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1 on 1 moves - Faking on my weak side

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Old
09-18-2010, 08:48 AM
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Jafar
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1 on 1 moves - Faking on my weak side

This is kind of advanced problem i'm trying to fix , i'm a dangler/stick-handler whatever you call it kind of player and i'm good at 1 on 1 moves and i'm capable of faking both side , but it's clear I have a weak side and to make things worst I have 10 pounds more on one of my feet probably due to leg length discrepancy ( I learned that during a chiropratic test but i'm not exactly sure it's due to leg length discrepancy but whatever )
And the worst of all is my weak side is the side I need to fake on my backhand , so what i'm really asking is not really a hockey tip but more of a trainer tip to produce more explosion on my weak side ( and both while we're at it ) is there anyone with knowledge of how to acheive this in training?

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09-18-2010, 08:32 PM
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The Scouting Report
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Doesn't sound like an easy problem to fix. I would likely work more on utilizing leg kicks/head fakes/shoulder dips to compensate for it.

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09-19-2010, 05:46 PM
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What level of hockey are you playing? Would you say that you're someone that does everything flat-out, or do you feel you make good use of change of pace?

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09-19-2010, 07:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReenMachine View Post
This is kind of advanced problem i'm trying to fix , i'm a dangler/stick-handler whatever you call it kind of player and i'm good at 1 on 1 moves and i'm capable of faking both side , but it's clear I have a weak side and to make things worst I have 10 pounds more on one of my feet probably due to leg length discrepancy ( I learned that during a chiropratic test but i'm not exactly sure it's due to leg length discrepancy but whatever )
And the worst of all is my weak side is the side I need to fake on my backhand , so what i'm really asking is not really a hockey tip but more of a trainer tip to produce more explosion on my weak side ( and both while we're at it ) is there anyone with knowledge of how to acheive this in training?
Ok, this is easy. Here's what you need to do, but it might turn into a long story...sorry for the rambling.

There are really two ways to make a one on one work! The first is to keep doing what you are doing, but start your dangle/deke a 1/2 to a full second earlier! Why? Well, it really has everything to do with read and react and the closure rate at your skating speed and the gap control between you and the defenseman.

You see, do to the closure rate speed, the defenseman will try and read and react to the speed that you are coming in as he tries to control the gap. The closer you get to him that better...to a certain point! Then he has the advantage.

So, here a little example (aka: drill) that you can do with some friends to understand what closure rate can do for you. Side note: You can also use this on a one on one with a goalie as well.

Ok, place your friends hand in a "C" the the same height and angle that you are going to shack hands with someone, but the thumb in down instead of up to make the so called...."C". Follow me so far?

Ok, then you take a puck and place it between the thumb and the main part of the hand. so that it is inside of this so called..."C". Then, what I do is kind of move it back and forth from the thumb to the main hand. this is to make sure that I have the proper distance between the thumb and the main part of the hand. Why? because that's why. You will understand in a minute.

Now, after I move the puck from side to side, I am telling that the "C" (hand) represents the defenseman/goalie and the puck represents the shooter. Now, just as you are tell thim this, you tell the other person that when you let go of the puck....he has to catch with it before it hits the ground.

At the point when you say "catch" you let it go! Well guess what....he can't! Why? Because you are not connected by an umbilical cord. be does not know whenyou are going to make your move....get it! Same way with a goalie. The way great goalies make great saves is because they know how to read and react to your body language....get it!

So, if you are on a break-a-way, you don't skate down the middle. Yes, you can do a figure "S"...that's not the point. When you are on a break-a-way, don't skate down the middle, have the puck move down the middle while you are off to one side. Why?

If you skate down the middle, then the puck is off to one side and the goalie knows it. He knows that you have limited your scoring chances, and he can now play the angle on you. But, if you skate down the ice, so that the puck is in the middle, then you have more options and the goalie know it. In fact, there's a really go chance thay you will make him freeze right in his tracks.

However, make sure that your stick and puck is loaded and ready to shoot. Which means off to the side and not in front. If he see it in front, he knows that you can shoot with the tip of your blade and this means you are going to deke...get it!

Ok, so what in the heck does this have to do with a one on one with defenseman? It's the same concept. The defenseman doesn't know when you really arr going to make the move. He also has to read and react to you speed and moves. This is why we teach our defenseman not to watch the stick handling, but to watch the chest and hips. Why? Because that portion of the body is hard to "Dangle".

Yes, you can do all of those fancy little move that you make, but if the defenseman is disciplined, he will watch your waist and hip to play you and not the "Snake charmer" dangle tricks that playes like to do these days.

