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I still cannot stop and I am getting really aggravated about it.

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Old
11-04-2010, 10:06 AM
  #26
ChiTownHawks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Yeap, the first step of recovery is knowing where the problem really lies...the fear of falling. Ok, not to be an a**, but how old are you? It doesn't matter what age you are...you are going to fall. Oh and guess what....it will not be the last time! I have been skating for over 30 years and...yes, I still fall every once and a while. it's just the nature of the beast....ice is slippery!
Everyone falls that is for sure. My coach in my Hockey 101 class took a major spill showing us how to stop just the other day and this guy played in the OHL and is a great skater.

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11-04-2010, 10:35 AM
  #27
WhipNash27
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If you're afraid of falling just put some pads on. No pain when you fall with pads.

Otherwise, just start at a very slow speed. As you start getting used to the motion, start increasing slightly.

For me, I still have trouble stopping on my weak side. I can do it when I'm skating at a slow to medium pace, but no way I can do it fast. I'm so used to stopping one way also, so it's my automatic response. Also, I don't wanna drop to the ice when skating full speed for the puck.

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11-04-2010, 10:49 AM
  #28
adaminnj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubiSnacks17 View Post
If you're afraid of falling just put some pads on. No pain when you fall with pads.

Otherwise, just start at a very slow speed. As you start getting used to the motion, start increasing slightly.

For me, I still have trouble stopping on my weak side. I can do it when I'm skating at a slow to medium pace, but no way I can do it fast. I'm so used to stopping one way also, so it's my automatic response. Also, I don't wanna drop to the ice when skating full speed for the puck.
I only stop week side in panic mode or if the situation calls for it to block an opposing player from getting the puck. It is not a natural feeling to stop week-side at all and at times at speed really freaks me out.

As you do it more you will get more use to the unsteady feeling and or get to feel more comfortable on your week side

My new thing is practicing week side backwards crossovers. I force myself to spend at least 15 min every time I'm on the ics (min of 3 times a week) doing nothing but forwards and backwards week side crossovers and I practice on dry land too.

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11-04-2010, 11:04 AM
  #29
TheOtter
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A lot of really good advice in this thread, and I agree with all of it, but I wanted to throw out one (possibly) contrary idea. When I was learning to stop, I actually couldn't do it at a slow speed at all. I had to be skating moderately fast in order to get it right, and then I was able to work on my control.

So if you're trying to do it at very slow speeds and just can't seem to get it, try speeding up a bit and then really go for it - no fear! For me, it was kind of like learning to ride a bike - I needed some speed going to make it work at first.

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11-05-2010, 08:23 AM
  #30
Calvin123
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There's been lots of good advice in this thread. I've been teach lots of kids to stop over the last couple years, and this is what I've found works.

First - you've got to be able to snowplow stop ie with your skates like this: /\ This teaches you to get the feel of scraping over the ice - the critical piece is keeping your knees bent and getting a feel for your edges. If you can't do this - keep practicing and ask someone to watch you and make suggestions.

Next step: a "T" stop where your front foot is perpendicular to the direction of travel, and your back foot is parallel to the direction of travel. In this scenario - the front foot is doing all of the breaking, but the back foot keeps you from turning, and also provide some balance.

Once you can do the "T" stop, start with the T, but rotate your hips a little more, and bring that back foot parallel with the front foot - voila a hockey stop. I find this last step is actually very natural once you can do the T stop. In fact the T stop is awkward feeling, but doing it helps learn the edge control needed for the hockey stop.

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Old
01-13-2011, 10:39 PM
  #31
drakerebel
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what i have found, when working on my weak side: when i'd turn into my weakside, i found that if i turned my inside foot (weak foot) too much that i'd actually start shaving ice and thus stopping rather than cutting. it was one of those "ahh-haa" moments. so i tried it again and sure enough, when i'd apply slighly less pressure on that inside foot & turn it sharper that it would start to stop...i was like "FINALLY".

and for the other edge of my weak foot (inside edge), it was just a matter of having a duller blade that would shave easier and when i'd go into my (strong leg)one legged stop...i'd start to apply my weak outside edge and start to find the right angle to apply pressure. and this is where i feel that it comes to...muscle memory and how you instinctively remember to have your feet positioned and how much pressure to place when you want to stop...for me, it just came with practice. i didn't practice for hours at a time, just ten/fifteen minutes here and there. and it was something that i couldn't forsee happening...all of a sudden i started to shave on the foot that i was working on...viola'.

