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Ball Hockey Passing Tips?

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Old
05-10-2010, 05:11 PM
  #1
jlnjcb
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Ball Hockey Passing Tips?

I have extreme difficulty passing when using a orange hockey ball.

I don't know why but whenever I pass with somewhat hard velocity the ball goes up in the air like its a shot.

I am already limiting my follow through that there is virtually hardly any follow through what so ever.

Any suggestions on how to keep it low?

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05-10-2010, 07:03 PM
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budster
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Originally Posted by jlnjcb View Post
Any suggestions on how to keep it low?
LESS follow through. I know you probably don't wanna hear that, but that's how your gonna keep it down. Try pulling up at the ball so your not swinging through it whatsoever.

If your still having trouble you might be chipping it because your blade has an open face. See what happens when you use one that's closed.

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05-10-2010, 07:52 PM
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AIREAYE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by budster View Post
LESS follow through. I know you probably don't wanna hear that, but that's how your gonna keep it down. Try pulling up at the ball so your not swinging through it whatsoever.

If your still having trouble you might be chipping it because your blade has an open face. See what happens when you use one that's closed.
I highly reccomend the Easton Zetterberg for passing, if you've already got the mechanics down that is

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05-10-2010, 08:52 PM
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jlnjcb
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Well, when I play on the street I use a Kane curve, when I play in the gym I usually use a Forsberg (which I think is a Zetterberg).

I do notice that both passes and shots go a bit higher with the Zetterberg.

I guess I'll try to just "smack" the puck (basically just whack at it with no follow through whatsoever)

Sigh.... if only a hockey ball had the same mechanics as a puck. LOL

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05-10-2010, 08:57 PM
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Hrad
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Interesting problem.

I'm mostly an ice hockey player, but I recently engaged in a legit ball hockey game where I was making some of the most crisp and beautiful passes ever using one of those orange balls.

Contrary to the rest of the people, I'm going to suggest a very long follow through...not up in the air though...just on the ground. I would just act as if I was taking a wrist shot, pull the ball from really far back, and just "swing" it to who I wanted to pass to. I don't really know, but it worked great. Just practice keeping the ball low...Simply don't lift it?
I did it with a Drury, which is a wedge, so you can really do it with any curve, but I would also suggest a PM9/Forsberg.

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05-10-2010, 09:04 PM
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jlnjcb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hrad View Post
Interesting problem.

I'm mostly an ice hockey player, but I recently engaged in a legit ball hockey game where I was making some of the most crisp and beautiful passes ever using one of those orange balls.

Contrary to the rest of the people, I'm going to suggest a very long follow through...not up in the air though...just on the ground. I would just act as if I was taking a wrist shot, pull the ball from really far back, and just "swing" it to who I wanted to pass to. I don't really know, but it worked great. Just practice keeping the ball low...Simply don't lift it?
I did it with a Drury, which is a wedge, so you can really do it with any curve, but I would also suggest a PM9/Forsberg.
hmm ill give your technique a try.

or probably I should be more selfish and not bother passing

i kid... nobody likes the guy who tries to do everything himself

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05-10-2010, 09:13 PM
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Yup, start the pass from the ball being further back...that's if you want to keep the speed/velocity in the pass.

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05-10-2010, 10:25 PM
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Hrad
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Originally Posted by fcb51 View Post
Yup, start the pass from the ball being further back...that's if you want to keep the speed/velocity in the pass.
+1

I was really whipping it right on my teammate's sticks. I like to lose no time with passing

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05-10-2010, 11:53 PM
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Roll your wrists. Exaggerate it. Repeat.

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05-10-2010, 11:57 PM
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jlnjcb
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Originally Posted by wearethegreek View Post
Roll your wrists. Exaggerate it. Repeat.
I tried exaggerating the roll of my wrist but i noticed that it sends the ball wayyy of the target.

