HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > Fantasy Hockey Talk > All Time Draft
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
All Time Draft Fantasy league where players of the past and present meet.

MLD 2010 Bios

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
06-15-2010, 11:09 PM
  #1
VanIslander
Hope for better 2015
 
VanIslander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 19,503
vCash: 500
MLD 2010 Bios

Place full bios here.

It can be a valuable resource for the next ATD.

VanIslander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-16-2010, 05:34 PM
  #2
papershoes
Registered User
 
papershoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Kenora, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,656
vCash: 500
the cornwall royals are pleased to select...

vasili pervukhin (d)

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
...coming along to supplement and then supplant Davidov and Vasiliev on the nationals were two other Dyanamo defensive stars - the crafty Vasily Pervukhin and the tough Zinetula Bilyaletdinov
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
Vasili Pervukhin stands out as the one player least likely to make a mistake on the ice. His flawless play was really quite remarkable, whether in closing a breach on the defensive line or winning a tussle with an opponent.

Pervukhin maneuvered himself as lightly as a butterfly to match the pace and rhythm of the attacker.

For Pervukhin there were no slumps, nor opponents that he couldn't handle.

The powerplay built around Pervukhin became a Soviet classic in those years.

...Pervuhkin's initiating pass made mounting an attack relatively smooth

papershoes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-16-2010, 06:16 PM
  #3
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 25,547
vCash: 500
nice job papershoes - that book collection is already paying off!

seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-16-2010, 07:30 PM
  #4
papershoes
Registered User
 
papershoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Kenora, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,656
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
nice job papershoes - that book collection is already paying off!
thanks! the book collection has worked well (especially kings of the ice - much better then i was expecting)

the cornwall royals are pleased to select...

sergey kapustin (lw)

Quote:
Originally Posted by chidlovski
One of the most gifted Russian elite players of all time, Sergey Kapustin was a part of Team USSR in many top international tournaments of the 1970s and early 1980s.

Fast skating, great puckhandling skills, mastery of hockey improvization and obvious scoring talent of an 18-year old native of a small town Ukhta quickly brought him to play hockey in Moscow. In addition to obvious technical skills, young prospect loved to play physical hockey.

Being a natural team player, Kapustin played with various world class players throughout his career.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
Among the 70's generation of Russian players, the most talented ones were Kharlamov and Kapustin.

A powerful skater equipped with a smashing wristshot...


Last edited by papershoes: 06-16-2010 at 10:13 PM.
papershoes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-17-2010, 04:32 AM
  #5
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Monsieur Hamilton Livingstone Gilmour



Position: Right Wing / Left Wing
Height: About 5'3''
Weight: Unknown
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: March 21, 1885
Place of Birth: Ottawa , Ontario, Canada
Date of Death: March 13, 1959 (Age: 73)

Stanley Cup Champion (1903, 1904, 1905, 1909)
MCHL First All-Star Team (1907)
ECAHA/ECHA 1st All-Star Team (1908, 1909)
Inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame (1962)


Canadian Amateur Hockey League [1902-1903]
Top-10 Scoring (9th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (6th)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (3rd)
Eastern Canada Amateur Hockey Association / Eastern Canada Hockey League [1905-1909]
Top-10 Assist (5th)
Top-10 Penalty Minutes (1st, 6th)

- In the ''Honor Roll'' of the All-New Hockey's 100 by Stan Fischler (Top-204 Hockey Player)
- Two of his brothers, Suddy and Dave, also played with Ottawa
- After retiring from profesional hockey 7 years before, Gilmour played two games in the National Hockey Association with the Ottawa Senators
- Billy Gilmour served in World War I
- He resided in Paris, France, prior to the outbreak of World War II before retiring to Mount Royal, Quebec

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Along with his scoring prowess, Gilmour was regarded as one of the greatest stickhandlers of all time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trail of the Stanley Cup, vol.1
1903 Playoffs: The Gilmour boys and Frank McGee were going great guns. The clean-playing Bowie got into a jangle with Billy Gilmour
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
1905 Ottawa Silver Seven

PlayerPosOOVODVOLVOV
Alf SmithRW9.08.5 9.08.83
Harvey PulfordP7.09.59.58.67
Frank McGeeC 9.58.58.08.67
Harry WestwickR8.58.58.58.5
Billy GilmourLW7.07.57.57.33

OOV = Overall Offensive Value
ODV = Overall Defensive Value
OLV = Overall Leadership Value
OV = Overall Value

links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...t=ByName#photo
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...TOKEN=32966801
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Gilmour

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-17-2010, 05:22 AM
  #6
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Defenseman Joseph Charles Jerwa



Name: Joe
Height: 6'2''
Weight: 185 lbs
Position: Defense
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: January 20, 1908
Place of Birth: Bankhead , Alberta, Canada
Date of Death: April 11, 1983 (Age: 75)

Top-10 Penalty Minutes (5th, 7th, 9th)

Top-10 Scoring Among defenseman (1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 8th)
Top-10 Goalscoring among defenseman (1st, 1st, 4th, 6th)
Top-10 Assist among defenseman (2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 7th)
Top-10 Penalty minutes among defenseman (5th, 5th, 7th, 9th, 10th)

Top-10 Playoff Scoring among defenseman (1st)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring among defenseman (2nd)
Top-10 Assist among defenseman (1st)
Top-10 Penalty minutes among defenseman (4th, 7th)

- His brother Frank Jerwa, also played in the NHL
- Born In Krakow, Poland, Jerwa migrated to North America sometime around 1913
- On May 6th, 1930, he was traded to NY Rangers by Vancouver (PCHL) with Red Beattie for $25,000
- On August 25th, 1931, he was traded to Boston by NY Rangers for Norm Gainor
- On september 28th, 1935 he was traded to the New York Americans by Boston with Nels Stewart for cash
- Jerwa logged the most ice time of his NHL career with the Americans and made the Stanley Cup playoffs three times in a row
- After spending three years with the AHL's Cleveland Barons, Jerwa retired in 1942

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
A rock solid physical defenceman who stood 6'2", Joe Jerwa played over 200 NHL games, mostly with the New York Americans.

Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13101
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=1647&mode=2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Jerwa

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-18-2010, 05:03 PM
  #7
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Ronald George Stewart



Nickname: Stew, Ronnie
Height: 6'0''
Weight: 201 lbs
Position: Right Winger / Defenseman / Center / Left Winger
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: July 11, 1932
Place of Birth: Calgary , Alberta, Canada

Stanley Cup Champion (1962, 1963, 1964)
Stanley Cup Finalist (1959, 1960, 1972)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1955, 1962, 1963, 1964)

Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (5th)
Top-10 Playoff Assist (6th)

Top-10 Norris Finalist (4th)


SeasonPOS
1952-53RW
1953-54RW
1954-55F/D
1955-56F/D
1956-57F/D
1957-58D
1958-59RW
1959-60C
1960-61C
1961-62F
1962-63F
1963-64F
1964-65F
1965-66C
1966-67C
1967-68F
1968-69F
1969-70F
1970-71F
1971-72F
1972-73RW


- Signed by the Leafs on October 6, 1952
- In his rookie season, Stewart played with Sid Smith and Ted Kennedy
- In 1959, he played with Bert Olmstead and Bob Pulford
- On June 8th 1965, Stewart is traded to Boston by Toronto for Orland Kurtenbach, Andy Hebenton and Pat Stapleton
- On June 6th 1967, he was claimed by St. Louis in Expansion Draft,
- On November 29th 1967, Stewart was traded to New York Rangers with Ron Attwell for Red Berenson and Barclay Plager
- On November 16th 1971, Stewart was traded to Vancouver with Dave Balon and Wayne Connelly for Gary Doak and Jim Wiste
On November 14th 1972, he was traded to NY Islanders for cash

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup, vol.3
Ron Stewart was a hard working versatile player who could play defence as well as anywhere on the forward line but, his regular position was right wing. He was a tireless skater and coupled with being a good checker, made him a steady and reliable penalty killer.

