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In the never ending saga of concussions (See post #598)

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Old
05-04-2012, 11:30 AM
  #301
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http://www.tsn.ca/nfl/story/?id=395032

Seau family decides to donate brain for study (but destination not clear/selected, yet).



Mod note: Let's keep this focused on concussions/suspected/possible concussions, not general NFL or other sports.

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05-04-2012, 03:20 PM
  #302
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NCAA to recommend change to 3/4 visors to make game safer?

http://www.collegehockeynews.com/new..._than_ever.php

Quote:
The NCAA Ice Hockey Rules Committee is planning to formally recommend, at its June meetings in Indianapolis, that college hockey change from full shields to three-quarter visors. The recommendation will go to the NCAA's Committee of Competitive Safeguards, where college hockey will have a chance to further make its case.

Beyond that, it would need approval from a few more levels of the NCAA hierarchy, but the Competitive Safeguards committee is considered the biggest hurdle.

The Rules Committee first met with members of the Safeguards committee last November, along with other interested parties, as part of an information session. Among those there to help make the case for college hockey were coaches Jack Parker, Jeff Jackson and Tom Anastos; former College Hockey Inc. Executive Director Paul Kelly; prominent doctors, including Dr. Paul Comper, the NHL's specialist on head injuries; and representatives from the USHL.
...
It's been believed that the NCAA, concerned about liability issues, would never change the policy. But Kelly, a practicing attorney, believes the NCAA has the liability issue backwards.

"I told the committee that, since every other organized league in the world has gone to half visors for players over 18," Kelly said, "if you're the only league that refuses to, and then you have a guy who crashes into the boards and suffers catastrophic injury, you can bet 100 to 1 you will have a lawsuit brought against the NCAA and maybe the conference for failure to take actions when your own coaching body and medical community is telling you it will make the game safer (without them)."

Coaches believe eliminating full face shields will reduce concussions, the potential for neck and spine injuries, and reckless play.

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05-04-2012, 03:43 PM
  #303
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so in other words, when college players make it to the NHL, they get hammered once and are out for the rest of their careers. good one!

then, the NHL gets blamed for other leagues' idiocy.


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05-09-2012, 11:02 PM
  #304
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Tonight on NBC's "Rock Center" with Brian Williams includes segment on girls soccer players "living" with concussions (and their aftermaths).

(#2 "sport" of reporting concussions after NFL.)

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05-09-2012, 11:31 PM
  #305
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Originally Posted by LadyStanley View Post
Tonight on NBC's "Rock Center" with Brian Williams includes segment on girls soccer players "living" with concussions (and their aftermaths).

(#2 "sport" of reporting concussions after NFL.)
... thats interesting, and I was unaware that it ranked that highly, almost an epidemic. Makes sense though, head contact with the ball & often times when two or more players are going for a header they'll collide while airborne, a sickening sight, and absolutely the cumulative effects of those kinds of sustained unprotected impacts are going to have consequences. Ive often wondered about that with soccer, and I thought Id read somewhere that at the amateur levels, a lot of leagues & organizations had outlawed "Heading" for players under the age of 16. Its a big part of the game, a skill thats required, but Man, talk about inviting trauma.

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05-10-2012, 12:11 AM
  #306
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So to clarify a bit.. Soccer is #2 sport behind football.


It was mentioned in the show that the physical trait of having a long neck may account for some of the severity of the injuries (IOW, head easier to turn fast, causing more/severe injuries). And female players are more likely to be injured than male (physical differences).

Right now, or at least in Pennsylvania, there is no age limit on heading.

They did post a video of Team USA star showing/teaching how to "properly" head the ball on their website.

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05-10-2012, 12:24 AM
  #307
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^^^ huh, thats kinda crazy. I played a lot of soccer as a kid, watched/watch it, fan, and therese a real art to doing it properly. Still, collisions simply cant be avoided, not to mention that the ball is traveling with a lot of velocity. That impact on a still soft skull in children just cant be good for the brain, and sure, the longer the neck, the more whiplash that'll occur.

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05-10-2012, 11:09 AM
  #308
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The Ball

Quote:
Originally Posted by Killion View Post
^^^ huh, thats kinda crazy. I played a lot of soccer as a kid, watched/watch it, fan, and therese a real art to doing it properly. Still, collisions simply cant be avoided, not to mention that the ball is traveling with a lot of velocity. That impact on a still soft skull in children just cant be good for the brain, and sure, the longer the neck, the more whiplash that'll occur.
The new synthetic soccer balls stay hard longer. The old leather soccer balls tended to get mushy with use.

