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In hockey, how do I roll off a body check?

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09-12-2010, 12:10 AM
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Iplayhockehh
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In hockey, how do I roll off a body check?

I have my first midget game tomorrow, and im a pretty short guy(5"4) some of you may remember a thread I wrote a few weeks ago asking about how hard midget is compared to bantam. The best advice I received was rolling off a body check, which supposedly made for less impact. How do I roll off a body check? do I turn around and "roll" of his body as in move away, or do I counter body check him?

Thanks guys

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09-12-2010, 12:49 AM
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CuteHockeyBunny
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If you have to ask HFBoards, change teams because your coach is terrible.

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09-12-2010, 01:07 AM
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kurt
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Just make sure you're low and powerful on your skates with good wide footing. Shift your center of gravity to the left or right of the hit, if you think you can sidestep it. That's likely your best bet. The only way to do it is to grow accustomed to the level of contact over time, and get better at anticipating it. Use the boards if you can, or if you can time it, step into them before they get their feet set.

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09-12-2010, 02:19 AM
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Iplayhockehh
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If you have to ask HFBoards, change teams because your coach is terrible.
I dont have a coach yet. Offseason.

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09-12-2010, 02:20 AM
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Iplayhockehh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kurt View Post
Just make sure you're low and powerful on your skates with good wide footing. Shift your center of gravity to the left or right of the hit, if you think you can sidestep it. That's likely your best bet. The only way to do it is to grow accustomed to the level of contact over time, and get better at anticipating it. Use the boards if you can, or if you can time it, step into them before they get their feet set.
Alright, thanks. Will do

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09-12-2010, 09:00 AM
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AIREAYE
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Wont sidestepping increase the risk of a knee on knee?

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09-12-2010, 10:13 AM
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Caeldan
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As a smaller guy who never played contact hockey as a kid - I'm curious, is there much difference between a deliberate check and the occasional collision you'll get in beer league pickup games?

Because if not, the key is just to being strong on your skates - use your lower center of gravity to its advantage and almost think about sinking into the ice as the collision is about to happen. A slightly wider stance does help that.

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09-12-2010, 12:39 PM
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blueberrydanish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caeldan View Post
As a smaller guy who never played contact hockey as a kid - I'm curious, is there much difference between a deliberate check and the occasional collision you'll get in beer league pickup games?

Because if not, the key is just to being strong on your skates - use your lower center of gravity to its advantage and almost think about sinking into the ice as the collision is about to happen. A slightly wider stance does help that.
Id assume there is a big difference...in beer leagues the guy will just run into you(unless its on purpose) where as in a checking league the guy will PLOW THROUGH you wantin to knock you on your ass.

But as for thew balance part thats helpful for both situations obviously

Not necessarily for avoiding hits...but a big mental thing to remember as a beginner is collisions/hits will happen, so brace yourself and be ready to stand your ground cause its pretty much either you or the other guy, you just gotta have it in your head that you dont wanna be the one on the ice =p

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09-12-2010, 12:49 PM
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RobertKron
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Keep skating leading up to it, get up against the boards if you can (and always avoid taking a check in the dangerous area 2-6' out from the boards if you can), and just take it.

It might work sometimes, but if you're trying to duck out of the way or otherwise being "scared" of taking a hit, eventually you're going to get hurt more badly than you would if you just kept your feet moving and took the hit. Just keep your feet moving and skate through it. If you get smashed, you get smashed. Everyone does.

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09-12-2010, 01:35 PM
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PuckHogs29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caeldan View Post
As a smaller guy who never played contact hockey as a kid - I'm curious, is there much difference between a deliberate check and the occasional collision you'll get in beer league pickup games?

Because if not, the key is just to being strong on your skates - use your lower center of gravity to its advantage and almost think about sinking into the ice as the collision is about to happen. A slightly wider stance does help that.
There is a world of difference if you're a small guy. If you know it's coming and you react quick enough it's not as bad and there are things you can do to minimize the impact, but even then if a big guy wants to steamroll you and you catch it full on or react too late, it's way worse than a beer league "woops sorry didn't see ya" collision.

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09-12-2010, 01:49 PM
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Dump and Chase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caeldan View Post
As a smaller guy who never played contact hockey as a kid - I'm curious, is there much difference between a deliberate check and the occasional collision you'll get in beer league pickup games?

Because if not, the key is just to being strong on your skates - use your lower center of gravity to its advantage and almost think about sinking into the ice as the collision is about to happen. A slightly wider stance does help that.

lol. One time in bantam hockey a guy caught me with my head down trying to take a pass from my D in the neutral zone. When I was getting back to my feet I thought my vision was blurred until I realized my visor was coated with mucous. He hit me so hard it literally knocked a handful of snot out of me. You don't get that from incidental contact.


You roll with a check by getting the center of your momentum out of the way of his center of momentum.

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09-12-2010, 02:48 PM
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SERE 24
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Yeah... rolling off of a check is just not letting him hit you head on. If his center of gravity collides with your center of gravity it's going to be a big impact. If his center of gravity just clips you rather than getting you square than it's just going to be a glancing blow. A glancing blow can be all that's needed to spin you around, knock you off balance or separate you from the puck, but it's not going to knock you silly. A good hit can.

As for incidental contact in beer league versus an intentional hit from a well trained player in a real checking league... is that even a question? As a hockey fan, I'd assume you have some respect for the guys that play it professionally... do you think that all hitting is in the NHL is running into one another? There's an art to delivering a good body check and the more practice and coaching you have the better you're going to get. Not even taking into account that most checking leagues are going to be higher level than many beer leagues (not to mention the higher level the beer league, the less likely accidental collisions are), and therefore your players are likely to be moving much faster, the fact that someone is actually lining you up and hitting you, with technique, rather than just bumping into you during the course of play should be enough to answer your question. You sure could have a brutal accidental collision in a pick up game if both guys have their heads down and are moving fast but even that's not gonna get close to getting rocked by a guy who has you lined up when your head is down and he explodes into his hit. You will literally have your bell rung if you don't go in expecting to have it rung.

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