He was particularly effective in the playoffs of 1963 when, despite cracked ribs, he scored four goals as the Leafs eliminated Canadiens and Detroit to win the Cup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
The next season saw Stewart make his NHL debut with the Leafs where he would play for thirteen straight seasons. Stewart joined the team while they were in the process of rebuilding but would see better days down the road. The Leafs and Stewart would be a part of three straight Stanley Cup championships from 1961-62 to 1963-64. During his time in Toronto, Stewart played in four All-Star Games, '55, '62, '63 and '64.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who's Who in Hockey
A defensive forward who also could play defense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leafs Top-100
The sturdy right winger [...] Stewart's main strenght was his effortless skating style. He was also a relentless checker, and he could play that way all season long.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Los Angeles Kings Website
Stewart’s 21 NHL seasons were divided among six teams – 13 years with the Toronto Maple Leafs; four and a half with the New York Rangers; two with the Boston Bruins, and parts of two and a half seasons with Vancouver, St. Louis and the New York Islanders. He played in 1,353 games, scoring 276-252=529.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1953-54 Parkhurst
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1954-55 Parkhurst
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1957-58 Parkhurst
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1958-59 Parkhurst
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1960-61 Parkhurst
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1964-65 Topps
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1965-66 Topps
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1966-67 Topps
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1968-69 O-Pee-Chee

- ''It pays a coach to be lucky and have solid, versatile players on the bench.'' - Punch Imlach on Ron Stewart

- ''They got us disorganized with that close checking, and no matter what we did with our lines, there didn't seem to be any reserve.'' - Sid Abel on the close checking Maple Leafs Team



Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=14459
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=3695&mode=0
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_Stewart

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-19-2010, 01:42 AM
  #8
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Pierre R. Larouche



Nickname: Lucky Pierre, Tubby, The Fire Starter
Height: 5'11''
Weight: 175 lbs
Position: Center
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: November 16, 1955
Place of Birth: Taschereau , Quebec, Canada

Stanley Cup Champion (1978, 1979)
Team Canada (1977)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1976, 1984)

Top-10 Scoring (5th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (3rd, 7th, 9th)
Top-10 Playoff Scoring (9th)
Top-10 PlayoffGoalscoring (6th)

Calder Nomination (2nd)

- Rank #94 on the 100 Rangers Greats Book
- Rank #85 on the Habs Heroes Book
- In junior, he got traded when he got caught smoking at his place
- In 1972-73, winner of the Michel Bergeron Trophy (Rookie of the Year in the QMJHL)
- In 1973-74, winner of Jean Beliveau Trophy (Scoring Champion in the QMJHL)
- QMJHL 2nd All-Star Team in 1973-74
- In 1973-74, he scored 251 points to set a league record that lasted until Mario Lemieux arrived a decade later
- Selected by the Pittsburgh Penguins #8 overall in the 1974 NHL Draft
- Selected by the Houston Aeros #30 overall 1974 WHA Draft
- In 1976-77, Larouche hit the 53-goal mark while centring Rick Kehoe and Vic Hadfield, and became the 16th player ever to reach the 50-goal mark and the youngest All-Time
- He was the first player to score 50 goals with two different team: with Pittsburgh in 1977 and Montreal in 1980
- In 1979-80, Larouche centered Guy Lafleur and Steve Shutt and registered 50 goals
- November 29th 1977, Larouche was traded to Montreal by Pittsburgh for Pete Mahovlich and Peter Lee
- On December 21st 1981, he was traded to Hartford on a swap of several round pick
- On September 12th 1983, he signed as a free agent by the New York Rangers
- In 1986, Larouche became one of the few players to registered 20 goals in both the AHL and the NHL
- After his retirement, Larouche became an avid golfer and he's one of the top-ranked golfers on the Celebrity Professional Tour

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
In terms of pure offensive talent, centre Pierre Larouche had few peers. He was at his best when allowed to rag the puck or use his quick release around the net. The tricky forward recorded ten 20-goal seasons in the NHL and was one of the most prolific scorers to ever play junior hockey in Canada.

Larouche did not see as much ice time as he would have liked under coach Scotty Bowman. His lack of interest in playing defence was a source of friction between the two, but Larouche still managed to see some action in the playoffs and win two Stanley Cup rings. When the Habs retooled in 1979-80, Larouche's offense was rekindled under Bernie Geoffrion and Claude Ruel.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 100 Rangers Greats
Skill and charisma made ''Lucky Pierre'' a fan favourite everywhere he played, and New York was no exception.

His nickname was misleading since much of the success Larouche enjoyed as a goal scorer came not from luck, but from stealth and cunning. At his most dangerous when drifting unnoticed through the offensive zone, Larouche would emerge from a cluster of players at the goaltenders's doorstep, poised to convert a pass for an effortless tap-in goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Our History, Canadiens Website
Very few people in the history of hockey were as proficient at finding the back of the net as Pierre Larouche.

At training camp the next fall, Larouche stated he would score 50 goals that season and then went about making his prediction become reality. Fast on his skates and an excellent stickhandler, Larouche was able to hold the puck for as long as he wanted to, threading his way through traffic until he used his quick release to baffle goaltenders around the NHL. When the curtain closed on 1975-76, Larouche had scored 53 times en route to a team-best 111-point season to finish fifth in the NHL.

After two less-than-stellar seasons with the Whalers, Larouche was on the move again, this time to New York. He joined the Rangers to start 1983-84, had an explosive start and came within two goals of becoming the first player to score 50 with three different NHL teams.

But Larouche was somewhat indisciplined in his early years - there was occasional suspensions for lateness to practice and missing curfew - and he struggle to find consistency. It was a stigma that he carried with him from city to city.

Larouche strived strived to shake a reputation for immaturity and earn a job centering one of New York's top lines.

'' Asking Larouche to dig in the corners is like asking Picasso to paint a garage.'' - Herb Brooks

- ''Tubby was a card - so loose. And he was so talented. He played the game so well that you kind of shock your head sometimes at some of the stuff he could do with the puck. He was a great guy and it was fun to play with him.'' - Kelly Kisio

- ''It was great - I got 50 and Guy got 50 that year. Steve got 47 and we tried so hard to get him 50. He must have had 14 shots in our last game against Detroit that year.'' - Pierre Larouche on his 1979-80 season

Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13318
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=2002&mode=2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Larouche
http://ourhistory.canadiens.com/player/Pierre-Larouche
http://penguinslegends.blogspot.com/...-larouche.html
http://wwweyesontheprize.blogspot.co...ky-pierre.html
http://hockeyadventure.com/2007/08/1...erre-larouche/

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-20-2010, 05:53 PM
  #9
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Richard Norman Ley



Nickname: Rick
Height: 5'9''
Weight: 185 lbs (83) kg
Position: Defense
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: November 02, 1948
Place of Birth: Orillia , Ontario, Canada

Avco Cup Champion (1973)
Avco Cup Finalist (1978)
WHA First All-Star Team (1979)
WHA Second All-Star Team (1978)
WHA Third All-Star Team (1973)
Played in the WHA All-Star Game (1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1979)
Dennis A. Murphy Trophy (Outstanding Defenseman - WHA) (1979)
New England Three-Star Winner (1975)
New England Most Valuable Defenseman (1978, 1979)
Whalers' defensive MVP award (1980)

Canada Summit Series (1974)
Team Captain (1975-1980)
#2 Retired by the Hartford Whalers ()



- Ley was selected by the Toronto Maple Leafs 16th overall in the 1966 NHL Amateur Draft
- He was selected by the New England Whalers in the 1972 WHA General Player Draft
- Rick Ley along with Brad Selwood and Jim Dorey, was a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs "Kiddie Korp"
- He's one of a small group of players that was around for all seven seasons of the WHA
- Ley is the All-Time leader in games played and penalty minutes for the New England Whalers
- After his playing career, Ley became a coach of multiple profesional leagues before joining the Hartford Whalers as the head coach in 1989. He was also was the Vancouver Canucks head coach in 1995 and assistant coach with the Maple Leafs from 1998 to 2006


Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Rugged defenceman Rick Ley spent six years in the NHL.

