a good listener; ask questions if something is unclear. Be a TEAM player not an Army of One...

3. Should I just get rid of the puck the first few games?

As someone else mentioned the tendency is to dump off the puck ASAP; this 'signals' those on the contra-team that you are either new or uncomfortable and you will most likely be on their radar... move the puck a bit before passing off/shooting/what have you... if you are there just to redirect the puck then you are just replacing the boards. Be active and comfortable.


4. For line changes, is it totally noobish if you use the door instead of just climbing over the boards?

Try jumping the boards... the first time I did it I was scared &^%$less... but it worked-out fine. By 'jumping' you can also sit on the board, throw a leg over, spin your other leg over and ease yourself down on both feet... doing this a few times will give you confidence to do it faster and smoother. Before you know it you'll be over the board in no time and without even thinking about it.

Good luck!

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05-17-2010, 02:53 PM
  #6
Jarick
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1. What do I wear underneath all that equipment?

I typically wear a compression jock (like boxer briefs with a nut cup pouch) under my jeans to the rink and a wife beater under a t-shirt or whatever. Normal t-shirts get soggy with sweat and disgusting. They sell fancy performance shirts that work great but a thin wife beater works fine for me, and it's cheaper.

Also, what is the standard "procedure" to put on hockey equipment?

When I get to the rink, I:
- put the cup in the jock
- put on shin pads
- put socks over the shin pads
- pull on breezers (pants) and tighten
- put on skates and tie them
- put on shoulder pads
- put on elbow pads
- put on jersey
- put mouthguard in
- put on helmet and snap it
- put on gloves
- grab my water bottle and sticks and go

2. What should I do to please/not annoy the coach and players?

If you've got a coach, talk to him before the game, be friendly and attentive. If it's a beginner league, you'll be fine. If it's higher level, just skate hard and go to the net (if you're on wing anyway).

Honestly, if it's too high a level, you'll probably annoy people, and it's not your fault, it's just a skill level discrepancy.

3. Should I just get rid of the puck the first few games?

No, not necessarily. Play to your game. It might take a few years to figure out what that is. I know after about a year, I found out that I like to drive straight to the net and shoot the puck whenever I can. When I try to pass too much or set up plays, I'm useless. When I try to shut down the other team, I'm useless. When I skate and control the puck and shoot, I'm producing.

4. For line changes, is it totally noobish if you use the door instead of just climbing over the boards?

Yeah, kind of. It bugs me to no end. If the 5'5 girls on my teams can jump the boards, learn to jump them. It takes a few tries, and for the shorter ones like me (5'8) you might have to jump a little higher.

5. I'm playing 3 on 3, is there anything different I should do from playing 5 on 5? What differences should I expect?

I haven't played 3-on-3 except shinny, played 4-on-4 some though. With 3-on-3, there should be one forechecker. Don't get in too deep otherwise you'll give up rushes the other way. One guy has the puck in the corner, one should be at the point as a passing option and one in the high slot. Keep moving, it's going to be all about moving your feet and finding openings and getting shots from good angles.

6. Will it roller blading make my ice skating worse?

I don't think it will make it worse, but it may not make it better.

7. Do any of you know any good dvds, books, websites, threads that can help with my shooting, passing, skating, general hockey sense?

Yeah, check out the Robby Glantz skating DVD's (at least the first one) and the Bobby Hull Jr (with Brett Hull) shooting DVD...awesome.

Only other piece of advice I have is that you can only control two things at the rink, your effort and attitude. If you work hard, have fun, and laugh at yourself, generally you'll be well-liked. I like to just rip on myself and have a laugh on the bench (love the self depricating humor) and I've gotten on great with hundreds of guys, maybe rubbed a few the wrong way but most teammates will enjoy someone with a good attitude and sense of humor.

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05-17-2010, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
They sell fancy performance shirts that work great but a thin wife beater works fine for me, and it's cheaper.
Agreed however I was able to find a few Reebok Compression Shirts (HeatGear) at the Reebok outlet for $14.99 plus an additional 15% off for registering on-line.... check outlets, etc. for this kind of thing!

Edited to add:

Reebok Outlet in MN:

Reebok Outlet Store
Outlets at Albertville
6415 Labeaux Ave.
Albertville, MN 55301
(763) 497-2716

Heck I'll be in MN tomorrow and 1/2 of Wednesday... maybe I'll head to the outlet to see what they have...? Not too far from Maple Grove (where I am staying).


Last edited by Monsignor: 05-17-2010 at 03:08 PM. Reason: Added store information
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Old
05-17-2010, 03:07 PM
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Jarick
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Target also sells Champion shirts for $15 or so. That's where I got mine for when I want to be extra fancy.

