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Do Defensemen never really lose their touch?

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08-14-2010, 03:01 PM
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OriginJM
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Do Defensemen never really lose their touch?

Am I wrong or the average retirement age for Defensemen seems to generally be higher than any other position in the league? It seems that some Defensemen are always usually good, even in their late 30's, they're still an impact and can play the game solid. Forwards seem to burn out quicker, but I feel playing Defense can guarantee you a spot in the NHL for a long time. I don't know if it's because they don't skate or rush as much or need to just stay positioned while everyone is moving, but it just struck me that they (more than any other position) can keep their talent and still play solid as they age. Thoughts?

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08-14-2010, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by OriginJM View Post
Am I wrong or the average retirement age for Defensemen seems to generally be higher than any other position in the league? It seems that some Defensemen are always usually good, even in their late 30's, they're still an impact and can play the game solid. Forwards seem to burn out quicker, but I feel playing Defense can guarantee you a spot in the NHL for a long time. I don't know if it's because they don't skate or rush as much or need to just stay positioned while everyone is moving, but it just struck me that they (more than any other position) can keep their talent and still play solid as they age. Thoughts?
I think it has to do with defensemen using their IQ and positioning. Defensemen can make up for losing a step or stride with intelligent positioning and great hockey sense. Forwards rely on speed and sudden movements which effects them much quicker. Defensemen usually hit their prime once they reach their 30s, because of their experience in cutting off passes and positioning learned over the years.

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08-14-2010, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by JABEE View Post
I think it has to do with defensemen using their IQ and positioning. Defensemen can make up for losing a step or stride with intelligent positioning and great hockey sense. Forwards rely on speed and sudden movements which effects them much quicker. Defensemen usually hit their prime once they reach their 30s, because of their experience in cutting off passes and positioning learned over the years.
This is the correct answer.

It's also why you see a lot of defensively suspect defensemen becoming two-way monsters into their early 30s.

Mike Green, later in his career, really could be the next two-way giant of the NHL world just because all that talent will blend with a wealth of experience.

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08-14-2010, 03:55 PM
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Mike Green, later in his career, really could be the next two-way giant of the NHL world just because all that talent will blend with a wealth of experience.
I can bet money that the best Mike Green years are already behind him. He hasn't shown that he's willing to work on the D side of the puck... He was just as terrible last year than he was the year before. I don't even get why the he got nominated for the Norris, its pretty embarassing for the league.

People do equate point production with talent nowadays, so I'm not really surprised in the end.

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08-14-2010, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by JABEE View Post
I think it has to do with defensemen using their IQ and positioning. Defensemen can make up for losing a step or stride with intelligent positioning and great hockey sense. Forwards rely on speed and sudden movements which effects them much quicker. Defensemen usually hit their prime once they reach their 30s, because of their experience in cutting off passes and positioning learned over the years.
I was going to say basically the same thing; what they lose in speed they make up for in savvy and experience. They also know better their ability and what is in the tank... the better ones anyway... End to end rushes may give way to smart lead passes.

In watch in Pronger this past extended season it was very apparent to me that the man does only what he has to and no more... His play seems effortless and he uses positioning and his long reach to great advantage. It seems that he is able to play huge minute totals because he wastes little energy in his shifts. My guess though is that is something that is 'in' him more than it is from his many years playing in the NHL... But I'm certain he has honed that skill with time. It is possible that the better D-men learn how to pace themselves in a like manner, thus being able to compete with the younger legs.

It also must be pointed out that the position takes longer to develop and years ago, when there were less teams, D-men came up to the Bigs at an older age. Ed Van Imp was runner up for Rookie of the Year at 28 I believe -- IIRC a man named Orr beat him out... not positive on that though -- Now D-men are not allotted the luxury to mature enough in the 'A' and often have to learn under fire against the big boys. I think that was one of the problems with Pitkanen... that and other things.

Those are my thoughts anyway.

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08-14-2010, 04:05 PM
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I can bet money that the best Mike Green years are already behind him. He hasn't shown that he's willing to work on the D side of the puck... He was just as terrible last year than he was the year before. I don't even get why the he got nominated for the Norris, its pretty embarassing for the league.

People do equate point production with talent nowadays, so I'm not really surprised in the end.
Maybe they like how he ratted out the Caveman,

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08-14-2010, 05:07 PM
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Wade Redden says hello.

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08-14-2010, 05:08 PM
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Wade Redden says hello.
Exceptions to every rule.

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