If you have a defenseman that is immuned to the Snake charmer, he will play the body and you will find yourself on the ice. But if you start a half a second easlier...you will throw off his timing...get it!

The second way is not to deke, but to use the defenseman as a screen...works everytime.

If you go to my facebook account and type in Pass the Puck into the search. There I have some dryland video to help increase that leg strength.

Hope this help

Head coach

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Old
09-20-2010, 06:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HFNHL Commish View Post
What level of hockey are you playing? Would you say that you're someone that does everything flat-out, or do you feel you make good use of change of pace?


This is an excellent question. Throwing consistently good dekes is not about explosive movements, it is about changing pace, offering deceptive angles and knowing exactly when your target has taken the bait.

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Old
09-21-2010, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HFNHL Commish View Post
What level of hockey are you playing? Would you say that you're someone that does everything flat-out, or do you feel you make good use of change of pace?
I definately change the pace well , since I got flat feet i'm not the greatest skater but I i'm a good deceiver.
I'm the kind of player that will slowdown the play with my stickhandling , i can also be a very good playmaker so I can also use that as an option defender has to look for.

I'm not playing any particular level right now i'm searching for a competitive adult league better than the average garage league in the Montreal area , but I dont think i'll ever turn pro at this point lol

I've played all my minor hockey and played A-BB-AA level depending of the year.

I'm still looking to get better and better


Last edited by Jafar: 09-21-2010 at 08:03 AM.
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09-21-2010, 08:04 AM
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Ok, this is easy. Here's what you need to do, but it might turn into a long story...sorry for the rambling.

There are really two ways to make a one on one work! The first is to keep doing what you are doing, but start your dangle/deke a 1/2 to a full second earlier! Why? Well, it really has everything to do with read and react and the closure rate at your skating speed and the gap control between you and the defenseman.

You see, do to the closure rate speed, the defenseman will try and read and react to the speed that you are coming in as he tries to control the gap. The closer you get to him that better...to a certain point! Then he has the advantage.

So, here a little example (aka: drill) that you can do with some friends to understand what closure rate can do for you. Side note: You can also use this on a one on one with a goalie as well.

Ok, place your friends hand in a "C" the the same height and angle that you are going to shack hands with someone, but the thumb in down instead of up to make the so called...."C". Follow me so far?

Ok, then you take a puck and place it between the thumb and the main part of the hand. so that it is inside of this so called..."C". Then, what I do is kind of move it back and forth from the thumb to the main hand. this is to make sure that I have the proper distance between the thumb and the main part of the hand. Why? because that's why. You will understand in a minute.

Now, after I move the puck from side to side, I am telling that the "C" (hand) represents the defenseman/goalie and the puck represents the shooter. Now, just as you are tell thim this, you tell the other person that when you let go of the puck....he has to catch with it before it hits the ground.

At the point when you say "catch" you let it go! Well guess what....he can't! Why? Because you are not connected by an umbilical cord. be does not know whenyou are going to make your move....get it! Same way with a goalie. The way great goalies make great saves is because they know how to read and react to your body language....get it!

So, if you are on a break-a-way, you don't skate down the middle. Yes, you can do a figure "S"...that's not the point. When you are on a break-a-way, don't skate down the middle, have the puck move down the middle while you are off to one side. Why?

If you skate down the middle, then the puck is off to one side and the goalie knows it. He knows that you have limited your scoring chances, and he can now play the angle on you. But, if you skate down the ice, so that the puck is in the middle, then you have more options and the goalie know it. In fact, there's a really go chance thay you will make him freeze right in his tracks.

However, make sure that your stick and puck is loaded and ready to shoot. Which means off to the side and not in front. If he see it in front, he knows that you can shoot with the tip of your blade and this means you are going to deke...get it!

Ok, so what in the heck does this have to do with a one on one with defenseman? It's the same concept. The defenseman doesn't know when you really arr going to make the move. He also has to read and react to you speed and moves. This is why we teach our defenseman not to watch the stick handling, but to watch the chest and hips. Why? Because that portion of the body is hard to "Dangle".

Yes, you can do all of those fancy little move that you make, but if the defenseman is disciplined, he will watch your waist and hip to play you and not the "Snake charmer" dangle tricks that playes like to do these days.

If you have a defenseman that is immuned to the Snake charmer, he will play the body and you will find yourself on the ice. But if you start a half a second easlier...you will throw off his timing...get it!

The second way is not to deke, but to use the defenseman as a screen...works everytime.

If you go to my facebook account and type in Pass the Puck into the search. There I have some dryland video to help increase that leg strength.

Hope this help

Head coach
this is a sick post and im not sure I understood eveyrthing but I didnt have time to read it slowly and doign the drills but I will this week for sure and PM you if I have question thanks

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