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MLD 2010 Bios

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Old
07-06-2010, 03:43 AM
  #51
seventieslord
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With the 111th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are proud to select:

Al Arbour, D



- 6'0", 180 lbs
- Stanley Cup Champion (1954, 1961, 1962, 1964)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1956, 1968, 1969, 1970)
- 5th in All-Star voting twice (1969, 1970)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1969)
- 1st, 3rd, 2nd in St. Louis D-men icetime as a 36-38-year old

Arbour's minor league accomplishments are extensive, too:

- WHL Champion (1953)
- AHL Calder Cup (1965, 1966)
- AHL Eddie Shore Award (best defenseman) (1965)
- AHL 1st All-Star Team (1963, 1964, 1965, 1966)
- QHL 2nd All-Star Team (1955)
- WHL 2nd All-Star Team (1956)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
In 1957-58, Arbour played his first full NHL season in the red and white of the Wings. Following that season, he was claimed by the Chicago Black Hawks, where he toiled for three years including 1961, the year of the franchise's Stanley Cup triumph. Arbour next played five seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs and earned his second Stanley Cup ring in 1962. After spending the 1966-67 season in the AHL, he returned to contribute experience and stability to the defense corps of the expansion St. Louis Blues in 1967-68. Early in 1970-71, he retired as a player after 600 games over 14 years. Arbour was also one of the few players in league history to wear glasses while playing.

"I enjoyed the fun of it (playing); the feeling that you had after you won a hockey game," stated Arbour in Dick Irvin's book, 'Behind the Bench'. "There's no greater feeling than the one you get when you're a player and you go out and win a real tough game. I've had great feelings coaching and winning the Stanley Cup, but it never seemed to be the same feeling I got when I was a player."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
...But while Arbour is recognized as one of the greatest (and winningest) coaches of all time, he is also remembered as the journeyman defenseman who played for 19 years pro hockey while wearing glasses.

Arbour was a classic defensive blueliner. He had neither the speed or hands to do much with the puck but became a stalwart without it. His patented move was his incredible shot blocking. He'd often sacrifice his body to stop the puck from ever reaching the net.

...The Leafs were a very strong team during the 1960s. Arbour had trouble sticking with the Leafs and spent most of his time in the AHL as opposed to the NHL when the Leafs were winning Stanley Cups. But Arbour's defensive excellence didn't go unnoticed as he was named a 4 time all star and the 1965 Defenseman of the Year in the AHL while playing with the Rochester Americans.

Arbour got his chance to return to the NHL when expansion hit in 1967. The St. Louis Blues eagerly snatched up the veteran blueliner. It is in St. Louis that Arbour is perhaps best remembered as a player. He was the first captain in St. Louis history, and under his leadership he guided the St. Louis squad to the Stanley Cup finals in each of their first 3 seasons of existence (never winning the Cup, however).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
Al Arbour generally performed his job in an unspectacular fashion. He did not make those rink-length dashes, nor did he bash oncoming forwards with bone-rattling checks. He simply frustrated the opposition with timely stick checks, by blocking shots, and by continually foiling good scoring opportunities. He totally epitomized what is called the "defensive defenseman".

...was the second defenseman chosen by the new St. Louis Blues. For three years the tall defenseman played brilliantly, qualifying for the West Division all-star team each year and playing an important role in the club's success.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punch Imlach: Hockey Is a Battle
We had a great defense in Toronto the next few years - so great that later even a first-rate NHL defenseman like Al Arbour couldn't break in and be a regular.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boom Boom: The Life and Times Of Bernard Geoffrion
Right after his Red Wings were knocked out by the Bruins, Adams went on record saying there were only five "untouchables" on his club - Gordie Howe, Alex Delvecchio, Red Kelly, Marcel Pronovost, and Al Arbour... a lanky, bespectacled defenseman who never seemed to make a mistake.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug: The Doug Harvey Story
(in the clinching game against Philadelphia) Arbour was fit to play, it turned out, and Bowman put him with Harvey. "I remember that game vividly," Bowman says, "Because Harvey and Arbour ran the game. They played over 40 minutes each."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty Bowman: A Life In Hockey
As a Maple Leaf, Arbour was a spare wheel on a glimmering vehicle... his ice time in Toronto depended on injuries to star players... played enough in 1962 and 1964 to put his name on the Stanley Cup for the 3rd and 4th times, but most of his time was spent with the Americans, where he served as captain. Arbour was a solid, stay-at-home defenseman, an unflappable, level-headed old pro who was renowned for his shot-blocking skills - in spite of the fact that he wore glasses while on the ice. He was one of the best examples of a capable talent what had become trapped in the minors during the Original Six years.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Game We Knew: Hockey In the Sixties
Al Arbour was named the first captain of the St. Louis Blues. An experienced winner, Arbour was excellent defensively.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Leafs: The First 50 Years
As a player, Arbour was one of the best. "I don't think there's anyone I'd rather have playing in front of me than Arbour," said Glenn Hall during an interview when they were both with the St. Louis Blues. "He's the most underrated defenseman in the game."

Underrated he may have been, but he knew how to get the job done. So much so, that during his 19 seasons as player, he never missed the playoffs. He was known as a second goalie, among the first defensemen to fall in front of the puck before it reached the goal. "Al does it with such perfect timing that it's beautiful to watch," said Hall.

Always tough to beat, always serious, he would still have fun playing the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Man They Call Mr. Goalie
More hurtful to the Blues than the loss itself was the injury to their top defenseman, Al Arbour, that saw him sit out the next four games of the series.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1965-06-12
Toronto's King Clancy was elated that veteran Al Arbour wasn't drafted. The 32-year old defenseman was a standout at Rochester last season and has plenty of NHL experience. "They think he's too old, but he can help any club."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, 1965-12-10
Imlach said he was "surprised no other team drafted him in the years we left him open."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsubrgh Press, 1967-12-23
A reputation as one of the best defensemen ever to ride a driving wing off the puck...
Quote:
Originally Posted by March 13th, 1971 NHL Coaches Poll - Toronto Star
Best Defensive Defenceman - Ted Harris, Al Arbour, Bobby Orr tie


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-13-2010 at 02:34 AM.
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Old
07-06-2010, 04:56 AM
  #52
seventieslord
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With the 114th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Chris Drury, C/LW



- 5'10", 190 lbs
- Stanley Cup (2001)
- Olympic Silver Medalist (2002, 2010)
- 14th in Goals (2007)
- 15th in Assists (2000)
- Top-12 in Playoff Goals 4 Times (2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 12th)
- Top-16 in Playoff Assists Twice (8th, 16th)
- Top-17 in Playoff Points 5 Times (6th, 9th, 10th, 14th, 17th)
- Top-15 in Selke Voting 3 Times (4th, 12th, 13th)
- 13th in Hart Voting (2007)
- 15 points in 46 International Senior Games

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
In 1998-99 Drury scored 20 goals for the Colorado Avalanche and was named the winner of the Calder Trophy over runner-up Marian Hossa of the Ottawa Senators. The next year he upped his point total to 67 and registered 14 points in the playoffs. Drury scored 24 goals in 2000-01 and was arguably the best third line centre in the NHL behind Joe Sakic and Peter Forsberg. When the latter went down with a season ending injury, Drury stepped up his game and scored 11 goals in the playoffs to help Colorado win its second Stanley Cup.

A silver-medalist with Team USA in Salt Lake City, Drury would spend one more season with Colorado before he was dealt to the Calgary Flames... Upon his arrival in Buffalo, Drury continued to put up solid numbers, finishing the year with 53 points on the strength of 23 goals. Even with Drury strong regular season, the Sabres failed to make the playoffs for the third straight year. Once the Sabres season came to an end, the former Hobey Baker winner was named to the U.S World Championship team and was instrumental in leading them to a bronze medal.

The following season Drury was named co-captain of the Buffalo Sabres. For the first time in Drury's tenure, the team entered into the NHL playoffs. The upstart Sabres shocked the Eastern Conference as they came within one game of entering into the Stanley Cup Finals. Earlier that season, Drury was a member of the United States Men's 2006 Winter Olympic team.

In 2006-07, Drury scored a career high 69 points co-captaining the Buffalo Sabres to an NHL-best 113 points. Expectations were at an all-time high as the President's Trophy winners entered the playoffs. However, the club failed to get past the Eastern Conference finals losing out to the Ottawa Senators.

As an unrestricted free-agent Drury signed a five-year contract with the New York Rangers in the summer of 2007 ending his tenure with the Sabres. Though his offensive numbers dipped with the Broadway Blueshirts, Drury continued to provide exceptional two-way play for the Rangers. For his efforts he was once again selected to be part of the US Olympic team that brought home the silver medal in a thrilling overtime final at the Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nhlsnipers.com
He was also named the top defensive forward in Hockey East in 1998. On January 15, 2009, well into his NHL career, Drury was named Hockey East’s Best (ever) Defensive Forward, as part of the league’s 25th Anniversary celebration. Drury was chosen in a vote of Hockey East fans and members of the league’s 25th Anniversary Committee.

...Drury became a fan favorite with the Avalanche crowd primarily due to his clutch play during playoffs. He had a total of 11 game-winning goals in 4 straight playoff seasons in Colorado. Avalanche captain Joe Sakic once said of Drury, “You want a goal, you’re in overtime – you want him.”Because of the amounts of game-winning goals, Drury is often thought of as one of the clutch players in the NHL today.

After a career-high 37-goal, 69-point campaign in 2006–07, the Sabres made a run to the Conference Finals against the Ottawa Senators as the Presidents’ Trophy-winning first seed. Drury scored two game-winning goals in the first round against the New York Islanders,[1] then scored the game-tying goal in game five of the second round against the New York Rangers with 7.7 seconds left in regulation time. The Sabres won 2-1 in overtime and closed out the series against the Rangers 4 games to 2. In game four of the Conference Finals against the Senators, Drury recorded another game-winner to stave off elimination, but the Sabres were eventually defeated 4 games to 1. (the next season), Matched up against the New Jersey Devils in the first round, Drury scored the game-winning and series-clinching goal to eliminate the Devils in five games.

...Drury was named the 25th captain in Rangers history on October 3, 2008... This makes Drury one of (four) currently active NHL players to be a captain of two different NHL teams... On February 21, 2010, Drury scored the go-ahead goal to break a 2-2 tie in a critical game against the Canadian national team. The American team went on to win 5-3.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey News
Is a born leader. Can play all three forward positions and any role on a hockey club. Possesses a good shot and great defensive instincts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueshirtbanter.com
Drury excels on the penalty kill and in the faceoff circle along with playing important defensive minutes against top competition. In defense of his mostly defensive style, Drury started in his own zone just more than 60 percent of the time; the most of any forward that played at least 50 games with the Rangers this past season. He also led the team in Blocked Shots per 60 minutes of ice time... Drury competes every game and flat out wants to win every game as well almost to the point where he tries too hard.

...The complete game that Drury plays - one that requires him to often skate 200 feet once or twice - doesn't allow him to float around like, for instance, 39 year old Bill Guerin and put up 50 points. That's not Chris Drury hockey, and I don't see him changing anytime soon. Honestly, if I was Torts, I would toy with putting Drury in a 3rd or 2nd line role with creative young wingers to see if any offense can be sparked. The worst that will happen is he plays solid defensive hockey per usual and mentors some great prospects.
Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighhockey.com
Chris Drury has never been a point-per-game player. He's never scored more than 70 points in a season. He's also never been named to an NHL All Star team. And yet, for a player with a hockey career that immediately appears to be unimpressive, Chris Drury has built a reputation as an unrivaled winner, as a clutch performer with few peers.

Drury, a smallish but quick center with good hands and incredible offensive awareness, fit right in as the Avs' third line center, behind Joe Sakic and Peter Forsberg. And in addition to a steady stream of points (20 goals and 24 assists), Drury established himself as a clutch performer both by winning late face-offs and scoring game-winning playoff goals. In the 1999 post-season, Drury scored four game-winners in 19 games. Not bad for a rookie. For his hard work, the league awarded him the Calder Trophy for best rookie, the only Avalanche player to receive that award.

In 1999-2000, Drury improved his offensive contributions, scoring 67 points in 82 games. Avoiding the sophomore slump, he established his reputation as a reliable 20-goal scorer and clutch face-off winner. But even more than that, Drury established his heart and his dedication to winning. With teammates like Ray Bourque, Patrick Roy, and Adam Foote---each with huge personalities and reputations---it's tough to make a mark in the locker room. But Drury's drive and youthful exuberance for the game immediately endeared him to his fellow Avs. Chris Drury, more than anything, established himself as an ultimate team player.

Unfortunately, Drury had to wait one more year before he was able to add the ultimate prize to his crowded trophy room. It wasn't until his third season that he and the Avalanche "won one for Ray," taking the Stanley Cup away from the New Jersey Devils in seven games. In the post-season, Drury added two game-winning goals and 16 playoff points to his already impressive regular season showing of 24 goals (5 game-winners) and 41 assists in 71 games.

His contributions to the Avalanche, especially in that championship year, and especially his clutch, game-saving performances, have left a lasting impression on his former Colorado teammates... He'll forever be known as one of the best players that ever wore the burgundy and blue. His intensity, his dedication, and his never-give-up attitude will always be remembered fondly by the Avalanche faithful.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001
Drury has a wealth of assets, starting with his skating. He gets in on top of a goalie quickly, and we mean right on top, because he isn't afraid of crease-crashing, and is able to control the puck while charging in. He knows where the net is, and isn't afraid to get there by the shortest route possible, even though he isn't the biggest guy in the world.

Drury has quick and soft hands, and is a steady scorer. His effort is so consistent, and that's what produces his points. He already has an advanced defensive side to his game, even on nights when he isn't scoring, he is doing something to help his team win. He is a clever playmaker, but linemates can also pick up goals by following him to the net and feasting on the rebounds his efforts create.

He is capable of playing wing or centre and was used extensively at both positions. He is a smart player who quickly grasps any concepts the coaching staff pitch him.

