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OT: The Oil Spill

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Old
05-29-2010, 10:33 PM
  #1
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OT: The Oil Spill

As an Earth Science buff, it is beyond words what is happening right now with the current Oil Spill. I want to bring notice to you all the type of damage that is currently happening right now:

Almost 45 million gallons of oil have leaked into the oceans. The Oceans are the largest and most comprehensive biosphere that mankind knows, and we are destroying and severely limiting our future lifespan. The type of damage that is currently ongoing is just not something you can put into words. For instance, in the Gulf of Mexico, the fishing industry is now completely non-existent. The Southeast states, notably Louisiana, rely on the fishing industry for gross income.

To think that humans, human beings, are responsible for what is happening just makes me sick. It behooves ALL of you to educate yourselves on what is happening, and start to realize that the oil will soon enter the Atlantic and, potentially, make its way up to Long Island by the way of the currents.

As we enter hurricane season, it is also important to note that ANY hurricane of strength(Cat 2 and above) will cause even more devastation. Devastation beyond what any of you have ever seen. God forbid a Category 5 hurricane enters the Gulf of Mexico. It is actually possible that the current pipe bursting 2000+ gallons of oil per hour into the gulf can possibly explode, leaking unimaginable amounts of oil into our ocean(s), leading to repercussions that will be felt for decades.

Seriously, start praying for this situation and start educating people about it. We need world aid. This is an environmental disaster that is approaching -simply- catastrophic levels.

And we are helpless in finding a way to stop this.

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05-29-2010, 11:09 PM
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Living in Florida, this is all we hear everyday. I'm in Tampa and we have not seen anything yet, but the clock it ticking quickly. This is beyond disaster at this point, it has reached catastrophic levels. We as humans understand the disaster, somewhat. What hurts is watching the helpless animals who have no clue what to do. Several birds were just released last week from Egmont Key, that came from Louisiana.

It truly is devastating and heartbreaking.

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05-30-2010, 12:07 AM
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We have nobody to blame but ourselves. If our consumption wasn't so immense companies wouldn't even be taking these kinds of risks.

The US is the #1 consumer of oil and it's not even remotely close. The numbers of this spill are all over the place but even the high estimates will most likely come out to less than 2-3 days of our use of oil lost in the spill.

I hope the big picture isn't lost in this. The damage is sad. There has already been and will be more human suffering as a consequence. There will be economic damage. There will be damage to natural resources, and ecosystems (including unnecessary loss of plant and animal life) that will take significant chunks of time to recover from. Some microcosms may never recover without massive work on our part. Some may never recover even WITH massive work on our part.

But before we spout our anger I think we need to take a long hard look in the mirror. I'm not exonerating BP...the risk they took here was unconscionable...but even if every precaution was taken there's still always the chance for disaster. Because of that, we should always look at how we do things and try to fully think through the effects of our actions upon others.

Without getting into a long drawn out economic discussion about inputs and outputs and the true cost of food, energy and war, I think people still instinctively know in their heart that we've created an inefficient society and have become like locusts on the world consuming far more than we're producing (which often leads to those elsewhere in the world working more and getting less.)

Without getting too political...maybe it's time to cut back our empire and live within our own means for a while. Just a thought.

,
Mitch


Last edited by mitchy22: 05-30-2010 at 01:17 AM. Reason: missing letters making my wordy posts that much harder to understand
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05-30-2010, 05:44 AM
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatientlyWaiting View Post


Seriously, start praying for this situation and start educating people about it. We need world aid. This is an environmental disaster that is approaching -simply- catastrophic levels.
Funny how any **** happens around the world we are the first ones there. No one is coming to our aid. Where are they? I haven't heard about any other country helping us out. So no matter who is in power in this country when some natural or man made disaster happens somewhere else in the world I say we do nothing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitchy22 View Post
We have nobody to blame but ourselves. If our consumption wasn't so immense companies wouldn't even be taking these kinds of risks.

The US is the #1 consumer of oil and it's not even remotely close. The numbers of this spill are all over the place but even the high estimates will most likely come out to less than 2-3 days of our use of oil lost in the spill.

I hope the big picture isn't lost in this. The damage is sad. There has already been and will be more human suffering as a consequence. There will be economic damage. There will be damage to natural resources, and ecosystems (including unnecessary loss of plant and animal life) that will take significant chunks of time to recover from. Some microcosms may never recover without massive work on our part. Some may never recover even WITH massive work on our part.