Technique is another issue. Quality coaching does not increase in direct proportion to participation.

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05-11-2012, 10:44 AM
  #309
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http://www.designnews.com/document.a...Layout=article

Colorado company working on prototype of football helmet that has up to 75 mini (dime sized) airbags. Hope to have prototypes by end of calendar year.

Quote:
Concussion Mitigation Technologies LLC is proposing to equip future helmets with enough electronic intelligence to enable them to measure a hit, compare it to pre-determined criteria, and intelligently pressurize as many as 75 dime-sized airbags. Troy Fodemski, founder of the fledgling company, believes the technology will help professional and amateur sports deal with growing concerns about head injuries.
...
The company's football helmet, which hasn't yet been fully prototyped, will incorporate multiple strain gages, a small cartridge of carbon dioxide (CO2), scores of tiny airbags, a lithium battery, and a printed circuit board with a microprocessor, memory, and analog-to-digital converters. On the field, the helmet will use the strain gages to measure the impact of hit. Then it will send the data to the microprocessor, compare it to software models in memory, and pressurize the airbags with CO2 when necessary.
...
Fodemski's solution would mitigate damage to the brain by firing the airbags when the brain is about to hit the inside of the skull. The company says that its airbags would provide inward force, serving to nudge the brain back to neutral sooner, rather than having to wait for eight or 10 more collisions while the brain moves back and forth.
...
Fodemski said he doesn't yet know what his football helmets will cost, but it's believed that they could run several times as much as today's helmets, which often cost between $175 and $300. Concussion Mitigation Technologies also hopes to place the technology in other sports, such as hockey, baseball, and skiing, as well as in the military. Initial prototypes for football are expected to be ready in about six months.

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05-11-2012, 04:14 PM
  #310
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Originally Posted by Killion View Post
... thats interesting, and I was unaware that it ranked that highly, almost an epidemic. Makes sense though, head contact with the ball & often times when two or more players are going for a header they'll collide while airborne, a sickening sight, and absolutely the cumulative effects of those kinds of sustained unprotected impacts are going to have consequences. Ive often wondered about that with soccer, and I thought Id read somewhere that at the amateur levels, a lot of leagues & organizations had outlawed "Heading" for players under the age of 16. Its a big part of the game, a skill thats required, but Man, talk about inviting trauma.
There's also heavy contact in goal. 12 years ago I had a knockout concussion playing in goal my sophomore year in highschool. They told me I got kicked in the head (I never did remember the impact) right above the ear, by my temple.
At the time, no one thought anything of letting me finish that game. Or the two other games that day, and three the next. (God bless tournament season) I didn't know any better, thought it was just a headache. The nauseau was just from the heat, etc. Popped a couple aspirin (blood thinner + hea dinjury = brilliant idea) in between games and kept trucking. Earned myself a trip to the emergency room the next day when I got lost on my way to class, slurred my speech, and stumbled down some stairs (they inititally thought I was drunk, go figure) CT scan showed no bleeding in the brain, so I was under observation, but never did miss a practice or a game.

A huge problem in youth sports is simply lack of education. Thank god it seems to have improved now- but there are still tons of coaches, trainers, and players that have no idea the risk factors of a concussion, how to assess a player after injury, treatment, etc.

As for heading- heading a pass isn't much of a danger if done correctly. However, it's increasingly common to see players block a shot with a header- which should probably be outlawed at every level of play. Trust your goalie's hands for those.

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05-12-2012, 11:40 AM
  #311
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http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/201...p&sct=hp_wr_a4

SI retrospective on the mental health of NFLers.

As rookies, players have mandated interactions with psychologists (or equivalent) to understand some of the issues they may face. Retiring/transitioning players also have access to counseling.

One obstacle to players reaching out for help is the "fact" of unguaranteed contracts; which player wants to get help if the cost of doing that means the team releases him?

There's also the issue of "breaking into" the culture of the team, and the inherent distrust of "suits" by the players.

(Definitely sounds like Dr Brooks may have been the prototype for USA TV's psychologist on Necessary Roughness.)

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05-19-2012, 01:44 PM
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http://www.iihf.com/nc/home-of-hocke...ecap/6978.html

IIHF talks about lack of respect which has lead to a lot of head hits.