Small but sturdy, Drury doesn't back down an inch and is usually the player who makes the pre-emptive hit. He sure doesn't play little. Drury plays hard and competes every shift, whether it's the first minute of the game or the last.

Remarkably poised and mature, with excellent leadership qualities, Drury is probably a future captain.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ESPN.com, 2006-05-18
Let's check veteran Chris Drury's line for the playoffs so far: 13 points, sixth among all playoff scorers, three power-play goals, one short-handed goal, one game-winner, 19:29 in average ice time a night. Gee, sounds like a guy who does it all. If ever there was a player who truly embodies the personality of his team it is the Sabres' co-captain, Drury. Quiet, understated, efficient, Drury is all of those things. As are the Sabres, as they prepare for their first conference finals since 1999.

Prior to the start of this playoff season, Drury had played 80 playoff games, all of those in Colorado, where he learned from one of the finest leaders in the game, Avalanche captain Joe Sakic. In fact, there is a definite sameness in the way both Drury and Sakic go about their business, on and off the ice.

A native of Trumbull, Conn., Drury won a Cup with Sakic and Co. in Colorado and is also a two-time Olympian. And yet, this spring marks a demarcation point for him, a giant, if quiet, step forward in terms of maturity, in terms of becoming a leader.

When the Sabres have stumbled or when they've faced adversity (as they did late in their second-round series against Ottawa), it's been Drury who's made the big play, set up the big goal or helped kill off the big penalty. There is as big a twinkle in his eye when he goes over the boards to kill penalties as when he goes on the power play "because he knows how much it means," coach Lindy Ruff said. "He's as well-rounded a player as you can have on a team."
Quote:
Originally Posted by coach *** ******, 2010 Olympics
Throughout his career and actually his whole life, the bigger the moment, the better Chris Drury plays. Everybody knows that. At some point in this tournament, I think he's going to be a hero for us in one of these games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy Roenick, 2010 Olympics
I think being in New York, I owe a huge apology, both in the New York area or across the country, to Chris Drury, who I said probably should not have been there, here in the Olympics. [He's] been a monster for Team USA. He's been one of their best players. I'll eat crow when crow needs to be eaten. This is my national apology to Chris Drury. He's just been a great, great hockey player.
Most 12-point playoffs since 1993:

Lidstrom7
Forsberg6
Jagr6
Sakic6
Yzerman6
Drury5
Fedorov5
C.Lemieux5
Modano5


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-07-2010 at 02:32 AM.
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Old
07-06-2010, 11:50 AM
  #53
TheDevilMadeMe
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Dan Bouchard, G



Quote:
Originally Posted by overpass
Bouchard won 286 games with a 0.543 winning percentage despite never playing on strong teams, not an easy thing to do in the NHL of the '70s and '80s. He also performed very well compared to his backups - over his career, on average his GAA was 0.32 lower than his backup's, his winning percentage was 0.061 higher, and his save percentage was 0.010 higher.

Bouchard's top-10s in save percentage are as follows:

1972-73: 9th
1973-74: 3rd
1974-75: 4th
1975-76: 3rd
1979-80: 7th
1980-81: 10th

(He was 11th in 1977-78 and 1978-79)
-Hart record: 7th in 80-81

-The modern Vezina was awarded for the first time in 81-82, towards the end of his career. Bouchard's Vezina record is very good, considering he was likely past his prime at this point:

-Vezina record: 4th in 81-82 (including 1st place votes from 2 NHL GMs), 5th in 83-84

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Old
07-07-2010, 03:53 AM
  #54
seventieslord
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With the 143rd pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Bryan McCabe, D



- 6'2", 220 lbs
- NHL 2nd All-Star Team (2004)
- Placed 4th, 9th in Norris Voting
- Placed 4th, 9th, 14th in All-Star Voting
- Top-15 in Scoring by Defensemen 4 Times (3rd, 4th, 10th, 13th)
- Top-5 in Playoff Scoring by Defensemen 2 Times (4th, 5th)
- Career adjusted +101
- Durable: 69+ games in 13 of 14 seasons, has seven 82 game seasons (tied with Recchi, Iginla, Kariya, H.Sedin for most 82-game seasons since 1996)
- Never lower than 3rd in team TOI. Has been 1st or 2nd in 11 of 14 seasons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
McCabe played just two-and-a-half years with New York, but did serve as the team's captain for a season. He, Todd Bertuzzi and a third-round pick in 1998 were sent to Vancouver for Trevor Linden in February, 1998. McCabe's stay on the Canadian west coast was short-lived as he was dealt to the Chicago Blackhawks which in turn was even shorter. After just one year in the Windy City, McCabe was sent to the Maple Leafs in October, 2000.

In the 2001 playoffs McCabe played the finest hockey of his young NHL career. "It was a lot of fun," said McCabe who was making his first appearance in the Stanley Cup playoffs. "I'm not satisfied though. It was tough losing in the second round." After a disappointing second round loss in the 2001 playoffs, McCabe and the Leafs looked to rebound in 2001-02. Having posted a career high in points with 29 the previous year, McCabe broke out offensively in 2001-02 scoring 17 goals and 43 points and was instrumental in Toronto's run to the Eastern Conference Final against the Carolina Hurricanes. Although Toronto lost the series in six games to the upstart Hurricanes, the team fought to the bitter end, tying the game in the dying seconds before losing in overtime.

McCabe's totals dipped in 2002-03 and the St. Catherines native missed his first games since the 2000-01 season. Coming off a sub-par year offensively, McCabe rebounded in 2003-04, registering a career high 53 points (16-37-53). He bettered those totals over the next two seasons with the Leafs, registering 68 points in 2005-06 and 57 in 2006-07.
Quote:
Originally Posted by canoe.ca
A hard-nosed defender... Prior to his third NHL campaign, the Islanders surprisingly named the 22-year-old the sixth captain in team history... Over his five-year stint with the Maple Leafs, McCabe has blossomed into the team's No. 1 defenseman. In 2003-04, he finished fourth in the Norris Trophy voting and was named to the NHL's Second All-Star Team. In 2005-06, he has picked up where he left off before the lockout and has been at or near the top of the points-list for NHL defensemen throughout the season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996-97
An offensive defenseman, McCabe has a mean streak and doesn't mind throwing his weight around. He has good speed up and down the ice (but he isn't as quick side to side). He has a good shot, which he leans into hard, using his size and weight to increase the shot's velocity. As a rookie, he spent most of his concentration on playing a solid brand of defense, which the team desperately needed. He's a big talker on the ice - not baiting opponents, necessarily - but keeping his head in the game by constantly chattering with his partner and other teammates. the Islanders love McCabe's toughness and his offensive promise. They're also impressed with how he made the transition from juniors, where he was more of a freewheeling player, to the NHL, where he played a more low-risk style. Not many rookies would have been able to demonstrate that poise and maturity.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
McCabe's offensive game was supposed to be ahead of his defensive aspects, but he sat back and studied the game a bit in his rookie season. He is still hesitant in his own zone and will get caught, but he is willing to work to improve. McCabe has tremendous offensive instincts. He knows when to jump up into the attacking zone. He has a heavy, major-league slapshot. McCabe moves the puck well and it won't be long before he s running the team's power play. McCabe's skating style is unorthodox. It's not fluid, and there appears to be a hitch in his stride. When he has the puck or is jumping into the play, he has decent speed, but his lack of mobility defensively is one of his few flaws. McCabe loves to play and loves to compete.

McCabe is not afraid to drop the gloves, and can handle himself in a bout. He is a sturdy bodychecker... he is big and strong and shows leadership... his performance exceeded even some of the more optimistic expectations... he proceeded cautiously, but improved throughout the season... McCabe has a wonderful attitude and is a possible future team captain.

WILL - Move the puck
WON'T - Carry Isles alone
EXPECT - Strength on puck
DON'T EXPECT - To push him around
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
He was asked to be one of the Islanders' top cops last season, which is a waste of his abilities. He is not tough, but he is very competitive... He handled a lot of tough checking assignments against other team's top physical lines... He moves the puck well and can run an NHL powerplay... He is maturing into a reliable, all-around defender.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
Defensively, McCabe plays well positionally and doesn't get mesmerized by the puck. He kills penalties well and blocks shots... pushes himself and competes hard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000
He doesn't have a classic, fluid stride, but he can get to where he's going...has strong leadership qualities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001
A team player who will go to war...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002
In good physical condition...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2003
McCabe's offensive upside gave the Maple Leafs the confidence to trade ***** ******... took full advantage of the extra PP time... McCabe understands that the physical part of the game is a major element of his success... the trade for McCabe from Chicago was daytime robbery. He played well after the deal and topped himself last season. McCabe is not an elite defenseman but he is not far below that. McCabe had a big playoffs going up against other teams' top lines.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2004
Routinely handles checking assignments against other teams' top lines.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slam! Sports Blog, 2005-12-11
Teams have watched video and realize the key to stopping the Leafs with the man advantage is nullifying the terrifying shot of point man Bryan McCabe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panthers GM
Bryan is a big, strong, hard-hitting defenceman who also possesses the ability to be a goal-scorer and play on special teams. He will be counted on to play an integral role on our defence and to help bring future success to our franchise.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panthers teammate
"He's done a great job as captain... He leads by example everyday. I've been really impressed with Bryan, the way he's carried himself. He probably learned a lot from playing with guys like Mats (Sundin)."


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-18-2010 at 02:18 AM.
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Old
07-07-2010, 05:46 AM
  #55
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With the 146th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Slava Kozlov, LW



- 5'10", 190 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1997, 1998)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1995)
- 17th in Assists (2009)
- 6 70+ point seasons
- Top-20 in Playoff Goals 4 Times (3rd, 8th, 12th, 20th)
- 13th in Playoff Assists (1998)
- Top-12 in Playoff Points 3 Times (8th, 9th, 12th)
- 12 Career Playoff GWG (among contemporaries, only Brett Hull, Claude Lemieux, Joe Sakic, Chris Drury, Jaromir Jagr, Mike Modano, and Peter Forsberg scored more in their careers)
- Career Adjusted +161
- Most career shootout goals (27)

- 6 points in 10 Games in Best-on-Best International tournaments (1992, 1996)
- 64 points in 42 Games in other International tournaments
- One Gold, Three Silver, Three Bronze in these tournaments
- All-Star Team, Top Forward, Top Scorer, 1990 European Junior Championships

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
A centre with excellent speed, quickness, and scoring ability...He played for the USSR at European Junior Championships in 1990 where he was named the top forward and placed on the tournament all-star team. ...He scored 36 goals in 1995-96 and enjoyed solid post-seasons when Detroit won consecutive Stanley Cups in 1997 and 1998... In 2006-07, Kozlov appeared in 81 games for the Thrashers and recorded a career-best 80 points (28 goals, 52 assists). His offensive contributions helped the Thrashers earn their first Southeast Division championship and a birth into the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Detroit Red Wings: the Illustrated History
Small but gutsy...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings of Fire: The History of the Detroit Red Wings
Jim Devellano recalled the find, saying, "We realized size didn't mean much because this was a real special player"... superb one-on-one skills...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Stanley's Cup
(in 1997) scored the game winner in game two of the conference seimfinals versus Anaheim in triple OT... (in 1998) contributed to the win with a team record-tying four GWG in the playoffs, most dramatically in the conference finals versus Dallas in games one and four.
Quote:
Originally Posted by History Of Hockeytown
The least-discussed member of Detroit's Russian Five unit, Kozlov was an outstanding playoff performer for the Wings' powerhouse clubs in the 1990s... in the postseason his star shone the brightest... Between 1994 and 1998, Kozlov registered 30 playoff goals, trailing only Claude Lemieux, Joe Sakic, and Jaromir Jagr. During that span, Kozlov's 11 game winners led all players. Many of those game winners were huge, like his tally after 22:25 of OT in game 5 of the 1995 Western Conference final against Chicago... "The playoffs are Kozzy's time," Detroit assistant coach Dave Lewis said. "He loves to play at that time of year." Despite his success, the soft-spoken Kozlov was often overlooked amongst his compatriots - and that was just fine with him. "I'm a quiet guy," Kozlov said. "I don't like to get a lot of attention." "He was a low-maintenance player who turned out to be an above-average player for our hockey club," Detroit Senior VP Jimmy Devellano said.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty Bowman: A Life In Hockey
...(Claude) Lemieux had nailed Kozlov in retaliation for a bit of stickwork that cut Avs defenseman Adam Foote for 20 stitches.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1994-95
At age 15, Kozlov was considered to be the most skilled player in his age group in the world... Kozlov has done nothing to indicate the early reports won't be borne out...even though the Red Wings use him on the left wing, Kozlov uses all of the ice, and fits in with the team's freewheeling style. Kozlov doesn't just skate up and down his wing, but cuts and wheels and bursts into openings on the ice... He can split the defense if it plays him too close or drive the defense back with his speed and use the open ice to find a teammate. He has great control of the puck at high speed and plays an excellent transition game.

Kozlov is very competitive and will fight his way through checks. Kozlov has good defensive awareness.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1994-95
Slick-skating... world-class offensive skills. Kozlov has quickness and agility, bursting up and down the ice with breakaway speed and slippery, evasive moves. His puckhandling is top-shelf and his array of shots are NHL caliber.

WILL - Skate like the wind.
WON'T - Overshadow Fedorov
EXPECT - Another scoring ace
DON'T EXPECT - much aggression
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1995-96
No longer a stranger to the league, and now draws considerable checking attention... earned respect points for returning to one playoff game after being clobbered by Scott Stevens.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1995-96
A dynamic skater with world-class finesse skills... his puckhandling is confident and bold... he'll take the puck to the net with velocity...

WILL - Kill you with speed
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
Stepped his game up to another level last season...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996-97
He sees the ice well, finds open areas, gets the puck to his linemates with sharp, accurate passes and has soft hands in close... There isn't much that's wrong with Kozlov's game, unless you want to make an issue of his reluctance to initiate physical confrontations. He will take a hit to make a play. He won't finish his checks with authority. He instead relies on his speed to backcheck... He can sniff out rebounds and shoot the puck over sprawled goalies. He has a world of moves to get away from checkers... Though he's physically strong, he isn't a nasty player to skate against... Kozlov is so fast, it's difficult for the opposition to track him down for a big hit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
Kozlov can play as freewheeling offensively as the team wants... he does not have to be coaxed into shooting, and generally has a quick release - to the top corners of the net...

