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Equipment Help for Very Overweight Person

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Old
01-15-2016, 03:43 AM
  #1
Hockeyfan1982
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Equipment Help for Very Overweight Person

Hi Everyone,

Love reading the posts on the rink section and in general HF Boards is awesome. I have played hockey since i was 7 years old (33 now), i have been pretty much overweight as long as i can remember but most of the time played a couple stone overweight. However over the last year put on a ridiculous amount of weight and havent played in around 6 months or so as am just so big.

I currently weigh around 370 pounds (i last played struggled in August at around 330 pounds) and i need to do something about it pronto for my health/happiness mainly. I want to get back playing but equipment especially shorts are an issue. Simply put the XL RBK 3K shorts dont fit (i had ripped them to make them easier on the legs to get on). I wondered if anyone could recommend some shorts for me to purchase to help me sort myself out. The issue i have is i am only 5 foot 7 so i know length of short will be a major issue. Is it a case of just gotta lose enough weight untill my shorts fit again, the issue i was having because they weren't really designed the XL shorts for my size the short belt was cutting into my skin and the braces were snapping off my shorts so i had to rig up a laces braces for my shorts.

Hope you dont mind me being honest, i have to sort my weight out and i love playing hockey and one day it be nice to be able to play at a proper weight, any help would be great, i am in England but dont mind shipping shorts in if that helps, thanks for reading and hoping everyone has a happy and healthy 2016

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01-15-2016, 05:04 AM
  #2
Goonzilla
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If you are that out of shape is there any point just jumping into gear and playing? Sounds like a heart attack or injury waiting to happen if you just start exerting yourself in a game situation.

I've been in and out of shape before and starting back or rehabilitating from lay offs or injuries; and always start small, road running, gyming of whatever. My advice would be just to worry about skates; and go skating. Just skate and skate yourself back into some conditioning.

At the same time you must need to cut something out or make a couple of changes. Suggest hitting the water.

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Old
01-15-2016, 06:20 AM
  #3
Fremitus Borealis
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I'm gonna agree with Goonzilla here: your health is the most important thing, so you might want to take it "slow" as far as getting back into hockey. Plus, since the goal will obviously be to lose a good bit of weight, it might be a bit of a waste to buy a bunch of gear that will fit you now, but (ideally) won't in a year.

So: I'd second the recommendation about getting skates first. Find a good hockey shop (even if it's a good distance from where you live) and get fitted for some good skates, because even losing a bunch of weight, your feet won't change all that much. Get used to skating again. At the same time, hit the exercise bike. You don't have to go nuts, but it's a good, low-impact way to burn calories, and you can do it while reading, or watching hockey, or whatever. Throw in some other light lifting here and there, but again, nothing outlandish. And at the same time as all this, you can still work on your shooting and basic stickwork off-ice until you're ready to put it all together.

I think if you do all this, you will be prepared to play again within a year, all without doing any harm to yourself. You don't have to be an adonis to play men's league hockey of course, but you will need a certain baseline level of physical fitness just to make sure you're not endangering your own health while out having fun.

I hope you don't take any of this the wrong way! As I said, it's got everything to do with assuring you don't inadvertently hurt yourself, while potentially saving a ton of money in the process.

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01-15-2016, 07:43 AM
  #4
mattw4466
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Maybe try to get the pad wraps, like the total one pants, and if you need to you can lengthen the Velcro straps to a good length for you with some quick sowing. Then just try and find the biggest shell you can.

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Old
01-15-2016, 10:15 AM
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Tweaky
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I am very heavy as well, and short, and I play regularly. Not well, as I did not start playing until my mid 30's. But gear is an issue. Luckily, pants are the only thing that really matter for non-check that are affected by weight. I use Warrior Covert DT2 in XXL, and they barely fit...like almost split them pulling them on, with the belt digging in, etc. But they will work for a while, as I am losing slowing. Not sure if they would fit someone 330+, as I am 'just' 315, but I am also only 5'8", so rounder than most.

HockeyGiant has Bauer Nexus 600 in XXXL that might have more room.

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Old
01-15-2016, 10:51 AM
  #6
Sinistril
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Have to agree with the first posters... you may be SOL on the equipment front anyways, but you might want to try a different route before jumping back to an ingame situation. Water/walking/jogging or just plain skating would help, and look at it this way... it gives you a goal. Get back to the point where you can fit in your old pants so you can play the game you love! That's a hell of a goal. Good luck man.

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01-15-2016, 11:29 AM
  #7
Ethereal Whisper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fremitus Borealis View Post
I'm gonna agree with Goonzilla here: your health is the most important thing, so you might want to take it "slow" as far as getting back into hockey. Plus, since the goal will obviously be to lose a good bit of weight, it might be a bit of a waste to buy a bunch of gear that will fit you now, but (ideally) won't in a year.