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05-17-2010, 05:42 PM
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Hey man, I am a beginner hockey player too, I have only been playing for 3 months. I just started my first season 3 weeks ago and I did not even know where to be during the face-off. The one thing about hockey is that there is never a stupid question. All of the good hockey players are always very helpful and will make every effort to guide you along during games. I went from barely being able to skate with a puck during pick-up games to already having 6 assists and 1 goal in a real season. The most important thing to do is have fun and learn at a pace that you are comfortable with. As for getting dressed, just get to the locker room a little early, engage a conversation with the guys who enter, and just kind of follow their lead, then you will get a suiting up style all of your own.

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05-17-2010, 06:54 PM
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budster
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Read this advice for your first hockey game

For pads I dress in this order: jock>garter>shinpads>socks>pants>skates. Usually a dri-fit shirt under the shoulderpads then elbow pads>jersey>helmet>gloves

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05-17-2010, 10:33 PM
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Starting off in 3 on 3 is like being thrown into a pack of wolves. 3 on 3 means there's a lot more room and fewer options with the puck. You'll do a lot more skating, and you'll spend more time with the puck on your stick. On the plus side, you'll learn individual skills a lot quicker.

The good thing is that you'll have more time and space to make decisions with the puck, so you can take a little more time to decide whether to pass, shoot, or skate.


3 on 3 is boatloads of fun though. I really miss playing that during the summer.

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05-18-2010, 02:04 AM
  #12
SERE 24
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1. What do I wear underneath all that equipment? How do you get "dressed"?


I played all my life, including 4 years of NCAA. I've had under armour 'moisture wicking' shirts and compression shorts and all that junk. At the end of the day, I usually prefer a light weight, loose fitting t-shirt (or no shirt at all). If you've got compression shorts with a cup, that's all you need on the bottom, if not, just wear boxers under your jock unless your comfortable going naked. As for HOW you get dressed:

Definitely you want to focus on your lower body first.

Make sure you've got comfortable socks for skating on and whatever kind of jock situation you're using. From there I would recommend:

Shin Guards.
Hockey socks. Roll the bottom half way up so the bottom half of your shin guards are exposed.
Hockey Pants.
Skates. If you want your tongue out, just lace 'em up. If you want to tuck your tongue, simply un-velcro the bottom strap of your shinguards and tuck the tongue in before you lace the upper eyelets of your skates and then re-velcro.
Roll down the socks so that your whole shin guards are covered again.
Tighten and tie your hockey pants.
Shoulder pads.
Elbow pads.
Jersey.
Helmet.
Gloves.

You're good to go. There is no right way to put on your gear, but while this way sounds complicated because of the length of the instructions I simply wanted to flesh it out for you in step-by-step. I find it's honestly the easiest and most straight forward way of dressing - I've been doing it this way since I started tying my own skates.


2. What should I do to please/not annoy the coach and players?

Be friendly. Play hard. Don't get frustrated. Tell them you're new. Do everything I say from here on in this post


3. Should I just get rid of the puck the first few games?

No. You're playing 3on3 which means you have more time and space than you normally would. If nothing else, look up and look ahead of you (and use your peripheral to see if anyone is coming from the sides). As long as you have room in front of you, the first thing you should do is skate straight ahead as quickly as you can with the puck. Hockey is a speed game and the worst thing you can do is stand still with the puck in your skates looking for someone else to give it to. The next worse thing you can do is put your head down and slowly try to stickhandle back and forth while you skate 1MPH. Cup the puck with your stick and move it, don't worry too much about "handling" it. Even if you only go 10 feet up the ice before someone steps up, you should have at least had time to spot a teammate. When someone is actually making a play on you, pass the puck or take the shot if you've gotten into a good position. Just aimlessly throwing the puck to a teammate as soon as it lands on your stick basically means your team is playing 2on3 when you're on the ice and will lead to turn overs and frustration, likely on your teammates end. The same goes for when making a pass after holding onto the puck. If you don't look up and make sure your teammate is actually in a position to receive a pass (ie. not double teamed) you'll just be turning the puck over. 3on3 is a lot of ice. Keep your head up and if you can't keep the puck on your stick without looking at it, keeping glancing up as if you were reading a speech to an audience.


4. For line changes, is it totally noobish if you use the door instead of just climbing over the boards?

Yes, it's totally noobish. Do you think, without skates on, you could hop over a 2.5 foot high wall? All you have to do is come to a stop (use the boards if you have to) and than, standing still, put your hands on the top to brace yourself, put one leg up, slide it over, straddle the boards and follow with the other. It's much easier than it looks; there is actually NO jumping involved. I've been playing my entire life... trust me, it's simply swinging one leg over and than the other. Like I said, stop first and steady yourself, just don't take a year to actually get on the bench. If you're going onto the ice it's even easier as you're already at a standstill. Just be confident.