The scrappy rookie played well for Toronto in 1968-69 and was a regular through the 1971-72 season. He rushed the puck well and played an abrasive style in his own end.

After scoring 27 points and playing well at both ends of the ice, Ley won the Dennis A. Murphy trophy as the top defenceman in the WHA. He returned to the NHL with the Hartford Whalers after the leagues merged and played a regular shift in 65 games while serving as the club's captain.
Quote:
Originally Posted by childlovski
Ley, was a strong, pugnacious defenseman who made life miserable for opposing forwards in the Toronto zone. Never much of an offense player, Rickey was rock solid in his own zone.

In that first ever WHA season of 1972-73 Ley was a key component of the Whalers championship team.

He was named to Team Canada 74 by Billy Harris. Before the series Harris spoke to Ley and impressed upon him the need to play a more disciplined brand of hockey and above all avoid any fights. Rickey had the reputation of being a very able, and willing fighter. With the severe penalties for fighting present in International rules, Harris knew Ley would have to control himself. Ley except for one unfortunate lapse of judgment at the end of Game 6 where he attacked Valery Kharlamov and beat him brutally, followed Harris's instructions and played very solid, capable defense throughout most of the Summit.

Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13394
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=2114&mode=2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Ley
http://www.courant.com/sports/hockey...2.photogallery
http://www.hockeydraftcentral.com/1966/66016.html
http://www.chidlovski.net/1974/74_pl...?playerid=ca02
http://www.myhockeytv.com/playerLEYRick.html
Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVKPcAe9Wlw
http://www.youtube.com/watch#!v=S3i4...eature=related

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-22-2010, 12:17 AM
  #10
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Joseph John Watson



Nickname: Thundermouth
Height: 5'10''
Weight: 185 lbs
Position: Defense
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: July 06, 1943
Place of Birth: Smithers , B.C., Canada


Stanley Cup Champion (1974, 1975)
Stanley Cup Finalist (1976)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1974, 1977)
Flyers Hall of Fame (1996)


- Brother of Jimmy Watson
- On June 6th 1967, Watson was claimed by Philadelphia from Boston in the expansion Draft
- On February 12th 1972, he was selected by Calgary Broncos/Cleveland Crusaders (WHA) in the 1972 General Player Draft
- On August 31st 1978, he was traded to Colorado by Philadelphia for cash
- Joe Watson's 746 games as Flyers are the most among all-time Flyers defensemen
- Watson career came to an end in 1978 against the St-Louis Blues when Wayne Babych checked him against the boards, leaving the fallen rearguard with the worst broken leg in NHL history. His thighbone was shattered into 14 pieces and his kneecap was split in two


Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Joe Watson was a salt-of-the-earth player who had to work harder than most to earn his spot at the top of the hockey world. He was gifted in no aspects of his game, save his sense of team spirit and his commitment to take the sum of his average parts and raise them into a greater whole.

In Philly, he found his spiritual centre as a charter member of the Flyers who added stability to his club's new blueline corps. Over the years that followed, he became a defensive workhorse who helped keep his team respectable until their Stanley Cup pieces began to fall into place during the early 1970s.

During those years, Watson became a reliable rearguard who employed a steady positional style of play, highlighted by a daring streak as a fearless shot blocker. He also exhibited a contagiously positive team attitude that won him the favour of his fans. In 1974 and 1975, his foundational contribution to his team came to complete fruition with Stanley Cup victories at the conclusion of both seasons.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers History
Reliability. Leadership. Hard work. Enthusiasm. Those are the traits that any employer covets and are the qualities that Joe Watson has come to personify in over three decades of nearly uninterrupted employment by the Philadelphia Flyers. Whether preventing opposition scoring chances as a mainstay on the Flyers’ blueline, working as a pro scout or in the organization’s sales and marketing departments, Watson has earned his keep and served with distinction.

-''Harry Sinden, who was the Bruins coach at the time, later called me to explain that he didn’t think the team would lose me if they left me open to the draft. To be honest, I didn’t really view that as a compliment, and it didn’t make me feel any better. - Joe Watson, after he got selected by the Philadelphia Flyers in the expansion draft


Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=14650
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=4031&mode=2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Wat...8ice_hockey%29
http://flyers.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=436198
http://flyers.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=434610
http://www.flyershistory.com/cgi-bin/hero.cgi?hero_10_

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-22-2010, 08:48 AM
  #11
Stoneberg
Bored
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Halifax
Country: Canada
Posts: 3,707
vCash: 500
D - Pekka Rautakallio.

-2 WHA Seasons, 3 NHL seasons, the rest (before, after, and in between) in Finland

-Left the WHA because Phoenix went bankrupt, returned to Assat Pori and was selected twice as the best defenceman in SM-liiga.

-Top 20's in NHL defensemen scoring: 6th, 17th

-SM Liiga scoring results among defensemen: 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, [Top 5 in league scoring once]

-Played in All Star Game in 1982 - first Finnish player ever to do so.

-Left the NHL after 3 seasons, for the sake of his kids getting an education in Finland.

-Represented Finland in 7 World Championships and 2 Canada Cups.

-Led Finish WC team in scoring amongst defensemen four times (one tie), and Canada cup once.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wiki
As a skilled but tough defenceman, Rautakallio fitted well to the North American style of hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
The Flames saw him as the defensive equivalent to Kent Nilsson, a skilled European puck wizard. The defenseman gave every sign of fulfilling that promise. His thirty points and +22 in 1979-80 were respectable in both areas. The hockey tactician had taken his rookie NHL year as a chance to get used to the closer quarters and hard hitting. [Insert: The only season of his 3 outside the top 20 in defensmen scoring]
Quote:
Originally Posted by GHL
Nicknamed Rocky during his North American tour of duty, Rautakallio is the Bobby Orr of Finnish hockey. He put up some very impressive stats in the National Hockey League as well as in his native Finland. He wasn't a puck rushing defenseman like Orr, as his skating ability wasn't overly tremendous, though it was certainly not bad. Instead he relied on his great understanding of the game to position himself perfectly be it in the offensive or defensive zone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GHL
He was a great passer, quarterbacking the point on the power play and making long breakout passes from his own zone. He also possessed a wicked snapshot from the point. It was hard and accurate, and he got it away in an uncanny hurry. Defensively he was solid, due largely to his positioning.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiki
After his NHL career, Pekka Rautakallio stayed as one of the top players of his time. Rautakallio returned to play for HIFK, instead of Ässät and served for a while as the captain of HIFK


Last edited by Stoneberg: 06-22-2010 at 09:02 AM.
Stoneberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-22-2010, 04:49 PM
  #12
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Steven John Payne



Height: 6'2''
Weight: 210 lbs
Position: Left Wing
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: August 16, 1958
Place of Birth: Toronto , Ontario, Canada


Stanley Cup Finalist (1981)
World Championship (1979)
Third All-Star Team (1980)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1980, 1985)

Top-10 Team Scoring (1st, 4th, 4th, 5th, 5th)
Top-10 Team Goalscoring (1st, 1st, 1st, 4th, 4th, 4th)
Top-10 Team Assist (3rd, 5th, 5th)


Top-10 Playoff Scoring (2nd)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (1st)
Top-10 Playoff Assist (10th)
Top-10 Playoff Team Scoring (1st, 1st, 2nd, 5th)
Top-10 Playoff Team Goalscoring (1st, 1st, 2nd, 5th)
Top-10 Playoff Team Assist (2nd, 3rd, 4th, 4th, 5th)



- Payne was selected by Minnesota 19th overall in the 1978 Amateur Draft
- Payne battled through a serious abdominal injury
- On November 14th 1987, Payne was hit from behind, suffering a neck injury that would only become more serious with time. The injury caused bone spurs to develop, and these spurs grew into his spinal cord. Doctors warned Payne That if he continued to play he would need career-ending spinal fusion surgery to repair the problem. Wisely, he retired rather than risk further damage

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
An offensively gifted forward, Payne played two seasons with the 67's, scoring 57 goals in his second season and helping his club reach the Memorial Cup tournament. Payne made his professional debut with Minnesota during the 1978-79 season while seeing limited action with the CHL's Oklahoma City Stars. Once Payne's NHL season came to an end, he suited up for Canada at the 1979 World Championships.