But before we spout our anger I think we need to take a long hard look in the mirror. I'm not exonerating BP...the risk they took here was unconscionable...but even if every precaution was taken there's still always the chance for disaster. Because of that, we should always look at how we do things and try to fully think through the effects of our actions upon others.

Without getting into a long drawn out economic discussion about inputs and outputs and the true cost of food, energy and war, I think people still instinctively know in their heart that we've created an inefficient society and have become like locusts on the world consuming far more than we're producing (which often leads to those elsewhere in the world working more and getting less.)

Without getting too political...maybe it's time to cut back our empire and live within our own means for a while. Just a thought.

,
Mitch
Yes it is true but there is just as much damage happening with emissions from 18 wheelers and mills and us (human beings) still use spray cans and the such. Pretty much why when i see a person drive a Smart car or something like that i smile. When i see a person get into a giant SUV I think "why do you need that? are you in construction?"

But we are all hypocrites, there is something we all could be doing and don't do. Me, you, all of us.

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05-30-2010, 06:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Pnut View Post
Funny how any **** happens around the world we are the first ones there. No one is coming to our aid. Where are they? I haven't heard about any other country helping us out. So no matter who is in power in this country when some natural or man made disaster happens somewhere else in the world I say we do nothing.


Yes it is true but there is just as much damage happening with emissions from 18 wheelers and mills and us (human beings) still use spray cans and the such. Pretty much why when i see a person drive a Smart car or something like that i smile. When i see a person get into a giant SUV I think "why do you need that? are you in construction?"

But we are all hypocrites, there is something we all could be doing and don't do. Me, you, all of us.
No one is helping because BP isn't letting them help. It's pretty much that simple. They're taking a "We've got this" approach and failing miserably.

I work in the oil and gas industry and from what I understand of the situation, heavy mud was about the best and last option left for capping the well. It didn't work, so now its going to free flow until the relief wells are finished drilling, which sounds like its going to take quite some time.

The only thing that can be done is clean up work at the moment. The well isn't going to stop flowing anytime soon.

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05-30-2010, 06:08 AM
  #6
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Originally Posted by Pnut View Post
But we are all hypocrites, there is something we all could be doing and don't do. Me, you, all of us.
You're only a hypocrite if you profess to be something that you are not. So be careful what you call freely another (or us all .)

There are things that I know I should be doing for the betterment of myself (and often those around me which is my choice) that I often do not do. Actually, more often than not I delay in doing certain things more than not doing them at all. I was almost one month premature...I believe I've been making up for it ever since.

As I freely admit my imperfections, I don't believe I've misrepresented myself...so therefore I am NOT a hypocrite (or I have improperly defined myself and have serious identity problems in which case it's probably best to just let me sort those things out on my own. Let's just say I've had dealings with those who lack identity and from experience I imagine it's not something most people would like to deal with!) Did I mention I have problems with digression?

The thing I wish for in my post are for those reading it to look at a problem in its entirety and to question the effects of their own actions before they blame those around them. I do this as often as my current nature allows me.

The blame I place is squarely upon our society and its members. I do not remove myself from it. I freely share this burden of blame.

,
Mitch

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05-30-2010, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by mitchy22 View Post
You're only a hypocrite if you profess to be something that you are not. So be careful what you call freely another (or us all .)

There are things that I know I should be doing for the betterment of myself (and often those around me which is my choice) that I often do not do. Actually, more often than not I delay in doing certain things more than not doing them at all. I was almost one month premature...I believe I've been making up for it ever since.

As I freely admit my imperfections, I don't believe I've misrepresented myself...so therefore I am NOT a hypocrite (or I have improperly defined myself and have serious identity problems in which case it's probably best to just let me sort those things out on my own. Let's just say I've had dealings with those who lack identity and from experience I imagine it's not something most people would like to deal with!) Did I mention I have problems with digression?

The thing I wish for in my post are for those reading it to look at a problem in its entirety and to question the effects of their own actions before they blame those around them. I do this as often as my current nature allows me.

The blame I place is squarely upon our society and its members. I do not remove myself from it. I freely share this burden of blame.

,
Mitch
People need to start worrying about finding a solution, and stop with the whole "Who will think of the children!" garbage.

Bottom line is everyone complaining will get in their cars tomorrow and drive to work. Drilling for oil and gas is a hell of a lot more complex than people seem to understands. Accidents will happen, there's no way around that.

Unless everyone wants to go back to riding horses, they need to understand that the oil and gas they consume comes at a dangerous price. Hopefully this is the last time something happens on this large a scale, but know that 100's of other mistakes, leaks, spills will happen.