Just as a defender comes to hit him, Kozlov gets rid of the puck... it would be easy to infer Kozlov is like a quarterback who gets rid of the ball rather than getting sacked; more likely, Kozlov is taking the hit to create space for someone else by allowing the defender to take himself - and kozlov - out of the play.

Kozlov has star-level talent, and his contributions to the championship in 1997 certifies his competitiveness. He regressed statistically as the Wings de-emphasized offense for defense, but was their third leading scorer during the playoff charge.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
Kozlov plays some of the quietest games of any Red Wing, yet he scored some of the biggest goals last season, especially in the playoffs... His darting style makes it impossible for defenders to chase him and easy for them to lose him... He seems to materialize at the right place at the right time... not tall, but solidly built... plays well enough to fit in when Detroit plays a tight defensive game...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000
He's got a little mean streak, too, as that elbow to the head of Joe Nieuwendyk proved.
Quote:
Originally Posted by THN, 2006-12-28
The 34-year-old is on pace to obliterate personal career bests of 36 goals and 73 points in a single season, two totals he set more than a decade ago as a Red Wing. But ask Kozlov what he's doing differently this year and you'll see that he is well-versed in the “Aw shucks, I can't take all the credit” routine.

“I think I'm playing at the same level as before,” Kozlov said. “We're just playing better team hockey. And I'm playing on the first power play (unit), around 20 minutes a game. That helps a lot. I think I played eight or 12 minutes in Detroit.”

Legendary ex-coach Scotty Bowman said Kozlov was an understated piece of the championship puzzles he helped put together in Detroit. “He was a solid player for us,” Bowman said. “He played mostly with (Sergei) Fedorov and **** ***** and they were a very good line for us in the playoffs. He's a clutch player, always had a good scoring touch around the net. Now he's getting power play minutes, and he's making the most of his chances.”

Right winger Marian Hossa – the biggest beneficiary of Kozlov's playmaking skills this season – knows how fortunate he is to have the veteran as his linemate.

“The Professor, he's one of the smartest players I ever played with,” said Hossa, “(Kozlov) sees plays really well and doesn't have to use speed or quickness as much because he's smart and he can make the play and hit you when you get open. That's what makes the other players around him better."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlanta News, 2008-11-06
Thrashers coach **** ******** said Kozlov’s recent success stems from his mental approach to the game more than from physical gifts.

“It’s strictly positioning,” ******** said. “He’s in the right spot. He’s a pretty smart player. I don’t think he has the wheels that he used to have probably six or seven years ago, but if you’re in the right position and know where to go, you don’t have to do as much skating.”

******** has juggled his lines a lot this season, and he appears to have found a good fit for Kozlov... ****** provides the speed defenses have to worry about, which creates space for Kozlov. *****'s passing ability and head for the game get Kozlov the puck in position to score.

He has great hands,” ***** said of Kozlov, who also has three assists. “He’s very patient, and he takes very accurate shots. He’s got great moves [on breakaways], and he makes the goalie make the first move.


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07-08-2010, 03:16 AM
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With the 175th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are proud to select:

Wally Hergesheimer, RW



- 5'8", 155 lbs
- Top-11 in Goals 4 Times (3rd, 4th, 7th, 11th)
- 8th in Assists (1953)
- Top-20 in Points 3 Times (4th, 13th, 20th)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1953, 1956)

Hergesheimer also had a very strong junior/minor league career:

- 1945: Led MJHL in goals and points, Memorial Cup Finalist, led team in goals and points in Memorial Cup.
- 1947: Led MJHL in goals, 2nd in points, Memorial Cup Finalist, led team in goals and points in Memorial Cup.
- 1950: 3rd in USHL goals, 7th in points, 3rd in playoff points, 1st All-Star Team
- 1951: 2nd in AHL goals, 8th in points, 1st in playoff goals, 6th in points, 2nd All-Star Team, Calder Cup
- 1961: 5th in WHL goals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
The odds against Wally Hergesheimer's success in hockey were as firmly stacked in place as sandbags against a flood. At the start of his pro career with the Minneapolis Millers in 1947, he stood 5' 8" and weighed only 145 pounds. He was also humourously known as "Fingers" because he'd lost his index and middle fingers up to the knuckles of his right hand in a punch-press accident.

"When I made it to the NHL," he recounted, "it was something I never really expected. It was little Wally this and little Wally that, but I just kept going and everything seemed to fall into place."

By 1951, Hergesheimer was voted the AHL's most outstanding rookie on the strength of his 96 points in 82 games with the Cleveland Barons. The New Rangers brought him on board the following season. He quickly established a reputation for angling his way into the goal crease to cash rebounds into goals. His success earned him the nickname "Garbage Collector."

In 1956, Hergesheimer was traded to the Blackhawks where he played one year before heading to Buffalo of the AHL for a season. 1958 brought one final crack at the NHL that lasted only 22 games. He then played three seasons respectively with Buffalo of the AHL plus Calgary and Los Angeles of the WHL.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
During the New York Rangers' darkest days in the early fifties, the most consistent bright light was smallish right winger Wally Hergesheimer. He was a relatively slow skater; he had lost two fingers on his right hand, and he lacked a particularly hard shot. But Wally had a surplus of good humour and guts. Dubbed a "garbage collector" because of his knack of scoring goals from rebounds near the crease, Hergie, as he was known, led the Rangers in scoring in 1952-53.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heroes: Stars Of Hockey's Golden Era
His excellent sense of humour, Hergesheimer thinks today, might have helped him "over the humps" during his hockey career. Only now does he admit that his career might have been prematurely ended b the attitudes of club management. He broke a leg in the 1954 campaign which did not mend well over the summer. Though the condition was known, the club put pressure on him to play by insinuating that he was exaggerating the extent of his pain. Fourteen games into the next season he fractured the leg again. Players understood that competitione xisted for work in the NHL, he says. That's why they were willing to undertake such risks to continue playing. There was no question about who was calling the shots. Never before has he expressed any of his true feelings on the subject for fear it would sound like "sour grapes".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red's Story
I was refereeing a game between the Red Wings and Rangers, when New York's **** ******** was tripped by Black Jack Stewart right in front of me. His skate came up and caught me right where the sun don't shine... They dragged me into the doctor's office and sewed up my pants... 25 minutes later, I was back out there, but still not feeling great. The Rangers had a right wing named Wally Hergesheimer, just a little guy but he led every team he was ever on in scoring. He was a great hockey player and a great guy so I wasn't surprised when he skated over to me before we started to play again,. I thought he wanted to give me some smpathy or say something nice. At this point, I'd better remind you that a referee was not supposed to laugh during a game; he was not supposed to do that under any circumstances. But I laughed that night, because Wally said, "Red, I have something for you. I found these on the ice and I thought you might have lost 'em." I looked down and he had two purple jelly beans in his hand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Game We Knew: Hockey In the Fifties
Hergesheimer was excellent at scoring goals by hanging around the crease... He was the second player in history to score 100 goals in both the NHL and the AHL.
Hergesheimer may have been the garbage man, but that wasn't the only way he could score. Check out these quotes from his four-goal game:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schenectady Gazette, 1952-11-13
Hergesheimer took over from there. He split the defense and tied the score late in the first period and netted again early in the second session, neatly faking goalie Al Rollins out of position. A rough third period opened with Hergesheimer tipping in Steve Kraftcheck's long pass from just inside the blueline... Less than a minute later, Hergesheimer evaded Dewsbury, faked Rollins out of position and tallied his fourth goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, 1952-11-15
the rough and tumble aspects of big league hockey leave the little man without the persuasive power of the bodycheck, but the main idea of the game hasn't changed. You still have to score goals. And that's where 150 pound Wally Hergesheimer tosses his weight around... "I had to go for him," Frank Boucher says. He's one of the trickiest players I ever saw around the nets. And small as he is, he manages to roll with the bodychecks so that nobody ever seems to get a clean shot at him. Something like Buddy O'Connor." Hergesheimer doesn't consider his diminutiveness a handicap. "Hockey can be rougher on the big men," he says. "Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that the big men are more prone to injury than us little guys."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, 1954-02-01
Muzz also singled out centre Paul Ronty and right winger Wally Hergesheimer for their fine play. "Ronty has been doing some fine work feeding the wings and coming up with an occasional goal. Hergy, of course, is our big gun. He comes through with those important goals - in several games he's had two."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee Journal, 1958-10-15
"We should have won all three games," Watson said. But we're a little weak on defense and our power play didn't click. You have to score at least 75% (sic) of the time when the other team is a man short. That's why we got Wally Hergesheimer. Hergy's got the experience to help us. Some of the rookies still have not got the feel of the big league yet."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schenectady Gazette, 1958-10-21
Wally Hergesheimer, a little guy with a world of courage, has battled back from two broken legs, a fractured shoulder and a "washed up" reputation to regain a position in ice hockey's big league with the New York Rangers. The 31-year-old right winger was assured of a regular job today by Ranger GM Muzz Patrick, who said "Hergy is skating as well as he ever did. He's going to help us a lot."

Hergesheimer was brought up from Buffalo of the AHL a week ago on a three-game trial. "I never thought I'd make ut back up here," said Hergy. "He looks real good," Watson recalled today... "We've got a young club, and a guy like hergesheimer can also help out rookies. he has a good shot that should help us on our power play and, besides, he passes and backchecks well." Hergesheimer is one of the all-time favourites of the MSG rousing gallery. "It's nice to know they didn't forget me," he said.


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-08-2010 at 04:35 PM.
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07-08-2010, 04:56 AM
  #57
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With the 178th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are proud to select:

Cal Gardner, C



- 6'1", 172 lbs.
- Stanley Cup (1949, 1951)
- Scored Stanley Cup Winning Goal (1949)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1957)
- NHL All-Star Game Participant (1948, 1949)
- 7th in goals (1951)
- Top-16 in assists 4 times (9th, 12th, 12th, 16th)
- Top-20 in points twice (10th, 20th)
- Played in six consecutive complete seasons (at least 420 straight games, 1951-1957)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Heroes: Stars Of Hockey's Golden Era
A rugged hockey player, Gardner is no stranger to on-ice combat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quest For the Cup
A rangy guy with equal degrees of finesse and toughness
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Leafs in Autumn
Gardner was the most interesting of the three. He'd kept in the best shape, tall and rangy, and he conducted himself on the ice with perfect confidence. He put on sudden bursts of speed when they were called for. He laid down passes in unstoppable, take-them-by-surprise patterns.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Leafs: An Anecdotal History
Nobody could precisely take Apps' place, but Gardner had the tools to keep the old Apps line - Harry Watson on left wing, Bill Ezinicki on right - more than respectable... good at both ends of the ice, a centre who took pleasure in handing out a body check, not a prolific scorer but a sweetheart of a passer. Gardner did the job for the Leafs in 1948-49. He skated miles, laid the body on Milt Schmidt and Elmer Lach and the other big-name opposing centres, and kept feeding passes to Harry Watson.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leafs Top-100, describing Gardner's 1949 Cup Winner
The Leafs took the first two games in Detroit and then won the first game in Toronto. The Wings looked like they may be able to prolong the series when they took a 1-0 lead in the first period. The Leafs tied the game and then took the lead on Gardner's goal. The play started when Bill Ezinicki kicked the puck ahead to Jim Thomson, when then hit a streaking Gardner with a pass. Gardner raced down the side that Jack Stewart had vacated and made a shift with his body that threw Harry Lumley out of position. Gardner put the puck where Lumley had left an opening...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Ice
Gardner emerged as a solid two-way center who never shied away from a tough game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
Reardon and Gardner, though, saved their worst for a game a short time later when they engaged in one of the most vicious stick fights in NHL history, both ending up bloodied and dazed and forced by Clarence Campbell to post peace bonds for the rest of the season. The two developed a hatred for eachother, and even 50 years later each swore never to so much as say hello to the other.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal Gardner, as told to Jack Batten
It was Ezinicki who hit Reardon first, not me... Reardon swung back at Ezinicki, and his stick landed on me. That's when I took my own stick and hit Reardon on both shoulders... I broke the stick on the right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal Gardner, as told to Jack Batten, describing the 1951 Cup Winning Goal.
"Cal", Smythe said in the dressing room after the game, "you should've got that goal." Sure, the puck came real close to me. But if you take a look at the famous photograph of the goal, the one that shows Barilko flying through the air, you'll see me skating in the direction of a montreal player. It was The Rocket. I had my attention on him, not on the puck. The thing was, Barilko had left his defense spot open, and if he hadn't scored, the puck could easily have come out to Richard. Without Barilko in position, the Rocket could've been on a breakaway. So I was just doing my job, putting a guard on Rocket Richard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee Journal, 1948-10-12
To replace Apps, the Maple Leafs obtained Cal Gardner from the Rangers. Gardner, who was used at LW by the Rangers, most of the season, is an excellent pivot man. The Maple Leafs have three of the league's best centers in Gardner, Ted Kennedy, and Max Bentley. Kennedy is the new captain and centers the first line. Bentley is the ice general for the second line and Gardner for the third.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1956-11-19
Cal Gardner, a veteran clutch player...
Gardner was also good at getting the opposition's stars off their game:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Ice
"The opposition started to pound us," said Doug Bentley. "The Bruins sent big fellows like Eddie Sandford and Cal Gardner after us. They hit us, leaned on us, and fouled us whenever possible."

Aware that Max Bentley was a hypochondriac, Lynn instructed his players to comment casually on how terrible he looked. "Cal Gardner did it best," Lynn recalled. "After a while, Max seemed to get depressed and more depressed and the quality of his play started slipping."

