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Old
06-29-2010, 04:11 PM
  #26
TheDevilMadeMe
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Fredrick Olausson, D

Quote:
Originally Posted by overpass
Fredrik Olausson

Olausson is a power play star - he has several high finishes in power play points for defensemen.

1998-99 - 1st (43 points)
1991-92 - 3rd (46 points)
1992-93 - 10th (38 points)

Olausson was also a plus player despite playing on weak teams for much of his career - his career even-strength plus-minus is +34, and his adjusted plus-minus is +109.
He's also a right handed shot for the PP and won a Cup in 2002 with Detroit.



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06-29-2010, 04:12 PM
  #27
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Jimmy Ward is gone, but jarek immediately found another playmaking right wing to flank Zabrodsky. And this guy has a better playoff record than Ward:

RW Eddie Wiseman

-3 Times Top 10 in assists, 6 Times Top 20 (6th, 10th, 10th, 12th, 17th, 17th)
-1 Time Top 10 in goals, 2 Times Top 20 (9th, 13th)
-1 Time Top 10 in points, 5 Times Top 20 (8th, 13th, 18th, 19th, 20th)

-Stanley Cup in 1941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Missing from this Bruins team was the great Eddie Shore. Shore was traded to the New York Americans in exchange for forward Eddie Wiseman. Wiseman may be long forgotten in NHL history, but the trade paid off nicely in the spring of 1941. Wiseman led all NHL players with 6 goals in the playoffs, including 3 in the low scoring finals against Detroit.
http://www.greatesthockeylegends.com...on-bruins.html



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06-29-2010, 04:13 PM
  #28
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Dutch Reibel, C



1 Top 10 in Goals: 7th
3 Top 10s in Assists: 4th, 5th, 6th
3 Top 10s in Points: 4th*, 7th, 8th
*Led the Wings in scoring over Gordie Howe in 1955 - the only player in a 15 year stretch (1950-64) to do so.

-Stanley Cups in 1954 and 1955
-12 points in 11 playoff games in 1955
-Won the 55-56 Lady Byng Trophy (back when the Trophy still had a good amount of prestige)

Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideHockey
Forward Dutch Reibel was a Calder Trophy runner-up ({Ted} Lindsay told me that Reibel was an unsung hero of the Red Wings).
http://www.insidehockey.com/columns/6130


Reibel had a fantastic start to his career, before "being betrayed" by one of Jack Adam's ill-advised trades that dismantled the dynasty:

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
But in 1957, the Wings traded Reibel to the Chicago Blackhawks?a move that marked a dramatic decline in his hockey career. He had thrived on sense of fidelity and consistency of skating for the Wings. Once the ties were cut, he no longer played with his usual zeal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOe Pelletier
The now long forgotten Reibel was pretty good in his own right. He helped the Wings win Stanley Cups in 1954 and 1955. He was the winner of the 1956 Lady Byng trophy. He finished in the NHL's top ten in scoring in his first three seasons. And in 1954-55 he was the only player between 1950 and 1964 to lead the Red Wings in scoring not named Gordie Howe.

In 1957 Reibel was part of an eight player mega-trade that sent him to Chicago. The move devastated Reibel, who had bled Wings' red for all his hockey career. He had a tough time moving on, feeling betrayed by the team he was so loyal to.

He finished the season in Chicago and played the next in Boston, but his game was lost.

"Once I left Detroit, things just went downhill," he told author Frank Pagnucco. "It just wasn't the same. I enjoyed Detroit . . . you play with an organization for so long."
Quote:
Originally Posted by guy on a message board whose father watched the 50s Wings
Dutch was a forward who played bigger than his size, modeling himself after Alex Delvecchio, and could put up a decent few points while keeping opposing defenses honest with his unpredictable moves. He won a few Cups back during the Fifties dynasty, and his flashy but unpretentious skill won a few hearts too. He never complained, always getting on with the game and fighting through more than a few checks that would have put a lesser-hearted man down for the count. He was a real glue guy. Fans from that era, my father included, remember him with fondness. But I don’t, because time has moved on and my Detroit Red Wings are nothing like my father’s.
http://www.kuklaskorner.com/index.ph...out_this/P100/


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06-29-2010, 04:14 PM
  #29
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Rich Preston, RW




In the WHA:

-2 Avro World Trophies (WHA champion) – 1975, 1979
-WHA playoff MVP in 1979 with 8 goals in 10 games

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
So Preston launched a successful four-year stint in Houston where he developed into an outstanding two-way player who, as he put himself, was a jack-of-all-trades and master of none. At least, until he joined the Winnipeg Jets for the WHA's final season in 1978-79. During the playoffs, Preston was stellar, being voted as the MVP of the tournament. His Jets won the last Avco Cup ever awarded.
In the NHL:

-4th in Selke voting in 1980, behind Bob Gainey, Craig Ramsey, and Don Luce

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Rich Preston was a fantastic defensive forward during the 1980s with Chicago, also spending 2 seasons in New Jersey. He was also a standout in the WHA.


Preston was great in the corners. He had very strong legs and a strong upper body. He really dug the puck out…" explained (Preston’s linemate in Chicago).

Preston immediately stepped into a Chicago lineup and scored 31 goals and 61 points, turning many heads.

As the Blackhawks team got stronger over the coming couple of seasons, Preston was relegated more to a defensive role, a role which he enthusiastically took on and excelled at. He was a student of the game and had a good understanding of any situation on the ice. He was a key penalty killer for Chicago as well.

An aggressive player despite an average build, Preston was excellent in the corners, a poor man's John Tonelli. Preston was also a super team guy in the dressing room as well. He had a contagious attitude. His up beat and positive attitude helped young players and other veterans alike.

While Rich Preston's hockey career is forgotten about by most now, he should be looked back upon as a good role player whose true contributions could never be quantified, but always were appreciated.


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06-29-2010, 04:15 PM
  #30
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Ron Sutter, C



-2nd in Selke voting in 85-86


-Selke record: 2, 14, 21 (received a single vote on 3 more occasions).

-Received a vote in an NHL coach's poll in 1994 for Best Faceoff man in the league. (Sutter was past his prime by then).

-Reached the Stanley Cup finals twice with the Flyers

-4th in short handed goals in 91-92; 14 career SHGs.

-Captain of the Flyers from 89-91

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier

Ron was the highest drafted Sutter ever...

Ron was never expected to put up great offensive numbers, although he would put up decent numbers during his Philly days. Instead, he was the guy who would try to shutdown the opposition's top player such as Wayne Gretzky or Mario Lemieux. Sutter's defensive excellence was recognized around the league. In 1985-86 he finished as runner up to Chicago's Troy Murray in league voting as the best defensive forward.

Because of his tenacity, defensive excellence and natural leadership ability, Ron was instantly compared to Bobby Clarke - the Flyers Legend. Those comparisons were ultimately a little lofty as Ron's game lacked offensive polish, although Ron was certainly a key member of the Flyers during the 1980s.
...

By 1988 Ron began enjoying his best years offensively. The Flyers were starting their downward cycle and as a result there was more playing time for Ron, which meant more offensive opportunity. He played often on a line with Brian Propp and Rick Tocchet. By December Ron became captain of the team, taking over from Dave Poulin. It was a great compliment to Ron, as he epitomized what Flyers hockey is all about.

...

Ron played well in St. Louis until 1993-94 when he was traded to Quebec. His stay there was brief, as was his next stop. By 1996 he found a home with the San Jose Sharks for 4 years, but was strictly a 4th liner. In 2000-01 he signed with the Flames by mid season. He was clearly not the player that he used to be, but he was a good influence in the dressing room and a good faceoff man.

Ron Sutter played 1093 games, registering 205 goals, 328 assists and 533 points, not to mention 1352 PIM.


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Old
06-30-2010, 03:39 AM
  #31
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With the 18th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Herb Jordan, C



Jordan was a star scorer everywhere he played, finishing top-4 in scoring five times! He was also 4th and 6th in other seasons. He missed 1-4 games a couple of times and actually placed 1st, 2nd, 2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 4th, 6th in points per game in these 8 seasons.

- 5'6", 130 lbs
- top-3 in CAHL scoring three straight years (3rd-1903, 2nd-1904, 3rd-1905, twice to Russell Bowie, once to Frank McGee, one of these times he had a much better GPG. This was as an 18-20 year old versus a 22-24 year old Bowie!)
- 9th in ECAHA scoring (1906)
- 15 points in 5 ECAHA games (1907) - which was 3rd-highest PPG average after Bowie & Russell
- 4th in ECAHA scoring behind Bowie, Walsh, Phillips (1908 - again, 2nd in PPG)
- 2nd to Marty Walsh in ECHA scoring (1909)
- Was leading Renfrew with 9 goals in 6 games before being replaced by Lalonde (1910)
- 33rd in pre-merger goals according to The Trail Of the Stanley Cup

Previously Jordan's playmaking was a question mark, as only goal stats were available. Thanks to solid SIHR research, the stats database has been beefed up with some sparse assist stats. It's still not much to go by, but Jordan was 1st in CAHL assists in 1903 with 4, 2nd in the ECAHA in 1908 with 5, and 3rd in the ECAHA in 1906 with 4. Jordan had 17 recorded assists to Russell Bowie's 22 during the 6 seasons they played in the same league together. This appears to be the 3rd-most over this period (one behind Alf Smith)

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
Herb Jordan joined Quebec in 1903 and played with them for seven years. During this time Quebec was never a threat for league supremacy and this great centre player was fated never to be on a winner.However, in that time he was the leading goal scorer for Quebec.

He carried the load until he got some real support with the arrival of **** ******** in 1907... his best year was 1909 when Joe Malone arrived but the team got nowhere, with poor goaling. This year he scored in 12 consecutive games.

When the O'Briens of Renfrew decided to pack a team to go after the Stanley Cup in 1910, they first tried to get Marty Walsh for centre. He would not leave Ottawa so they signed Jordan who had finished second to Walsh as a scorer in 1909. He centered a line of Fred Whitcroft and **** ******. The Creamery Kings were well-loaded but could not win consistently. A deal was made with Canadiens to get Newsy Lalonde for the balance of the season. Although Jordan was their best scorer up to that time, he had to make way for Lalonde.