5. I'm playing 3 on 3, is there anything different I should do from playing 5 on 5? What differences should I expect?

There's going to be a lot more open ice. This means you'll have a lot more time when the puck is on your stick than you think. Ultimately, 3on3 is 4 less total players on the ice than normal hockey, which means space. Going back to what I said earlier, you don't have all the time in the world but you DO have time to look up and make a smarter play. Space also means more odd-man rushes. Skate HARD and be ready to get back and help out, even if you're not playing D. You may not be great defensively, but going up against a 2on2 with one bad defender is still a LOT harder than coming in 2on1.

6. Will it roller blading make my ice skating worse?

Generally yes, but if you're really just going to skate forwards and backwards than no. Make sure you do only that and do it FAST. The worst guys that I see when I'm on the ice with beginners are the guys who do everything at a snails pace and coast towards open pucks instead of skating into them. Obviously, with the puck on your stick or if you're going around the net, being a beginner, you're not going to be able to do things full speed, but in open ice SKATE... even if you can't receive a pass or take a good shot, skating fast and being in the play gives you the opportunity to cover a man defensively or make the defender think about covering you offensively - you may not know what to do if a pass comes your way, but the defender won't know that and will have to respect your presence, thus creating more space for your teammates. You may not be 100% comfortable on the ice, but skating HARD will help you and even if you make mistakes while skating hard, you're going to learn faster from giving 100% than you will if you only go 65% because you're afraid.

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05-18-2010, 07:45 AM
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I will only address #4. yes and no. it's pretty newbish to use the door to get ON the ice but not quite as much to get OFF the ice. the important thing getting off the ice is to make sure that you don't spend all day getting the door open and make smart changes that won't cost your team a Too Many Men on the Ice penalty.

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05-18-2010, 10:20 AM
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#4. Its a 3v3 league...Can't we cut them a little slack on using the door? The only reason why off over the boards, in through the door typically happens is because the bench is filled to the MAX with people on the bench in a 5v5 league. Also they are gonna be covering a lot more ice only having 3 people on the rink, most likely gonna get a little more tired then in a typical 5v5 game. Last year at nationals we had 3 guys get turned back at the Det/Windsor border so we had to skate with 6 guys. Unless it was the 1st line change of the game I think we all used the door lol....

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05-19-2010, 01:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Monsignor View Post

1. What do I wear underneath all that equipment? How do you get "dressed"?


...

1. Pants (leave untied)
2. Socks (up around knee or upper calf - basically outta the way)
3. Skates (after skates I pull my socks down over the top of my skates prior to #4)
4. Shin guards (then pull socks over guards)
5. Pull pants down/pull up socks and Velcro to jock
6. Shoulder/chest pads
7. Elbow pads
8. Jersey
9. Helmet
10. Gloves
Same here. Also, jlnjcb, if you're not sure, it's a good idea to practice at home until you get the idea of how it should all go on. Do it a couple times to make sure you like how it all goes on, and if not you can change the order to what works with your gear and preferences.

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05-19-2010, 03:27 AM
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Never ever play without a jock. The first day you do you will regret it.

All the equipment has been covered very good by the other posters, here are some tips:

Make sure your shin pads are the proper size; if they are too small obviously the puck and sticks are going to hit your bones and if they are too big you will have a harder time skating.

Also have good elbow pads as being new you will be falling and the ice is not soft.

Make sure your helmet is a tight fit, same as above when falling.

Proper skate as well, too big causes instant blisters. Wear around the house for an hour or two each day.

Keep your head up!

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05-19-2010, 11:25 AM
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jlnjcb
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Thanks for all the info guys. This will really help me out.

I just thought of another question:

Will it hurt my shot if I practice on cement?


I can't really make it to stick n' pucks all the time, but I do have a tennis court just a few minutes away that I can go to all the time.

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05-19-2010, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlnjcb View Post

Will it hurt my shot if I practice on cement?


I can't really make it to stick n' pucks all the time, but I do have a tennis court just a few minutes away that I can go to all the time.
In my mind, no. When I played I did a lot of street hockey in the summer and my shot didn't appear to suffer.

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05-19-2010, 12:10 PM
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlnjcb View Post
Thanks for all the info guys. This will really help me out.

I just thought of another question:

Will it hurt my shot if I practice on cement?