...the Rangers hadn't found a way to cure Max's hypochondria and that's how the rangers became the only team to be talked out of a playoff berth. The culprit was Cal Gardner, an ex-ranger and Leaf. Cal Gardner: "I had been max's teammate on the Maple Leafs when we won the cup in 1949 and 1951 and we had been roommates but this was a game we had to win. As soon as we got on the ice for warmups, I made a beeline for Max and told him straight out that he seemed sick to me and that he should see a doctor. Whenever we'd pass I'd bring it up again. By game time, Max was a wreck and couldn't do a thing for New York that night. Naturally we beat the Rangers."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewiston Daily Sun, 1948-11-18
Only one of the ten penalties handed out was a major. That was imposed on Ed Sandford early in the third session for throwing a punch at Cal Gardner, who had been roughing him.


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-12-2010 at 04:58 AM.
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07-09-2010, 03:43 AM
  #58
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With the 207th pick in MLD2010, The Regina capitals are pleased to select:

Bob MacMillan, RW/C/LW



5'11", 175 lbs
- 13th in Goals Twice (1978, 1979)
- 3rd in Assists (1979)
- 5th in Points (1979)
- 7th in LW All-Star Voting (1978)
- 3rd in RW All-Star Voting (1979)
- Career Adjusted +64
- Played 68+ games in 12 of 13 pro seasons

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
MacMillan spent his first two years as a professional playing for the Minnesota Fighting Saints but jumped to the NHL in 1974. "Mack the Knife" as he was known, split that campaign between the New York Rangers and their farm team in Providence and it would take a trade to make him a full-time NHL player.

MacMillan was dealt to the St. Louis Blues in September of 1975 and he blossomed with them by scoring 20 goals and 52 points in his first full year in the league. The following year he upped his point total but it wasn't enough to stop his from being traded yet again during his third year with the team. MacMillan was shipped to the Atlanta Flames in a big six-player trade and it was down in Georgia where he enjoyed his greatest success.

With the Flames MacMillan exploded offensively lighting the lamp 31 times in the 52 games he spent with them following the trade. During his first full year in the red and orange, MacMillan scored 37 goals and 71 assists for 108 points. His line mate, Guy Chouinard, managed 50 goals and finished just one point back of MacMillan. Not only was his offensive prowess impressive, but he only received fourteen minutes in penalties during the entire season and was given the Lady Byng Trophy as the league's Most Gentlemanly Player.

When the Flames franchise shifted to Calgary, MacMillan went with them, but he couldn't reproduce his scoring successes, though he was still a productive player. During the 1981-82 season he was on the move again as a part of the package that brought Lanny McDonald to Calgary.

MacMillan spent two and a half seasons with the Colorado/New Jersey franchise before moving on to the Chicago Blackhawks in 1984 to play his final season in the league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by PEI Sports Hall Of Fame
Bob MacMillan has done himself, his family and his native Prince Edward Island, proud. He accomplished something that only one other Maritimer has been able to do, in being named the N.H.L.'s Lady Byng Trophy winner for the 1978-79 season. Certainly a worthy recipient of the trophy, which is emblematic of the player judged to have displayed the most gentlemanly conduct matched with playing ability, the Charlottetown native, performing with Atlanta Flames, amassed 108 points in 79 games, made up of 37 goals and 71 assists and drew only 14 minutes in penalties.

Robert Lea MacMillan was born in Charlottetown on September 2, 1952. Raised by his mother after his father passed away, Bobby grew up idolizing his hockey playing older brother Billy [inducted 1985], who had played in both the Olympics and the N.H.L. A product of the Charlottetown Minor Hockey System, Bob was one of eight players who graduated from the Charlottetown Junior Islanders of the early 70s and go on to a professional hockey career. After finishing his time in Junior Hockey with St. Catharines’ Black Hawks, Bob was drafted by the New York Rangers in 1972, but chose instead to perform in the W.H.A. with Minnesota for two seasons. He eventually moved to the Rangers in 1974-75 and played 22 games with the Broadway Blue Shirts before being shipped off to Providence of the American Hockey League for the remainder of the season. In September 1975, Bob was traded to St. Louis where he spent almost two seasons. During his first season with the team, Bob equalled one rookie record and broke another two; he scored 20 goals to equal the rookie record of **** ******, established in season 1971-72, picked up 32 assists to break the rookie-record of 30 established by *** **** in the 1974-75 season, and amassed 52 points to beat **** ******'s rookie-record set in 1971-72.

These records are impressive, but it was upon moving to Atlanta in 1977 that Bobby really found his shooting eye. In 52 games with the Flames, he averaged a point a game, potting 31 goals and garnering 21 assists. The following season would be the best of his hockey career: he more than doubled his number of points and was awarded the prestigious Lady Byng Memorial Trophy. In honour of this incredible accomplishment, Bobby was inducted into the P.E.I. Sports Hall of Fame on July 16, 1979.

In the spring of 1978, Bob MacMillan was chosen as a member of Team Canada when they took part in the World Championships in Prague; the team placed third. Professionally, Bobby continued to play for the Atlanta Flames, which became the Calgary Flames in 1980. He then played for the Colorado Rockies in the 1981-82 season, followed by two seasons with the New Jersey Devils.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeydraftcentral.com
A 1978-79 poll of coaches found him to be the NHL's most underrated player
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lanny
Both Bob MacMillan and Don Lever were popular players in the dressing room, on the ice and with the fans. They were well-liked among the players, and everyone on the team thought of them as friends.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
Noted for his speed and streaky scoring
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakeland Ledger, 1978-11-23
While his career has rocketed, MacMilan remains reserved... "In St. Louis, even though Bobby was greatly competitive and even though he could skate really fast, he had absolutely no one to back him up," said Flames LW ****** **********. "Now he doesn't have to think about his well-being, because he's got us." It must be remembered, though, that Bob MacMillan must be caught before he can he hit, and that's no small order for opposing players. "He's not really a big man, but his strides are deceptively long. His moves come at you so fast. A guy like Gil Perreault, he can do everything well, but if you slow him down by 10 miles an hour, he wouldn't be as exceptional. With Bobby, you make a play on him in a hurry or he'll be around you. There isn't a defenseman in the league that wouldn't like to get him against the boards, but they've been trying since the season started and they haven't done it yet."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewiston Daily Sun, 1979-01-27
Midway through the third period, Bob MacMillan seized control in the corner and passed to ******** in the faceoff circle. the rookie center scored.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herald-Journal, 1979-02-26
"We always thought he was the best player on the Blues, but I think it would be ridiculous to say we expected him to score the way he's been scoring," said GM Cliff Fletcher.

MacMillan signed his first pro contract with the WHA's Minnesota Fighting Saints and played two seasons. "It was the worst mistake of my life," said MacMillan. "the players were out of shape and had lousy attitudes. It wasn't what I thought pro hockey would or should be like."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1981-11-26
Utility forward Bob macMillan...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Press, 1982-11-05
New Jersey's Bob MacMillan, out of control, plowed into (the goalie) on the play. The goalie suffered a concussion and was held in hospital overnight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1977
valuable addition to the Blues...concentrated on defense until the Blues encouraged him to open up on offense...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1978
Versatile forward who can play center, LW, or RW. Led Blues in scoring with 58 points... Noted for hustle and reputation as team player... Has not missed a game in two years... Good checker who excels as a penalty killer and in winning faceoffs... Fast, energetic skater.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1979
The Big Mac... Blossomed as a big goal scorer after trade... Tough and versatile... Can play either wing or center... Also durable, having played in all 80 games in each of last three seasons... used on faceoffs and penalty killing... would play goal if you asked him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1980
Mac the knife... can slice a defense to shreds... Has emerged as a bonafide star... Broke every major offensve club record and won Lady byng trophy... Leader on one of league's most potent offenses... Mostly a RW but can play center too... swift skater with a bullet for a wristshot... voted team's MVP... a hustler.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1981
Teriffic offensive player... also gentlemanly... swift skater with devilish wristshot... always a good interview.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1982
Useful, versatile veteran who can play all forward positions... Regards his 108-point season as "a bit of a fluke". Strong skater, excellent defensive player who is a good penalty killer... He's been a key worker since trade from Blues.. Easy going and gregarious, he's been a favourite interview of many reporters because of his frank, funny views on hockey and other matters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1983
versatile player with good skill in all areas of the game... Excellent skater.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1984
Mack the knife, slices through defenses with blazing speed... good skater, scorer and defensive player... almost never in penalty box... Was big fan favourite in Atlanta... possesses excellent shot and savvy to go along with it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete handbook Of Pro Hockey 1985
Was heartthrob of Devils' young female fans... can play any positon... excels as penalty killer...


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-13-2010 at 10:35 PM.
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07-09-2010, 04:52 AM
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Posts: 23,882
vCash: 500
With the 210th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Jaroslav Jirik, RW/LW



- 5'11", 170 lbs

Domestic:

- Top-10 in Czech League Goals 9 Times (1st, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th)
- Top-10 in Czech League Assists 5 Times (5th, 7th, 7th, 10th, 10th)
- Top-10 in Czech League Points 7 Times (2nd, 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th)*
- League Champion (1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966)
- 302 Goals, 105* assists, 407* points in 442 Czech League Games

* assists not available for Jirik's first 4 years. Did not duplicate goals finishes as points finishes

International:

- World Championship/Olympic Silver (1965, 1966, 1968)
- World Championship/Olympic Bronze (1959, 1963, 1964, 1969)
- 2nd in Scoring and World Championship All-Star (1965)
- Top-4 on Czechs in Tournament scoring 5 Times (2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 4th)
- 38 Goals, 23 Assists, 61 Points in 56 Major International Games

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings Of the Ice
"We are like comedians. We travel from town to town, entertaining people," Jaroslav Jirik once said about his mision as a hockey player. For him, playing the game was more than just a job. His fame stemmed mainly from his talent as a scorer... Most of the goals he scored were from the crease area. He would literally push and shove at the puck or try to poke it in behind the goalie.

Jirik was famous for the way he parked himself in front of the net and assumed a pose like a tripod, with his stik out in front of him. It was nearly impossible to get him away from the net, to push him off balance or lift his stick. He provoked almost everyone he encountered - pushing and jabbing at defensemen and the scorers and sometimes flying into a rage. they were araid of him. He was the terror of all defensemen. He also had a weakness for referees and constantly irritated them with his aggressive style of play. In his day, the game wasn't as rough, so he stood out. And his aggression was just as verbal as it was physical.

For as long as anyone can remember, Jaroslav's nickname has been "Brambor" (Potato). His teammates gave it to him when he was very young... Jirik had a tendency to get deeply absorbed in the game and very passionate about its outcome. He hated losing and couldn't stand for pessimism, no matter who the opponent was. To him, losing was a disgrace. Even during training, when there was nothing at skate, he would often say or do whatever it took to win. And if he didn't come out a winner, he would get very frustrated.

He had a thick skin and was never offended by jokes, even if they were personal... Jirik liked to think of himself as invincible and he had a need to push himself to the limit. He played in one tournament from start to finish with a broken arm.
Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
A talented right winger with a natural scoring touch, Jaroslav Jirik was the first player from an Eastern Bloc country to play in the NHL. When he suited up for three games with the St. Louis Blues in 1969-70, Jirik was an experienced international competitor who was granted permission by the Czechoslovakian authorities to sample the NHL.

Born in Vojnur Mestac, Czechoslovakia, Jirik represented his country at five World Championships in the 1960s as well as the 1964 and 1968 Olympics. His medal haul at the World tournament consisted of three bronze medals and two silver. Jirik helped Czechoslovakia win a bronze at the Innsbruck Games in 1964 and a silver in Grenoble four years later. His finest individual performance came at the 1965 World Championships when he registered 12 points in seven matches.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Jaroslav's playing style was perfect for the NHL. He first caught the eye of former NHL defenseman Carl Brewer who then tipped Scotty Bowman (St. Louis coach at that time) about him. A young Cliff Fletcher went to Czechoslovakia in 1969 to sign three players, they were Jaroslav Jirik, ********** and *******. The Czech government had given them their permission to let them play in North America. The problem was that ***** was 27-years old and ******** only 23, so the Czech government changed their minds about these two and only released Jaroslav Jirik because he was 30-years old, which was the age when they usually released their players.

...He was held pointless in the three NHL games but played so well that St.Louis wanted him to stay for another year. They of course couldn't guarantee a spot on the team but told him that his chances were very good, especially since he had adapted very fast to the North American style of play.

Jaroslav, who only months before had married in the USA, declined the offer and wanted to go home. He later said that he regretted that decision. "I only wish that I had been 25-years old instead of 30 when I came over," he said.

Jaroslav was a greater player than most people knew when he came over to North America. Today he is regarded as a legendary player in the Czech Republic. Unfortunately the North American crowd only got a brief look at this top notch player who most certainly could have become a fan favorite with his fearless play in front of the goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by THN, August 28, 2011
While in Kansas City, Jirik made a quiet impression. He was fairly fluent in English, but was also shy, said teammate Don Giesebrecht. “That was understandable with him coming to our country,” Giesebrecht said. “I think he was missing his home country sometimes. It was a big cultural shock when he came to Kansas City.”

Jirik, who was older than most of the other players, was assertive on the ice when needed. “He held his own,” Giesebrecht said. “He didn’t back away from anything. He was a well-built kid, very muscular and mature-looking. He didn’t avoid contact or anything.”

Jirik ended up tallying 19 goals and 35 points in 53 games with K.C. “It’s more of a scramble in the minor league,” Jirik told THN at the time. “They play positions more in the NHL, the game is so much faster and they handle the puck so much better. It’s a lot harder.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1966-01-10
Jaroslav Jirik intercepted a Canadian pass and fed it to *****, who pulled ********* out and shot the puck over his shoulder.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1969-03-25
Jirik, returning with a heavily bandaged wrist after a week's treatment, was always a threat when on the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1969-03-31
The Czechs sorely missed Suchy and Jaroslav Jirik, who has signed a one-year contract with St. Louis of the NHL... Suchy, who starts the scoring plays, broke his index finger. Jirik, who finishes them, pulled a leg muscle and left the game in the first period... Without Jirik, the Czech's attack dissipated.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southeast Missourian, 1969-05-26
SCOTTY Bowman praised Jirik at a news conference as a "good two way player. He is very aggressive."