Payne was an instrumental in leading the North Stars to the Stanley Cup final in 1981 against the eventual Cup champion New York Islanders. In 19 playoff games, Payne recorded 29 points (17-12-29). Payne went on to play parts of ten seasons in Minnesota, and had seven consecutive 20+ goal seasons before calling it a career early into the 1987-88 season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Payne, a big left winger with the Minnesota North Stars from 1978 through 1988, blew out his knee during the 1985-86 season. The final three seasons of his solid career were filled with surgeries, re-injuries to the knee, and frustration.

Steve was big at 6'2" and 205lbs. He was a bit like John Leclair, although he was criticized for underachieving.

After seeing Payne play so masterfully at such a high level throughout the playoffs, great expectations were placed on his shoulders. If he could have played that way consistently over a full season, there'd be no doubt he'd be an all star and perhaps the game's best LW at that time.

But Steve failed to live up to the lofty expectations. He had a good but not great year in 1981-82 with 33 goals and 78 points. Come playoff time he again found the magic switch to turn his game up an extra notch. He scored 4 goals in 4 games, but unfortunately the North Stars came back to reality and were eliminated early in the playoffs.

Payne's production continued at the 30 goal level until his knee injury felled him.

Despite the injury, Payne tried very hard to return to the NHL. At one time he was as strong a skater as there was, though lacked agility. The knee injury all but removed what speed and agility he had. He remained strong on his skates, but checkers could knock him off the puck much easier.

Steve, who was at times lazy defensively, was never a great physical player despite his size. With the tremendous agony of the injury he became even more shy of contact, thus making him a perimeter player.

Payne could be compared to Claude Lemieux or a Trevor Linden. All three players found an extra gear come playoff time and were great playoff warriors. But in the regular season they generally played at a level below, thus for some leaving something to be desired.

Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13949
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=2946&mode=2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_P...8ice_hockey%29
http://northstarslegends.blogspot.co...eve-payne.html

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-22-2010, 10:45 PM
  #13
papershoes
Registered User
 
papershoes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Kenora, Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,656
vCash: 500
sorry for the skipped picks folks - been very busy lately.

the cornwall royals are pleased to take the following players...

viktor shuvalov (c)

- 6'0", 190 lbs
- USSR Champion (1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956)
- Olympic Gold (1956)
- World Championship Gold (1954)
- World Championship Silver (1955)
- Finished 2nd, 2nd, 3rd on Russia in his three Int'l tournaments - only ever finished behind Guryshev and Bobrov
- Placed 1st, 1st, 2nd, 2nd, 4th in Russian League Scoring (1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954)
- Soviet League All-Star (1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954)
- Had 4 of his 5 top-5 seasons separate from Bobrov/Babich
- 222 goals in 150 Russian league games
- 18 goals in 22 International games

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
When hockey fans think of the famous Bobrov forward line, they usually first remember Bobrov and Babich, and then recall the equally outstanding Viktor Shuvalov. Bobrov and Babich had made a name for themselves in hockey well before Shuvalov came along. But it was when Shuvalov joined the Bobrov line that it achieved the status it holds to this day. Shuvalov became the driving force behind Bobrov's troika.

Shuvalov was a leader, had strong character... Their relationship wasn't always smooth because Bobrov always demanded that the game be focused on him... Once Shuvalov understood that it was Bobrov who always drew at least two opposing players to the center line, he reconciled himself to the fact that Bobrov was the dominant member of the line.

..his style of play changed acordingly. At the beginning of an attack, Shuvalov would get Bobrov and Babich to the opposing team's goal with a series of strategic passes. If the attack folded up, Shuvalov could be counted on to back up his partners, and he frequently functioned as an offensive defenseman. he had quickly become a skillful and versatile player. Shuvalov also varied his game in front of the goal. He would position himself not right in front of the goal itself but farther back, giving the opportunity to attack and if need be, fall back and take up a defense position.

The fact that opposing teams beefed up their efforts to guard Babich and Bobrov meant Shuvalov was often left unguarded, and he lost no time taking advantage of that situation. He would fire the puck on the fly without bothering to set it up. His stability on ice was a great boon to him... with bowed legs spread wide in a low crouch he could avoid sudden bodychecks.

A hockey master is remembered by fans because of his unique abilities and individuality. This can take many forms - superb stickhandling, shots on goal, speed, and superior strategy. Viktor Shuvalov had a number of original techniques, among them his famous slapshot that flew four to six inches above the ice...Despite Bobrov's dominance, Shuvalov was a very valuable member of the famous forward line. His often dazzling and original playing style was backed up by high-scoring performances. When Shuvalov played alongside Bobrov at the WC, their scoring performances were virtually equal... He was a man who had his own views on the game, which is perhaps why he quit so early to take up coaching...
*from seventieslord's bio

dmitri ukolov (d)


...info to come

alexander uvarov (c)


- 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, and 6th in Russian league scoring
- 202 goals in 259 Russian League games

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
He had speed, a smooth skating style and stamina... quickly mastered the art of handling the puck... had all the requirements - speed, technique, powerful shots on goal, and an ability to help out on defense... had an outstanding ability to think on the ice. He controlled the game and orchestrated play by speeding up or slowing down the pace as needed.... had excellent peripheral vision... quickly assessed the situation... fed his partners at the right moment for a breakaway... his teammates would score on his brilliant passes while he remained in the background... had a knack for being in the right place at the right time... could conceal his intentions on the ice, baffling his opponents... would stop as if looking for someone to pass to, and just when it looked like he had missed the chance, he flipped it over to a teammate, who would score a goal... another special talent was versatility... his line attacked aggressively and scored the most goals domestically... when on the national team he became the shutdown center, neutralizing opposing stars... strategy was to keep the puck away from the opposition using a series of short, swift passes... The 1956 Olympic gold medal game was practically won on two goals scored on passes from Uvarov... a team player of the highest caliber, always placing the team's interests above his own... was team captain for 11 seasons in a row, and played until age 38
*from seventieslord's bio

aleksey morozov (rw)


...info to come

papershoes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-22-2010, 11:48 PM
  #14
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Robert Brian Ftorek




Height: 5'9''
Weight: 160 lbs
Position: Center
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: January 02, 1952
Place of Birth: Needham , Massachusetts, United States


WHA First All-Star Team (1977, 1979)
WHA Second All-Star Team (1976, 1978)
Gordie Howe Trophy (Most Valuable Player - WHA) (1977)
Olympic Silver Medalist (1972)
Canada Cup (1976, 1981)
Tam Captain (1981)
United States Hall of Fame (1991)

World Hockey Association [1974-1979]
Top-10 Scoring (2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (3rd, 7th, 8th)
Top-10 Assist (1st, 4th, 5th)

- On February 12th 1972, Ftorek was selected by New England Whalers in the 1972 WHA General Player Draft
- On August 15th 1972, he was signed as a free agent by Detroit
- In the 1976 Canada Cup, he was elected MVP of Team USA
- In 1977, Ftorek became the first American ice hockey player in major professional hockey to win a league's most valuable player
- On May 30th 1977, he was signed as a free agent by Cincinnati (WHA) after the Phoenix (WHA) franchise folded
- Ftorek own the longest game played streak of the WHA with 276
- On December 30th 1981, Ftorek was traded to the New York Rangers by Quebec with Quebec's 8th round choice (Brian Glynn) in the 1982 Entry Draft for Jere Gillis and Pat Hickey


Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Robbie Ftorek was a skilled forward who made his presence felt in the NHL, WHA, and internationally. Although he was only 155 lbs., the crafty forward was lightning quick and able to avoid many hits during his career.