And I won't even get into how much my blood boils when I hear "But I drive a smart car!" might as well just say "I pollute, but less than you, so I have the right to judge everyone!"
Smart cars still run on oil and gas, polluting is polluting.

This wasn't directed at you, I kind of went off on a tangent when I started my reply. This is directed towards the anti oil crowd who still drive their cars (no matter what kind they are), heat their home with natural gas, and so on. Hypocrites.

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05-30-2010, 06:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RStar View Post
No one is helping because BP isn't letting them help. It's pretty much that simple. They're taking a "We've got this" approach and failing miserably.

I work in the oil and gas industry and from what I understand of the situation, heavy mud was about the best and last option left for capping the well. It didn't work, so now its going to free flow until the relief wells are finished drilling, which sounds like its going to take quite some time.

The only thing that can be done is clean up work at the moment. The well isn't going to stop flowing anytime soon.
What help are they denying? Not trying to be a {MOD EDIT} about it so I hope it doesn't come off that way. I honestly want to know who or what is being turned away. The only thing I'm sure they're doing (with the help of our own government) is limiting access to the scene of the crime. If they're being know-it-all {MOD EDIT} and denying useful help I'd hope that will be held against them at a later date (and would be curious to see the information for my own knowledge.)

To the best of my knowledge, they started building the relief well already knowing that all of their efforts may not work and it would take a tremendous amount of time to accomplish this task.

As well as, currently, they are also trying:
Quote:
Originally Posted by AP
to use robot submarines to cut off the damaged riser, and then try to cap it with a containment valve. The effort is expected to take between four and seven days.
http://www.aolnews.com/nation/articl...-leak/19496642

Prior to this (referenced in the same article above):
Quote:
Originally Posted by AP
In the days after the spill, BP was unable to use robot submarines to close valves on the massive blowout preventer atop the damaged well, then two weeks later ice-like crystals clogged a 100-ton box the company tried placing over the leak. Earlier this week, engineers removed a mile-long siphon tube after it sucked up a disappointing 900,000 gallons of oil from the gusher.

In the latest try, BP engineers pumped more than 1.2 million gallons of heavy drilling mud into the well and also shot in assorted junk, including metal pieces and rubber balls.
I think they're moronic for not taking all of the reasonable precautions they could have leading up to this (for a number of reasons.) That said, every precaution being taken doesn't remove the risk from this business or the possibility of disaster (merely reduces it.)

Hence my post blaming the need for such operations to begin with and that whole look in the mirror thing .

,
Mitch


Last edited by Homeland Security: 05-30-2010 at 11:13 AM. Reason: some words just don't belong/ mod edit profanity
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Old
05-30-2010, 06:28 AM
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This wasn't directed at you, I kind of went off on a tangent when I started my reply. This is directed towards the anti oil crowd who still drive their cars (no matter what kind they are), heat their home with natural gas, and so on. Hypocrites.
No worries. I kind of touch on that a bit myself.

Edit - Oh, and a solution successfully used in the past was to seal the ocean floor...via nuclear device.

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05-30-2010, 06:31 AM
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It was a bad cement job. They were told by Halliburton that the cement job did not go well and to not try to displace the hole. BP decided to go ahead and roll the dice anyways and here we are. With a bad cement job, there isn't much you can do to fix the problem other than the relief wells.

That's about all I'm willing to say on the subject since I don't know what kind of stupid trouble one can get in for discussing this if they work in the industry, but its all online if anyone wants to search for it.

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05-30-2010, 06:57 AM
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That's about all I'm willing to say on the subject since I don't know what kind of stupid trouble one can get in for discussing this if they work in the industry, but its all online if anyone wants to search for it.
Thank you for the heads up on what to look for. I didn't quote the material in case you think better of leaving it up at a later date.

That said, I still haven't seen anything regarding BP denying help after the fact. I still see BP potentially being on the hook for negligence in the cause of the problem to begin with. I'll use the word "potentially" fully knowing the entirety of all of the facts of the matter may never see my eyes.

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-sp..._well_cas.html

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05-30-2010, 08:03 AM
  #12
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Keep in mind my point of view comes from someone who is an employee in the construction end of one of the largest oil corporations in the world (not BP, Exxon or Chevron...) and have been in the industry for a long time.

My two cents...

The consequences of this disaster are not only going to be felt in the gulf region but along the eastern seaboard and eventually up to the northeast. The question is not if but how significant will it be.