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-29-2011 at 06:19 PM.
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Old
07-09-2010, 01:46 PM
  #60
Leafs Forever
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Quote:
Defenceman Hy Buller played five NHL seasons in the 1940s and '50s. He was a fine passer who could also deliver jolting bodychecks and play with a chip on his shoulder in his own zone.-loh
Quote:
"But you can't have everything. Bill Quackenbush doesn't hit them either, and he's quite a defenseman. They're both exceptional stick checkers, fine stickhandlers and rushers. Buller, like Quackenbush, is very good on point in power players. He has our best shot from the blue line and can it away without a windup. The most noticeable thing about Buller is his coolness and quick thinking under fire. He'll adapt himself to any situation."-Frank Boucher
Quote:
He was outstanding in his first big league season, scoring 35 points, delivering a host of thunderous hits and earning a place on the NHL second all-star team-loh
The Toronto Marlies are happy to select, our leading defenceman...



HY BULLER!

NHL Awards and Statistics
1 x NHL Second Team AST (1952)

Points Amongst Defencemen- 1st(1952), 3rd(1953), 12th(1954)*
*-Missed 29 games due to injury

AHL Awards and Statistics
3 x Calder Cup champion
2 x AHL First AST

Points among Defensemen – 2nd(1947), 2nd(1951), 3rd(1948), 6th(1944), 6th(1949), 7th(1945), 8th(1946), 12th(1950)*
Goals among Defensemen – 2nd(1947), 2nd(1948), 2nd(1951), 4th(1944), 5th(1946), 7th(1945), 8th(1950)*
Assists among Defensemen – 2nd(1947), 2nd(1951), 4th(1948), 7th(1944), 7th(1946), 7th(1949)*, 8th(1945)

*missed over 1/3 of games in 1950

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Old
07-10-2010, 12:04 AM
  #61
seventieslord
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With the 254th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Ted Hampson, C



- 5'8", 173 lbs
- Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy Winner (1969)
- Top-15 in NHL Assists 3 Times (6th, 9th, 15th)
- Top-15 in NHL Points Twice (14th, 14th)
- Top-7 in SHG three times (5th-NHL-1971, 3rd-WHA-1974, 7th-WHA-1975)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1969)
- GF/GA figures strongly indicate Hampson was the Seals' runaway icetime leader among forwards in 1968 and 1969, and was a close 2nd in 1970
- Hampson's career -57 is actually an adjusted -4, and is based solely on games played past age 31
- Hampson retired at age 39; only Gordie Howe, Norm Ullman and Harry Howell were older, among active players in a top league.
- Hampson played 1411 pro hockey games and 109 more in the playoffs

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Centre Ted Hampson got his first taste of major junior A hockey playing two games for the Flin Flon Bombers in the 1954 Memorial Cup playoffs. He spent four full seasons with the Bombers and was a member of two other Memorial Cup participants in 1956 and 1957.

The New York Rangers were in possession of Hampson's NHL playing rights, when the Toronto Maple Leafs acquired those rights after he was placed on waivers in 1959. In 1959-60, Hampson dressed for 41 games with the Leafs, scoring two goals and ten points. In the summer of 1960, the Rangers had obviously felt they made a mistake in releasing Hampson, and re-acquired him from Toronto in the Intra League Draft. After three years in a defensive checking role with the Rangers, he was taken by Detroit in the 1963 Intra League Draft by Detroit.

Hampson also made NHL stops in Oakland and Minnesota before trying his hand in the WHA... He played three years for the Minnesota Fighting Saints and one year with the Quebec Nordiques. What he lacked in size, he more than made up for with quickness and agility on the ice, making him the perfect hound for checking other team's top offensive threats.

Hampson wound down his career in the CHL with Oklahoma City, retiring after appearing in six games in 1980-81. Known throughout his entire career for his defensive capabilities, the one season that stood out from an offensive point of view was in 1968-69 when he set career highs with 26 goals, 49 assists and 75 points while skating for the Oakland Seals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorthanded: The Untold Story Of the Seals
If you were to choose a player to personify the Oakland Seals in the first four years of their existence, Ted Hampson would be as good a choice as anybody. Hampson stands second on the all-time scoring list with 184 points, and has the record for points scored in a season... he holds the record for assists, and is sixth all-time in goals. He served as captain of the seals from 1968-69 until he left the team during the 1970-71 season, and represented the club in the All-Star game. But more than that, Hampson was the heart and soul of the early Seals clubs. **** ******** described Hampson as "the hardest worker on the team, a great leader and an inspiration." Many of his teammates shared that view.

...he played with the Rangers and Red Wings, mostly in a defensive or checking role... Despite his lack of physical size, nobody questioned his desire. "He was abour 5'6" in stature but 6'5" in heart," former teammate **** ******* said. Dennis Hextall, who played both with and against Hampson, added, "He never quit. You could knock him down, but he'd get right up and go faster."... Hampson recalled that ********** gave him the nickname "The Tick" "because I latched on and never let go", Hampson said.

Prior to the 1968-69 season, Ted Hampson was voted the second captain in Seals history, replacing the traded Bob Baun. "It was a great thrill for me," Hampson said. "I had been the captain of my teams a couple of places before. I was an old style captain. I didn't say anything in the dressing room. I tried to give my best effort on the ice and hopefully get others to do likewise. I tried to bring the players together off the ice and not to exclude anybody. Today's captains are more vocal and demanding in the dressing room. For me, it was play together and play to win."

The younger players on the Seals seemed to really respect Hampson's leadership qualities. Rookie Ron Stackhouse saw that Hampson was "a veteran who was not resting on his laurels," while ***** ***** remembered that "Ted helped me as a captain when I was a rookie. He was a team player and he wanted to win more than anybody on the team. He was always there when I needed him."

When asked to describe himself as a hockey player, Hampson replied, "skating was easy for me. I came into pro hockey as a high scorer but I had to learn to be a checker in the NHL. In Oakland, I got the chance to play more offensively, take faceoffs, kill penalties, and did my share of checking. I liked to play with guys who liked to share the puck. Team play was important to me and the Seals had a lot of it. I gave it my best to try to win every game."

Two former linemates did a great job of summing up what Ted Hampson meant to the Seals. **** ***** described Hampson as "a real 3D player: dedication, determination and desire. He gave 110 percent every night." Meanwhile, **** ********** called Hampson "the ultimate player for determination, a team player who gave his all every shift. He didn't know when or how to quit." Determination, hustle, effort, desire. Ted Hampson possessed all these qualities on the ice and they made him the heart and soul of the Seals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heroes: Stars Of Hockey's Golden Era
After arriving in the NHL in 1959, he discovered the game was slightly more defensive than in junior hockey. "I found I wasn't scoring very big in professional hockey. Fortunately I was able to still play a good checking game and kill penalties."

The promotions, demotions and trades were all an accepted part of the game, Hampson agrees. "I think we were pretty naive in those days. I think we just kind of let things fall where they may and hope you played well enough that someone would give you a chance or you'd get promoted. I felt if I played well enough I'd get a chance and if I didn't, I didn't deserve to."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey! The Story Of the World's Fastest Sport
Hampson finished as the Seals' leading scorer but he arrived too late and there were not enough of his ilk.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Chronicle
Ted Hampson made up for a lack of size with unrelenting desire.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
A utility centre..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seals Coach Fred Glover
Anybody would be happy to have Ted Hampson, a good guy and a hard worker. You might call him an overachiever but I don't think so; he had a big heart. I could use him on the power play, penalty kill and double shift him and he never said a word. He was a good leader, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1972
was a valuable pickup for North Stars... a scrambler who is a fine playmaker... was captain of the Seals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
was a persistent NHL performer when lured away... Had 62 points in inagural WHA season; this included 82% clutch goal record...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1975
a 100 percenter... (Minnesota Fighting Saints) team captain... A player who makes a coach's job much easier...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976
Nicknamed "The Tick" because of his skin-tight checking ability... Has been the Saints' captain since their formation... Coach Harry Neale said of him, "The only bad thing about Teddy Hampson is that if he ever quit to start coaching, he wouldn't have a Teddy Hampson on his team." Fine penalty killer... Voted most sportsmanlike player in both leagues (actually most dedicated in NHL, most sportsmanlike in WHA)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Press, 1966-01-11
Hornets captain Ted Hampson has been receiving a return lately on his tireless work at center. He has collected three goals and two assists in the last three games. Teammate Murray Hall pointed out what Hampson's determined play means to the team. "If he's healthy, we're gonna go. I've got nothing but praise for the guy. If he had Frank Mahovlich's ability, he would be in the NHL for 20 years."
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1969 Hockey Magazine
On January 9, with Oakland mired deep in last place - a habitat due mostly to an utter lack of offensive punch - the seals acquired Hed Hampson... "Ted has played a lot of good hockey for me," says Fred Glover. "Despite his age, he'll be playing with us for a long time." Hampson is 32... Never noted as a high scorer, Ted, a hustling center, was in the top-5 in scoring among West division players once Coach Glover convinced the 5'8", 168-pounder that he'd have to shoulder a large part of the offensive load for the Seals. It didn't take much convincing... He was the only center on the club to do steady work for the initial half. He was also a bit of a pest... In 1960, Punch Imlach said, "He's still green, makes mistakes, but he's out there trying. And he listens in the dressing room. That's more than I can say about a lot of my men." ... In 1966 he was recalled by Detroit because Sid Abel wanted a man who could skate as well as handle the puck.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1971-11-15
Then there are diggers like Ted Hampson and Charlie Burns who the marvelous Minnesota fans give standing ovations for their penalty killing and checking prowess... Hampson, the scrappy little winger...


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-21-2010 at 05:32 AM.
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07-10-2010, 04:38 AM
  #62
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With the 253rd pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are proud to select:

Grant "Knobby" Warwick, RW



- 5'6", 155 lbs
- Top-20 in Goals Six Times (7th, 12th, 13th, 15th, 17th, 19th)
- Top-20 in Assists Three Times (16th, 17th, 19th)
- Top-20 in Points Five Times (15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 20th)
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1947)
- Calder memorial Trophy (1942)

Warwick's career outside the NHL is impressive as well. It seems like every year he was either a champion, a finalist, an all-star, or led his league or tournament in scoring:

- Memorial Cup Finalist (1940)
- Allan Cup Champion (1941)
- On pace for 4th in AHL scoring - played half of season in NHL (1950)
- 2nd in AHL scoring (1951)
- 8th in AHL scoring - on pace for 2nd, missed time (1952)
- On pace to lead OSHL in scoring, 1st AST, was leading playoff scorer, Allan Cup Finalist, Allan Cup Scoring Leader (1953)
- 7th in OSHL scoring, 1st AST, was leading playoff scorer, Allan Cup Champion, Allan Cup Scoring Leader (1954)
- 4th in OSHL scoring, on pace for 1st, 1st AST, 2nd in Olympic scoring, Won Olympic Gold (1955)
- OSHL leading scorer, 1st AST (1956)
- 1st in OSHL playoff assists, 4th in points (1958)

Warwick might have the most diverse and impressive North American non-NHL post-merger resume of any player! (completely aside from the fact that he was a very good NHL player)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
An unselfish decision turned out to be the best one Grant Warwick ever made in his hockey career.

With Canada, represented by the Penticton Vees senior club, set to face the Soviet Union in the game that would decide the gold medal at the 1955 World Championship, the 33-year-old player-coach announced to his players that he would not play. Warwick was so intent on winning the world title that he wanted to concentrate on his duties behind the bench. He had been effective earlier in the tournament on a line with his brothers, Bill and Dick.

Before the game in Krefeld, West Germany, Warwick warned his players that if they lost they had better not go home, they might as well go to China. The year before in Stockholm, the Soviets, competing in their first world tournament, had dealt a huge blow to Canadian hockey pride by trouncing the Toronto East York Lyndhursts 7-2 to win the gold medal. Penticton played almost a perfect game, shutting out the defending champions 5-0, and the Warwick brothers, who grew up in Regina, Saskatchewan, became the toast not only of Penticton, British Columbia, but of all Canada.

In the 1952-53 season volunteers from the Penticton fan club had raised $1,300 by passing the hat at a game to help pay for Warwick's release from the Buffalo Bisons of the American Hockey League. After joining the Vees in British Columbia's Okanagan Senior Hockey League in December, Warwick scored 19 goals in 31 games as the Penticton club won the Western Canada senior championship and traveled east to face the Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen in the Allan Cup finals. The Vees lost the series, but made no mistake the following year when they played host to the Sudbury Wolves and won the Allan Cup in seven games despite trailing early in the series. Warwick scored two key goals in the fifth game to tie the score twice and keep Penticton alive. As a result of their championship, the Vees were selected by the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association to represent their country at the 1955 World Championship and Warwick was named player-coach for the 1954-55 season.

Grant "Knobby" Warwick had been the NHL's rookie of the year in the 1941-42 season with the New York Rangers and had spent eight seasons and part of a ninth in the league, also playing briefly with Boston and Montreal. He scored 20 or more goals three times and finished his NHL career with 147 goals in 395 games.

Warwick was selected to play in the first NHL All-Star game at Maple Leaf Gardens in 1947, along with some of hockey's greatest stars, such as Maurice Richard and Gordie Howe.

Often in the doghouse in Boston for taking too many penalties, Warwick was welcomed with open arms in Montreal, where he played on a line with Bill Reay. But early in the 1949-50 season with Montreal he broke his nose and eventually ended up with the AHL Bisons.