Always a bit of a free spirit, Ftorek decided to pursue his pro dreams in the World Hockey Association. He was an offensive force for three years on the Phoenix Roadrunners then two seasons with the Cincinnati Stingers. Along the way Ftorek won the Gordie Howe trophy as the league's most valuable player in 1977 and was selected to the league's first and second all-star teams twice each. He also scored five points in five games for the USA at the inaugural Canada Cup in 1976.

The tricky forward was a major asset when the Blueshirts extended the Stanley Cup champion Islanders to six games in the quarterfinals. Ftorek remained a solid role player in New York until the end of the 1984-85 season.

Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=12658
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=1207&mode=2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robbie_Ftorek

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-24-2010, 05:48 PM
  #15
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
Henrik Lundqvist




Name: King Henrik
Height: 6'0''
Weight: 187 lbs
Position: Goaltender
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: March 02, 1982
Place of Birth: Ĺre , Sweden


Honken Trophy *Elitserien best Goaltender* (2003, 2004, 2005)
Guldpucken *Sweden Player of the Year* (2005)
Guldhjälmen *Elitserien Player of the Year* (2005)
Third All-Star Team (2006)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (2009)
NHL All-Rookie Team (2006)
World Championships (2003, 2004, 2005, 2008)
World Championship Silver Medalist (2003, 2004)
World Cup (2004)
World Cup Best Goaltender (2004)
Olympic (2006, 2010)
Olympic Gold Medal (2006)

Top-10 Wins (4th, 4th, 8th, 10th)
Top-10 GAA (5th, 7th, 8th, 9th)
Top-10 Save % (4th, 7th, 9th)
Top-10 Shutouts (1st, 6th)
*Minimum 20 games*

Calder Finalist (4th)
Top-10 Hart Finalist (9th)
Top-10 Vezina Finalist (3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 6th, 6th)


- Lundqvist was selected 205th overall in the 2000 NHL Entry Draft by the New York Rangers
- He's the only goaltender in NHL history to record 30 wins in each of his first five seasons


Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
In the fall of 2005, Lundqvist made his NHL debut with the Rangers and was instrumental in leading his team to the post season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Lundqvist is considered a butterfly style goalie, though unorthodox because of the aggressive way he performs the butterfly. He is best known for his sensational quickness, athleticism and strong positional play.
Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=19762
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...TOKEN=32966801
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henrik_Lundqvist
http://henrik-lundqvist.com/

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-26-2010, 03:38 PM
  #16
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
James William Ward



Name: Jimmy
Height: 5'11''
Weight: 167 lbs
Position: Right Wing
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: September 01, 1906
Place of Birth: Fort William , Ontario, Canada
Date of Death: November 15, 1990 (Age: 84)

Stanley Cup Champion (1935)
Stanley Cup Finalist (1928)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1934, 1937)

Top-10 Scoring (9th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (8th, 10th)
Top-10 Assist (7th, 8th, 10th)

Lady Bing Finalist (4th)

- He's the Father of professional baseball player Pete Ward of the Chicago White Sox
- On August 26th, 1927, Ward was signed as a free agent by Montreal Maroons
- On September 14th, 1938, Ward was traded to the Montreal Canadiens by the Montreal Maroons for cash


Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Jimmy Ward enjoyed a prosperous 12-year NHL career, eleven of which were spent with the Montreal Maroons. Ward was known for his resiliency and tenacity, rarely missing any action due to injury. He was also a consistent player, scoring at least ten goals in ten of the 12 seasons back when the NHL regular season was just 48 games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trail of the Stanley Cup, vol.2
Smith, Stewart and the newcomer Jimmy Ward would make a strong line.

Hooley Smith was the only remaining member of the big 'S' line but Northcott and Ward were still very much in evidence.
Quote:
Quote:
Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=14635
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...TOKEN=32966801

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-26-2010, 04:27 PM
  #17
EagleBelfour
Registered User
 
EagleBelfour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,370
vCash: 500
August Bodnar



Nickname: Gus
Height: 5'11''
Weight: 160 lbs
Position: Center
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: April 24, 1923
Place of Birth: Fort William , Ontario, Canada
Date of Death: July 01, 2005

Stanley Cup Champion (1945, 1947)
Calder Memorial Trophy (1944)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1951)
North Western Sports Hall of Fame (1983)
Oshawa Sports Hall of Fame (1995)

Top-10 Scoring (9th, 10th)
Top-10 Assists (4th, 5th, 7th, 7th)

Calder Finalist (1st)

- #81 on the Greatest Leaf of All-Time by the Maple Leafs Top-100 book (played 3 full seasons with them)
- On October 29th 1943, Gus was signed by the Toronto Maple Leafs to a pro contract
- He scored the fastest goal by a rookie, only 15 seconds into his first NHL game against goaltender Ken McAuley and the New York Rangers, in a 5-2 victory
- Bodnar played on the effective "Flying Forts" line with fellow Fort William natives Bud Poile and Gaye Stewart.
-On November 2nd 1947, he was traded to Chicago Black Hawks by Toronto Maple Leafs with Bud Poile, Gaye Stewart, Ernie Dickens and Bob Goldham for Max Bentley and Cy Thomas
- Bodnar was traded to the Boston Bruins by the Chicago Black Hawks for Jerry Toppazzini
- In the last game of the 1951-52 season, he collected the fastest three assists when Bill Mosienko scored the fastest hat trick in NHL history, only 21 seconds
- Gus died on July 1st, 2005, of cancer at the Lakeridge Health Unit in Oshawa, Ontario


Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Gus Bodnar was a fine scorer and playmaker in an NHL career that lasted nearly 700 games in the 1940s and '50s. He hit double figures in goals seven times and rarely found himself in the penalty box.

The clever centre played nearly seven full years in the Windy City. He toiled admirably and was selected to play in the 1951 NHL All-Star Game though the club rarely made the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Western Sports Hall of Fame
Known for his good speed and stick handling abilities, he was signed on by the Toronto Maple Leafs for the start of the 1943-44 season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leafs Top-100
Bodnar was a good offensive player and could score or set up goals, although he was a better playmaker than goalscorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF Stanley Cup Journal
It was an amazing day for Gus Bodnar, and an outstanding tribute to a terrific athlete and a true competitor. Then, on Friday, July 1, just six days after his visit with the Stanley Cup, Gus succumbed to the cancer that had ravaged his body.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who's Who in Hockey
But Bodnar, a slick center, immediatly proved he was a winner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1953-54 Parkhurst
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1954-55 Parkhurst

- ''It appears that we have reached the Children's Hour in the NHL.'' - Hap Day on Bodnar playing his first year with the Maple Leafs


Links:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=12022
http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/...T&year=1943-44
http://www.hhof.com/html/exSCJ05_09.shtml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gus_Bodnar
http://www.nwosportshalloffame.com/i...tee.aspx?id=28

EagleBelfour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 03:50 PM
  #18
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
One of the most significant players in history left, though there are concerns about his level of competition, which I am going to try to put into perspective.