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05-24-2012, 04:16 PM
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05-31-2012, 03:32 PM
  #314
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http://www.smashfest.ca/

NHL player Dominic Moore (former Shark, plus a bunch of other teams) has announced (1st annual?) charity ping pong tournament in July 2012 to raise funds for concussion research.

Bunch of big names have signed up to participate.


(He has a former teammate on every NHL squad. )

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06-01-2012, 01:07 AM
  #315
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http://www.winnipegsun.com/2012/05/3...-a-hurting-lot

6 of the NHL Entry Draft combine invitees have concussions.

You have to wonder the impact of any lingering injuries (and how they "perform" in interviews while recovering from them), and how teams may select/avoid the players (and/or see them slip down the draft order).

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06-03-2012, 07:02 PM
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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sport...85/?cmpid=rss1

James Mirtle looks at the impact of concussions on members of the Toronto Maple Leafs and their effectiveness (and sometimes diminished capabilities) after being deemed "healthy" on their return to play.

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06-03-2012, 10:43 PM
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http://www.startribune.com/sports/wild/156927415.html

Quote:
In his final three seasons playing in the National Hockey League, before dying last year at 28 of an accidental overdose of narcotic painkillers and alcohol, Derek Boogaard received more than 100 prescriptions for thousands of pills from more than a dozen team doctors for the Minnesota Wild and the New York Rangers.

A trove of documents, compiled by Boogaard's father, offer a rare prescription-by-prescription history of the care given to a prominent, physically ailing athlete who struggled with addiction to some of the very drugs the team doctors were providing. The scores of prescriptions came before and after Boogaard's entry into the league's substance-abuse program in September 2009 for an addiction to painkillers and sleeping pills.
...
But, at the least, the records raise questions for hockey and professional sports of all kinds. Do team doctors communicate with one another about the care they are giving or the drugs they are prescribing? Do they demand to see a player before writing a new prescription? Are team medical records monitored and complete? How much information is shared among doctors, team officials and administrators of programs like the NHL's Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program? Can a hockey player, especially one paid to inflict and to absorb pain, continue a career with an addiction to painkillers? And what role does the league play in all this?

The NHL, teams, team doctors and substance-abuse program directors involved in Boogaard's care all declined to discuss any of that.
Sad.


Edit:

http://www.twincities.com/localnews/...ard?source=rss
NY Times version of story (reprinted)


Last edited by LadyStanley: 06-03-2012 at 11:02 PM.
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06-07-2012, 08:14 PM
  #318
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http://blogs.denverpost.com/avs/2012...che%3A+Blog%29

Adam Deadmarsh steps down as Colorado Avalanche assistant coach due to (continuing) concussion issues. (Moving over to player development with team; family relocating from Colorado.)

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06-07-2012, 11:54 PM
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http://prohockeytalk.nbcsports.com/2...ges-to-visors/


Quote:
Hours after ACHA Insider reported that the NCAA would announce a transition from full cages to half-shields, NCAA hockey denied that rumor via its official Twitter page. The NCAA simply responded “Sorry, but this is not true. More info to come Friday.”
Article goes on to discuss some of the pros and cons of visors.

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06-11-2012, 03:11 PM
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http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/201...sct=nfl_t11_a0

Q&A with NFL commish.

Quote:
Goodell said he has spent more time this offseason on player safety than on any other issue -- more time, he told me, than on the Saints' bounty program. He also pointed to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health study that said former NFL players lived a longer life than average male citizens as bursting a myth that the life span of football players is shortened by the game.
Me: What have you learned, let's say, since the end of the season that's contributed to your continuing education on head trauma and concussions?
Goodell: "The head, neck, and spine committee met back in early- to mid-February. I think we had 48 professionals in that room, leading doctors and scientists from institutions all over the world, virtually all of them unaffiliated with the NFL. I think the thing that strikes me the most about it is how much more we have to learn as a society, as a medical profession, as scientists. There's still a lot of unknowns about the brain, either brain disease or brain trauma and how it reacts. That's not unusual in science and medicine as you know. You have different findings and medical debates. We could see that in the room. There are some tremendous professionals that are taking a very cautious and conservative approach that are making it safer for our troops, NFL players, girls soccer players and that you can manage the risk of concussions, that we can do more to prevent it and that we can understand it better to make sure you fully recover from these injuries. The first thing to do is prevent it. That goes to rules, equipment. The second is our sideline assessment tools. We have made changes to that. There are some new technologies that make this very soon in the future where on a tablet, you can actually take a test on the sideline to determine (the concussion).''
Me: A tablet? An iPad? This year?
Goodell: "It's possible.''
Me: How do you expect the system to work this year?
Goodell: "The player has to self-report and has to tell professionals. We have spotters, as you know, our ATC [athletic trainers] spotters program, which we implemented late in the season to sort of identify hits that would require an evaluation. That will be expanded and fully in place this season. There's an ATC, which is an athletic trainer who's not active right now, but they'll be upstairs. They will have access to all the video and if they see a hit that involves a significant blow to the head or if a player demonstrates any kind of dizziness or potential slowness to get up, they call down to the sideline and make sure the medical professional has that number and they can go make an evaluation ... Now we have the technology to send the play down to the field, so that if a medical personnel wants to look at that, they can look at the play and that has been very helpful in the playoffs. It's almost like the instant replay setup. You'll see the equipment down behind the bench area. The ATC spotter can actually, just like we do with instant replay, send a play down if the trainer or the doctor wants to see a play. They can look at the play and see what they call the mechanisms of injury. That's the term that's used. Through the mechanism of injury, you can determine, 'OK, I need to look at that.' It's a tremendous tool for the doctors.