So: I'd second the recommendation about getting skates first. Find a good hockey shop (even if it's a good distance from where you live) and get fitted for some good skates, because even losing a bunch of weight, your feet won't change all that much. Get used to skating again. At the same time, hit the exercise bike. You don't have to go nuts, but it's a good, low-impact way to burn calories, and you can do it while reading, or watching hockey, or whatever. Throw in some other light lifting here and there, but again, nothing outlandish. And at the same time as all this, you can still work on your shooting and basic stickwork off-ice until you're ready to put it all together.

I think if you do all this, you will be prepared to play again within a year, all without doing any harm to yourself. You don't have to be an adonis to play men's league hockey of course, but you will need a certain baseline level of physical fitness just to make sure you're not endangering your own health while out having fun.

I hope you don't take any of this the wrong way! As I said, it's got everything to do with assuring you don't inadvertently hurt yourself, while potentially saving a ton of money in the process.
I dropped from a size 12 to a size 10 (US women's) going from about 180 pounds to 125, but that's in shoes. My skate size didn't really change.

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Old
01-15-2016, 11:42 AM
  #8
Eazy for Kuzy
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I don't think there's any pro stock you can find that will fit you. You'd have to make a special order for a stock of XXL pants from the retailer of your choosing. Skating will definitely help you get fitter, I hope you get to the point where you can find equipment that fits you easily.

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Old
01-15-2016, 01:25 PM
  #9
Sundinology
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Man I love the enthusiasm! I really look up to people like you willing to make such a life change for the better. I have certainly played hockey with guys over 300 pounds, but really they're few and far between. Like mentioned earlier in this thread I'd really recommend cutting down on the weight before getting back on the ice. Even though hockey is a low impact sport (in that your joints take low impact, compared to all the running and jumping of other sports) you'll be putting a LOT of pressure on your ankles and feet in your skates being held up by only a thin blade.

For losing weight, the biggest advice I can give is to stop drinking your calories - soda, Gatorade, specialty coffees, beer, everything. Switch to a diet soda or no calorie Gatorade if you need something sweet, but the healthiest will always be water. You may even want to switch to a ketogenic diet or something similar. And although this may sound counter-intuitive you may want to avoid prolonged exercise until you hit the 300 lb mark. The best way to lose weight is through healthy eating habits, since as they say, you cannot outrun a bad diet.

I don't want to link outside sources but there's plenty of websites that allow you to calculate your daily energy expenditure (TDEE) and the number of calories you burn throughout a simple day (BMR, or Base Metabolic Rate.) Once you get the diet figured out and continue to lose weight then I think you'll find you'll be having a lot more fun playing hockey than you would now, losing breath quickly and risking an injury.

These are just my thoughts though, so keep an open mind and please check back in here so we can all follow along with your fitness journey. Remember, in just a few weeks you can make a huge difference, and in less than a year you can look back and feel like a whole new person. Good luck!

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Old
01-15-2016, 10:56 PM
  #10
dkwan9
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Another suggestion that hasn't been brought up yet is maybe instead of jumping right back into full-gear hockey, you could try starting with some stick & puck first. Many rinks have weekly S&P times where all you need are skates, gloves, a helmet, and a stick - all of these things should still fit you reasonably well in spite of the weight gain. And on that note, I've struggled with my weight at times as well. Like a couple others have suggested, cutting out sugary drinks is the best place to start. I was a huge pop drinker back in the day, but I switched to drinking club soda with lemon, and haven't gone back to pop since. Weight loss isn't complicated. If you burn more calories than you eat, you will lose weight. Try to go skating as often as you can to keep up with it, and on the days you don't skate, maybe try swimming or the elliptical or even a nice brisk walk outside. Try your best to identify your biggest weaknesses (desserts, fast food, alcohol, etc) and slowly remove them from your regular diet. Losing fat is hard, but you can do it! Remember, the best time to start was yesterday, but second best time to start is today. Just take it one day at a time, one workout at a time, and one healthy meal at a time.

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Old
01-19-2016, 07:06 AM
  #11
shoeshine boy
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before hitting the ice to play consult your doctor just to make sure it's safe for you. many folks assume that if you're 300+ that you're guaranteed to have a heart attack if you exert yourself but this isn't necessarily true.
I knew a guy who was about your size, maybe even bigger who wanted to be a ref. he was so big that when he started reffing he had to wear sweatpants instead of ref gear. it took him some time but eventually he fit into regular ref gear.
for player gear I recommend Tackla. they go all the way up to a size 60 and are great pants. they also offer shorter lengths as well. the big ones might not be easy to find but you might try contacting the company directly.
http://www.montrealhockey-usa.com/#!pantsandcovers/cnqq

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