The Brooklyn Americans select the captain and best player of the best national team in the world in the 1940s:

Vladimir Zabrodsky, C

The Best Czech Hockey player of the Century:
voted by 50 experts, played-out pros, coaches and refs.

1. DOMINIK HAŠEK 472
2. JAROMÍR JÁGR 357
3. VLADIMÍR ZÁBRODSKÝ 240
4. VLADIMÍR MARTINEC 235
5. IVAN HLINKA 181
6. XXX 160
7. JAN SUCHÝ 154
8. JIŘÍ HOLÍK 136
9. XXX 121
10. VÁCLAV NEDOMANSKÝ 98
http://hfboards.com/showpost.php?p=1...&postcount=208

Zabrodsky is basically the Bobrov of Czechoslovakia. In the late 1940s, Czechoslovakia was looking to become Canada’s main rival in the world of hockey, and Zabrodsky was by far their best player. Czechoslovakia won the 1947 and 49 World Championships and got the silver medal in the 1948 Olympics, after tying Canada’s record and losing out narrowly on goal differential. Zabrodsky was still the leading scorer at the 1948 Olympics, however.

Briefly, here are events that help explain why the USSR and not Czechoslovakia started to emerge as Canada’s principal rival in the 1950s:

1. Zabrodsky’s club team traveled to the USSR in 1948 to help the Soviets develop their hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatestHockeyLegends.com
Zábrodský will also go down to history as one of the players who were on the first ever hockey team that visited Russia in 1948. His LTC Praha team played three games against the Russians and helped them develop their hockey.
2. After the Czechs helped to develop Soviet hockey, the Soviets set about undermining the Czech team. First was a mysterious plane crash over the USSR in 1948, then most of the national team (minus Zabrodsky) was arrested for treason in 1950 by the puppet government in Czechoslovakia.
Quote:
November 18, 1948 team Czechoslovakia had a grievous stroke, in a plane crash killed the goalie XXX, full-back XXX., XXX and XXX, forwards XXX and XXX. XXX left Czechoslovakia and emigrated to the UK (along with him XXX). Nevertheless, Czechoslovakian team once again became the world champion of 1949 in Stockholm, the team won Canada (3:2). From this moment story of Czechoslovakian team was suspended. Before the World Cup of 1950, almost all national team players were charged with treason, attempted to emigrate and sentenced to various terms of imprisonment or disqualified.
http://www.nphu.com/2009/07/07/history-of-hockey/

Quote:
Czechoslovakia was the best national team in the world in the years following World War II. The team won the 1947 and 1949 World Championships and lost the 1948 Olympic gold to Canada only on goal differential.

But it was their own people, driven by conspiracy theories in Stalinist Czechoslovakia, who prevented this great team from defending its title at the 1950 World Championship in London, England. Just before the national squad was about to board the plane for Great Britain on March 11, 1950, the players were handcuffed by the national state security police (KNB, Czechoslovakian forerunner to the KGB) and taken to jail.

Seven months later, on October 7, the players appeared in court accused of attempting to defect and they were charged with treason.
Czechoslovakian team jailed for treason – entire generation lostl

Here is information on Zabrodsky himself:

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatestHockeyLegends.com
Vladimir Zábrodský was a Czechoslovakian giant who almost single-handedly put hockey on the map in what is now the Czech and Slovakian Republic.
...
His individual play single-handedly won his team many games
. He led the national team to the 1947 and 1949 World Championships. He also participated in the 1948,54,55 and 56 World Championships as well as two Olympic tournaments (1948 and 56). In the 1948 Olympic games in St. Moritz Switzerland, he led the tournament in scoring and his team to a 6-0-1 record, good enough for the silver medal.

Zábrodský was the Czech national team.
He represented the Czechs 93 times and scored an incredible 158 goals, including 29 goals in 7 World Championship games in 1947 and 21 in 8 Olympic games in 1948 !

In Czech league play this crafty center scored 306 goals in 237 games spanning 16 seasons. He led the league in scoring 5 times - 1947 (17 goals), 1949 (19), 1954 (30), 1957 (33) and in 1959 (23). He also won the league championship 6 times - 1946-49 (LTC Praha) and 1953 and 19 54 (Spartak CKD Sokolovo).

12 of Zábrodský's teammates were jailed for espionage and treason in 1950. Their sentences ranged from 8 months to 15 years. Zábrodský somehow wasn't jailed and many people to this day think that he was a "rat", who snitched on his teammates in order to escape any punishment for himself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reds4Life View Post
Zábrodský was center.He was a bit selfish on the ice, but he had to be to score so many goals.
He scored 158 goals in 93 games for the National team.
He played 18 seasons in Czechoslovakian league (230 games) and scored 306 goals.
6 times World Champion.
He played for LTC Prague, Spartak CKD Sokolovo and Bohemians CKD Prague.
5 times best goalscorer of the Czechoslovakian league.
He was called "Boss" some of his teammates call still call him Boss.
He was the leader of World Champions 1947 and 1949.
Phenomenal goalscorer. His backhand shoot is legendary.
He remarkably affected whole team in both National and Club competition. He was the cornerstone of those teams.
Conclusion:
I think that there is a lot of evidence that Czech hockey in the late 40s was at the same level as Soviet hockey through much of the 1950s. We give Soviet standouts from the 1950s the benefit of the doubt; we should do the same for Zabrodsky, who I think is likely very comparable to Bobrov in terms of talent, in other words an elite scorer at the MLD level. If jarek has time, he can use his magical SIHR membership to show just how dominant Zabrodsky was statistically, but the quotes I provided above are a good start.



______________________________________

Zabrodsky vs. Malecek:

I like Zabrodsky a bit better than Malecek for 2 simple reasons:

1) The Czechs themselves seem to consider him better. Malecek was the "9. XXX 121" from the list where Zabrodsky is third. I really don't think there much "modern bias" when you are talking about a player who is from the 1930s vs. the 1940s.

2) It's much easier to figure out a comparable for the level of competition Zabrodsky faced. I'd guess that his competition was probably on the same level as the Soviets faced in the mid-late 50s; this is assuming it took the Soviets several years to reach the level that the Czechs had been at in the late 40s. I have no idea how to even start determining Malecek's level of competitions.

Zabrodsky vs. Bobrov

Zabrodsky isn't just 1940s "European hockey," though. He's 1940s Czech hockey, which was well ahead of the Soviets at the time. I'd say it's pretty comparable to the competition that ATD mainstays Bobrov and Solugubov faced.

And he dominated his competition, much like Bobrov did. Of course, the criticism of Bobrov is apt with Zabrodsky too - he has to be the centerpiece of his line to be effective. We'll see what we can do.

I think Zabrodsky, like Bobrov, should be an ATD spare or a superstar at the MLD level.


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 06-29-2010 at 04:23 PM.
TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 03:53 PM
  #19
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
Miikka Kiprusoff, G.

Kiprusoff might have the best peak of any goalie in the MLD - a Vezina finalist 3 straight seasons including 1 win, 3rd and 4th in Hart voting, and a trip to the Cup finals.

-In 03-04, he was 2nd in Vezina voting and 4th in Hart voting, despite playing only 38 games. He led the league in save % (.933) and GAA (1.69), and had a 24-10-4 record. The 1.69 GAA is a modern-day NHL record. The other goalies on the team combined for an 18-23-3 record, before Kiprusoff took over the starting job. Overall, the team's save % was .919 and team GAA was 2.04, a far cry from Kiprusoff’s personal statistics.

