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The Erich Kühnhackl Story (pre-1968)

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08-17-2010, 06:26 AM
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Anderson9
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The Erich Kühnhackl Story (pre-1968)

A great blank spot in the history of one of the European legends, Erich Kühnhackl. Born and raised in what used to be Sudetenland, he took up minor hockey at a local Czech team and played on until he and his family as part of a German community emigrated/were forced to emigrate to West Germany (Malá encyklopedie ledního hokeje) My question is, how come a whole German enclave was allowed to stay in the former German-speaking town of Zieditz (Citice) for so long. And can anybody throw some light on the circumstances of their move to Germany. History sources say the German minority was deported from Czechoslovakia and Poland to a man in 1945-48 but how the Kühnhackls managed to happily escape?
PS I used ti be a huge Kühnhackl fan back in the seventies, even though his W-Germany was regularly thrashed by top European powers at WCs, often by a monstrous margin.

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08-17-2010, 07:29 AM
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slovakiasnextone
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Originally Posted by anderson9 View Post
A great blank spot in the history of one of the European legends, Erich Kühnhackl. Born and raised in what used to be Sudetenland, he took up minor hockey at a local Czech team and played on until he and his family as part of a German community emigrated/were forced to emigrate to West Germany (Malá encyklopedie ledního hokeje) My question is, how come a whole German enclave was allowed to stay in the former German-speaking town of Zieditz (Citice) for so long. And can anybody throw some light on the circumstances of their move to Germany. History sources say the German minority was deported from Czechoslovakia and Poland to a man in 1945-48 but how the Kühnhackls managed to happily escape?
PS I used ti be a huge Kühnhackl fan back in the seventies, even though his W-Germany was regularly thrashed by top European powers at WCs, often by a monstrous margin.
Not all of the Germans from Czechoslovakia were deported after WWII. If we trust wikipedia there still was around 100 000 ethnic Germans in the Czech part of Czechoslovakia in 1950. According to the last population census in 2001 there still were around 40 000 Germans in Czech republic. Though most of them are more or less assimilated- while they still preserve their German traditions, culture, language to soe extent a lot of them consider themselves Czech first.

I can´t confirm this but the reason why the Kunhackl family emigrated to Germany has probably much more to do with the occupation of Czechoslovakia rather than their ethnicity.


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08-17-2010, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by slovakiasnextone View Post
Not all of the Germans from Czechoslovakia were deported after WWII. If we trust wikipedia there still was around 100 000 ethnic Germans in the Czech part of Czechoslovakia. According to the last population census in 2001 there still were around 40 000 Germans in Czech republic. Though most of them are more or less assimilated- while they still preserve their German traditions, culture, language to soe extent a lot of them consider themselves Czech first.

I can´t confirm this but the reason why the Kunhackl family emigrated to Germany has probably much more to do with the occupation of Czechoslovakia rather than their ethnicity.
Is this supposed to mean that ethnic Germans bore so strong an anti Communist sentiment that the removal of Dubček drove them all to emigraton to Vaterland? Can you please elaborate cause I can't seem to get it. And those so-called ethnic Gernans - dont they by any chance go by the name of Vaclav Klaus or Bohuslav Ebermann or František Kaberle?

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08-17-2010, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by anderson9 View Post
Is this supposed to mean that ethnic Germans bore so strong an anti Communist sentiment that the removal of Dubček drove them all to emigraton to Vaterland? Can you please elaborate cause I can't seem to get it. And those so-called ethnic Gernans - dont they by any chance go by the name of Vaclav Klaus or Bohuslav Ebermann or František Kaberle?
Maybe you should reread what I wrote?:
Quote:
Not all of the Germans from Czechoslovakia were deported after WWII. If we trust wikipedia there still was around 100 000 ethnic Germans in the Czech part of Czechoslovakia in 1950. According to the last population census in 2001 there still were around 40 000 Germans in Czech republic.
The deportation of the Germans in Czechoslovakia and the Beneš decreets happened during the "democratic" Czechoslovakia between 1945-1946 before the Communist Party was in power (Communist rule started in 1948). It didn´t continue under the Communist rule, though they did have other ways of destroying and opression of national/ethnic minorities in Czechoslovakia (and all the other Communist ruled countries).

According to Czech wikipedia 250 000 of the Germans were allowed to stay and weren´t deported although they did not by far have all the rights other citizens of the country had (for example they could not vote, could only shop 1 hour before the shops closed etc.).The Kuhnhackls probably were amongst the Germans that were allowed to stay.

My point was that the Kunhackls probably chose to emigrate themselves because their country was occupied similarly to the Czechs/Slovaks who fled the country after August 1968. Their German ancestry gave them less reason and need to return back after 89 unlike the ethnic Czechs/Slovaks.

I´m not sure I know any famous current ethnic Czech Germans, maybe the Czech minister of foreign Affairs Karel Schwarzenberg (or Karl zu Schwarzenberg), but a Czech poster would have to confirm this. I however know one very famous member of the Carpathian Germans in Slovakia (only 10 000 of them left after the deportations)- 2nd president of independent Slovakia Rudolf Schuster from Košice.

As for the people you named, it is very possible that they had some German ancestors down the line or maybe even that their ancestors were Germans, who were "czechized". But really you can rarely go just by the surname of a person from Central Europe to find out their ethnicity, for long years many nations have lived here alongside each other and most of the countries here were pars of multinational kingdoms/countries for centuries, so pretty much everyone has mixed bloodlines. As an example it is possible that someone with a Hungarian surname in Slovakia considers themselves ethnic Slovak and a person in Hungary with a Slovak (or Slavic) surname consider themselves ethnic Hungarian- or even better an ethnic Hungarian in Slovakia has a Slovak name and and ethnic Slovak in Hungar has a Hungarian surname. Plus the current surname of a person tells only a part from paternal line of a person´s family tree. I´ve got a German sounding surname myself, but even in that paternal side of my family the vast majority of my family tree has Slovak sounding name.

About Kunhackl though it´s all just my guess.

EDIT: It seems I was actually right about Kuhnhackl and 1968, here from the German wikipedia article about the deportations (Vertreibung) of Germans from Czechoslovakia:

Quote:
Nach der tschechoslowakischen Volkszählung 1950 lebten 159.938 Deutsche auf dem Gebiet des heutigen Tschechien (und einige Tausend in der Slowakei), 1961 waren es 134.143 (1,4 % der Bevölkerung von Tschechien), im Jahr 1991 48.556; in der jüngsten Volkszählung, 2001, haben sich 39.106 Personen zur deutschen Nationalität bekannt. Die starke Abnahme zwischen 1961 und 1991 wurde wahrscheinlich durch die Emigration Deutscher nach der Zerschlagung des Prager Frühlings 1968 verursacht.
Translation:
Acc. to the 1950 Czechoslovakia population census 159 938 Germans lived in the territory of today´s Czech republic. (and a few thousands in Slovakia), 14 14 in 1961 (1,4% of the Czech population), in the year 1991 48 556 and in the most recent population census in 2001 39 106 people claimed German ethnicity. The strong decline between 1961 and 1991 was probably caused by the emigration of the Germans after the smashing of the Prague Spring in 1968.


Last edited by slovakiasnextone: 08-17-2010 at 03:30 PM.
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