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05-11-2010, 12:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hrad View Post
Contrary to the rest of the people, I'm going to suggest a very long follow through...not up in the air though...just on the ground. I would just act as if I was taking a wrist shot, pull the ball from really far back, and just "swing" it to who I wanted to pass to.
That's what you call the ole push broom pass. That works too.

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05-11-2010, 01:16 AM
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i cant do anything with a ball. i cant stickhandle, shoot, or pass. give me a puck and im fine. But i have found that a longer follow through works well for passing

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06-15-2010, 01:53 AM
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Ducati1098VII
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Originally Posted by nyr33 View Post
i cant do anything with a ball. i cant stickhandle, shoot, or pass. give me a puck and im fine. But i have found that a longer follow through works well for passing
I close the blade. and jsut throw it with the blade down.. dont open the blade, and i can get some fast ass ball hockey passes that lie flat on the ground.

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06-15-2010, 08:58 AM
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Jarick
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Yep, close the blade, start behind the body, follow through low (i.e. bottom of the blade barely leaves the ground).

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06-15-2010, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hrad View Post
Interesting problem.

I'm mostly an ice hockey player, but I recently engaged in a legit ball hockey game where I was making some of the most crisp and beautiful passes ever using one of those orange balls.

Contrary to the rest of the people, I'm going to suggest a very long follow through...not up in the air though...just on the ground. I would just act as if I was taking a wrist shot, pull the ball from really far back, and just "swing" it to who I wanted to pass to. I don't really know, but it worked great. Just practice keeping the ball low...Simply don't lift it?
I did it with a Drury, which is a wedge, so you can really do it with any curve, but I would also suggest a PM9/Forsberg.
I think I might also agree, although I do not play a lot of ball hockey but when I do I can pass just like on ice with a puck. I use the same motion, good quick hard pass, long follow through, and the blade of the stick stays low to the ice while I roll my wrists.

I think rolling your wrists over will probably do it for you, when you pass, roll your wrists so that the blade of the stick rolls over (the forehand part of the blade should be pointing at the floor when you complete the pass)

That should keep the ball nice and low

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Old
06-17-2010, 06:02 PM
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlnjcb View Post
I have extreme difficulty passing when using a orange hockey ball.

I don't know why but whenever I pass with somewhat hard velocity the ball goes up in the air like its a shot.

I am already limiting my follow through that there is virtually hardly any follow through what so ever.

Any suggestions on how to keep it low?
I've been playing inline hockey with a ball for a LONG time... Basically, to keep the ball on the ground, you want to SLIGHTLY angle the blade forward when making contact... Your hard passes should feel more like you're taking a snap-shot in terms of the motion... It's easier to make accurate passes if you replicate that motion.... But angle the blade forward a bit to put top-spin on the ball and prevent the chance that your blade will get under it or elevate the ball....

I'm righty, when I make contact on a hard, rink-wide pass, I'd say my blade is angled like this: ( ) \

I use a KOHO Ultimate 2100 Senior blade, 1/2" mid-curve.

You may be passing the ball like you're shooting the ball which will certainly elevate the ball....Pay attention to the angle of your blade and your follow through.

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06-17-2010, 07:18 PM
  #17
budster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfgaze View Post
I'm righty, when I make contact on a hard, rink-wide pass, I'd say my blade is angled like this: ( ) \

I use a KOHO Ultimate 2100 Senior blade, 1/2" mid-curve.

You may be passing the ball like you're shooting the ball which will certainly elevate the ball....Pay attention to the angle of your blade and your follow through.
A blade with a closed face (low loft) will help with this. Just like in golf, using a wedge will pop your shot up, but a less open club will give you more distance/speed by keeping it low.

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06-17-2010, 09:04 PM
  #18
ShawnTHW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyr33 View Post
i cant do anything with a ball. i cant stickhandle, shoot, or pass. give me a puck and im fine. But i have found that a longer follow through works well for passing
Im the same way only with a puck. I cant do anything with a puck. With a ball, I can do just about everything. I just like the way it feels better than a puck. But thats just me

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