i wish the best to anyone else that has been struggling with this issue as well. i hope that you keep practicing and do not lose hope that it will get better.

and btw, i did fall on my tail a number of times and it would've been less painful with pads


Last edited by drakerebel: 01-17-2011 at 10:18 AM.
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Old
01-15-2011, 12:05 AM
  #32
UDnyr92
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Thanks guys for making this thread, really helpful. I'm working hard to be able to play in a mens league sooner than later, but I've only been skating seriously for one semester. All these recommendations and different ways to think about learning a hockey stop really helped.

I went skating this morning and worked on understanding the pressure needed to "scrape" the ice, and not put too much pressure on certain feet. Within just an hour and a half, I can just about stop, or at least slow down drastically, by having my feet in a position like... / | ... and almost in a T.

I can't quite do this in the other direction, I don't know why I feel like I cannot turn my right foot the same way. Also, I can't quite bring myself to full commit and turn the back foot parallel as well to complete the hockey stop. Nonetheless, I greatly appreciate your help - all the of tips and tricks to progress to a hockey stop really seemed to work so far.

Thanks!

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Old
01-15-2011, 03:58 AM
  #33
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You are well on your way. If you got the scrape down, then the rest is mostly just repetition. You will get more confident from practice and your balance will improve, then you'll be able to use more weight and you'll stop quicker.

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01-15-2011, 08:54 AM
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UDnyr92 View Post
I went skating this morning and worked on understanding the pressure needed to "scrape" the ice, and not put too much pressure on certain feet. Within just an hour and a half, I can just about stop, or at least slow down drastically, by having my feet in a position like... / | ... and almost in a T.

I can't quite do this in the other direction, I don't know why I feel like I cannot turn my right foot the same way. Also, I can't quite bring myself to full commit and turn the back foot parallel as well to complete the hockey stop.
Well, the actual trick to stopping is shifting of weight. Yes weight on both legs are important. But lets talk about up and down weight. You see, most hockey player skate with their knees bent...yes some coast. But, when you bend your knees, the center of gravity is now on your hips. This action gives you more balance.

So, when you are ready to stop, you stand up! This standing up, shifts the center of gravity weight from your hips to your chest. This allows you to feel light on your feet, allowing you to turn on the balls of your feet (where the toes meet the foot).

Then once you have made that turn, you slowly bend your knees backdown and you shift the weight bck to your hips and slowly stop! Now, the faster you bend your knees, the faster you stop.

Good Luck!
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01-15-2011, 12:26 PM
  #35
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Hockey Stop

I made a video on how to hockey stop, got some feedback from beginners on what they were still having trouble with, and then made another one to address these issues. I embedded it here.


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Old
01-15-2011, 09:56 PM
  #36
Grave77digger
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If you can shave ice with your skates while standing still you can hockey stop. Stand with feet shoulder width apart and push out with one foot shaving ice until you build a small pile of snow. Do it with both feet.

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Old
01-15-2011, 10:26 PM
  #37
kirsi
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one of these days i am going to be shameless and go to a public skate with my pads on and finally learn to hockey stop...

these tips are great. i will learn!!

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01-17-2011, 11:51 PM
  #38
Copeland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kirsi View Post
one of these days i am going to be shameless and go to a public skate with my pads on and finally learn to hockey stop...

these tips are great. i will learn!!
Will do the same... once I get pads. Unless you have natural skating talent, I don't think you can do it any other way.

And Grave77digger, it's the "with both feet" part that's the killer!

HC, that's an awesome description of vertical weight transfer, I think I'm gonna copy & paste it onto my desktop for easy access haha

Jeremy, I beg you, please do not ever let your site go down

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Old
01-18-2011, 12:33 PM
  #39
Jerry Lundegaard
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Like cpt_jeff said, the best thing would be to go to a public skate and work on it for 2 hours. someone there should be able to give you tips and demonstrate. try not to get to frustrated, it takes time.

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Old
01-18-2011, 01:47 PM
  #40
Fleuryoutside29
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I had this problem when I first started. I went to the public rink and asked the guy in the shop. He came out on the ice with me and worked with me for about a half hour free of charge. If you have a public rink near you you should go and and talk to someone. They'll probably help you. People like teaching others how to skate.

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