He was a player with a scoring average of better than two goals per game, who like Russell Bowie, had the bad luck never to be on a Stanley Cup winner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Renfrew Millionaires
When the club announced the signing of Herb Jordan, a speedy centre from Quebec, it was also stated that he preferred to play as an amateur... Jordan was an established star in his own right, too. He had been the second leading scorer in the ECHA the past season, while playing on a last place team... O'Brien showed his flexibility. Not wanting to leave any stone unturned in his attempt to assemble the best players he could, and his money not being directly of use in this situation, the mining magnate used his business interests to lure Jordan... Certainly, Jordan did not have the high profile of the Patricks or Fred Taylor, but that soon became immaterial. Once he was announced as a member of the Renfrew aggregation, fast becoming thetopic of conversation, importance was ascribed to him.
A few one liners that show Jordan's stature in the world of hockey:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen
Jordan, a brilliant center with the professional team...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen
Such fast forwards as Herb Jordan and *** ***** require fast ice... it is certain Jordan and ***** were handicapped... Jordan was the only man to play in anything like his usual form...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen
with those two playing the boards, and Jordan (at center) and Cyclone Taylor or Bobby Rowe at rover, Renfrew will certainly have a great organization.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, 1908-01-06
Jordan was the bright star of the forward line, and he was at all times dangerous... Jordan gave the Ottawa defense a few anxious moments... Jordan went in off the faceoff, and scored in 30 seconds...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daily Telegraph, 1908-01-04
Jordan is still the neatest, most dangerous and quickest forward.
Here's one quote that indicates Jordan was a playmaker:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quebec Daily Mercury 1903-01-07
Jordan passed back to Garneau after a nice rush, and Garneau scored.
And another:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1908-01-27
Two of their first three were scored on three-man combinations with a double-pass between Jordan and ****** *****... During the last seven minutes there were seven goals scored, and of these, Jordan, the Quebec rover, who put up a sterling game from the beginning, got four.
And another:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1908-02-17
****** ***** failed to score on a pretty run with Jordan... Jordan scored for Quebec on the prettiest combination play of the night, the disc being slapped to and fro by the Quebec forwards three times before Jordan shot and scored... Quebec came back with the next goal in short order, ***** scoring from the side after a run by Jordan.
And another:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daily Telegraph, 1908-01-04
***** and Jordan played fast combinations.
And another:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daily Telegraph, 1909-01-05
Jordan then got the puck and after a few passes with Malone, he dashed in past the point and cover point and to the surprise of the goaler the puck was in before he could prevent it.
And another:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1909-01-18
Jordan carried the rubber in, passed to *****, and the latter poked it cleverly past Hern...
And another, that also shows Jordan was still a great player in the 1910 season with Renfrew:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, 1910
Jordan notched two beauties as a result of combination attacks with Frank Patrick and Fred Taylor... Herb Jordan played perhaps the finest game he has ever put up, the manner in which he dodged by the big defensemen of the visitors bringing down the house.
Apparently there were rumours that Jordan was to retire in 1906:

Quote:
Originally Posted by St. John Daily Sun, 1906-01-24
As the Quebec hockey team are now practically out of the running for the championship, it is understood that a couple of the players, who were only prevailed upon when the local septette's chances looked good, will retire from the game permanently. Among the names mentioned are those of Herb Jordan and Wllie Hogan. Their loss to the team, if they definitely decide to withdraw, will be serious.
But they were greatly exaggerated:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1906-03-03
Jordan was the pick of the four, and all through a fast and hard game stood up to the pace and gave a fine exhibition of fast skating and clever stickwork
Jordan was out of hockey at 26, similar to a lot of other stars at this time who shone brightly and then vanished. (There's no evidence that he couldn't cut it anymore, but was signed as a personal assistant to Ambrose O'Brien) How do his numbers look compared to theirs?

Frank McGee: 23 GP, 71 G, 3.09 GPG
Russell Bowie: 80 GP, 238 G, 2.98 GPG
Tom Phillips: 48 GP, 116 G, 2.41 GPG
Herb Jordan: 61 GP, 146 G, 2.39 GPG
Marty Walsh: 69 GP, 142 G, 2.06 GPG
Blair Russell: 67 GP, 107 G, 1.60 GPG
Harry Trihey, 29 GP, 46 G, 1.59 GPG

Jordan the Playmaker

More than enough quotes have been provided to show Jordan was not a one-dimensional finisher. Here are some stats to substantiate it:

Most Assists in recorded top-level hockey (CAHL/ECAHA), 1903-1909 seasons (min. 6)

(FAHL not included as there are no reconstructed assists there, same with 1905 CAHL)

NameGPAAPG
Alf Smith32230.72
Russell Bowie44220.50
Blair Russell36180.50
Herb Jordan46180.39
Pud Glass41130.32
Ernie Johnson43130.30
Jack Marshall31120.39
Harry Westwick37120.32
Walter Smaill36110.28
Cecil Blachford24100.42
*** *****49100.20
****** *******3090.30
Marty Walsh2180.38
Billy Gilmour2880.29
Jack McDonald2880.29
*** ********1870.39
Cyclone Taylor2170.33
******* *******2270.32
Ernie Russell2470.29
******** ****1760.35
Frank McGee1760.35
Lester Patrick1860.33
Harry Smith2160.29
Jimmy Gardner2560.24
Harvey Pulford2960.21

Bolded are ATD Selections.


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-20-2010 at 05:58 PM.
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07-01-2010, 07:28 PM
  #32
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With the 15th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Don Edwards, G



- 5'9", 165 lbs
- NHL 2nd All-Star Team (1978, 1980)
- Vezina Trophy (1980)
- Top-5 in All-Star Voting Five Times (2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th)
- Top-10 in sv% Five Times (4th, 6th, 7th, 10th, 10th)
- Top-6 in wins Five Times (1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1980, 1982)
- Named the star of Buffalo's 6-1 victory over the Soviets in 1980
- Allan Cup (1987)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Goaltender Don Edwards was a fifth round pick of the Buffalo Sabres, 135th overall in the 1975 NHL Draft. To say he was a steal would be a huge understatement. Edwards had a highly successful eleven-year NHL career that included stops in Buffalo, Calgary, and Toronto.

Edwards was a standout goalie in junior hockey with the Kitchener Rangers of the OHA. He was a workhorse, playing in 120 games over two seasons, and yet was not listed as a high draft pick by the scouting bureau. Many felt his size--or lack of it--would be a major problem in the NHL.

In his first pro season, Edwards got the nod to start in goal for 25 Sabres games in 1976-77 after spending a year honing his skills in the minors with the Hershey Bears. In 1977-78, he was tabbed the team's number one netminder and played in 72 games. In fact, from the time he was called up from Hershey, Edwards played in 50 of 53 Sabres' games and 85 of their last 91 regular season contests. What had the hockey world amazed was how Edwards seemed to save his best performances for the league's strongest teams. Buffalo did not have a losing record against any of the top teams and Edwards' goals against average facing Montreal, Boston, Philadelphia, and the New York Islanders was lower that it was against the rest of the league. Worried that they were overusing their goalie, the Sabres cut his games down to 54 in 1978-79, giving more playing time to backup Bob Sauve. Edwards posted a solid 26-18-9 record. In 1979-80 he and Sauve shared the Vezina trophy, given to the team with the lowest goals against average.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
By the late 1970s and early 1980s, the Buffalo Sabres boasted one of the league's best goaltenders in Don Edwards. Twice he was named to the NHL Second All Star team (1978 and 1980) and he shared the Vezina trophy as the league's best goaltending tandem in 1980. Don was also included on the 1981 Team Canada squad at the Canada Cup tournament as he backed up Mike Liut.

Goaltender Don Edwards was a fifth round pick of the Buffalo Sabres, 135th overall in the 1975 NHL draft. Edwards, a nephew of former Detroit and Pittsburgh goaltender Roy Edwards, enjoyed a brilliant junior hockey career with the Kitchener Rangers. Despite his obvious talent and ability, he wasn't drafted until late in the draft because of his lack of size. He was just 5'9" and 160 pounds. Don quickly dispelled any ideas that his lack of bulk would hinder him. He used his cat-like reflexes to impress enough to earn the nickname "Dart."

Don only spent a year and a half apprenticing in the minor leagues before he got the call up to the NHL during the 1976-77 season. He impressed immediately, as he posted a 16-7-2 record with 2 shutouts and a 2.51 goals against average. Don came out of seemingly nowhere to catapult himself to the top of the Buffalo Sabres goaltending depth chart.

Don remained atop of the depth chart for most of his 6 seasons in Buffalo. In his first full NHL season of 1977-78 he led all NHL goaltenders in games played (72) and wins (38). He also posted 5 shutouts and a 2.64 goals against average en route to be named to the NHL all star team. Edwards was quickly becoming the talk of the goaltending world. He seemed to be able to take his game to a higher level in important games against strong opponents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
during his decade in the NHL he became one of the league's best goalies... He became a number one in his third year of pro, playing in a league high 72 games and leading the NHL with 38 wins. He earned an invite to the 1981 Canada cup, though he played only one game behind Mike Liut... joined the Brantford Motts Clamatos and won the Allan Cup in his only season with the team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey All-Stars: The NHL Honour Roll
made a huge impression on general manager Punch Imlach, who effectively controlled the Sabre lineup. "You can see quick hands and feet. You can see desire to play and will to win. Don has it all." Imlach ensured that he started a league-high 72 games. "Goalies used to do it all the time, and there's no reason they can't do it in these times." Edwards completely agreed, maintaining that he could relax enough between games to avoid fatigue. "I think I could play all the time. I hate a game when I don't play."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heaven and Hell in the NHL
Phil Ranallo, a columnist, flayed me for embarrassing Floyd Smith (coach) and Al Smith (dejected ex-starting goalie). I guess they were disappointed as hell when Edwards beat Minnesota Sunday night and Toronto Monday night, and was chosen a star each night, then went on even that late in the season to be a hot contender for rookie-of-the-year. He was also Buffalo's number one goaltender from then until he was traded to Calgary in 1982. One of the league's best, still... I made the decision and I was right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1981
small but tough goalie who moves from side to side on rapid-fire shots as well as any in the NHL... plays in low crouch the way that Terry Sawchuk did and handles screen shots well... not easy to beat one-on-one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1982
Small, quick, standup goalie who plays angles well, makes difficult saves look easy, and is hard to beat from close range or on rebounds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1983
High quality goalie... his 2.90 career average is among the best of active goalies... standup style, strong technically, superb reflexes, and fine catching hand.