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06-14-2012, 12:46 AM
  #321
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06-14-2012, 07:11 AM
  #322
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Would it be fair to say that increased awareness of brain injury could lead to a drastic reconfiguring and/or possibly an end to certain contact sports such as hockey and football?

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06-14-2012, 10:11 AM
  #323
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Some comparative concussion rates high school sports from two recent studies:
Rate is # per 100,000 Athletic Exposures (AE). One AE=one athlete participating in an organized practice or competition, regardless of time played.

Football: 60-77 per 100k
Girls soccer: 33-35
Boys lacrosse: 30-47
Girls lacrosse: 20-31
Boys soccer: 17-19
Boys wrestling: 17-24
Girls basketball: 16-19
Girls softball: 11-16
Boys basketball: 11-21
Girls field hockey: 10-25
Cheerleading: 11.5
Girls volleyball: 5-9
Boys baseball: 5-6

Boys football has the highest rate, but only 2x that of girls soccer.
The concussion rate has gone up a great deal in the past decade. This appears to primarily be greater concussion awareness and and more accurate reporting.
There is evidence that girls are more prone to concussion than boys. One theory is that girls have weaker neck muscles and are more likely to have their heads whipped back and forth in a collision. Another theory is boys are simply under-reporting, especially mild concussions, to avoid appearing weak or being removed from the competition. Likely a combination of both factors.

Here's where I got the #s from.

It's a sports parent website, but they got their #s from recent scientific publications and list their sources.

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06-14-2012, 11:14 AM
  #324
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Was watching a bit of NBC Nightly News (IIRC just before game 6). They had a story on the change of Pop Warner football changing when/how players could have (head) contact. Formerly, they practiced 9 hours/week. Plan is to limit (head) contact to 3 hours or less/week.

Saw another story on girls HS soccer team that had members suffering from concussions, some so bad they are in dim light "all the time" (possible), and have had to give up the sport.


Will take a paradigm shift to get parents, coaches, peers, and players to accept that head injuries should not be taken lightly.

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06-17-2012, 08:23 AM
  #325
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http://www.dailyherald.com/article/2...ts/706169873/?

Former Chicago player, Lightning coach, Steve Ludzik diagnosed at 40 with Parkinson's disease. Probable cause - concussions/hits to the head (not from fighting).

Quote:
Right away, there was speculation about how Ludzik wound up with Parkinson's, which can be genetic but is almost certainly in Ludzik's case due to the scores of hits to the head he absorbed in decades of playing hockey.

After a spectacular junior career as a scorer — Ludzik playfully points out that Niagara Falls teammate Steve Larmer was drafted four rounds behind him — the 5-foot-11, 185-pound Ludzik was turned into a checking center by minor-league coach Orval Tessier, who later became the Hawks' head coach.

“People who want to say this is from fighting are clueless,” Ludzik said. “I don't give a (bleep) what they think. I only fought (22) times in 10 years and I never got clocked. I never caught anyone good, either.

“This is from getting hit in the head. The constant banging wore me down. It's like being in bumper cars for years without stopping.

“My guess is I had about six concussions, and you never said anything because you didn't want to lose your job. You'd find out later from the guys that when you got to the bench you couldn't say your name, and then you had a headache for a week and couldn't eat anything.”


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