He was traded to Boston in February of 1948 for three players, then sold to the Canadiens in October of 1949. He has been inducted into the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
It was in large measure due to his great play for the Regina Rangers en route to the Allan Cup that the Rangers wanted Warwick for the following year. Although he stood just 5'6", he was a chunky 172 pounds, and with a low centre of gravity he was tough as nails to knock around.
Quote:
Originally Posted by When the Rangers Were Young
Two young veterans, Tony Leswick and Grant Warwick, tough little fire hydrants both, also gave me high hopes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewiston Evening Journal, 1948-10-21
Cagey little Grant Warwick...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Total Hockey
Following his career in the NHL, Warwick had his amateur status reinstated... served as Team Canada's playing coach in 1955 at the world championships... Canada breezed to the Championship with an 8-0 record, including a convincing 5-0 win over the Soviets in the final... Warwick declared that he was taking the trophy back to Canada, where it belonged. When the IIHF ordered Warwick to return the trophy in 1956, he had an exact replica made and sent it overseas instead. The original World Championship trophy would remain in Penticton where for many years it was displayed in a restaurant.
Quote:
Originally Posted by IIHF 1908-1978
The Penticton V's from British Columbia were given the task of gaining revenge for the defeat in Stockholm of the Lyndhurst motors. Stan Obodiac paid this tribute to the V's in 1955: "A team of friends, the best that Canada had ever sent to a World championship." The V's included the Warwick brothers. They were a genuine ex-professional troop - tough, humorous, but short on temper at times. In the last match of the tournament they beat the Soviets 5-0 and Canada were world champions once more.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
"Knobby" Warwick played a robust and efficient brand of offensive hockey for the Rangers from 1941 until he was dealt in 1947... Knobby received his amateur reinstatement and played for the Penticton V's, a senior team that won the Allan Cup in 1954. Surrounded by a hard-bitten crew, Knobby, along with his brothers, played in the world hockey championships in 1955. The canadians brought a boisterous, gashouse-gang style of hockey to the championships. Paced by the galvanic Warwick brothers, Penticton reached the finals against a heavily favoured Russian team and whipped them 5-0. b.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Is Our Game
The Warwick brothers were the backbone of the robust V's. Grant Warwick was the playing coach of the V's, and he established the standards of on-ice deportment, which was rather physical, to say the least. For the Warwicks, the trip to Gernamy wasn't merely the greatest hockey assignment of their lives - it was a sacred pilgrimage to restore our national pride. From the outset, the V's didn't act like members of the canadian diplomatic corps. On the ice, they hit anything that moved. Before the tournament had gone very far, the European crowds were whistling their passionate disapproval of these tactics... the Canadian hockey wasn't pretty, but it was efficient. Although the Russians had some truly great hockey players, including Bobrov and Sologubov, who were at the peak of their careers, they had never been exposed to this type of close checking... the Penticton game plan had been designed to contain Bobrov, who personally had destroyed the Lyndhursts the previous year. It was so effective that Bobrov didn't have a single shot on the Canadian net throughout the entire game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by War On Ice
Grant Warwick, short but rugged...

...The Warwicks were all hard-nosed products of Regina playgrounds - tough, sometimes rowdy, but singlemindedly dedicated to winning, at all costs... they owned a restaurant. They ran the hockey club. Some people felt sometimes that they were running the town. But they gave value.

...Jim Hunt, on hand for the Toronto Star, reported that during the quick interviews and pictures the V's often had their hands shaken by total strangers. The greetings were all variations of "Good luck! Make sure you really give it to the Russians!" Grant Warwick, having his hand shaken by men and women he'd never seen before, told Hunt, "It's wonderful and sort of frightening. But it certainly is making the boys realize what this tournament means to the people of Canada. I guarantee we'll be doing our utmost to live up to it."

...That's when Grant, whille we were waiting for the plane, got us all together. He didn't say much, except to repeat what the team had come over there for: to win. Then he stared around into every pair of eyes and said, "the next one that cuts up is on the next plane home."

...In Penticton they started a parade at the firehall, led by the firetruck and fire chief... The parade stopped at Grant Warwick's house... one great shout they heard was Grant's whooping message: "God Bless Canada! We brought the cup back home where it belongs and we'll keep it there!"

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07-10-2010, 07:19 PM
  #63
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With the 259th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are proud to select:

Larry Hillman, D



- 6'0", 185 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1955, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1967, 1969)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1956, 1958)
- 12th, 14th in All-Star Voting (1966, 1970)
- 11th in Norris Voting (1973)
- Top-12 in Scoring by Defensemen Four Times (6th*, 9th, 10th, 12th) *on pace for 1st in 70 games
- 4th in Playoff Defense Scoring (1967)
- Hillman's career -34 is an adjusted 0, and covers only from age 30-36
- Hillman played 1347 pro games and 114 in the playoffs
- GF/GA figures strongly suggest Hillman was Buffalo's #1 defenseman in 1972, with over 28 minutes per game
- Hillman retired at 39 after 3 WHA seasons; only Howe, Bucyk, Howell, Ullman and Hampson were older at this time. (Hillman's career only ended over a contract dispute, he could have kept playing!)

- AHL Calder Cup as captain (1965)
- Eddie Shore Trophy (Best defenseman, AHL) (1960)
- AHL 1st All-Star Team (1960, 1965)
- 1st, 2nd in AHL Defense scoring (1960, 1965)
- Scored 35 Pts in 34 AHL games in the 1966 and 1967 seasons, easily on pace to lead AHL defensemen in scoring

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Larry Hillman was one of the most traveled professional hockey players to ever sit aboard a train, a bus or eventually, an airplane. During his 22-year pro career, Hillman competed with 15 clubs.

He started out in Kirkland Lake where the boys at his school would frequently take on Honoured Member Dick Duff's gang one day and Ralph Backstrom's the next. Hillman soon began to rise to the top of the town and on to the OHA where he played for the Windsor Spitfires and the Hamilton Tiger Cubs.

In 1955, Hillman launched his NHL career with the Detroit Red Wings where he played in three playoff games en route to a Stanley Cup win. He made it to the finals again the following season and then settled into a familiar pattern of bouncing between the AHL and the NHL.

Hillman's basic steadiness on the blueline made him a desirable commodity for slotting into the gaps opened up as a result of injuries and slumps. In 1957, he put in three seasons with the Bruins and then spent most of the sixties toiling for the Leafs and the Rochester Americans. His reward for Leaf loyalty came in the form of (four) Stanley Cup wins, one in 1964 and the other in 1967 (and 1962 & 1963).

By the late 1960s, Hillman's nomadic tendencies continued with brief stints in Minnesota, Montreal, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and finally, in Buffalo. In 1973, he jumped to the WHA's Cleveland Crusaders before having his career cut short in Winnipeg as a result of a contract dispute with the Jets. After the ugly squabble was resolved, the club hired him as their head coach for two additional seasons.

By the end of his well-travelled career, Hillman had captured a remarkable six Stanley Cups through 1955-69 with the Toronto Maple Leafs and Detroit Red Wings (and Montreal Canadiens).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Stanley's Cup
Larry Hillman was Johnny Bower's dream - a solid, reliable, stay-at-home defenseman who had little interest in what happened north of his own blueline.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heroes: Stars Of Hockey's Golden Era
At one time, Larry Hillman says, he held the record for being the most travelled player in professional hockey... he had played with 17 teams in four different leagues... his father mentioned the difficulty he had keeping track of his son. "I said I can't help it if everyone wants me! I took the positive attitude rather than the negative."

Hillman sees himself as having been an average defenseman, "not great at anything" who "could handle most situations". During his stay in the NHL, he perfected the method of clearing the puck by lifting it high above everyone else. He learned this trick playing in the tight confines of Boston Garden.

It was his goal, Hillman states, to last as long as he could in professional hockey. He wanted to emulate the great Gordie Howe. "I took good care of myself both on and off the ice. I took care of myself better than most guys did. Most players liked the big lights in those cities. I wasn't there for the big lights."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leaf Legends
Hillman was a valuable member of the 1967 Stanley Cup-winning team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leafs Top-100
Robust six-foot, 185 pound defenseman... his strength was moving the puck up the ice quickly, and he had the size to handle some of the NHL's bigger players... He was a very important part of the Leafs' 1967 Cup Win when he was teamed with Marcel Pronovost to give the Leafs their most consistent defense pairing... Hillman played his best hockey as a Maple Leaf, with three points and did not collect a single penalty minute. He and Pronovost were not on the ice for an opposition goal against at even strength for the entire playoffs... Hillman was never afraid to drop the gloves and fight when he had to, taking on John Ferguson on more than one occasion. He also fought with noted hardrock Reggie Fleming.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey's Glory Days
A winner wherever he went... After being named the best defenseman in the AHL, Hillman was acquired by Toronto and played a significant role in helping the Leafs post the NHL's best defensive record.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 67: The Maple Leafs, Their Sensational Victory, and the End of an Era
Hillman has been one of several pivotal individuals who have been all but robbed of recognition for their crucial contributions... Pronovost/Hillman proved utterly impenetrable... significantly superior to the more heralded pair of Allan Stanley and Tim Horton... Hillman, in particular, logged extraordinary amounts of icetime and directed the Leaf power play... "I think I logged the most icetime outside of the goaltenders. I started every period, played the powerplay, took faceoffs and was out there in most critical situations."... in game 6 vs. Chicago, only a spectacular, sprawling chest save by Hillman on Bobby Hull had prevented Chicago from taking the lead in the third...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punch Imlach: Hockey Is a Battle
I wanted to protect Baun in the 1967 expansion draft. That didn't mean I felt I should have played him in the Cup Final that spring. The way Larry Hillman was playing, the greatest hockey of his life, there was no way I could have benched him and put in Baun... Hillman wanted a lot more money after that... I can't blame him after the great Stanley Cup he'd played...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Years Of Glory: The Official Book Of the NHL's Six-Team Era
The veteran played a significant role in establishing Toronto as the league's finest defensive team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold War
(February 14, 1968) John Ferguson had a fight with Leaf defenseman Larry Hillman, who had a slight advantage in the scrap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Thinking Man's Guide To Pro Hockey
his brother Larry Hillman performed for 12 different clubs. He skated a little better than Wayne, but his value was mostly as a bruiser, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Brewer: The Power Of Two
Larry Hillman, who was an outstanding defenseman and perhaps the greatest team player I ever saw, because he fought a lot of battles...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Schoenfeld
Larry Hillman was more of an offensive player, and he was a great help, too. I would sit in the corner of the dressing room, Timmy to my left, Larry to my right, sometimes between periods they would tell me olf Maple Leaf stories . It was great - it would relax me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1973
Still one of NHL's most solid defensemen, despite age (35)...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976
Has the size and spirit to pose a challenge to forwards accustomed to taking liberties in front of the Jets' net...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, 1969-04-02
He hasn't played much (in Montreal) but has given nothing but his best when needed. The 32-year old defenseman remains a great team player and never lets himself get out of shape despite inactivity.


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-16-2010 at 03:20 PM.
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07-10-2010, 07:43 PM
  #64
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"Doc" Romnes

Awards and Achievements:
Inducted into the United States Hockey Hal of Fame (1973)

2 x Stanley Cup Champion (1934, 1938)
4 x Stanley Cup Finalist (1931, 1934, 1938, 1939)

Lady Byng Winner (1936)

Scoring:
Points – 4th(1936)
Assists – 3rd(1936), 4th(1934), 7th(1938), 15th(1939)

Play-off Points – 2nd(1934), 5th(1938), 10th(1939)
Play-off Assists – 1st(1934), 2nd(1938), 6th(1939)

From 1933 to 1939, Romnes was 4th in assists and 14th in points. Marty Barry, Art Chapman, Busher Jackson, and Paul Thompson were among the leaders.

From 1934 to 1939, Romnes was 1st in play-off assists and 1st in play-off points. Charlie Conacher, Bill Cowley, Gordie Drillon, and Herbie Lewis were among the leaders.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Back of his Hockey Card
One of the best defensive players in the National Hockey League….”
Americans seem to have gone through the same hatred that the Swedes would endure 40+ years late....

Quote:
Originally Posted by ”Doc” Romnes
“...There were times when nobody on my own Chicago Blackhawk team talked to me...They treated me a little like I was a thief. They wondered what an American was doing invading their preserve. Gosh, how I’d try to be a good teammate and set them up! That’s why I became a good playmaker, setting those fellows up so that they’d talk to me. I eventually got accepted, but it wasn’t easy.”

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07-11-2010, 01:58 AM
  #65
seventieslord
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With the 260th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are delighted to select:

Jason Arnott, C



- 6'5", 219 lbs
- Stanley Cup (2000)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (2001)
- 20th in goals (2009)
- Top-5 in Playoff Goals Twice (4th, 5th)
- 4th in playoff Assists (2000)
- Top-12 in Playoff Points Twice (3rd, 12th)
- Stanley Cup Winning Goal (2000)
- Career Adjusted +169
- 8 25+ goal seasons, 11 54+ point seasons, 13 0.73+ PPG seasons
- World Championship Gold Medal (1994)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
He scored a goal in his first NHL game, but the road to respectability has been fraught with difficulty and unexpected turns for Arnott. He was a top-rated junior out of Oshawa in the OHL, winning gold with Team Canada at the 1994 World Championships after being drafted 7th overall in 1993 by the Edmonton Oilers.

Upon arriving with the Oilers, he was seen as one of a core of young saviors ready to repeat what Gretzky, Messier, Kurri and Coffey had accomplished a decade ago. But Arnott was both inconsistent and frequently injured early in his career. One game he would show remarkable potential, the next he would play distractedly, the next he'd get a puck in the face and miss games. Oilers GM Glen Sather gave up on "Arnie," trading him to New Jersey for Bill Guerin. It was a mistake.

Slowly but surely Arnott developed that extra level of intensity and consistency, and his play culminated with a trip to the 2000 Stanley Cup finals during which he scored the Cup-winning goal in overtime. That summer, his hometown, the beach called Wasaga, gave him a huge party on Jason Arnott Day. He was a hero, and the next year he continued his development as one of the best young power forwards in the game, again going to the finals before losing to Colorado in seven games.

Arnott went on to play the better part of four seasons in New Jersey, before being dealt to the Dallas Stars in the latter stages of the 2001-02 NHL season. Upon his arrival with the Stars, Arnott continued his strong play and in 2003-04 notched his sixth straight 20+ goal season.

Following career highs in goals (32), assists (44) and points (76) in the 2005-06 campaign, Arnott signed with the Nashville Predators on July 2, 2006. In his first year in Nashville, Arnott led the team in goals with 27 and was a key addition to the club's powerplay. The Predators finished the 2006-07 season in fourth place in the Western Conference with 110 points, setting a new franchise record. However the club was quickly bounced from the NHL playoffs by the San Jose Sharks for a second consecutive year. During the off-season the club's roster was decimated by trades which included the movement of captain Kimmo Timonen. Arnott, now an experienced veteran on a rather young Nashville team, was subsequently named captain.