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-06-2010 at 02:11 AM.
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07-01-2010, 08:38 PM
  #33
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With the 47th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are proud to select:

Wade Redden, D



- 6'2", 209 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1997)
- 5th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th in Norris voting
- 6th, 9th, 10th, 11th in All-star voting
- World Cup Champion (2004)
- Played in NHL All-star Game (2002)
- Top-15 in points by defensemen 4 times (11th, 12th, 13th, 13th)
- NHL +/- Leader (2006)
- Career adjusted +143
- 13 Points in 34 Games with Team Canada (WEC, WC, Olympics)
- Top-2 in icetime on his team 9 straight years (2000-2009) - six times 1st, and four times 1st on a top-4 team in the conference

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
The Loydminster, Saskatchewan native emerged as one of the top all-around defenceman in the NHL, posting a career high 47 points during the 2000-01 season and continues to be a leader on the ice leader with the Sens.

Following the NHL lockout of 2004-05 the Senators re-signed the defenceman. Over the next three seasons, Redden would anchor the club's blueline and contribute offensively. In 2006-07, Redden and the Senators came within three wins of capturing the Stanley Cup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
He proved himself a true young star in the league and a player the Senators would need if they were going to win in the playoffs. Big, tough, and unflappable, Redden led the defense by example. He never panicked and never tried to do too much. The result was that he became a natural team leader.
Quote:
Originally Posted by THN
Plays with ice water in his veins and never gets rattled. Is extremely durable, a good skater and fine passer. Owns an accurate point shot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by canoe.ca
McCrimmon describes Redden as unassuming and modest; a player who doesn't impress with flashiness but wows with poise under pressure.

"His panic point is very low," he explained. "He makes the right decisions under pressure, and makes it look easy."

Team captain Daniel Alfredsson describes Redden as a quiet, funny guy who likes his privacy but always shows up with a smile.

"He's not the most vocal guy, but he really leads by example. He's got the respect of all the guys," he said. "He mingles with everyone and goes to dinner with different people. I don't think he's a very good cook, so I don't think he eats at home very much."

Coach ******* ****** says Redden has earned that respect from his teammates with character, values and commitment to the game. He plays smart, is a tremendous passer and understands hockey; but there's maybe room for more aggression.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
Redden has tried to pattern his game after Ray Bourque, and the youngster has a few things in common with the Boston great. He is a good skater who can change gears swiftly and smoothly, and his superb rink vision enables him to get involved in his team's attack. He has a high skill level. His shot is hard and accurate and he is a patient and precise passer.

Redden plays older than his years and has a good grasp of the game. As he has been tested at higher and higher levels of competition he has elevated his game. his poise is exceptional.

Redden's work habits and attitude are thoroughly professional. he seems to be a player who is willing to learn in order to improve his game at the NHL level.

Redden is not a big hitter, but he finishes his checks and stands up well. What he lacks in aggressiveness he makes up for with his competitive nature. He can handle a lot of icetime. He plays an economical game without a lot of wasted effort, is durable, and can skate all night long.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
Redden was Ottawa's best defenseman down the stretch and into the playoffs. He has such a laid-back demeanour that perhaps the urgency doesn't hit him until the finish line is in sight. He raises his game when something is on the line.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001
His ability to move the puck is one of his best assets... He consistently plays against other teams' top lines... has a very long fuse
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002
Redden was mature when he broke into the game. He is smart and his level rises with the competition.


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-16-2010 at 08:24 PM.
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07-01-2010, 09:38 PM
  #34
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With the 50th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are proud to select:

Robyn Regehr, D



- 6'3", 225 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (2004)
- World Cup Gold (2004)
- Olympic Participant (2006)
- 3rd in scoring among blueliners in 2004 playoffs
- 14th in Norris Voting (2006)
- 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st, 1st, 3rd, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd on his team in icetime in his ten seasons

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
A rugged positional player... Known more for his physical presence on the ice, Regehr set a career high for points in 2003-04 with 18 (4-14-18) while helping the upstart Flames reach the Stanley Cup Final, only to lose in a hard-fought seven game series to the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Upon having his NHL season come to an end, Regehr helped Team Canada capture the 2004 World Cup title and in the spring of 2005 represented his homeland for the second time at the World Championship. A year later, Regehr was selected to represent Canada in the 2006 Winter Olympics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by THN
Has an accurate point shot, great size, sound hockey sense, decent mobility and an exemplary work ethic. Is considered a defensive stalwart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by George Johnson, Calgary Herald
"How about the Scott Stevens Award?'' suggests the Calgary Flames associate coach. "For the best shut-down defenceman in the league. The largely unsung guy who plays 20 to 25 hard minutes a night against the best players.

"Want a winner? Poll the GMs. Better yet, poll the goalies -- ask them who they want to see out on the ice in front of them in the final minutes of periods. Or poll the forwards -- ask them who they absolutely hate playing against.

"They know the guys that make the opposing winger look up in the faceoff circle and say: 'Oh, s--t! Not No. 28 again.' "

"If they did start handing out that kind of award,'' says Playfair, "Robyn Regehr would be right at the top of the list, or near it, every year. Try and find comparables around the league. It's tough.''

Regehr might just be the most underrated, unheralded, elite defenceman in the game right now. The man is a virtual lock for Canada's Vancouver 2010 Olympic team, is just now reaching the summit of his considerable powers at 28 and at a shade over $4 million this season is a relative bargain in today's whacked-out NHL salary world.

Phaneuf is perfect for the YouTube generation. Thundering hits. Time-warp-speed slapshots. Quick, explosive highlight clips. Regehr, meanwhile, simply just does the job, with little fanfare, on a more consistent, competent basis than anyone decked out in the colours.

Oh, he's fully capable of launching Pavel Datsyuk like, say, a Sputnik, or turning Ales Hemsky into a bas relief in the woodwork, but the word has been out for a while -- venture down the right side of the ice on Regehr's watch and someone had better have the stomach to inform the widows.

"We're just different people with different personalities and styles,'' says Regehr, shrugging. "Dion's an engaging guy, he likes to talk in the room. He's loud. He can really hit in the open ice and he's very good offensively. That all draws attention.

"Me, I'm a defensive defenceman.''
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001
Regehr is a power player with a good passing touch - an exciting combination for a young defenseman. Regehr seems to have lost none of his skating ability after suffering injuries to both of his legs. He has a good first step for such a big kid, and his skating is strong and well-balanced. He is defense-oriented, but with his heads-up passing and intelligence he keys many breakouts that lead to scoring chances. He does not get involved in the rush himself. When parked on the point, he has a decent slapshot, but it is hardly his best skill. Regehr plays at a very intense, competitive level on a nightly basis. He plays in all defensive situations five-on-five and killing penalties. Regehr is mature beyond his years.

Regehr has NHL size. He's strong but not a fighter. He won't go out and try to beat people up, but he is tough to play against because he hits. he finishes his checks and pins players to the boards. He resembles a young Rod Langway.

Regehr wasn't even supposed to be on skates by December after a tragic car accident... his amazing recovery made him the youngest nominee in the history of the Bill Masterton trophy. He is a quality person and a quality player... will never score a lot of goals, but will prevent a lot of them from being scored. Has all the makings of a franchise defenseman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002
Regehr is going to be a stud - a big, powerful, defensive defenseman and franchise foundation for years to come... If a trophy for the best defensive defenseman is ever created, Regehr will be an instant contender.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2003
Regehr is one of the first players opposing teams ask about when they come shopping in Calgary.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2004
Even though his name may not show up on the scoresheet, check the videotape and you'll find that four or five passes ago, the play originated with Regehr... last season saw him take the next step in becoming a confident top-pairing defenseman... Regehr was a restricted free agent after last season, but if the Flames trade him, they may as well fold the franchise.
Skaters to Play for Canada in the most best-on-best tournaments since 1996:

Sakic, Foote: 5

Blake, Pronger, Niedermayer, Iginla: 4

Yzerman, Smyth, Shanahan, Lindros, Gagne, Fleury, Heatley, Doan, Thornton: 3

Nieuwendyk, MacInnis, Kariya, Redden, Brind'Amour, Bouwmeester, ******, Desjardins, Jovanovski, Draper, Gretzky, ******, Lemieux, Linden, Lecavalier, Stevens, Regehr, Richards, St. Louis, Nash, Marleau, Morrow: 2

Regehr was the 35th of these 37 players to be selected. Most were taken hundreds of picks earlier.


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-16-2010 at 04:26 AM.
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07-02-2010, 01:03 PM
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Trivia: He Became only third player in NHL history to score 100 points in his first three NHL seasons when he achieved feat in 1981-82 (Wayne Gretzky and Peter Stastny were first two).

Who is he??

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07-03-2010, 06:37 PM
  #36
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Brooklyn selects one of the best defensive specialists and penalty killers in the MLD.

LW Jay Pandolfo


Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Pandolfo has established himself as a solid, up-and-down winger who plays an exemplary team game. He has sufficient size to battle in the corners and is feverishly intense as a forechecker and penalty killer. Pandolfo earned his stripes in the mold of the prototypical Devils forward who plays a tight, tough and tenacious game. In 2003, Pandolfo earned his second Stanley Cup ring.
-Winner of the “Unsung Hero” award, voted on by his Devils teammates, 5 times (98-99, 02-03, 05-06, 06-07, 07-08). No other player has won the award more than twice.

-Selke Record: 3, 8 (he also received Selke votes on two more occasions)
-Lady Byng Record: 4, 13

Pandolfo’s Selke record is depressed, because he was overshadowed by John Madden during his prime. He played every game on the same line as John Madden, who was a better goal scorer (which make no mistake, matters in the Selke voting). Madden, as a center, was also the guy who took the important faceoffs (flanked by Pandolfo). But in terms of defensive ability without the puck, Pandolfo was every bit as good as Madden.