(lockout year)

-In 05-06, he was 1st in Vezina voting in a landslide (25 first place votes, 140 points. 2nd place Brodeur had 2 first place votes, 48 points.). He was also a solid 3rd in Hart voting.

-06-07: 3rd (tied) in Vezina voting behind what I think were the best seasons of Brodeur and Luongo's careers

Vezina record:
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 8th, 8th (updated to include his 8th place finish in 09-10)

Hart record: 3rd, 4th

-Kiprusoff is a workhouse, finishing Top 4 in minutes played by a goalie every year since 05-06 (1, 1, 3, 3, 4).

While Kiprusoff doesn't have a Cup, he's been a good playoff performer:


-In the 03-04 playoffs, Kiprusoff sported a .928 save % and a 1.85 GAA along with 5 shutouts in taking his team to within 1 game of winning the Stanley Cup.

-Kiprusoff’s career save % rises from .914 in the regular season to .921 in the playoffs and his career GAA decreases from 2.44 to 2.32 in the playoffs.

Records:
-Modern-day NHL record; lowest goals against average, single-season - 1.69 GAA in 2003–04
-Calgary Flames franchise record; most shutouts, single-season - 10 in 2005–06
-Calgary Flames franchise record; most wins, single-season - 45 in 2008–09 (surpassed own record of 42 wins in 2005–06)
-Calgary Flames franchise record; most games played, single-season - 76 in 2007–08 and 2008–09 (surpassed own record of 74 games in 2005–06 and 2006–07)
-Calgary Flames franchise record; most shutouts, all-time - 32


Here is an incredibly flattering picture of the Finnish superstar:



Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 07-25-2010 at 03:46 PM.
TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 03:56 PM
  #20
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
LW Dubbie Kerr

Kerr was an All-Star in both the ECHL and PCHA. He won two Cups. He was usually just behind the scoring leaders of the era and he appears to be equally proficient at goalscoring and playmaking. He also has some impressive PIM totals, indicating at least some level of toughness.



-Stanley Cup Champion (1909, 1911)
-Stanley Cup Finalist (1914)
-First All-Star Team (1909) *ECHA*
-First All-Star Team (1914) *PCHA*
-Second All-Star Team (1917) *PCHA*

The following author selected 1st and 2nd Team All Stars for the PCHA, NHA, and WCHL for this timeframe, as well as the first 10 years of the NHL. Dubbie Kerr was selected as the all-time 1st Team All-Star LW for the PCHA. (And quite a few of his accomplishments were before he joined the PCHA).

http://www.makojo.com/earlyhockey.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by EagleBelfour
Eastern Canada Hockey League [1908-09]
Top-10 Scoring (5th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (5th)
*Assist were not recorded*
National Hockey Association [1909-12]
Top-10 Scoring (2nd, 5th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (2nd, 4th)
Top-10 Penalty Minutes (8th)
Top-10 Playoff Scoring (3rd)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (3rd)
Pacific Coast Hockey League [1913-20]
Top-10 Scoring (2nd, 3rd, 7th, 8th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (4th, 5th, 8th, 8th)
Top-10 Assist (2nd, 2nd, 9th)
Top-10 Penalty Minutes (3rd, 3rd, 3rd)
Top-10 Playoff Scoring (4th)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (4th)
Top-10 Playoff Penalty Minutes (2nd)
From EB's profile from ATD12: http://hfboards.com/showpost.php?p=2...&postcount=148


Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Albert "Dubbie" Kerr started his pro hockey career as a high scoring left winger with the Toronto Pros of the Ontario Professional Hockey League in 1909. After only three games with Toronto, he jumped to the Ottawa Silver Seven. He promptly led them to a Stanley Cup victory!

Kerr, along with center Marty Walsh and Billy Gilmour became the most prolific scoring line in the ECHA.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup, vol. 1
With the Senators he played left wing on a line with Billy Gilmour and centred by Marty Walsh. This line was the class of the league and they romped the Stanley Cup.

He played two more years with the Senators being on another Cup Winner in 1911. That year he was the sensation of the league, scoring in twelve consecutive games and finishing second only to Marty Walsh for the scoring leadership. The line of Kerr, Walsh and XXX combined for a total of 91 goals.


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 06-29-2010 at 04:25 PM.
TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 04:05 PM
  #21
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
Here's more on Normand Rochefort, one of the best stay at home defensemen of the 1980s:



Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
But obscurity continued to follow Rochefort, in part because of his stay-at-home style of play and in part because the Nordiques had a long-standing reputation for being weak on defense. If such was the case, it was thought, then perhaps Rochefort wasn't really all that good. However, he was the kind of defender who was noticed only when he made a mistake--and he didn't make many of those.

He anchored the Nordiques' blueline, which had a strong offensive orientation, for seven seasons until his little secret got out. He was invited to play at Rendez-vous '87 and the Canada Cup later that year. He surprised everyone as the steadiest defender at the tournament. From then on, Rochefort was on the NHL map.
Rochefort played in in 9 games of the 1987 Canada Cup. He had 1 goal, 2 assists, and was +3. Against the Soviets, he was matched against the KLM line:

Quote:
From game 2 Canada matched the line of Mark Messier, Mike Gartner, and Glenn Anderson linked with defensemen Rochefort and XXX against the Soviets' main threat, the KLM line, to attempt to shut them down...
-The Canada Cup of Hockey Fact and Stat Book, by H.J. Anderson, page 115

http://books.google.com/books?id=Pp-...hefort&f=false

The Pelletier quote jarek provided goes into his style of play in more detail:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Rochefort was one of the top defensemen in the National Hockey League for a time during the mid 1980s. Don't believe it? Well he played in the 1987 Rendez Vous tournament against the Soviet Union, and later that year was a nice part of Team Canada in the 1987 Canada Cup.

Rochefort was a bone crunching bodychecker. Though he took few penalties, he was one of the most feared physical players of his time. He loved to rattle a player along the boards and at times would go out of his way for an open ice hit. He was also a menace in front of his own net, punishing any opposition forward who dared to enter the slot. He was also a premier shot blocker.

Playing such a physical style can be tough on a guy's body - no one knows that more than Rochefort. However Rochefort just absolutely loves to play, which is why he came back from repeated severe injuries and why he continued to play in the minors for years after his NHL days were done. Rochefort, who wasn't the fleetest skater to start with, had several major surgeries on his knees, including reconstructive surgery in 1988-89.

Though his skating wasn't impressive, his puck skills were. He rarely jumped up into an offensive attack, but he had this knack of always clearing his zone with a perfect pass to a breaking forward.

TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 04:07 PM
  #22
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
Dennis Hextall, LW



-Played in NHL All-Star Game (1974 & 1975)
-“Honoured Member” of the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame

-Points finishes: 9, 19
-Assist finishes: 3*, 11, 15
-3 Consecutive 50 assist seasons

-7th in Hart voting in 72-73
*Behind only Bobby Orr and Phil Esposito in 73-74

-One of 2 Red Wings captains in 77-78 and one of 3 Red Wings captains in 78-79 (it appears they used alternating captains these years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
In 1968, Hextall caught a brief stint with the New York Rangers before being sent to the Buffalo Bisons of the AHL. From there he embarked on a familiar pattern of being traded to the NHL's cellar dwellers. First it was off to the Los Angeles Kings. Then, he joined the California Seals where his trademark balance between scoring and abrasive play emerged.

