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How to get more power 2: Grounder shots

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09-08-2010, 08:17 PM
  #1
Noir
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How to get more power 2: Grounder shots

I didn't want to hi-jack the original thread but I do have another shot question in conjuction to the original thread.

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Just something I want to work on. Generally, I'm a top corner shooter because growing up it was deemed the flashier goal; and I guess easier. What I want to know is, do you guys have any advice in how to shoot grounder shots with velocity. And by Grounder Shot, I mean flat on the ice.

Basically, I want to learn 2 things:

1. Shoot Grounder shots with the same velocity as my fully loaded wrist shot. I can do grounders but rather slow. Any time I put some weight on it for velocity, it gains altitude.

and to add to 1.

2. Shoot Grounder shots with high velocity, but only a good 2" off the ground. Basically just enough to clear a goalie stick in the 5 hole, but still a lot lower than a butterfly goalie's knees.


Again, I can do these shots but weak. I need to know how to get velocity without altitude.


TIA

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09-09-2010, 12:36 AM
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HowToHockey
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Do everything the same, but follow through nice and low AND really roll your wrists over to close the blade of the stick.

If you do that, there is no possible way the puck can go high (unless you do it wrong)

I talk about it in this video, so I have conveniently embedded it to start at the exact moment Same goes with wrist shots!


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09-09-2010, 01:54 AM
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Timmer44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beavboyz View Post
Do everything the same, but follow through nice and low AND really roll your wrists over to close the blade of the stick.

If you do that, there is no possible way the puck can go high (unless you do it wrong)

I talk about it in this video, so I have conveniently embedded it to start at the exact moment Same goes with wrist shots!

It's mostly follow through, but when I shoot low I like to push my top hand a touch forward to force my blade closed yet still getting the flex out of my stick.

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09-09-2010, 06:51 AM
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Dump and Chase
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follow through low and turn your bottom hand over.

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09-09-2010, 09:51 AM
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Jarick
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I couldn't do them as well until I switched to a flatter blade. With a bigger curve, the shots were less predictable and less accurate, and as I use a whippy stick, they all tend to go high. With the flatter blade, I exaggerate the low follow through and keep the blade closed and it stays nice and low.

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09-09-2010, 02:18 PM
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Noir
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
I couldn't do them as well until I switched to a flatter blade. With a bigger curve, the shots were less predictable and less accurate, and as I use a whippy stick, they all tend to go high. With the flatter blade, I exaggerate the low follow through and keep the blade closed and it stays nice and low.
I've thought about this too and I usually play with a flat blade but a strongly tapered toe for easy lift.

The thing is, I don't want to hurt my high shots and I only want to develop my low shots as good as my high shots so that I increase my threat of variation. (So basically I don't want to give up any of my strong game now to increase my current deficiencies)

Changing blades to flatter will hurt my high game no?







(And thanks for the youtube vid above. I'll play around with wrist roll over in the next few pick ups I play; probably won't be using it gametime anytime soon yet though)

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09-09-2010, 02:48 PM
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Jarick
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For me switching from a BIG mid curve, be it closed or open, to the Drury fixed all my accuracy problems. I was all over the place before, and now it's exactly where I want it. Again, I really need to do a new video one of these days...

But the key is the low follow through and keeping the wrists closed a lot more. And if it's a snapper, sometimes what helps is releasing the shot further back in your stance. For example grab a stick and get in shooting position, then face your blade at the target...it's straight up and down. Now draw it back as far away from the target as you can while keeping the bottom of the blade flat on the ground...it's naturally going to be very closed. Push it towards the target keeping the bottom flat and it's going to be very open. So if you shoot further back in the stance, it will go lower.

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09-09-2010, 09:58 PM
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raygunpk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir View Post
I've thought about this too and I usually play with a flat blade but a strongly tapered toe for easy lift.

The thing is, I don't want to hurt my high shots and I only want to develop my low shots as good as my high shots so that I increase my threat of variation. (So basically I don't want to give up any of my strong game now to increase my current deficiencies)

Changing blades to flatter will hurt my high game no?







(And thanks for the youtube vid above. I'll play around with wrist roll over in the next few pick ups I play; probably won't be using it gametime anytime soon yet though)
Hey Noir!

What curve are you currently using?

And yes the follow through is important for grounder shots. I use the same motion as a hard pass, but I put a little more strength into it.

Weird that I also found grounder shots much easier with a higher flex stick, over my usual whippy ones.

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09-10-2010, 09:02 AM
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Blueland89
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This is one area I'm aactually pretty good at passing and low shots. I do them the same as a pass like everyone else said short follow though in my follow through the blade my come 5 to 6 inches of the ground and instead of trying to follow up i lead my stick out away from my body more. When you tourn you bottom wrist you just guide hit wear you want it to go where the toe is poointed is where it will go but that on any shot.

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09-10-2010, 10:53 AM
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Noir
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raygunpk View Post
Hey Noir!

What curve are you currently using?

And yes the follow through is important for grounder shots. I use the same motion as a hard pass, but I put a little more strength into it.

Weird that I also found grounder shots much easier with a higher flex stick, over my usual whippy ones.
I have the Easton Stealth w/ Sakic curve.

(at least I think it's Sakic, the name's been covered up by tape long ago)

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09-10-2010, 12:49 PM
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Blueland89
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another thing i just thought about when i want a shot to go low i turn my wrist earlier than i would a shot that i want some loft on. if your taking a wrist shot and you have it loaded behind your back foot i would turn your wrist right as it passes you back foot somewhere in between you back foot and the center of your legs

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09-11-2010, 06:20 PM
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rye&ginger
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If you do have a Sakic curve, it might be part of the problem since the curve is pretty extreme. I was using it for a year or so and also could not really keep shots low. I have switched to the RBK Modano curve/M-14 and am happier with the overall feel.

It does mean my shot does not get up as quick, but passing and lower shots are much better. I found slap shots to be difficult with the Sakic curve also as they just went really high, but now I can pick the 4 corners. Basically you get more 'sweet spot', and the Sakic curve is less forgiving.

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09-13-2010, 01:33 AM
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Jimmy Carter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rye&ginger View Post
If you do have a Sakic curve, it might be part of the problem since the curve is pretty extreme. I was using it for a year or so and also could not really keep shots low. I have switched to the RBK Modano curve/M-14 and am happier with the overall feel.

It does mean my shot does not get up as quick, but passing and lower shots are much better. I found slap shots to be difficult with the Sakic curve also as they just went really high, but now I can pick the 4 corners. Basically you get more 'sweet spot', and the Sakic curve is less forgiving.
Strange, I find for me that the Sakic curve gives me a good medium for all kinds of passes/shots. Doesn't overly excel at anything nor does it really take anything away (whereas other blades I've used helped me do one thing while made it more difficult to do other things). It's my swiss army knife for hockey lol. I guess it's just a difference in blade preference?

Anyway, I think you can develop a low, hard shot without changing equipment. Might as well stick with the blade you love and work on improving with the blade you are used to. Worst comes to worst you don't develop the skill and then try a new blade. May as well see if you can add to your arsenal without changing equipment first.

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09-13-2010, 09:06 AM
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Dump and Chase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJimmyCarterC View Post
Anyway, I think you can develop a low, hard shot without changing equipment. Might as well stick with the blade you love and work on improving with the blade you are used to. Worst comes to worst you don't develop the skill and then try a new blade. May as well see if you can add to your arsenal without changing equipment first.


No kidding. If you can't learn a skill like shooting the puck hard and low without tweaking your gear you have a problem.

Put the honus on your self to improve, not your equipment.

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