I can't really make it to stick n' pucks all the time, but I do have a tennis court just a few minutes away that I can go to all the time.
Nope, but it really won't help it either. Mechanics are totally different. Get a sheet of lighting panel for like $3 at home depot, spray some pinesol on it, and use that to shoot off of. The puck will slide like it's on ice.

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05-19-2010, 12:10 PM
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Practicing your shot any way you can is good.

Scraping a blade on cement though is a good way to mess up your stick. You may want to look at some sort of shooting pad.

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05-19-2010, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skraut View Post
Practicing your shot any way you can is good.

Scraping a blade on cement though is a good way to mess up your stick. You may want to look at some sort of shooting pad.
You can put down a sheet of chipboard or MDF, it will be easier on your blade. Or just practice using an inexpensive hockey stick made of wood. You can use a propane torch to heat the blade and bend it to match the curve on your regular stick if it is different (has the added bonus of more weight to strengthen as well)

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Old
05-19-2010, 03:54 PM
  #22
cptjeff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlnjcb View Post
Hi all:

Well, if you read my other thread you understand that I am going to start playing in a 3 on 3 hockey league during the summer .

I have a few newbie questions:

1. What do I wear underneath all that equipment? How do you get "dressed"?


Also, what is the standard "procedure" to put on hockey equipment?
Jock is a must. Go ahead and change in the locker room, don't be that weird guy. Everyone's seen a penis before. A wicking shirt is very nice, don't use cotton. I use a reebok one, don't go with underarmour. They jack up the price way past what you need to pay. Reebok outlet is where I got mine, I've seen them at places like Kohl's too.

My routine:

Jock
Shirt
Socks
skates (with bottom of sock in skate)
Socks pulled down over skate
Shin
Socks pulled up and attached to jock
Pants (with zippers if you go skates first)
skateguards off
shoulders
elbows
jersey
helmet
gloves.


Quote:
2. What should I do to please/not annoy the coach and players?

I've played enough street hockey to know that nobody likes a ball hog. But what other things should I not/do to please the coach and players? Other then the obvious things like skate hard and never stop working....

The last thing I want is for the coaches and other players to be annoyed at me.

3. Should I just get rid of the puck the first few games?

Because I'm a beginner, I'm afraid I'll make a completely bone-headed play. Should I just pass the puck to people and just stay under the radar for the first few games?
Just be a team player, and play like normal. If the situation calls for a pass, pass. If you have a shooting lane, shoot. If you can't do anything, dump. People are usually understanding, especially in fun leagues.

Quote:

4. For line changes, is it totally noobish if you use the door instead of just climbing over the boards?
For going on the ice, absolutely. It's also inefficient. It's a lot easier to jump off and get going, and faster to get off too. And it's not as hard as you might think it is, you'll get the hang in no time.

Coming back onto the bench is personal preference. Most guys jump, but there are some guys who like to use the door. With crowded benches at competitive levels, it's usually easier to use the door getting back on, as well as maintaining a rotation.

Quote:

5. I'm playing 3 on 3, is there anything different I should do from playing 5 on 5? What differences should I expect?
More ice, more time to handle the puck. And you'll wear out faster because you have to cover more ice.

Quote:
6. Will it roller blading make my ice skating worse?

I was planning to practice skating forwards and backwards (not turning or stopping) on roller skates on days I can't get to the ice. Even though I won't be practicing turns I was hoping that forwards and backwards skating would translate on the ice (making my stride more powerful, smoother etc.)

Is this a bad idea?
I would lean against it, at least until you understand proper technique on ice. Once you learn that, you can do that on roller, but if you learn roller technique and try and more it to ice you'll look like a moron.


Quote:
7. Do any of you know any good dvds, books, websites, threads that can help with my shooting, passing, skating, general hockey sense?

That's all the questions I have for now, but I'm sure I'll think of something later on. Any answers would be really helpful.

Thanks!
Read and ask questions here. Look around for any posts by Headcoach in here, especially in the positional play threads. You can probably use search to find them somehow, they're very much worth reading. If you want drills, he runs a website: http://passthepuck.net

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Old
05-19-2010, 06:41 PM
  #23
jlnjcb
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Hi again guys,

Okay now I've got a problem. A friend of a friend said that he tried out 3 on 3 and it was MURDER. He apparently puked on the first day.

Now I have an option of playing 5 on 5. What would you recommend for a beginner?

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Old
05-19-2010, 06:59 PM
  #24
Skraut
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5 on 5, there's 4 other guys who probably know what they're doing as opposed to just 2

3 on 3 is a LOT of open ice and a lot of skating, and is great for really getting an aerobic workout. But if you're starting off, it may be a bit much.

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Old
05-20-2010, 01:39 AM
  #25
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take the 5 on 5 route, 3 on 3 is for better skaters or small rinks

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