Pandolfo scored only 27 points the year he was 3rd in Selke voting. Given the fact that the Selke is realistically more about two-way play than strictly defensive play, it is very impressive that he was even a finalist. These are some advanced stats the year he was 3rd in Selke voting:

Quote:
Pandolfo 5-on-5
(opponent ranking: 2 of 676,
teammate ranking: 569 of 676)
GA/60 minutes on the ice: 1.95
GA/60 minutes off the ice: 2.40
http://puckstopshere.blogspot.com/20...hl-awards.html (numbers originally from BehindTheNet).

playoffs
-Won two Stanley Cups (2000, 2003)
-Top PKer on both Cup wins and member of the top shutdown line at even strength in 2003
-6 goals, 6 assists, 12 points on the 2003 Cup winning team (while playing against the best opposition).
-only 12 penalty minutes in 131 career playoff games, which shows that he can check the best superstars in the league (players better than anyone available in the MLD) without taking penalties.



a masterful job against Jaromir Jagr

-In 05-06, Jaromir Jagr scored 54 goals and 123 points, won the Pearson, and was runner up for the Hart. However, he only scored 3 goals and 4 assists in 8 games versus the Devils.

- In the final two regular season games between the teams, Pandolfo was being used as an old fashioned shadow on Jagr and held him to a single assist.

-in the 2006 playoffs, Pandolfo (as Jagr’s shadow), held him to a single assist in 3 games, before a clearly frustrated Jagr injured himself trying to punch one of Pandolfo's teammates.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times
When the Devils played the Rangers during the regular season, Pandolfo seemed to know exactly how to steal Jagr's personal space. No one has come up with a better method of smothering the Rangers this season.

This is one high-profile matchup that will not be made up of two superstars trying to outscore each other...

When he faces Jagr, Pandolfo does not even look toward the net most of the time. He focuses on Jagr, reacting to his every twitch.

Hockey has long had a name for a player who uses such a tactic -- the Shadow. In the past two meetings between the Rangers and the Devils, Pandolfo has shadowed Jagr from the bench to the ice, from defense to offense, from right wing to left wing and back to the bench. He is the ultimate follower.

''This has been my role on the team since I've got here,'' said Pandolfo, who is in his ninth season with the Devils. ''I've been in a checking mode.''

Larger opponents often try to bully Jagr, but Pandolfo torments him in a more subtle manner. He hovers nearby, close enough to make the Rangers hesitate to pass to Jagr, but not so close that Jagr can race around him. ''You've got to deny him the puck from the beginning,'' Pandolfo said. ''Once he gets it, you won't be able to get it back from him.''
Pandolfo's strategy is rather simple: If Jagr does not get the puck, he cannot score. If he does get it, Pandolfo calls for help from his teammates, primarily defenseman XXX. That was basically how the Devils won their last two games against the Rangers, holding Jagr to only one assist.

Slowly, Pandolfo has crept out of the shadows. Jagr even started to mention his name.

When Jagr stays on the ice for a double shift, Pandolfo stays with him. When Jagr moves from right wing to left wing, Pandolfo switches, too. Only Jagr receives this much attention. The Devils generally match Pandolfo's line against the opposing team's top line, but they rarely try to match Pandolfo against the opponent's top player.

Jagr's spike in production inspired the extra attention. Weary of watching Jagr hold the puck for 10 seconds at a time, Devils Coach Lou Lamoriello tabbed Pandolfo around midseason to halt the onslaught.

Pandolfo is disciplined and relentless, the kind of single-minded defender who can fluster a free-styling scorer.


''Jay is always in your face,'' said Grant Marshall, the right wing on Pandolfo's line. ''He is constantly working -- reading plays, anticipating plays. We watch him all the time, and the way he competes filters right down the lineup.''
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...pagewanted=all
“Devils Hope to Follow Their Shadow,” Lee Jenkins, April 21, 2006

Quote:
Originally Posted by newsday
There was one shift in the first period, captured on one of NBC's isolation cameras, on which Jay Pandolfo followed Jaromir Jagr stride-for-stride from one end of the ice to the other. They're calling Pandolfo "The Shadow," but he seemed more like a gnat. By the middle of the game, Jagr was swatting at Pandolfo, clearly annoyed by his pestering.

It worked. In a penalty-filled game ruled by strict officiating, Pandolfo immaculately performed his difficult role. In 18:03 of ice time, mostly one-on-one against Jagr, Pandolfo wasn't called for a single penalty. Jagr, who played 23:22, did manage to avoid his shadow on some shifts. He wasn't completely neutralized because he took nine shots on goal. He also had the primary assist on the Rangers' only goal, when he fed Petr Prucha in the slot. Pandolfo wasn't on the ice for that one.

But he was when Jagr was called for a critical penalty 32 seconds into the third period. Jagr hooked Pandolfo out of frustration and the ensuing power play led to a game-breaking goal by the Devils

Jagr also spent much of the latter portion of the game pushing and poking at Pandolfo, clearly expressing his displeasure with the extra attention the Devils were paying him. Pandolfo's linemate, John Madden, also spent some time buzzing around Jagr, and attempted a big hit on the Rangers star but missed andwound up running over his teammate, Paul Martin. After the whistle, instead of seeking out Madden, Jagr again found Pandolfo and chopped at him with his stick.

"That happens when a game is going like that, when someone is doing the job that Jay is doing on an individual player," Devils genera manager/coach Lou Lamoriello said.

The frustration might have led Jagr to attempt an awkward shoulder check when he lost the puck to xxx in the third. Jagr suffered a shoulder injury on the play.
-Where Jagr Went, Pandolfo Followed, Alan Hahn,
http://www.newsday.com/sports/where-...lowed-1.577023

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07-03-2010, 06:46 PM
  #37
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Rudy Pilous, coach

# PCHL Championship (1949)
# Memorial Cup Championships (1954 & 1960)
# Stanley Cup Championship (1961)
# WHL Championship (1964)
# Avco Cup (WHA) (1976, 1978, & 1979)
# Inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1985
# “Honoured Member” of the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame



Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
During a career than spanned more than four decades, Rudy Pilous was a success everywhere he worked. His interests were many and included coaching, playing, managing, team ownership, and promotion.

...
Pilous returned to pro hockey in 1946 to work as a scout and promotion assistant with the Buffalo Bisons of the American Hockey League (AHL). He then moved to Houston, Texas and turned around the fortunes of its United States Hockey League (USHL) team, winning the championship in 1947-48. Pilous was gaining a reputation as a trouble-shooter who was adept at transforming teams' fortunes for the better. His next accomplishment was taking the Pacific Coast League's San Diego Skyhawks from last place to the league crown in 1949.

After his foray into minor pro hockey, Pilous returned to St. Catharines where he a solid base of talent and won the Memorial Cup with the TeePees in 1954. He was part owner as well as manager and was very content when the opportunity to coach in the NHL presented itself. The Chicago Black Hawks needed a competent individual to coach their improved team and take it to the next level in the late 1950s. Pilous was up to the challenge of coaching the Hawks while still managing the junior outfit as he won the Memorial Cup in 1960 and the Stanley Cup the following year. This dual success didn't last long as Pilous soon sold the TeePees to a group of St. Catharines entrepreneurs and the Hawks opted to replace him with Billy Reay in 1963.

Pilous next moved back into minor pro hockey after he was hired by Punch Imlach to coach the Maple Leafs' Denver Invaders affiliate in the Western Hockey League (WHL) which was soon transferred to Victoria, BC. Before going to Victoria the Invaders won the WHL title in 1964.

Pilous soon tired of the strife existing between Stafford Smythe and Imlach. He joined the Detroit Red Wings' junior team in Hamilton, Ontario then was hired by the expansion Oakland Seals as their first general manager in 1967. The Seals' ownership was not patient and Pilous was removed and soon returned to Denver of the WHL where he quickly put together a contender.

He next worked with the junior Wheat Kings in Brandon, Manitoba when he was contacted by former Black Hawk Bobby Hull who wanted an experienced person to coach the Winnipeg Jets of the new World Hockey Association. After being elevated to general manager, Pilous built a team that won the Avco Cup in 1976, 1978 and 1979. He left the Jets after John Ferguson was hired as the head of operations and joined the Detroit Red Wings as a scout. Pilous later scouted for the Los Angeles Kings and coached the Toronto Maple Leafs' St. Catharines Saints AHL farm team from 1983 to 1986. He also coached in the popular Original Six oldtimers' circuit.

Pilous was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1985.
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideHockey.com

(Al Arbour, one of the greatest coaches ever) also learned from Tommy Ivan how to be a father figure to his players and from Rudy Pilous (his coach in Chicago) the necessity of leavening his intensity with humor. (When I interviewed Arbour in 2008, he practically had me in stitches with his potent and sometimes earthy sense of humor).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan Mikita
Pilous had a talk with me and told me to take a look at the penalty minutes. I realized most of the penalties were additions of 10 minutes - misconducts. I also tried to knuckle down and stop the stupid lazy penalties, the hooks, the trips and the holds. I also realized I couldn't talk the referees out of anything, so I just went to the penalty box if I was called for anything.
http://blackhawks.nhl.com/club/page.htm?id=46777

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan Mikita
Behind the scenes, he was the guy who kept the composure and made us laugh by keeping us loose and making us believe we could win it all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Hull
Rudy was my junior mentor and I hadn't learned to play the game properly yet. I wanted the biscuit all the time and he didn't think I should get it as much. He was a great teacher and you have to give him credit and appreciate what he did to win the Cup.'
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago Tribune
Besides being the Blackhawks' last Stanley Cup-winning coach, in hockey circles they regard Pilous as an innovator who was the first coach to pull his goaltender to add an extra attacker — a ploy he used to tie a junior-league game with 12 seconds left in 1954.

They remember Pilous as a quick-witted comedian who used humor to reduce the stress of the season such as the time he told the Hawks during a trip to New York, "I don't want you western farm boys to get a sunburn on the roofs of your mouths standing out here in the sunshine staring up at the tops of those tall buildings.''

They know Pilous as the guy who introduced the NHL to the idea of a morning skate, originally intended to make sure a young, carousing group of Blackhawks had a reason to get up after late nights on the town.

"That was the worst rule in the world,'' Bobby Hull said, snickering.