BP deserves all the scorn it has been getting and perhaps more so. The fact that there are obviously no contingency plans for catastrophes like this is mind boggling.

The destablization of oil industry oversight is a surprise to us? After all the poor oversight we have seen from the past 10 years on Wallstreet? Call this what it is. This is a result of a previous administration loosening up oversight and regulation for his friends in the oil industry when he first came into office. I don't want to make this a political post but rather call it like I see it. I could care less about the Republican or Democrat agenda.

We have a oil rig disaster running of of control today in 2010? Well no kidding! For years, the people we elected to office to serve and protect and look out for the best interests of our country dismantled whatever oversight and regulatory handcuffs that protected the public in order to serve big business - for political capital regardless of future costs. We have that bill today.

The Minerals Management Service (US agency) has been responsible to conduct oversight over offshore and other drilling. It has been widely reported that the "oversight" has been lax at best and corrupt at worst with payoffs, cushy jobs for friends from the oild and gas industy - many from Wyoming still in place - and it became a simple case of the fox guarding the henhouse.

I think many of today's problems are a direct result of what happened in 2001 when Dick Cheney conducted secret meetings with over 100 oil industry officials allowing them to draft a wish list of industry demands to be implemented by an oil friendly administration. Does anyone remember that? It went away in the news pretty quick.

Cheney also used that time to re-staff the Minerals Management Service with oil industry friends. By 2002, Minerals Management Service - then staffed with administration oil friends, bowed to the oil cartel by recommending the removal of the proposed requirement for remote, acoustic switches that could shut down extrusion at a disabled rig. The reason? The Minerals Management Service's concluded that "acoustic systems are not recommended because they tend to be too costly" That said it all. By the way, a single remote acoustical trigger runs about $500,000. Small potatoes when you look at what we are facing.

If that remote acoustic switch was in place today, we are not having this discussion.The oil well spewing crude right now into the Gulf of Mexico did not have a remote-control shut-off switch that are typically used in other major oil-producing nations as a last resort protection against underwater spills.

What I want to hear is what Obama is planning on doing with all the other rigs off our coasts. They need to have immediate reviews and corrections because this can happen again. The saftey and fail safe technology on many US based rigs are from the 1960's and 1970's because our government has allowed it to happen. They are ALL in bed with big oil and that is the biggest problem.


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05-30-2010, 11:11 AM
  #13
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Originally Posted by Pnut View Post
Funny how any **** happens around the world we are the first ones there. No one is coming to our aid. Where are they? I haven't heard about any other country helping us out. So no matter who is in power in this country when some natural or man made disaster happens somewhere else in the world I say we do nothing.


Yes it is true but there is just as much damage happening with emissions from 18 wheelers and mills and us (human beings) still use spray cans and the such. Pretty much why when i see a person drive a Smart car or something like that i smile. When i see a person get into a giant SUV I think "why do you need that? are you in construction?"

But we are all hypocrites, there is something we all could be doing and don't do. Me, you, all of us.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RStar View Post
No one is helping because BP isn't letting them help. It's pretty much that simple. They're taking a "We've got this" approach and failing miserably.

I work in the oil and gas industry and from what I understand of the situation, heavy mud was about the best and last option left for capping the well. It didn't work, so now its going to free flow until the relief wells are finished drilling, which sounds like its going to take quite some time.

The only thing that can be done is clean up work at the moment. The well isn't going to stop flowing anytime soon.


If I am not mistaken I believe the President said the other day that countries have offered help, but we have told them to hold off for the time being.

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05-30-2010, 11:15 AM
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Living in Florida, this is all we hear everyday. I'm in Tampa and we have not seen anything yet, but the clock it ticking quickly. This is beyond disaster at this point, it has reached catastrophic levels. We as humans understand the disaster, somewhat. What hurts is watching the helpless animals who have no clue what to do. Several birds were just released last week from Egmont Key, that came from Louisiana.

It truly is devastating and heartbreaking.
Also here in Tampa, and the situation sucks. You hit the wildlife on the head, and our beaches will be destroyed, imagine what st. pete or clearwater beach is going to look like? The environment/wildlife is hurting a lot-but that's not all.What it's going to do to our economy if it touches FL coast, and all the tourists start dwindling away (more than they already are), is devistating.

(This is why I think the allowing of offshore drilling should be up to the states are mostly effected by it-and not the rest of the nation-but hey that's a different discussion).

edit: accidentally quoted the same thing twice haha


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05-30-2010, 11:16 AM
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Just a note. This discussion has the tendency to head into political discussion, let's try to avoid that and strictly discuss the spill itself. THANKS!!