In 1972, Hextall was traded to the Minnesota North Stars where he reached the peak of his productivity, scoring 284 points in 295 games. But just as the North Stars were approaching respectability, he was again traded to the struggling Red Wings and then on to the hapless Washington Capitals to round out his career in 1979.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette
Hextall, on the other hand, has slugged it out with some of the best - and won more than he’s lost.
His most recent was a brawl with the Chicago Black Hawks’ policeman, Keith Magnuson, which most observers rated as a draw.
-North Stars' Dennis Hextall Finds a Little Education Didn't Hinder His Career, The Montreal Gazette - March 17, 1972

Quote:
I do remember Hextall: Dirty, chippy, win at all costs 70's style of player. Back in the day I hated the Wings( until Probie played for them) and Hextall was near the top as far as most hated Wings. I'm pretty sure my first live gm ( 77) was at the Old Barn (the Olympia) where I saw a preseason gm between DET-PIT . Schultz fought Hextall and gave it to him pretty good( similar to their fight in ATL (playoffs) a few yrs earlier. I remember him more at the end of his career, but he was a tough guy that could play. Near the end of his career he wouldn't want to open up much, and looked to hang on. But earlier in his career he had a good rep as a fighter- BJ, was spot on about him being a playmaker in the mold of T.Ruskowski- happier to assist than score. Real team guy and the epitome of the gritty 70's player. You'd love to have him on your team , but boy you wanted to kill him if he was on another team.
Quote:
Hextall was a tough,mean player. He had many run in's with the Bruins. The two articles shown were a couple that I remember well. He also fought Orr,Jonathan and in the Forbes vs Boucha game ,Orr swung his stick at Hextall and received a major. Hextall used to get under Orr's skin big time.He was a pretty good fighter at the time
from http://www.hockeyfights.com/forums/f...extall-139731/


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 06-30-2010 at 05:31 AM.
TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 04:08 PM
  #23
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
The Brooklyn Americans select an offensive defenseman to QB our PP who can play reasonably responsible in his own zone:

D Dick Redmond



Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
From that point forward, Redmond established himself as an all-around defenseman who wielded a heavy, accurate shot from the point and could headman the puck to good effect. Such skills kept him in good stead for many years to come as he moved east to Chicago for four-plus seasons.
-Top 10 in goals among defensemen 6 times (3rd, 3rd, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th)
-Top 15 in points among defensemen 6 times (3rd, 6th, 6th, 8th, 11th, 14)

-Stanley Cup finalist in 1973 with Chicago
-Scored a hat trick in the 1973 playoffs
-California Golden Seals Assists leader in 71-72
-Led all NHL defensemen with five game-winning goals for Boston in 1979-80.

Quote:
Originally Posted by evil speaker
Redmond was a superb talent on the backend who wielded a heavy, accurate shot from the point, had strong skating abilities and was responsible in his own end.
____

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey Johnson
I grew up with him. He had more confidence than half of our team. He could do everything and he had a lot of talent to go along with his confidence
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorthanded: The Untold Story of the Seals
Dick Redmond was one of the early offensive defensemen who joined the NHL in the wake of Bobby Orr. He could skate, shoot, and quarterback the powerplay very effectively."

...
Most of Redmond's teammates immediately recognized his talents. XXX remembered that Redmond 'had the hardest shot outside of Bobby Hull in the game. He was great on the point of the powerplay...' XXX called Redmond 'as good a skater as I've ever played with. He could shoot the puck hard."

...
Winger XXX recalled that Redmond 'had a bullet of a shot and was a great skater. He was more offensive-minded than defensive-minded, but he knew how to pick his spots.'"
From: http://books.google.com/books?id=OvX...sult&resnum=6#

Points by defensemen in the 1970s (1970-71 to 79-80):

1. Bobby Orr 659 (71-79)
2. Brad Park 574
3. Dennis Potvin 544 (74-80)
4. Guy Lapointe 542
5. Carol Vadnais 453
6. Borje Salming 431 (74-80)
7. Larry Robinson 419 (73-80)
8. Dick Redmond 409
9. Ron Stackhouse 403
10. Ian Turnbull 346 (74-80)

The rest of the top 10 were selected in the main draft.

TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 04:10 PM
  #24
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
RW Todd Bertuzzi

I think Bertuzzi is probably the most talented power forward in the MLD (he almost certainly has the best regular season peak). And I think that in a few years when his negatives fade from recent memory, he'll be a perennial 4th liner in the main draft.

2000-01: 14th in PP goals
2001-02: 13th in goals, 8th in assists, 3rd in points, 6th in PP goals
2002-03: 3rd in goals, 13th in assists, 5th in points, 1st in PP goals
2003-04: 19th in assists in the, ahem, shortened season.

-4 consecutive 40 assist seasons (02, 02, 04, 06).

-All Star games in 2003, 2004
-1st Team AS RW in 2003
-5th in Hart voting in 2003

-3rd in All Star voting for LW (behind Naslund and Shanahan) and 6th in All Star voting for RW in 2002. Does anyone know what happened here? Why Bert received more votes for AS LW than AS RW?

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
The 6'3" 235-pounder could play rough when necessary but was even more impressive when exhibiting the touch of a goal scorer.

Todd is one of the most popular players in the history of organized hockey as seen in the image below:


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 06-29-2010 at 04:28 PM.
TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 04:10 PM
  #25
TheDevilMadeMe
Global Moderator
 
TheDevilMadeMe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Brooklyn
Country: United States
Posts: 42,257
vCash: 500
The Brooklyn Americans select one of the top defensive defensemen at the MLD level:

Rick Green, D



How highly was Green's defensive ability thought of after the 1986 Cup win? He was 9th in Norris voting and 8th in postseason All Star voting in 1987, despite scoring only 10 points!

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
One of the game's quintessential stay-at-home defencemen, Rick Green played over 800 NHL contests between 1976 and 1991. His trademark was staying in position and utilizing his 6'3', 220lb. frame to tie up opposing forwards.
...
He spent six years stabilizing the Caps' blueline and represented Canada at three World Championships, including the bronze medal win in 1982.

...Green was traded... to the Montreal Canadiens... The high point for the steady blueliner was helping Montreal vanquish the Calgary Flames to win the Stanley Cup in 1986.

Through the late 80s' Green's defensive excellence was a pillar of the club's success under Jean Perron and Pat Burns. He was picked to participate in the 1987 Rendez-vous series between the NHL and Soviet All-Stars and was a key figure when the Habs reached the final in 1989.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Historical Website of the Montreal Canadiens

Big, strong and with enough of a mean streak to make his opponents hesitate before invading his territory, Rick Green spent 15 years patrolling the blue line with four NHL teams, enjoying the best years of his career with the Montreal Canadiens.

Green broke into the NHL with the Washington Capitals, who chose him first overall in the 1976 Amateur Draft. A tough competitor who specialized in clearing the Capitals’ goalmouth of opposing players, Green also contributed to Washington’s offensive efforts, chipping in from 20 to 40 points a season, but not playing a single postseason game until he left the U.S. capital.

After six seasons that established him as one of the toughest rearguards in the league, Green came to Montreal with Ryan Walter in the blockbuster 1982 deal that saw four Habs head to Washington. Green continued his effective, robust play, quickly becoming a stalwart on the Canadiens blue line.

For the next seven years, the 6-foot-3, 220-pounder flattened opposing forwards in front of the net, dug for the puck along the boards and battled in the corners. His point totals diminished as Green concentrated on his duties as a stay-at-home defenseman but his utility to the team did not.

After missing a large part of the 1985-86 season with a broken thumb, Green came back and contributed a career-high five postseason points on the way to the Habs’ 23rd Stanley Cup Championship.

While his work often went unnoticed by fans, the local media were paying attention. They voted the big defender with the low public profile as the 1987 Jacques Beauchamp Trophy winner, recognizing his unsung contributions to the team.

Green’s body paid the price of his rugged approach to the game and he announced his retirement following the 1988-89 season. He later reconsidered, playing briefly in Europe and then returning to the NHL where he wore Red Wings and Islanders jerseys before hanging up his skates for good in 1992.


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 06-29-2010 at 04:36 PM.
TheDevilMadeMe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:35 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2015 All Rights Reserved.