But to Mikita and Hull, Pilous always will be the guy who forced them to quit high school football and taught them what being a professional hockey player meant. Both legends got to know Pilous as teenagers on their way to the Blackhawks.
-David Haugh, Pilous deserves more prominent spot in Chicago sports lore, Chicago Tribune, June 12, 2010

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports...7242093.column

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07-03-2010, 06:50 PM
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Brooklyn selects Dave Lewis, D



Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Defenceman Dave Lewis was a tower of strength in his own end and moved the puck over to his more talented teammates effectively during his 15 years in the NHL. He was an important member of the New York Islanders when they became competitive in the 1970s and later helped solidify the blueline on three other teams.

...

A few weeks before New York launched its Stanley Cup dynasty, Lewis was sent with Billy Harris to the Los Angeles Kings for Butch Goring. He was an important defensive component on a club which had a host of offensive-minded forwards. In 1982, Lewis was a member of the plucky squad that upset the heavily favoured Edmonton Oilers in the first round
Quote:
5. Dave Lewis: 514 games as a defensive stalwart in the ’70s, only to come a few months short of winning the Cup when he joined Harris in the trade to LA for Butch Goring.
-Best Islanders of the 70s who didn't win the Cup.

http://www.islanderspointblank.com/2...ley-cup-teams/

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07-03-2010, 06:52 PM
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Charlie Sands, C/RW

- Stanley Cup Winner (1939)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1933)
- Top-10 in goals twice (8th-1937, 10th-1938)
- 8th in assists (1940)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1934)



Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Forward Charlie Sands played over 400 NHL games with four different clubs in the 30s and 40s. He was a decent offensive player who could check well and rarely found himself in the penalty box.

Born in Fort William, Ontario, Sands played with the local Forts and Port Arthur Ports of the TBSHL before dressing for three games with the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1932-33. He spent most of that season with the IAHL's Syracuse Stars then scored eight goals as a solid role player for the Leafs the next year which included participation in the Ace Bailey Benefit Game.

In May, 1934, Sands was sent to the Boston Bruins for cash. He fit in well and scored 15 goals for his new club while playing on a line with Marty Barry and XXX. Two years later he scored a personal high 18 goals for the club while teaming with Bill Cowley and Rey Getliffe.

Early in the 1939-40 season Sands was sent to the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for Herb Cain. He was a fine checker and playmaker for four years with the Habs before he was loaned to the New York Rangers for a few games in 1943-44. Sands retired in 1945-46 after playing a few contests for the Los Angeles Monarchs of the PCHL.

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07-03-2010, 06:55 PM
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RW Keith Crowder

-9 straight seasons of 100+ penalty minutes (and a 10th season with 93)
-Top 10 in powerplay goals twice (9th in 84-85, 5th in 85-86)
-84 points in 77 games in 85-86 (led the Bruins and 24th in the NHL)



Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Keith was a hard-nosed winger and crowd favourite in Boston for almost a decade in the 1980's. He not only was tough but he could score as well. Keith was a working man's player who often had to do the "dirty work". He didn't mind it though and mixed it with solid and steady offensive production.
...
Keith was put on a line together with another rookie, Steve Kasper and veteran Wayne Cashman. The line shined on many nights and Keith scored a respectable 25 points (12+13) in 47 games, but the most eye popping stats was his 172 Pim's in those 47 games. He not only set a rookie team record for most penalty minutes in a season but he also set a team mark for most penalty minutes in one game when he collected 43 against Minnesota on February 26,1981.

The Bruins fans loved this kid. He continued to play solid two-way hockey on the checking line with Kasper and Cashman the following season. Keith had 44 points (23+21) and amongst other things had the second longest point streak (7 games) on the club that 1981-82 season.
...

Keith continued to cement his reputation as one of the best two-way players in the NHL and played in the same mold as Wayne Cashman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
In 1980-81, Crowder cracked the Boston Bruins' lineup, dressing for 47 games, scoring 13 goals and 25 points while generating 172 minutes in penalties. His play earned him a regular spot in the Bruins' lineup the following season. In 71 games, he had 23 goals and 44 points. Crowder's best offensive season came in 1985-86, when he scored 38 goals and 46 assists for 84 points in 77 games. The rugged style of play continued to play a major role in his game as he spent 177 minutes in the box. The 1988 playoffs saw the Bruins reach the Stanley Cup finals, which was the closest Crowder came to winning a championship. The Bruins were ousted in four-straight games by the Edmonton Oilers, who claimed their fourth Cup in five years.

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07-04-2010, 02:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markrander87 View Post
Trivia: He Became only third player in NHL history to score 100 points in his first three NHL seasons when he achieved feat in 1981-82 (Wayne Gretzky and Peter Stastny were first two).

Who is he??

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07-04-2010, 03:57 AM
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With the 79th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Leo Labine, RW



- 5'10", 170 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1957, 1958, 1961)
- Top-20 in Goals 4 Times (8th, 16th, 19th, 20th)
- Top-20 in Assists Twice (14th, 20th)
- Top-20 in Points Twice (15th, 17th)
- Top-10 in Playoff Goals Twice (5th, 6th)
- Top-10 in PIMs Twice (3rd, 6th)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1955, 1956)
- Was a top-10 scorer in the AHL for two seasons after leaving NHL
- WHL 1st All-Star Team (1964)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
For Leo Labine, the official NHL rulebook was little more than a list of bad habits to be avoided. An early pioneer of "trash talk," he used every trick, foul or tool available to terrorize and needle his opponents. He had an above-average scoring touch and a ferocious sense of team spirit that was not unlike his spiritual cousin, "Terrible" Ted Lindsay.

After brief stints with the St. Michael's Majors and the Barrie Flyers of the OHA, Labine cracked the Boston Bruins line-up in 1951. After a few trips to the minors, he settled in for the long haul, netting 24 goals in 1955.

The night after hurricane Hazel swept across the Great Lakes region in 1954, Labine went into Detroit's Olympia stadium and had a career night. "I had one of my better games," he stated with modesty. "I think I had three goals and three assists. I got five of them in one period! When the reporters wrote about the game the next day, they referred to me as the 'Haileybury Hurricane'."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
...as the story goes, Rocket Richard was knocked unconscious, came back and took the Habs to the finals. What no one remembers is that it was LaBine, Richard's career nemesis, who had knocked the Rocket out. LaBine wasn't big, but he was as ferocious and brutal on ice as any forward on the original six. He also had a sense of humour on the ice and might be the grandfather of all trash talkers, such was his rep for trying to throw star players off their game with a few sharp words. He started in Montreal's training camp as a youngster, but he caused so much trouble that the Habs simply told him to get lost. Boston signed him and felt the same way, but the B's also saw the value of such a disturber.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heroes: Stars Of Hockey's Golden Era
"I was lucky to get out of the game alive," remarks Leo Labine. "I was a little aggressive sometimes". The Loquacious LaBine developed a reputation as a tough bodychecker and a better-than-average needler.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
Opponents could never make up their minds whether Leo Labine was more to be feared as a scorer or a bodychecker... Labine terrorized the enemy while platrolling the right wing... Leo was more a needler than a scorer... nearly killed Maurice Richard with a vicious bodycheck...

He could also be terribly amusing. Once, when the Bruins were playing an exhibition game against the Rangers at New Haven, Leo decided that he would use the early September fog on the ice as a "smokescreen". After the play shifted from the New York to the Boston end, Labine hid behind the Rangers' net. Soon, he began laughing. Rangers' goalie Gump Worsley heard him, turned around, saw Leo, and called to referee Red Storey, who, himself laughing, ordered the linesman to blow an offside. By this time everyone in the rink, including Worsley, was laughing at Leo's jape.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Picture History Of the Boston Bruins
Not only was Leo Labine a good, hard-hitting player, he was a good man to have around to lighten the spirits of the team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Bruins In Black and White
The bodychecker was a big crowd favourite with his tenacious style of play. Known as the "Haileybury Hurricane", LaBine's job was to shadow and hound the opposing team's scoring stars. He was a scrapper who was very skilled with his fists as well as his tongue. His confrontations with Rocket Richard are legendary. In 1958, NHL GMs named him in their top-five list of the toughest players in the league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Years Of Glory: The Official Book of the NHL's Six-Team Era
Peirson described the Bruins of the 1950s this way: "We were sort of a lunchpail gang... I remember Lynn Patrick brought up Leo Labine from Barrie and told him, 'Stir up some trouble and don't worry about the fines, I'll pay them.'"
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey In the Fifties: The Game We Knew
Known as a gadfly on the ice, he was also a tough bodychecker with a deft touch around the net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Boston Bruins: Celebrating 75 Years
An impish disturber... A manic character who carried his stick at high port... infuriating... a little nutty, but lovable...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Beddoes' Greatest Hockey Stories
Newsy Lalonde, before he died in 1970, picked an All-Mean-Team, capable of spilling enough corpuscles to gratify any blood bank in North America. He said he'd have been delighted to coach these "very perfect gentle knights":

Paddy Moran

Joe Hall, Sprague Cleghorn, Eddie Shore, *** *********

Leo Labine, Bill Ezinicki, Ted Lindsay, Cully Wilson, Bill Cook, Ken Randall

Labine, tougher than chuck steak, had a needling tongue that provoked ill-tempered opponents into penalties.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1954-03-26
Leo Labine rushed joyously into the fray, anxious to take on anybody, and ** ***** accomodated him... Leo Labine, who can't see a fight without wanting to get into it, took on Bert Olmstead.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1955-01-08
Lynn said the three men who had played the best hockey for the Bruins so far are Leo Labine, Fern Flaman and Fleming Mackell. "In that order, too", he added... Leo Labine is the Bruins' gag man, the fellow who always leaves his teammates laughing... he is a natural disturber of the peace once the puck is dropped.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian Science Monitor, 1955 Headline
SCHMIDT RATES LABINE BEST PLAYER IN LEAGUE... "He's only the best player in the league! That's all! And this game tonight proved it."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toledo Blade, 1958-04-09
Claude Provost of montreal came out of the fray with his upper dental plate broken and his nose swollen to three times its normal size. He was checked by Leo Labine - cross-checked, said Provost - late in the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, 1958-04-17
Dollard St. Laurent was injured when he was checked by or collided with Boston's Leo Labine... Of the injury, Toe Blake said: "Labine reefed him with his elbow. there should have been a penalty."
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1959 Hockey Magazine
The buffoon of the Bruins... with only 16 goals for the pst two years, he has become defensive stalwart for Bruins and proficient penalty killer. A rugged performer, he has always been well up in penalty parade.