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05-30-2010, 11:32 AM
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If I am not mistaken I believe the President said the other day that countries have offered help, but we have told them to hold off for the time being.
I believe he was offered by many but has allowed two to help us, Norway and Mexico. One I get, the other....I unfortunately get as well.

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05-30-2010, 11:36 AM
  #17
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It is an extremely tragic and scary situation. I hope a solid solution will come quickly.

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05-30-2010, 12:02 PM
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Quote:
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(This is why I think the allowing of offshore drilling should be up to the states are mostly effected by it-and not the rest of the nation-but hey that's a different discussion).
The problem with this logic is that the oceans/wildlife should not be viewed as a state owned commodity, but as a commodity owned by the world and whose stewardship is shared by all.

I am a huge fan of our capitalistic system, but its major fault is that it doesn't properly allocate a monetary value on the environment when costs of processing natural resources are calculated.

How can BP ever repay the cost of what is has done to the environment? The cost of lost professions? The cost of lost tourism? The cost of lost species? How can that cost even be put in monetary terms?

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05-30-2010, 01:15 PM
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I am a huge fan of our capitalistic system, but its major fault is that it doesn't properly allocate a monetary value on the environment when costs of processing natural resources are calculated.

How can BP ever repay the cost of what is has done to the environment? The cost of lost professions? The cost of lost tourism? The cost of lost species? How can that cost even be put in monetary terms?
There are so many issues that are never answered by adopting 'capitalism' versus something else, which makes it nearly aways a red herring when it comes up.

As far as costs are concerned, the issues are not necessarily aligning monetary values to effects. This is something people generally overlook when discussing the value of awards in lawsuits. Monetizing damages often aren't the point. Instead, the point is to reorganize incentives - to deter, for example. The cost BP must pay should be no greater or less than a cost steep enough to deter any company from being so negligent in the future.

I work in buildings systems - residential and commercial. People right now want to use less fuel only if they can get someone to subsidize them to do so. That's ridiculous. I hear the same story from people in other areas of the energy sector - government gives disorganized subsidies for implementing technologies meant to reduce energy use. Those can never organize incentives properly, partly because the solutions are ad hoc, partly because it's behavior that's the problem - not technology.

There's a pretty straightforward way to organize incentives the right way. But I won't say what it is, should I end up offending anyone's political sensitivities.

Cheers,

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05-30-2010, 01:34 PM
  #20
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Oil spills are bad. They suck. But oil is needed and it isn't going anywhere.

To be blunt, what we don't need is a bunch of knee-jerk "no more drilling" reactions.

Figure out what went wrong, learn from it, get on with it in a safer fashion.

Windmills and solar won't solve the world's energy issues. Not even close. They're too expensive and the energy isn't concentrated. Plus, battery storage is 10x more expensive than energy creation right now.

We need more nuclear and coal. Lots more. But they have risks as well. (As witnessed by the recent coal mining disasters in the US and China.)

The issue isn't if you drive a smart car or not. The issue is 2.5 billion people in India and China are looking for the same standard of life -- and corresponding energy consumption -- that we have.

Think about that.

The other thing that bugs be about this particular issue is a lot of people are bemoaning the impact to birds and fish, etc., but not nearly enough are talking about the people that died. I really feel for the folks that lost their loved ones.

It's a dangerous business. Hopefully we'll learn from this and make it safer.

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05-30-2010, 01:46 PM
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Oil spills are bad. They suck. But oil is needed and it isn't going anywhere.

To be blunt, what we don't need is a bunch of knee-jerk "no more drilling" reactions.

Figure out what went wrong, learn from it, get on with it in a safer fashion.

Windmills and solar won't solve the world's energy issues. Not even close. They're too expensive and the energy isn't concentrated. Plus, battery storage is 10x more expensive than energy creation right now.

We need more nuclear and coal. Lots more. But they have risks as well. (As witnessed by the recent coal mining disasters in the US and China.)

The issue isn't if you drive a smart car or not. The issue is 2.5 billion people in India and China are looking for the same standard of life -- and corresponding energy consumption -- that we have.

Think about that.

The other thing that bugs be about this particular issue is a lot of people are bemoaning the impact to birds and fish, etc., but not nearly enough are talking about the people that died. I really feel for the folks that lost their loved ones.

