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5v5, What to do diffrent?

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07-17-2010, 04:06 PM
  #1
O23L
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5v5, What to do diffrent?

Hey guys, Let me start off with, Im probably one of the youngest people on HF. Im still in Bantom, and I started late. Ive only played organized hockey for about a year now. I always wanted to play, ever since I was about 2 years old watching the Coyotes on TV and going to the games, So about 10 years later my parrents finnaly let me. So first off, I had to do a learn hockey program, witch sucked because I was the best in there.

Then I did a 3v3 league, with people my age, and I was in the top 25% probably.
Im a decent player, I have practiced every day the past like 7 years, at skating, or shooting or puck handeling. Im a average skater, great passer, above average shooter and puck handler.

My problem is tho, I dont know what to do when I play 5 on 5. I like playing defence, so any advice on positioning or what to do so I dont make an ass out of myself would be awesome

Thanks in advance!

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07-17-2010, 05:43 PM
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FiveAndAGame
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Are you coming straight into 5v5 from your 3v3 league? Just wondering.

In the defensive zone...

Communicate with you partner. Don't bunch up in front of the net, and make sure you don't chase the puck into the corner at the same time. I can't tell you how many times I have scored because both defensemen chase the puck into the corner and I am left alone in front of the goalie.

In odd-man rushes, play the pass. Your goalie should be able to stop a normal shot, but a one-timer is a lot harder to stop. Do your best to stay towards the middle, and be aware of where the opposing forwards are.

In the offensive zone...

Play smart. If you are going to step up and try to keep the puck in, then make sure you keep the puck in. Don't get fancy or start dancing on the line. Get the puck into the zone and get back into position.

Keep your shots low, and avoid traffic. Players like to shoot high and score "highlight reel" goals. But whats the point in shooting high when you miss the net? Playing the point, the number one objective when taking a shot is to GET IT TO THE NET! You can also try putting the puck somewhere for your forwards to deflect the puck or get rebounds.

Do not hesitate. If you hesitate, you will(most of the time)get beat. Make a decision, and go after it. It leaves a big opening for the other team if you hesitate.



Well, that's about all I got. I'm naturally a center, but I play defense a lot because my defensemen like to join the rush. Maybe a true defenseman could enlighten you a little bit more. Best of luck to you

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07-18-2010, 10:34 AM
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Communication is definitely key.. when you're in your defensive zone only one dman to the corner the other one should post up in front of the net.. when you're skating backwards on defence, make sure to focus on the forwards center of gravity and angle him towards the boards where you can take the body (if you can hit in your league) and if checking is allowed, don't let yourself get out of position just to make a big hit your number one objective is seperating him from the puck which doesn't always involve a hit (pokecheck ofc but don't overreach as this can leave you out of position also) the poster before me definitely had some good advice.. Other than that have fun and you'll get a hang of it as you go along

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07-18-2010, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Are you coming straight into 5v5 from your 3v3 league? Just wondering.
Yes I did.

And thanks to the both of you! It helps alot, I had my first 5v5 pickup game last night, and I did alright, I had a few nice assists and had one break away, and passed to a teamate for a 1 timer goal.

I wasnt the star, but I didnt look out of place.

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07-18-2010, 08:27 PM
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Main thing I would say about 5 on 5 is that now you are playing zone hockey. If you interested in playing defense, the advice of FiveandGame is a good start. The only thing I would add to it is:
  • Don't give up on perusing your opponent if you get beat
  • Try to force the other teams offense towards the boards. It's harder to score outside of the slot
  • Position yourself in the passing lane so you can intercept the puck
  • If you find yourself in a 2-on-1 situation, cover the pass and leave the carrier for the goalie

I'm sure you will do just fine, it sounds like you have a lot of experience for your age.

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07-18-2010, 08:49 PM
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Great advice from Budster and FiveAndAGame! If you are going to play defense, just make sure that you know your zone and the responsibilities that come with it. Make sure that you are always communicating with your team mates, but more importantly you and your defensive partner need to be in constant communication. Also, now that you have an extra two team mates on the ice, you will have to trust all of your team mates on the ice to do their job. Have fun in the 5 on 5 league; best of luck

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07-18-2010, 09:52 PM
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The most important thing (to me) when playing D is being able to read the play effectively and decide what is best to do. Pinching in too far can create an odd man rush for your D partner and playing too shallow can give the opposing players more time than they should have to rush up ice out of their zone. Its a very cerebral position, a lot of thinking to be done.

The main thing is though, when someone is coming down on you, dont worry about the puck. Keep your eyes on his chest and take the body on him. You will get beat! Don't worry about it. Force the play to the outside and in case he gets around you he will have to either shoot from an angle or cut in towards the net.....all of which decreases the quality of the scoring chance.

Have an active stick and always keep it down. Keep it out in front of you and try to knock the puck away or block passes but try not to overcommit to the poke check or a forward will have an easier time skating by you. You'd be amazed what just simply having your stick on the ice doesn't in the way of disrupting the plays. It seems so elementary, but I know I have been playing D, watching the other team cycle the puck and realized my stick was off the ice.

When in doubt, clear the zone. Obviously you dont want to just keep icing the puck, but if the pressure in front of the net is too much for your goalie, just clear the puck out (if you can flip it up and out, do it) or a hard wrister off the glass should suffice. Dont get fancy at either end of the ice because you are the last man in front of your goalie in any given situation.

Have fun. Being on D is not for everyone, but if you value breaking up plays and making solid passes, it may be for you. I love giving a long stretch pass to get the play started! It feels magnificent.

Good Luck

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Old
07-19-2010, 02:59 PM
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O23L
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Thanks to everyone! It's really helped! My main problem was I would always take the puck carrier on a 2v1 and then they would have an easy 1-timer, but what you all are saying about play the pass makes sence.

Thanks again!

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