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07-05-2010, 05:20 AM
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With the 82nd pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Viktor Tikhonov, Coach



- Member of the IIHF HOF
- Member of the USSR HOF
- 13 straight Soviet titles (1978-1989)
- 8 World Championship Gold Medals (1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1989, 1990)
- 3 Olympic Gold Medals (1984, 1988, 1992)
- Challenge Cup Champion (1979)
- Canada Cup Champion (1981)
- 702-302-137 Domestic Record (.675)*
- 147-23-12 "Big-Game" International Record (.840)*
- 191-21-19 "Other" International Record (.868)*

*through 1997-98 plus 2003 and 2004 seasons in Russia. direct me to updated stats panel if possible!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings Of the Ice
Many remembered Viktor Tikhonov as a slave driver who endeavored to squeeze the most out of his subordinates for the sake of victory. Yet Tikhonov maintained the same standard for himself... Tikhonov expected the same dogged determination from the players he coached as he displayed... Tikhonov placed heavy emphasis on the ability of a player to work hard and to persevere and on a player's will to succeed. Preference is given to physical conditioning during workouts, even more than tactical and technical maneuvers... "I once asked a colleague how many defense systems he knew," Tikhonov recalls. "He replied, 'two.' But I know more, and a whole lot of variants."

Over the life of his coaching career, he's seen very few changes. In the first half of the 1970s, he was extremely popular in the Soviet Union. At that time he coached the provincial Riga team and was able to drag it out of the cellar of the league and all the way to fourth place. The state then gave him its blessing to take total control of the CSKA club and the USSR national team.

Tikhonov can't be compared with any of the coaches who worked during the same era. No other coach, whether in the Soviet Union, Canada, Czechoslovakia, or Sweden, acquired such national prominence. No one else was given such a clean slate to rebuild a team from the ground up. Tikhonov could only be compared with Anatoly Tarasov - the previous "monarch", who in essence wielded the same power and enjoyed the same rights.

Viktor Tikhonov is still plying his trade, turning down all other offers... Today it is with a sense of pleasure that he recalls how he managed to outstrip his competitors by about a decade back in those "golden years". He points out that NHL scouts prefer to see his weaker CSKA team than the provincial teams that are higher in the Russian standings. "The scouts are interested in whether I have thought up something new. yes - I have - you can be sure of that!"
Igor Larionov pulled no punches in his autobiography in 1990, yet, he could not deny Tikhonov's greatness:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Larionov
For nine years I was under the charge of... this man "Tikanoff" as they pronounce his name abroad... In May of 1989, makarov, Krutov, Bykov and I took part in a sports TV show "Arena". the conversation was sharp, touching on the impending problems and recent conflicts. In the course of this talk I named Tikhonov as a "talented coach". After that, friends and acquaintances who had seen it fell upon me. How could I make such compliments? I want to be objective. there had been some pluses.

...The Dynamo Riga team stood 14th when he took it. In his third year there it finished first and was promoted to the first division where it finished fourth in 1976... He brought with him the concept of using a fourth line, a total preoccupation with physical preparation, and an insane tempo which was in force for all three periods. This, too, he developed in Riga, where the team battled as if it were a matter of life and death, sometimes even beating the Moscow clubs.

...He did not spare himself, give him that. He worked nights on end without sleep, watching video tapes of the matches, twisting this way and that, analyzing them. You cannot take that away from him. I will not take away all the coaching talent of Tikhonov, by no means.

But the backside of the coin was his fanaticism. His was a constant round-the-clock vigil. Every action was aimed and justified by his interpretation of the single aim - victory - everything, including his inhumane conduct.

He records everything that is possible, forever writing in thick notebooks. And probably the thickest of these notes are concerned with the physical, the conditioning of the player. He supervises this aspect as one would take care of a child. I agree it is an important part of the preparation, but surely not to the repression of all else. He is not a man who likes change in this area, preferring to stay with the system he has used for years to get his players into top shape. If it is not his way, then it must not be the right way.

...Apparently he got used to having us at hand like a magic wand, and the rest did not worry him. He got lucky with us. He put together a line, and it worked from the beginning. He did not change anyone, he did not shuffle us. How would you call it? He hit the bull's eye with the first shot.

...A coach. How can one evaluate a person in this most interesting profession? Talented toiler, psychologist, teacher, theoretician, tactician... all of these things he must be in varying degrees. How would I evaluate Tikhonov? I cannot immediately define him. I cannot doubt his services in certain areas. Tikhonov strived to resolve everything himelf. His hands were unfettered, and as a coach he could do absolutely everything that was combined as necessary for the club or the National team. He broke through problems in the offices of superiors. Not everyone knew how to do this, for it demanded a particular talent. But with that talent our coach was strengthened and even without it he exercised an enormous power over us hockey players.

He knew how to place himself on top, in the CSRA, in Goskomsport, the governing body of all Soviet sport, so that they gave him unlimited power. He knew how to use that time, those structures, to bring the team together, and with that team to win. He knew how to select people for the team, although it was not that complicated when everything was under his hands, when he had unlimited opportunity.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretzky to Lemieux: The story of the 1987 Canada Cup
To the players on Team Canada and virtually every other hockey fan in North America, the Soviets were still the automatons from the Evil Empire; a soulless collection of robots who'd been programmed to excel by the black genius Tikhonov.

"All that I know of myself is that nothing was ever given me without effort, not when I first stepped out on the ice or now when I am carrying the coach's burden," Tikhonov said. "Stubborn labour, self-sacrifice, fanatical devotion to a favoured activity, tireless perfection of athletic professionalist - these are, in my understanding, the key to success for every hockey player and every athlete. And these principles I always and everywhere defend." As mentioned, a good-time Charlie he wasn't.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
In 1962, Chernyshev was looking for an assistant and asked Tikhonov, who impressed him as being a most serious student of the game... He became a full-time assistant, learning under the esteemed master. By 1968, the ambitious Tikhonov felt he was ready to coach his own club, but the best offer he could get was a second-division team in Riga. The offer wasn't much - an unknown, dog-division team in a hostile city. But Tikhonov accepted the challenge. He was a man consumed by hockey. For him, it was like gambling or alcoholism, an addiction. He had to win and win again - and keep winning. In Riga, he soon whipped up a win-at-all-costs mentality, as if his lowly team was fighting for the elite league crown. Pushing on his players the priorities of speed, discipline and creativity, he saw them begin to make progress. For most coaches, it would take a lifetime to make the advances that he made with the Riga team within five years.

Once in the elite division, Tikhonov's team didn't fare so well. No degree of coaching genius could compensate for the deficiencies of a team with only one real star, Balderis.

...To his disciplinarian mindset was added some room for creativity. He was experimental enough to move to four lines and he didn't try to shackle his players to a system where their individual talents couldn't flower... Few accused Tikhonov of not knowing how to use talent and no one accused him of not working hard enough. Although many players like Balderis would come to despise him, they continued, strangely, to play extremely well under him. He made many of them so bitter, it seemed, that they became determined to prove themselves - to show him.

(In the 1979 Challenge Cup) Tikhonov tried to create a relaxed atmosphere for the team in The Big Apple. The players saw the movie Superman, though most couldn't understand English. They attended an NBA game between the Knicks and the Supersonics. And, in their Manhattan hotel rooms, they had their choice of X-rated movies: "Hot Times", "The Fruit Is Ripe", or "Maid In Sweden".

Tikhonov showed boldness as a coach. In the decisive game, he had put Vladimir Myshkin in goal for Tretiak, and Myshkin scored the shutout. Tikhonov also inserted the kid line of Makarov, ******* and ******** for the last game, and all three sparkled. "On the defence we told our players to keep closer to their opponents to prevent them from capitalizing on rebounds. On the attack we instructed them to make unexpected, concealed shots." He made a significant summation of developments in the different hockey worlds. "In the contest of two styles of hockey - the fast, combinational Soviet style and the tough, sometimes cruel North American one - victory went to our more progressive style. I have no doubt that, from now on in North America, more attention will be paid to the game and less to battles on ice."

...(by 1983) The Russian streak, with the one glaring interruption at the 1980 Olympics, had actually extended over six years without a tournament loss, going back to Tikhonov's first defeat as coach at the 1977 Izvestia tournament. In addition to his achievements with the national team, Tikhonov's Central Army club had perennially won the Soviet championship. The coach thus had a ready answer for any critics - the scoreboard. The only victory run that could begin to compare was Tarasov's stretch through the 1960s. But there was no competition against NHL pros at the time. The extent of the Soviet talent was such, it could be argued, that any good coach could have accomplished the same and maybe added the 1980 gold to the Soviet pile. The Swedes, the Finns and the Czechs had been losing many of their best players to the NHL. Canadian teams sent to the worlds were comprised of only the stars from the NHL dregs. But the Russians also beat the best of the pros in the decisive matches of 1979 and 1981, and in super series games. moreover, to win as consistently as Tikhonov did in those years, even against weaker, international competition, was something that few other coaches could likely have accomplished. The law of averages dictated that there would be more off-days, more upsets, more times when the opposing team got extraordinary goaltending or was phenomenally lucky. But Tikhonov's team defied the law of averages in those years. No team was supposed to be that hot.

It was Tikhonov, too, who had a hockey eye judicious enough to put the Larionov five together. The unlikely idea of the Little Larionov between Krutov and the smallish Makarov was something another national team coach might not have even been tempted to try. It turned out to be a piece of coaching brilliance. None of the five players on the unit could point to anything that Tikhonov actually taught that improved their game. But bringing them together and leaving them together to develop a degree of cohesiveness seldom seen was art enough. NHL coaches, not imaginative enough to try the five-man system, have rarely demonstrated the patience to go with a three-man forward line for as long as Tikhonov went with a five-man unit.


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07-05-2010, 02:01 PM
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D/W Walter Smaill

(note this is just a minor update of 70s profile from MLD11)



On a per-game basis, Smaill appears to have been just as good as other back-and-forth players of the time, such as Goldie Prodger and Ken Randall, only he had a shorter career. He played 13 seasons until age 32, while Prodger and Randall's careers spanned 15 and 18 years, to ages 34 and 39.