Arnott tied his career high in assists with 44 and for the ninth straight season he posted over 20 goals in his first year as captain in Nashville.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1994-95
An excellent skater for a big man, Arnott has speed, balance, a long stride, and agility in turning to either side. Arnott's biggest edge, though, is his hockey sense and his intensity. He got off to a slow start last season, but once he got rolling he played every shift as if it were overtime, making great scoring plays at one end of the ice and coming back to make a save with his goalie out of positionat the other. Arnott is just as good a scorer as a passer, which makes it difficult for defenders who can't overplay him. His timing with his passes is fine, as he holds onto the puck until a teammate is open. If the shot is his, Arnott will use an assortment - snap, slap, or wrist - and is accurate with a quick release. He is fair on draws but will have to improve. Arnott works down low on the power plays and is on the Oilers' first unit. He also kills penalties.

Arnott is big and plays to his size. He has a mean streak, and he's honest as well. Arnott loves to hit and gets involved physically, especially in the attacking zone. He isn't much of a fighter, and he can be expected to be challenged even more in his sophomore season, so he will have to learn how to keep playing hard without taking bad penalties. A well-conditioned athlete, he gets a lot of icetime and can handle it.

Arnott had numerous opportunities to fold last season. There was an emergency appendectom that had to take something out of him physically. Emotionally, he was affected by the deaths of two young cousins in a car accident. This kid is tough in every way. At just 19, Arnott was appointed one of the assistant captains of the Oilers last season. He made up his mind to be a leader, and his mature approach to his game is well beyond his years. He was still in awe of playing in the NHL but he is growing up fast. Oilers' coach/GM Glen Sather says that Arnott is better at this age than Mark Messier was.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1994-95
Arnott is very big and very fast, a combination that sets him apart from many NHLers... He has great hands, an excellent release, and a mean streak that allows him to make room for himself. With his size and strength, he won't lose many physical challenges... It isn't that Arnott is immature, he only lacks seasoning... last season he experienced lapses in his concentration.

WILL - Be a star
CAN'T - Be awed by surroundings
EXPECT - A franchise player
DON'T EXPECT - A shrinking violet
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1995-96
Tremendous skills... has added muscle to his frame without losing any edge in his skating... He doesn't overstay his welcome (in the offensive zone) and is dilligent in playing defensively... Arnott is well on his way to becoming a dominant power centre... Arnott has serious grit. He found out as a sophomore that people are gunning for him and he's had to adjust his game... Has to learn to pay the price every night... tough and honest... proud of his abilities but has to maintain the balance between pride and arrogance... mature and will emerge as a leader... lacks a veteran role model.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1995-96
Arnott has a scary combination of gifts... size, speed, and scoring touch... Whether he is in the high slot battling for rebounds or carrying the puck through traffic, he has good hands... has superstar written all over him... tough and has leadership qualities.

CAN'T - Be held back
EXPECT - An all-around threat
DON'T EXPECT - A Gentleman
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
Injuries have helped to derail his steady progress... He has had fewer problems with inconsistency lately, and is learning to pay the price every night... Has been given a lot of responsibility and for the most part has handled it well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996-97
The complete package... skates with speed and authority, throwing his weight around... There is no part of the rink he's afraid to enter, no battle he won't join to gain control of the puck... has a bad temper... fiery leadership potential.

WILL - Play tough, score
CAN'T - Carry Edmonton
EXPECT - A strong will
DON'T EXPECT - To push him around
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
Can play the point on the powerplay... can challenge all but the biggest NHL defensemen...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000
Started the season on the fourth line but once put together with ****** his whole future changed... Part of the difference was due to his switch from RW to centre where, quite simply, he's a better player... Arnott has one of the hardest shots on the team. Last year, he used it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001
Arnott has one of the hardest shots on the team, but he doesn't always play as a power forward, not until last season... when he bangs and initiates, he is far more effective. Arnott's problem is that he is so skilled for a big guy that some nights he likes to take the easy way out... He has become an effective weapon at the point on the powerplay... Arnott has shown he is willing to pay the physical price. He has a taste for the game again - the same taste he showed in his rookie season, and has matured physically and emotionally. he plays mean. he plays hurt. He has applied himself in the weight room and taken better care of himself off-ice. The payoff was a near-MVP performance in the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002
He has become one of the ultimate complementary players... has a great one-timer from the circles...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated, 2000-06-12
on his first shift against Arnott in Game 3 last Saturday the Devils had two good chances before scoring when Arnott split the defense and shoveled the puck past the poke-checking Belfour. Arnott's effort, stunning more for its will than its skill, tied the score in what would become a 2-1 Devils win. "What I saw there was what Jason used to lack: second effort," New Jersey general manager Lou Lamoriello said afterward. "That was a second-effort goal, a goal that picks up the bench, a competitor's goal."

..."He was a typical Oiler player when he started there—all revved up, 100 miles an hour, full-court press," says Dallas coach Ken Hitchcock, a native Edmontonian. "At the end of his [ Oilers] career he was frustrated. He wore that pressure poorly. Now he's free. He uses his size to his advantage better defensively than he used to. In Edmonton his game started and ended with the puck, but he's a strong positional player now and, with that size, very effective."

His transformation was laborious. When the Devils acquired him for disgruntled forward Bill Guerin, Arnott, who'd always been a center, was told to play right wing on a line with veteran playmaking center Doug Gilmour. Arnott responded with five goals in 35 games, the exact number he'd had in the first half of the season in Edmonton. He continued to flounder with the Devils until December 1998, when ****** ******, New Jersey's coach at the time, decided to thrust him between flashy young Czech forwards Patrik Elias and **** ******.

"We were all young guys who had started out well but knew we could play better," recalls ******, 23. "As soon as we got together, I felt we could get something going. Arnie has the big shot. Me and Patty are on the puck a little more. We could learn from him, how to shoot and go to the net and to hit, and he could learn from us some passes and how to use the boards."

...Hatcher decided the rent was due with fewer than eight minutes to go in Game 4 when he threw caution to the wind and his forearms to Arnott's head. Arnott was practically out on his feet as he was carried over the locker room threshold by two equipment managers, fair enough considering that Arnott had carried New Jersey for a week.

...Arnott was seeing stars, but then Hatcher's cheap shot was ample proof that the Stars had seen more than enough of Arnott.
Arnott lacks the "elite finishes" that we like to look for in offensive players. However, I think his offensive resume is much stronger than a number of players who might have 1-2 top-20 or even top-10 finishes. Arnott's level of production has been remarkably consistent for 16 years now, and the numbers he's put up stand up well even to guys who played their whole careers between expansion and the start of the dead puck era.

Disclaimer: I realize these lists essentially only apply to post-expansion players as anyone from the days of 48-70 game schedules with a bunch of 25-goal and 54-point seasons is long gone by now. I also realize these lists are not immune to fluctuations in scoring due to era, but this works against Arnott, who is the youngest player to show up on any of these lists.

Most 25+ goal seasons, MLD and available players

Rick Kehoe10
Jason Arnott 9
Paul Maclean9
(undrafted)9
(undrafted)9
Ray Ferraro9
Ray Sheppard9
Alexei Yashin9
Ivan Boldirev8
Dave Christian8
(undrafted)8
Pierre Larouche8
John Ogrodnick8
(undrafted)8
Anton Stastny8
Geoff Courtnall8
Stephane Richer8
(undrafted)7
Bob Carpenter7
Dave Gagner7
Slava Kozlov7
Dennis Maruk7
Mike Ridley7
(undrafted)7

from the above list, only Arnott, Ferraro, Yashin, Kozlov and two undrafted players had 25-goal seasons deep into the dead puck era (which obviously worked against them). And only Arnott, Boldirev, Ferraro, Sheppard and Carpenter are providing this type of offensive consistency in the bottom six of their team's roster. (a 15-goal season in 1994-95 counts for this list)

Most 54+ point seasons, MLD and available players:

Jason Arnott12
Ivan Boldirev11
Dennis Maruk10
John Ogrodnick10
Cliff Ronning10
Ray Whitney10
Geoff Courtnall10
Mike Ridley10
Alexei Zhamnov10
Scott Gomez9
Alexei Kovalev9
Pierre Larouche9
Paul MacLean9

From the above, Arnott, Ronning, Whitney, Gomez, Kovalev and Zhamnov all had the dead puck era working against them. (A 32-point season in 1994-95 counts towards this list)

Most 0.73+ PPG Seasons, MLD and available players:

Jason Arnott13
Pierre Larouche13
Ray Whitney12
Russ Courtnall11
Pavol Demitra11
Saku Koivu11
Dennis Maruk11
Alexei Yashin11
Alexei Zhamnov11
Ivan Boldirev10
Craig Janney10
Kelly Kisio10
Alexei Kovalev10
Stephane Richer10
Mike Ridley10
Cliff Ronning10

Not too shabby, hey? And he's on our fourth line and 2nd PP unit..


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-13-2010 at 11:00 AM.
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Old
07-11-2010, 04:27 AM
  #66
Dreakmur
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Art Gagne

Awards and Accomplishments:
Stanley Cup Finalist (1923)

WCHL Second All-Star Team (1922)
WCHL First All-Star Team (1923)
WHL First All-Star Team (1926)

Scoring:
Points – 6th(1928), 16th(1931)
Goals – 18th(1927), 6th(1928), 11th(1931)
Assists – 7th(1928)

Play-off Points – 8th(1928)
Play-off Assists – 5th(1928)

WCHL Points – 7th(1922), 1st(1923), 3rd(1926)
WCHL Goals – 8th(1922), 5th(1923), 3rd(1926)
WCHL Assists – 6th(1922), 1st(1923), 5th(1926)

WCHL Play-off Points – 2nd(1923), 2nd(1926)
WCHL Play-off Goals – 2nd(1923), 6th(1926)
WCHL Play-off Assists – 1st(1926)

Quote:
Originally Posted by ourhistory.canadiens.com
“The 5-foot-7, 160-pound right winger fit right in and proved that he was NHL material with 14 goals and three assists in his initial campaign, more than respectable numbers over the 44-game schedule. The gritty little forward also picked up 42 penalty minutes, not taking kindly to opponents who took liberties, no matter their size.

In 1927-28, while playing alongside linemates Howie Morenz and Aurele Joliat, Gagné put up the biggest numbers of his career. The shifty but short-tempered forward found the twine behind enemy goaltenders 20 times that year, good for third on the team and sixth among all NHLers. Eleven assists stood him seventh in the league in that department and, with 75 minutes of penalty time, Gagné was also ranked among the league’s most penalized players.”

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Old
07-11-2010, 05:57 AM
  #67
seventieslord
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With the 317th pick in MLD2010, The Regina Capitals are pleased to select:

Andre Boudrias, LW/C



- 5'8", 165 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1970)
- Avco Cup (1978)
- Avco Cup Finalist (1977)
- Top-22 in Assists 4 Times (5th, 8th, 20th, 22nd)
- Top-26 in Points 4 Times (19th, 20th, 22nd, 26th)
- Career Adjusted +58

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Left-winger Andre Boudrias was only 5'8" but used his speed and accurate passing skills to elude checks and keep the opposition off balance. He played nearly 700 career games with five different teams in a solid career.

The Montreal native starred with the Junior Canadiens and led the OHA in scoring in 1962 and 1964. He spent the majority of his first four pro seasons in the minors since the Canadiens were so deep at forward. Expansion gave Boudrias a chance to shine after he was acquired by the Minnesota North Stars. He scored 53 points in 1967-68 then provided solid defensive play for the Stars, Chicago Black Hawks, and St. Louis Blues over the next two seasons.

The talented winger took on a great deal of offensive responsibility with the expansion Vancouver Canucks in 1970-71. Boudrias topped the 60-point mark in each of his first five years with the club before taking on a more defensive role and serving as the club's captain in 1975-76. He then added offensive savvy and leadership on the WHA's Quebec Nordiques before retiring in 1978.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
Like so many Montrealers growing up, little Andre Boudrias had a dream of playing for the Habs. And, like so many, his dream was clouded by the deep pool of talent available to the team in those days... as a result, he was traded to Minnesota and then Vancouver, where he defined his career as a scorer and leader...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canucks Legends
They affectionately labelled him "Super Pest", but Andre Boudrias provided the Canucks with much more than stellar forehecking during his half-dozen years with the fledgling club. Boudrias was the first consistent offensive star for the Canucks, managing five straight seasons of 60 points or better and continually supplying his linemates with quality scoring chances.

The slick centreman was best known for his whirlwind style of play in the opponents' zone, where he moved around like a buzz saw, breaking up plays and turning them into offensive forays for Vancouver. He also managed to work his way effectively under the skin of those he played against. "I guess I got that nickname because I was tenacious checking for the puck," Boudrias says more than 30 years later. "The forechecking part of the game was more important to me. And I always wanted to give a little more on the ice to make sure the paying customers had fun."

The fans appreciated his effort in those early days. A diminutive man by today's hockey standards, Boudrias was one of the most popular canucks. "The fans were in love with me, for some reason," he says. His linemates liked him, too. Whoever skated with Boudias seemed to light it up. ******* ******** scored a career high 34 goals playing with Boudrias in 1970-71, Bobby Schmautz had 38 as his linemate in 1972-73 and Don Lever matched that total in 1974-75.

"Boud was a pest. He was a little ****-disturber," Schmautz recalls, fondly. "All the guys would run after him. I don't know how many times I had to fight that Hextall because he'd drive Hextall crazy, and I'd jump in, and Hextall and I used to go just about every time we played. He'd get on guys' nerves, I guess. I really don't know why, but they'd seem to go after him. When I played with him, I didn't think that was right so I'd step in."