It's a dangerous business. Hopefully we'll learn from this and make it safer.
Well, one step is allowing drilling to occur where the ocean floor is not so deep.....but the environmental impact of that would be - wait, nevermind.

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05-30-2010, 04:42 PM
  #22
Satan'sIsland81
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Oil spills are bad. They suck. But oil is needed and it isn't going anywhere.

To be blunt, what we don't need is a bunch of knee-jerk "no more drilling" reactions.

Figure out what went wrong, learn from it, get on with it in a safer fashion.

Windmills and solar won't solve the world's energy issues. Not even close. They're too expensive and the energy isn't concentrated. Plus, battery storage is 10x more expensive than energy creation right now.

We need more nuclear and coal. Lots more. But they have risks as well. (As witnessed by the recent coal mining disasters in the US and China.)

The issue isn't if you drive a smart car or not. The issue is 2.5 billion people in India and China are looking for the same standard of life -- and corresponding energy consumption -- that we have.

Think about that.

The other thing that bugs be about this particular issue is a lot of people are bemoaning the impact to birds and fish, etc., but not nearly enough are talking about the people that died. I really feel for the folks that lost their loved ones.

It's a dangerous business. Hopefully we'll learn from this and make it safer.
If you are referring to the oil workers for BP who died in the explosion, then sorry, but I feel a lot worse for the innocent animals who have no way of escaping this and the people living in our country and around the world who will be affected by disasters like this than I do for anybody associated with oil companies. They do not give a crap about the environment or the world we live in, all they care about their profits and their greed.

I also certainly do not feel bad for our idiot of a president (who I voted for) and the inconvenience for him having to cancel his second vacation in a little over a month in order to go inspect the damage. Keep in mind, this is the man who ran on a platform of helping the environment and the world, and criticized the "drill baby drill" idiocy of the Republicans, yet he is now advocating drilling off our shores as well in the northeast and in Alaska, plus his cabinet and advisors like Ken Salazaar have done just about the opposite of everything that will help our natural resources and the environment. I am just so disgusted by this world we live in right now and what is going on down in the Gulf. Everyday I see the photos in the paper, it makes me want to puke.

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05-30-2010, 05:26 PM
  #23
Blackhawkswincup
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As someone from the Midwest I honestly haven't really been concerned.

I am not gonna lie my attitude when it comes to other parts of US is mostly #### them. No one gave a damn about my relatives who lost everything in the great flood of 93. The East/West coasts of US never give a damn about us so that is how I have taken to your disasters

Just look at what just happened in Nashville. Where was the rest of US? Where is the aid or support?

I dont know what you would call someone like me but we in midwest have survived our share of disasters and got very little help from anyone else in US. I expect Gulf + Florida to do the same.

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05-30-2010, 06:37 PM
  #24
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Originally Posted by Blackhawkswincup View Post
As someone from the Midwest I honestly haven't really been concerned. I am not gonna lie my attitude when it comes to other parts of US is mostly #### them.

I dont know what you would call someone like me but we in midwest have survived our share of disasters and got very little help from anyone else in US. I expect Gulf + Florida to do the same.
I have a few choice names for people like you, but in the interest of civility, I'll refrain from listing them here. And, I thank God every day that there are not more narrow minded people like you.

I'll give you a few reasons why you should care:

-The folks who just lost their profession may move to your town and tax your services while they look for scarce employment.
-The folks who can no longer make a living from the Gulf won't be able to afford cars made in your Midwest town.
-The price of seafood will go up; and even if you don't like seafood, those who do like it and can no longer afford it will start eating more beef and chicken, driving up the price for you.
-Your children will never be able to enjoy the beauty of the Gulf of Mexico and what it once was.
-The heritage of Louisiana is threatened and may be lost forever.


Last edited by beach: 05-30-2010 at 06:45 PM. Reason: addition to post
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05-30-2010, 07:05 PM
  #25
Forty Six and Two
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhawkswincup View Post
As someone from the Midwest I honestly haven't really been concerned.

I am not gonna lie my attitude when it comes to other parts of US is mostly #### them. No one gave a damn about my relatives who lost everything in the great flood of 93. The East/West coasts of US never give a damn about us so that is how I have taken to your disasters

Just look at what just happened in Nashville. Where was the rest of US? Where is the aid or support?

I dont know what you would call someone like me but we in midwest have survived our share of disasters and got very little help from anyone else in US. I expect Gulf + Florida to do the same.
I was rooting for the hawks to win, but I will now be rooting for the Flyers

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