- 5'10", 180 lbs.
- Stanley Cup (1908, 1909)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1914)
- LW from 1905-1907, D from 1908-1909, RW in 1910, LW in 1911, D in 1912, RW from 1913-1915, D in 1916
- 6th & 9th in ECAHA scoring (1906, 1907)
- 2nd & 1st in EC(A)HA defense scoring (1908, 1909) - behind Cyclone by 1 point, then tied with Cyclone
- 3rd in PCHA defense scoring (1912) - behind only the Patricks
- 7th in NHA defense scoring (1916) - behind H.Mcnamara, Ross, Cleghorn, Cameron, Prodger, Corbeau
- ECHA 1st All-Star Team (1909)
- PCHA 2nd Team All-Star (1914)
- Was sent three times to New York to play in the All-star games between Eastern and Western stars. Scored 7 goals in these 6 competitive games.
- 104 goals, 17 assists, 121 points, 248 PIMs in 144 games.
- 6 goals, 13 PIMs in 11 Stanley Cup games.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
There are some players who, far better than average, didn't quite reach the category of being stars by leading the scorers, setting records or winning important games. Nonetheless, they played good hockey and gave balance in their team play. Such a player was Walter Smaill.

At the outset he was a forward and was a fair scorer with a weak Montral team on a line with (removed names of never-before-drafted scrubs).

The champion Wanderers thought him good enough to sign for the 1908 season and he played defense with Art Ross for two years... Smaill helped the Wanderers defend the cup against Edmonton... he was with a championship team in Victoria but they lost out in the Stanley Cup series... he returned east to rejoin the wanderers. He played as a substitute until Sprague Cleghorn badly sprained an ankle and was forced out of action. Smaill and Odie Cleghorn then teamed together as the Wanderer defense for the balance of the season.
Smaill was a good and rough player in the well-chronicled 1910 NHA season:

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Renfrew Millionaires
(page 84) And wasn't that some check thrown by Smaill on Patrick earlier in the game?

(page 92) Perhaps smarting from the attack by Smaill in the first home game, Frank Patrick was aware that he would again be the subject of heavy checking.

(page 128) Cobalt had lost its best player, Smaill...
In 1912, when the Patricks were raiding the NHA for players, Smaill was considered one of the brightest stars:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Patricks: Hockey's Royal Family
It was further reported that some of the brightest stars had already been signed, including Percy Lesueur, Fred Lake, and Walter Smaill, from Ottawa; Pud Glass and Moose Johnson from Wanderers, and Cyclone Taylor of the Renfrew Millionaires.

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07-05-2010, 02:12 PM
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Fred "Steamer" Maxwell, Rover



- Inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962
- Manitoba Senior League Champion (1911, 1914, 1915)
- Allan Cup (1915)
- MSHL 2nd All-Star Team (1912)

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Fred Maxwell picked up the nickname "Steamer" in his native Winnipeg because of his tremendous ability to skate. In 1910-11 he joined the Winnipeg Monarchs as a rover in the Manitoba Senior League, scored six goals in five regular season games, and was named to the league's second All-Star team. The next year he tallied seven goals in seven games for the Monarchs.

By 1913 he was offered a $1,500 contract to play for the Toronto Blueshirts of the NHA but refused the inducement, choosing to remain in Winnipeg. In 1914 the Monarchs won the Manitoba Senior Hockey title with Maxwell scoring three goals and two assists. He was then offered an $1,800 contract to play in the PCHA but again refused a professional offer and remained a pure amateur and led Winnipeg to another senior title and the Allan Cup in 1915.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honoured Members
A speedy terror on ice, a rover in seven-man hockey who was born to skate... he refused all professional contract offers...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame
A man of deep principles, he retired as a player in 1916, when he discovered that some of his teammates had received gifts and money to play for Winnipeg Monarchs, the 1914-15 Allan Cup Champions

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07-05-2010, 02:15 PM
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Sergei Brylin, F

-three Stanley Cups (1995, 2000, 2003). Every other Devils player who was a member of all 3 Cups was picked in the main draft. (Martin Brodeur, Scott Stevens, Scott Niedermayer, Ken Daneyko).

The ultimate utility player on a champion:
-scoring line center on a Cup winner in 1995
-left wing on a scoring line on a Cup winner in 2000 (the glue guy for the Mogilny lime)
-he was injured for much of the playoff run in 2003, but was usually used as a checking forward by then.
-checking line right wing post-lockout, playing with Madden and Pandolfo when Pandolfo was a Selke finalist
-used in real life as a utility forward - he was the guy who would be slotted into any line or any situation in case of injury, which allowed all the other lines to stay intact.
-regular on the 2nd PP and PK units for most of his career.

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Possessing good speed and a sound grasp of all the game's facets, centre Sergei Brylin became a valuable member of the New Jersey Devils in the late 1990s. His superior puck-handling and strength on his skates made him a versatile player for the club and an asset on both specialty teams.

The Moscow native spent three years with the Central Red Army and was drafted 42nd overall by the New Jersey Devils in 1992.

...(In 1995) He scored 54 points in 63 games for Albany then looked solid in the last 26 games of the season for New Jersey. He then played 12 games in the post-season for the Devils when they captured their first Stanley Cup.

...(In 2000) He played solid two-way hockey all year and scored eight points while helping New Jersey win its second Stanley Cup title.

In 2003, Brylin was limited to a mere 52 games, yet was able to suit up for five post season games in helping the Devils capture their third Cup title in nine years.

On the international stage, Brylin was a two-time member of Russia's World Junior team (1993-1994) and represented his homeland at the 1996 World Championships.
In Russia, the Stanley Cup and Brylin pose with Kremlin security:

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Assistant Coach Larry Robinson



-Three Stanley Cups as a Coach (Assistant Coach with a big role in 1995, Head Coach in 2000, Special Assignments Coach in 2003)

-Runner-up for the Jack Adams Trophy in 97-98 (as coach of the LA Kings).

-In 00-01, Larry's only full season with NJ, the team scored 295 goals, leading the league (by 14 goals over 2nd place Pittsburgh). This was the highest goal total of any team during the dead puck era (96-97 to 03-04). That season, NJ allowed 195 goals, tied for 5th best in the league.


A. LARRY ROBINSON WAS A GREAT PLAYER'S COACH / ASSISTANT COACH

1. He was enormously popular with his players

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times
Robinson is enormously popular with the players and has already been an assistant coach with the Devils twice, under Jacques Lemaire (1993-95) and Robbie Ftorek (1999-2000).
Dave Caldwell, Old Head Coach is Devils' New Assistant Coach, NY Times, Fed 26, 2002
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/26/sp...ant-coach.html

2. This is how one of the regulars on the Devils' board (who is a hockey coach of some kind) described Robinson about a year ago:


Quote:
Larry is a player's coach, which makes for a great assistant who can act as a buffer/liaison between the locker room and the head coach who can not be bothered with keeping the guys happy and must be making the hard decisions with the input of his assistants. Larry's sense of humor also helped ease the tensions of both the coaches and players which is also a key ingredient in success - having the guys 'loose' and night gripping the sticks with fear of failure.

I think he was an above average head coach too, but his real calling is that of Defense coach as an assistant and being the friend behind the bench to all the players. Not to mention his vast amount of experience and knowledge of the game that can help teach young defense so much. I think Daneyko said he learned more in 1 season with Larry than he did in all his years previous. I wish he was still there.
http://hfboards.com/showpost.php?p=1...2&postcount=20

3. 7 games after the Devils fired Robinson from their head coaching position, they hired him as an assistant:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ny times
The Devils have played only seven games without Robinson, who led the Devils to within one victory of back-to-back Stanley Cups in 22 months as coach. Asked how it would feel to have the team's former head coach back on the bench, (new head coach) replied, ''The best thing in the world would be Larry looking over your shoulder.''

Robinson, who could not be reached today for comment, reluctantly became the Devils' head coach when Ftorek was fired on March 23, 2000. Robinson, a Hall of Fame defenseman with the Montreal Canadiens, never made it a secret that he enjoyed working with players on a one-to-one basis more than he liked overseeing an entire team.

''This is what Larry always wanted; Larry came here to be an assistant coach,'' Scott Stevens, the Devils' captain and veteran defenseman, said today. ''I had a feeling Larry would be back. Not this quick, but I'm glad he's back.''
Dave Caldwell, Old Head Coach is Devils' New Assistant Coach, NY Times, Fed 26, 2002

4. Robinson's failure as head coach was that he was "too nice," which is not a problem when he is the assistant (and is an asset when he's the assistant to a demanding head coach).

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times on Larry's failure as a head coach in LA
He became known as a nice guy and a good teacher whose players took advantage of his good nature.
-Joe Lapointe, Robinson's Devils Having Fun, NY Times, April 16, 2000
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/04/16/sp...aving-fun.html

B. ROBINSON HAD A BIG IMPACT IN THE DEVIL'S TURNAROUND AND THE 1995 CUP WIN AS ASSISTANT COACH

1. Robinson was Jacques Lemaire's assistant coach during Lemaire's best two seasons as coach of the Devils (93-94, 94-95) and it was well known that Robinson played a big role:


Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Kings official website
One of the greatest defensemen in the history of the NHL, Robinson finished his career with the Kings following the 1991-92 season. Robinson spent one year away from the game before joining the New Jersey Devils as assistant coach to his former teammate Jacques Lemaire. The incredible impact of this coaching duo during his two seasons culminated in New Jersey’s 1995 Stanley Cup victory over the Detroit Red Wings.