Although he started on the fourth line, Boudrias was eventually teamed with ******** and **** ****** and he finished the year as the team's leading scorer... Boudrias was durable, skilled at finding his linemates at the right time, and a decent skater. He was also an outstanding penalty killer. In fact, he even scored a goal against Chicago's Tony Esposito when the Canucks were two men short.

The pinnacle of his career came in 19740-75, when he piled up 62 assists and 78 points. That winter his linemates were Don Lever and ****** ***********, and they both enjoyed banner seasons. "Boudy was just a really smart player, you know," Lever says. "He didn't have a lot of speed, but he could really pass the puck. He could see the ice, he had good vision." "Boudrias was good in the corners," adds ***********, who would never find another center with whom he worked so well. "He was just a little pest. It was hard to take the puck off him, and he allowed you time to get in position for a good scoring chance."

After a stint as team captain in 1975-76, he opted to leave Vancouver when the WHA's Winnipeg Jets came calling. The move was a good one, as he won the Avco cup with Quebec in 1978.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Canucks Story
Boudrias scored a beautiful goal in the third period when we were two men short. He skated right through Hull and Mikita to do it, but would you believe that was our only shot on goal in the period?
Quote:
Originally Posted by the vancouver Canucks Story
Boudrias is short and broad, a deliberate eel-like skater, a bit of an introvert... ******** was the more momentarily spectacular, Boudrias the more consistent.

Primarily, Boudrias was assigned checking duties. When he was checking Phil Esposito in the slot, Boudrias often looked like a small logger trying to topple a douglas fir with an axe. But Boudrias checked so dilligently that Coliseum fans nicknamed him Super Pest... He is a fine passer, who seldom wastes the puck, he doesn't intimidate and he likely would have scored 30 goals each season had it not been for an unfortunate proclivity for shooting high when eyeball to eyeball with opposing goalies... He carries himself like a veteran on the ice and off...

Boudrias wiggled his way into the hearts of vancouver fans like a tongue-wagging puppy in that first season. They liked the way he mixed it with players a neck and head taller.

There is a fine story about the defensive hanuting that the Pest hung on Boston's scoring leader, Esposito. As the story goes, the Bruins remained in town for a couple of days after a game against the Canucks. Some went fisihing in Howe Sound. It is said that, after trolling around without success for two hours, Esposito stared sourly down to the water and said, "I know what's wrong. That little b*st*rd Boudrias is down there, checking my bait."
It is well-known that Jacques Plante stoned the Russians with the Junior Canadiens for a 2-1 win, but did you know who made the play that won the game?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques Plante: The Man Who changed the face Of Hockey
The conclusion to this anxious drama came with only 20 seconds remaining on the clock. Andre Boudrias checked a Russian defenseman inside his own blueline, jarring the puck loose and onto the stick of **** ******, who quickly laid the puck on the stick of **** ******, who backhanded it into the back of the Russian net. The final score was 2-1.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1971 Hockey Annual
Boudrias kept the Canucks respectable last year. He is a tireless skater, and an expert puck ragger and penalty killer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey 1972
Likes to buzz after the puck and is one of the best forecheckers in the business... Not a muscle man, but give him a pair of decent-sized linemates, and he'll score...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey 1973
Has a buzz-saw style that led to his being nicknamed "Super Pest"... shortly after that, local radio station came out with "The Super Pest Song" and it became a regular part of warmup music... lack of size has never prevented him from being a good scorer... good forechecker and opportunist around the net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
Small but elusive center who has tricky moves, a deceptive shot and good checking ability... An opportunist who turns numerous rebounds, steals, and loose pucks into goals at scrambles around the crease
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey 1975
An effective checker despite his size... Says Phil Esposito: "They always put Super Pest on me and I hate him. He hangs all over me and just plain gets in the way."
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey 1976
Superb checker for his size, drives Phil Esposito to distraction.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey 1977
Durable for his size: Prior to last season, missed two games in five years.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook of Pro Hockey 1978
Signed by Quebec as sound insurance, and wisely so... a good team man, as the Nordiques discovered... centered the #1 line for 9 playoff games when Chris Bordeleau was injured.
Need a playmaking LW in the MLD who isn't one-dimensional? Super Pest is your man!

Career Assists Per game leaders, LW, minimum 250 assists, available entering MLD2010:


RkNameAPGTop-20s
4Anton Stastny0.598
8Alex Tanguay0.564,9,17
17Andre Boudrias0.515,8,20
18Dennis Hextall0.513, 11, 15
20Ray Whitney0.5110, 12
27Steve Vickers0.49NIL
34John Ogrodnick0.46NIL
35(undrafted)0.46NIL
40Eric Vail0.4420
41Gerard Gallant0.44NIL


Last edited by seventieslord: 07-21-2010 at 05:35 AM.
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07-11-2010, 06:48 AM
  #68
Dreakmur
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Al MacAdam

Awards and Achievements:
Stanley Cup Champion (1974)
2 x NHL All-Star (1976, 1977)

Bill Masterton Winner (1980)
Named California Golden Seals MVP (1976)
Named Minnesot North Stars MVP (1980)

Team Canada's Leading Scorer (1979)

Scoring:
Points – 12th(1980)
Goals – 14th(1980)

Play-off Points – 10th(1981)
Play-off Goals – 7th(1981)

IIHF Points - 10th(1979)

Where he ranks on his team?
Points – 3rd(1975), 1st(1976), 2nd(1977), 4th(1978), 2nd(1979), 1st(1980), 3rd(1981)
Goals – 4th(1975), 1st(1976), 3rd(1977), 2nd(1979), 1st(1980)
Assists – 2nd(1975), 4th(1976), 2nd(1977), 2nd(1978), 2nd(1979), 2nd(1980), 3rd(1981)

Play-off Points – 1st(1980), 4th(1981)
Play-off Goals – 2nd(1980), 3rd(1981)
Play-off Assists – 2nd(1980)

Quote:
Originally Posted by PEI Sports Hall of Fame
“"Give me a team of Alan MacAdams," observed one NHL coach, "and I'll give you a championship." Such was the ultimate tribute paid to Kings County's most famous hockey player, a man who has been called the best two-way right-winger in the recent history of Canada's national game.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by PEI Sports Hall of Fame
“Al MacAdam played for the Team Canada squad at the 1977 World Championships in Vienna. He proved to be Canada's most effective forward, swirling around the Luzhniki Rink with linemates Steve Payne and Bobby Smith… 1979 saw Al MacAdam return as Canada's most outstanding player in the world tournament held at Moscow, playing on a line with North Star Bobby Smith and the explosive Marcel Dionne."
Quote:
Originally Posted by PEI Sports Hall of Fame
One of hockey's most respected competitors, Alan MacAdam is a most deserving inductee to the Prince Edward Island Sports Hall of Fame.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
“Affectionately known by teammates as "Big Al" or "Mac," he was an extremely talented skater and two-way player who could always be counted upon to show up to every game (he missed a mere 21 games over the course of 11 seasons) and to produce solid numbers for his teams (many of which, mind you, were not the most competitive in the league). The moustached MacAdam, who donned #25 throughout his NHL career, was adept on both right wing and left, and he could play in virtually all situations.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
“MacAdam earned the reputation as being "Mr. Clutch".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Smith
“He is one of the people I admire most in the whole world.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Hynes
“not the hurrah type, but one who led by example
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al MacAdam
I like to out-think the opposition. What I enjoy most about the game are the big challenges


Last edited by Dreakmur: 07-11-2010 at 06:56 AM.
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07-11-2010, 11:46 AM
  #69
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Evgeni Nabokov

Awards and Achievements:
World Championship Gold Medal (2008)
Best Goalie (2008)

Calder Trophy (2001)
First Team All-Star (2008)

Hart Voting – 18th(2001), 23rd(2004), 7th(2008), 16th(2009), 23rd(2010)
Hart Voting among Goalies – 6th(2001), 8th(2004), 2nd(2008), 4th(2009), 6th(2010)

Vezina – 4th(2001), 4th(2002), 6th(2004), 2nd(2008), 5th(2009), 4th(2010)

Statistics:
Save Percentage – 10th(2001), 8th(2002), 7th(2004), 6th(2010)
G.A.A. – 6th(2001), 7th(2007), 3rd(2008), 10th(2009), 10th(2010)

Play-off Save Percentage – 3rd(2004), 9th(2007), 10th(2008), 10th(2009)

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey News
“Has lightning-quick reflexes and the ability to snatch a sure goal away from opponents with his great glove hand. Challenges shooters well and is confident.”

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07-11-2010, 03:19 PM
  #70
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Cecil Blachford

Awards and Achievements:
5 x Stanley Cup Champion (1903, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1910)
Captain of Montreal Wanderers from 1906 to 1908

2 x Retro Selke Winner

Scoring:
5th(1905)

He played center, rover, right wing, and defense during his career, so he gives us quite a bit of flexibility. We will likely use him on our 3rd line as a 2-way presence and classy leader.

During his career, he won 5 Stanley Cups. His first, was with Montreal HC, as a member of the "little men of iron." He then captained the Montreal Wanderers to 3 consecutive Stanley Cup Championships in 1906, 1907, and 1908. He retired in 1909, during which time Montreal promptly lost the Cup. When he returned to play in 1910, he, once again, helped his team capture the holy grail. He then retired, and Montreal, again, lost the Cup, and never even came close to winning it again.

I say he won 5 Cups because he held the Cup during those 5 seasons - in fact, during those seasons, they sometimes won or defended the cup multiple times. In total, Blachford won or defended the Cup against challengers a total of 9 times!

He was not a prolific scorer, but he did contribute on occasion. He finished 5th in league scoring once, and was among the leaders in a few Cup Challange series'. He was also a solid defensive player - playing rover and defense suggests this, but he was also awarded 2 Selke trophies in Total Hockey.

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07-11-2010, 03:47 PM
  #71
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Brian Rolston

Awards and Achievements:
Stanley Cup Champion (1995)
World Cup Winner (1996)
Olympic Silver Medal (2002)
3 x Olympian (1994, 2002, 2006)

NHL All-Star (2007)

Selke voting – 10th(1999), 5th(2002), 10th(2003), 14th(2004), 10th(2006), 16th(2007)

Scoring:
Olympic Goals – 2nd(1994)

Short-Handed Goals – 1st(1999), 1st(2002), 2nd(2003), 3rd(2006)

From 1995 to 2010, Rolston leads the league in short-handed goals for the regular season as well as the play-offs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
“From that moment on, Rolston secured his place in the NHL on the strength of his fine skating, penalty killing, and ability to score short-handed goals.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
“Rolston is considered a utility forward, as he can play as a centre, left wing and right wing competently. The 6'2', 214 pound forward is best known for his highly regarded two-way ability.”


Last edited by Dreakmur: 08-01-2010 at 05:58 AM.
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07-11-2010, 03:48 PM
  #72
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Jan Erixon

Awards and Achievements:
Selke voting – 7th(1987), 3rd(1988), 9th(1989), 6th(1990), 8th(1991)
Lady Byng – 9th(1991)

Ranked #81 on the all-time list of New York Rangers in “100 Ranger Greats”

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
“Known more as a defensive specialist…”


Last edited by Dreakmur: 07-12-2010 at 07:14 PM.
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07-11-2010, 04:49 PM
  #73
Leafs Forever
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Quote:
"He was hard hitting defenseman most notably with the Wings and Bruins in the 1950s and 1960s. He hit so hard they called him "The Rock" or "Rocky" for short." -- Greatest Hockey Legends
Quote:
"Defenceman Warren Godfrey played nearly 800 NHL games in the 50s and 60s. He was best known as a reliable stay-at-home blueliner on the Detroit Red Wings for many years." -- Legends of Hockey
Quote:
"A solid checker and an excellent positional rearguard, Warren Godfrey was a classic "stay-at-home" defenseman who played 16 seasons in the NHL." -- Hockey's Glory Days
Quote:
"200 stitches in the face, a broken jaw, a broken nose, dislocated shoulders, damaged elbows, cracked ribs, broken fingers, five knee operations, broken toes and 12 missing teeth." -- Warren Godfrey listing his hockey injuries
The Toronto Marlies proudly select, a great stay-at-home defenceman with an offensive touch for our blueline...



Warren Godfrey!

Accomplishments and Statistics
2 x Stanley Cup Finalist (1953, 1961)

All-Star (1955)

Points among Defensemen – 15th(1953), 19th(1954), 10th(1955), 15th(1958), 19th(1960), 10th(1961), 15th(1962)

From 1953 to 1963, he was 15th in points among defensemen.

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07-11-2010, 05:17 PM
  #74
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Quote:
It was from the Rockies that Scotty Bowman acquired Van Boxmeer for the Buffalo Sabres in 1979. Bowman was now with the Sabres and recalled how he had reluctantly moved Van Boxmeer three seasons earlier. The Sabres need the two-way flexibility the defenseman provided. Van Boxmeer responded with a +40 season and help the Sabres climb to first place in their division.-Legends of Hockey
The Toronto Marlies are happy to add a solid two-way defencemen with some great offensive ability...



JOHN VAN BOXMEER!

Accomplishments and Statistics

Points Amongst Defencemen- 4th(1981), 5th(1982), 12th(1978), 12th(1980), 18th(1979)

Playoff Points Amongst Defencemen- 9th (1980), 10th(1981)*
*-3rd in PPG amongst defencemen

From 1978 to 1982, he was 5th in scoring among defensemen. Denis Potvin, Borje Salming, Reed Larson, and Larry Robinson were the only ones to outscore him.


Last edited by Leafs Forever: 07-11-2010 at 06:30 PM.
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07-12-2010, 12:09 AM
  #75
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Bun Cook

7 x Calder Cup Champion (1938, 1940, 1945, 1948, 1951, 1953, 1954)
10 x Finalist (1938, 1940, 1945, 1946, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1956)

Member of the AHL Hall of Fame

Quote:
Originally Posted by AHL Hockey Hall Of Fame
“Following a storied playing career in the NHL that earned him an honored place in the Hockey Hall of Fame, Fred “Bun” Cook carved a legacy in the American Hockey League as the most prolific coach ever to work an AHL bench."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
“Cook went down in history as one of the most popular and successful coaches in AHL history.”

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