Robinson’s future as a coach took on meteoric proportions after New Jersey skated to its best record ever in 1993-94 (47-25-12, 106 points), the second-best mark in the league that year behind the New York Rangers. His influence on the Devils’ defense was apparent as New Jersey gave up 220 goals (79 fewer than the previous season), just two more than league-leading Buffalo. Following the 1994-95 Stanley Cup winning season, Robinson was immediately at the top of everyone’s list as a head coaching-candidate and the Kings strong pursuit of his services convinced him to return to Los Angeles.
http://kings.nhl.com/club/page.htm?bcid=23533

2. Media reports from these two years always credited both coaches with turning around the once-floundering franchise:

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times
Lemaire and his assistant, Larry Robinson, are tuning the Devils as if they were experienced mechanics and they appear to have all cylinders firing, from the goaltending down to the last forward on the last line.
...
Scott Niedermayer, in his second full year in the league and Stevens's partner, is the man with the most offensive potential. If Lemaire and Robinson had made more use of his offensive attributes, Niedermayer would have more than the 38 points he has right now.
Alex Yannis, Devils Honed for Long Spring Skate, NY Times, March 15, 1994
http://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/15/sp...ing-skate.html

(Note: Niedermayer was projected to be an offensive defenseman, and Lemaire/Robinson were credited with making him more well-rounded)

C. ROBINSON HAD A BIG IMPACT ON THE 2000 CUP TEAM AS HEAD COACH

1. With the Devils down 3-1 in the series against the Flyers in the Eastern Conference finals, the normally soft-spoken Robinson threw a tirade and threw a garbage can in the lockerroom. Media reports at the time credited the tirade with spurring the comeback:

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times
In so many ways, Coach Larry Robinson seems to have his motivational thumb on the psychic pulse of the Devils. When they trailed the Philadelphia Flyers by three games to one in the Eastern Conference finals, he screamed at the players and spurred their historic comeback.
Joe Lapointe, Robinson Finds Right Touch for Young Team, NY Times, May 27, 2000

2. Several players specifically mentioned Robinson's tirade as the defining moment of their 2000 playoff run when the team was honored 10 years later:

Quote:
Without question, Jason Arnott's winning goal against the Dallas Stars in the finals has its special place in Devils history. But it was coach Larry Robinson's dressing room tirade after the Devils went down three games to one against the Flyers in the Eastern Conference finals that lit a fire and ultimately led to Arnott's glory.

Indeed, it was Robinson kicking the trash can in the Devils' dressing room that was recalled by several players as the 2000 team was honored at the Prudential Center.

"He had a great meeting at the end of the game when we got down, 3-1," goalie Martin Brodeur recalled Tuesday. "Knowing Larry, he's not a guy who reacts like that a lot. So I think everybody kind of felt how much he cared about it.

"I think the biggest thing he said was, 'You guys tried it your way for a while. Now, I'm telling you what to do and do it. You'll be good.' It was a pretty impressive speech. It came from the heart. You could see he was upset about the situation and we responded real well."
...
Jay Pandolfo didn't recall a lot from that season, but he remembered Robinson's anger.

"I think he was just fed up because he knew we were a better team than what we were showing," Pandolfo said. "He'd had enough so he had to do something. It was out of character for him, so I think it kind of woke up some guys."
Rich Chere, Larry Robinson's tirade the defining moment of NJ Devils 2000 Stanley Cup run , Star Ledger, Jan 5, 2010
http://www.nj.com/devils/index.ssf/2...e_the_def.html

3. Robinson got a shaken Scott Stevens to refocus after the infamous Lindros hit:


Quote:
When the captain Scott Stevens felt depressed after injuring Eric Lindros with a big check in last night's first period, Robinson took him aside in the dressing room during the first intermission and counseled him to change his frame of mind.
Joe Lapointe, Robinson Finds Right Touch for Young Team, NY Times, May 27, 2000

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/05/27/sp...oung-team.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated
Last Friday, three hours after what Devils center Bobby Holik called "a play that legends are made of, a play that will never be forgotten," Stevens was doing his utmost to forget it. He was near tears, crestfallen over the possible career-ending concussion Lindros had suffered (INSIDE THE NHL, page 75). Where once there had been bravado, now there was sadness. Robinson had to pull Stevens aside after the first period of the 2-1 victory to remind him he had done nothing other than his job.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...9381/index.htm

ROBINSON WAS A GREAT TEACHER AND MENTOR TO SEVERAL GREAT DEFENSEMEN

1. Scott Stevens:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Murray (Panthers coach after Stevens held Pavel Bure to a single goal in a 4 game sweep)
He's been a top player and a top defenseman in the NHL for many years. He had an impact with the Washington Capitals as an 18-year-old because of his physical play, his strength, his ability to hit and fight. I think when he got to New Jersey, he brought it to another level. I think Larry (Robinson) and Jacques (Lemaire) did a great job with him and he really became a solid team player. He's controlling his emotions now."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Stevens
I'm more knowledgeable, more patient. I've learned a lot here under Jacques and Larry about playing defense and good position. Just goes to show, you never stop learning. I probably played over 10 years, then I came here and was taught a lot of new things.
http://www.nhl.com/intheslot/read/in...vens/hits.html

2. Scott Niedermayer:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Driver (after Niedermayer announced his retirement)
A lot of people thought early on that he was just an offensive defenseman. I got to appreciate as I watched him grow how smart he is and how good a defensive defenseman he was. Part of that was God-given ability and part was ability to move laterally so quickly. His Devils teammates and coaches taught him well. He played with Scott Stevens and Ken Daneyko, tremendous defensive defensemen, and he had Larry Robinson as a head coach and an assistant. What he didn't learn himself, they taught him."
http://www.nhl.com/ice/news.htm?id=532328

3. Ken Daneyko:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ken daneyko
I’ve always said and will say again, I learned more about the game in the first two months under (assistant coach Larry Robinson) and Jacques than I did the first 11 years of my career.
http://www.thehockeynews.com/article...-at-heart.html

4. Rob Blake:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Blake
I was fortunate. (The LA Kings) gave me the first opportunity... My first partner was (Hall of Famer) Larry Robinson. That's how you learn, from these great players... The players I was able to play with in L.A. helped shape my career.
http://www.nhl.com/ice/news.htm?id=532034

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Gazette
Robinson later became Blake's coach, taking over the Kings from 1995-99. The two are still close, and Blake credits Robinson for teaching him more than anybody else in hockey - learning that has lasted most of a lifetime.
John Branch, Blake once again plays his idol's role, The Gazette - Colorado Springs, Feb 26, 2001

Quote:
Originally Posted by Summary of Blake's press conference announcing his retirement
11:28 – Credits Larry Robinson as a big influence on his game.
http://foolsandsages.net/2010/06/18/...ss-conference/


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 07-05-2010 at 06:26 PM.
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Old
07-05-2010, 04:43 PM
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Is extremely shifty and sees the ice well. Possesses tremendous offensive instincts. An excellent playmaker, he finds his teammates with precision. Has improved his play without the puck. Can agitate opponents.- The Hockey News
With our 1st selection, the Toronto Marlies proudly select tremendous plamaking centre..



MARC SAVARD!

Statistics
Points – 8th(2007), 9th(2006), 9th(2009)
Assists – 3rd(2006), 3rd(2007), 3rd(2008), 6th(2009)

Since the lock-out, Savard is 5th in assists and 15th in points. Thornton, Datsyuk, Sedin, Crosby, Ovechkin, and Alfredsson are among the leaders.

Excluding 2010, where Savard was injured, he was 2nd in assists and 6th in points.

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07-05-2010, 04:48 PM
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In 1987-88, however, all of his offensive tools came together. His excellent skating ability, his refusal to be intimidated, his size and strength and his cannon-like shot with the lightning quick release were all harmonized under one helmet. By season's end, he became the first Canadiens 50-goal scorer since Guy Lafleur's heyday-loh
Quote:
He was a beautiful player, blessed with lightning speed, good size and a bullet of a shot, he had no real weakness in his game. He was a very streaker player and scorer, but he was a conscientious defensive player and refused to be intimidated physically.-Joe Pelletier
The Toronto Marliers proudly select....



STEPHANE RICHER!

Awards and Statistics
2 x Stanley Cup Champion (1986, 1995)

Goals – 6th(1988), 7th(1990), 14th(1995)

Play-off Points – 2nd(1995)
Play-off Assists – 2nd(1995)

From 1986 to 1997, Richer was 13th in goals. Gretzky, Lemieux, Messier, Hull, Yzerman, Robitaille, and Lafontaine are among the leaders.

From 1986 to 1995, Richer was 9th in play-off goals and 13th in points. Again, Gretzky, Messier, Kurri, Anderson, Tikkanen, Lemieux, and Gilmour are among the leaders.

Where does he rank among players on his team?
Goals – 4th(1986), 5th(1987), 1st(1988),1st(1990), 1st(1991), 2nd(1992), 1st(1993), 2nd(1994), 1st(1995), 3rd(1996), 5th(1997)
Play-off Goals – 1st(1988), 3rd(1989), 1st(1990), 1st(1991), 1st(1993), 1st(1994), 4th(1995)

With 72 game-winners and 13 play-off game-winners, Richer was among the best clutch scorers in the league.

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07-05-2010, 04:56 PM
  #50
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Quote:
Born in Toronto on January 11th, 1917, Robert "Red" Hamill was about as tough as they come. He was sort of an early day Wendel Clark-type of hockey player.-Joe Pelletier
Quote:
The tough, hard-hitting winger divided his time between the Bruins and the IAHL Hershey Bears for the next three seasons before being sold to Chicago in December 1941.

With a brief interruption for military service (the 1944-45 season) Hamill played the next eight years with the Black Hawks. He was a consistent, if not prolific scorer and played with enough grit to earn him ice time up until the 1950-51 season. After spending most of that year in the USHL, he went into coaching.-loh
Quote:
Hamill went on to record a career high 28 goals that first full season with the Hawks in 1942-43, although his reputation was clearly being made for his hard hitting style. Still, it was impressive that only teammate Doug Bentley (33 goals)and Montreal's Joe Benoit (30 goals) scored more than Hamill.-Joe Pelletier
Quote:
Hamill scored 128 goals and 94 assists for 222 points in 419 NHL games. He picked up only 160 penalty minutes, which suggests even though he had a zest for the rugged part of the game, he was very clean. Still, this is a surprisngly low total when newspaper archive searches turn up repeated stories of him in wild battles.-Joe Pelletier
To complete our top line, The Toronto Marlies proudly select..



Red Hamill!

Awards and Statistics
Stanley Cup Champion (1939)

Goals – 2nd(1942), 3rd(1943), 9th(1946), 15th(1947)

In the seasons before and after World War II, which are 1942, 1943, 1946, and 1947, Hamill was 2nd in goals. Max Bentley, Doug Bentley, Syl Apps, Toe Blake, and Sid Abel were among the leaders.

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