HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Has anyone taken up goaltending in middle age?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
11-16-2010, 02:45 PM
  #1
Van40
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 6
vCash: 500
Has anyone taken up goaltending in middle age?

Hi, new member here. I'm 40 and am looking to get back into hockey but this time am considering goaltending as it's a position I've always wanted to play. Hey, life's short.

I'm a fairly decent winger and my skating is fairly strong. I played about 4 years as a kid and then another 12 years between the age of 22-34 in a men's league. I'm in very good shape, train about 10 hours a week between a personal trainer, running, and cycling. My only physical constraint as it relates to goaltending would be flexibility, which I would rank as about what you'd expect from a 40 year old who hasn't worked on their flexibility. That would obviously have to improve somewhat.

I'm curious if anyone else has gone down this path? Or let's hear from the goalies, am I crazy? Any advice?

Van40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2010, 03:22 PM
  #2
Badger36
Registered User
 
Badger36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Columbus, OH
Country: United States
Posts: 2,318
vCash: 500
I havent personally dont it, but I think if its something you want to try, you should definetly do it!
I just hope youre prepared to spend a small fortune on goalie equipment though.
As youve said though, you will definetly want to work on your flexibility.

Badger36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2010, 04:03 PM
  #3
adaminnj
Leafs out = SPRING!
 
adaminnj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NJ
Country: United States
Posts: 675
vCash: 2466
I bought pads, skates, the whole sha-bang and played a beginners mens league this summer. That was enough for me. LOL I'm 46

If you really want to do it I say do it. I'm keeping the pads to fill in for friends once in a while but it's not a position I will go and play open pickup, or mens league out side of helping friends.

The goalies I know love the position, everyone else thinks goalies are nuts.

You can start by learning angles and play mostly stand up to start. As you get more limber and more use to the crease and position you can start working that into pad slides, and butterfly.

I never thought that I could sweet as much as I did in the pads. it's very anaerobic and tough position to play well. I still don't play it well but I have fun and chirp when I actually make a stop. LOL

Again If you think you want to play net then you should. it will either cure you of ever wanting to play net again or you will love it. either way you can say you done it.

adaminnj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2010, 06:11 PM
  #4
SabFanInOtt
Registered User
 
SabFanInOtt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Canada's Capital
Country: Canada
Posts: 889
vCash: 500
I'm 40 now but started playing pick-up hockey as a 33 year old after never playing any hockey (other than street hockey) as a kid. Then after a couple years I was pressed into being a fill-in goalie for our weekly pick-up game when one of our regular goalies tore a tendon.

Long story short, it was pretty quick to see that goalie was a more natural position for me as I actually had a little raw talent for the position. I quickly become fully engrossed in becoming as good a goalie as possible where as when I skated out I enjoyed it but never took it upon myself to really try and get better.

Now five years after picking up the position I'm the full time goalie for a team in one of the lower rungs of a beer league. I can honestly say if I can do it ANYBODY can do it because I would have been the last person anybody would have picked to become a goalie.

My advice is to buy some used goalie gear and try to get as much ice time as possible. There are many great vidoes on youtube to help you and I would recommend the goalie book by Jim Corsi (mentioned in another thread). I read it cover to cover and still go back to it from time to time for refreshers. There are a couple of really good websites with goalie forums (do a google you will find them easily) that will also have tons of advice and tips on every aspect of being a goalie. PM me if you want a list. For flexibility I would take up yoga (sign up with wifey if you have one) as it is awesome.

If you are interested in being a goalie just do it. Life is way too short to not try new things.

SabFanInOtt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-16-2010, 06:54 PM
  #5
Gino 14
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 812
vCash: 500
I started hockey at 41 because my daughter pulled me in. At 45 I started playing in net and loved it, I still play it 6 years later and enjoy it a ton. The one thing I did find out is that even in lower leagues you need good pads to really enjoy the game. Go for it, if you don't you'll regret passing the opportunity up.

Gino 14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 01:23 AM
  #6
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by adaminnj View Post
it will either cure you of ever wanting to play net again or you will love it.
This cracked me up

It's always a gamble to see which one it will be, isn't it?

Sorry, I'm in a worse situation than the OP but 15 years earlier, so I can't really comment. I just had to share that this post totally made my day.

Copeland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 01:51 AM
  #7
predfan24
Registered User
 
predfan24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,678
vCash: 500
I've been wanting to try net for in a beginner league but the price to be a goalie drives me away. If I buy that much money worth of equipment I better damn well enjoy being a goalie. Another thing is that I'm a right handed shot. But I also grew up playing baseball so I caught with my left hand. Holding the goalie stick in the right hand just sounds awkward.

predfan24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 07:51 AM
  #8
pelts35.com
Registered User
 
pelts35.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 11,612
vCash: 500
I am 38 years old and never played ice hockey in my life. As a kid and young adult I played street and always was a goalie.

My son (4) just started skating and I get on the ice with him. As I skated more and more I've made the decision that I want to start playing ice hockey and since I've always been a goalie, that is the position I am going to play. I just purchased goalie skates and plan on purchasing one piece of equipment every month or so. I figure that by next fall I will be fully equipped and ready to go.

The rink where my son takes lessons has an adult beginner hockey skills clinic. I asked if they have any goaltending training and while they said no, they did say that I could attend and face the shooters. I figure this might be a good way to get into it and then we'll see what happens from there.

pelts35.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 08:46 AM
  #9
adaminnj
Leafs out = SPRING!
 
adaminnj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NJ
Country: United States
Posts: 675
vCash: 2466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copeland View Post
This cracked me up

It's always a gamble to see which one it will be, isn't it?

Sorry, I'm in a worse situation than the OP but 15 years earlier, so I can't really comment. I just had to share that this post totally made my day.
Glad I made your day.

I was going to say cure you or kill you but that seemed a bit extreme.


As for the rest of the want to be goalies. I can't stress how important it is to start by learning the crease and angles before you start the fancy butterfly stuff.

here is a link that has a bunch of good exercises from beginner to advances to get you started.

You don't even need goalie pads for the beginner crease work like (out, over, and back).

http://www.usahockey.com/usahgoalies...F_10&ID=245894

I'm not a good goalie, but I'm an okay goalie coach. I was forced to start coaching my son 4 years ago and in the process of taking him to real instructors, clinics, and camps I have learned allot. As well I read everything I can about standup goalies. It seems that most classes are very butterfly focused which is good for some people but My son is kind of small and I'm kind of old so having the understanding of the angles while standing helps us allot.

And most of all GOALIES SKATE WITH THEIR FEET ON THE ICE! Learn to C-cut forward and backwards, and go fast in both directions. As well learn the T-push .

Good luck to all of you, and don't get discouraged when you let a bad (Stinker) goal in.

adaminnj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 12:12 PM
  #10
fyrestorm
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 24
vCash: 500
Van -
You're obviously crazier than a ****house rat if you're thinking about playing goalie, according to most people. However, as this post is coming from someone who decided to start playing goalie again at the age of 51 after being off the ice for 37 years, I'm here to welcome you to the fraternity. I'm in my second full season in a lower rec league, and even though I'm getting roughed up pretty badly this season (defense issues, i.e., traffic cones in front of me, but that's another story), I still can't wait for the weekly games.
As for advice, I have to agree with what has already been said - nothing beats ice time, no matter how you get it. Be sure to stretch before you get on the ice; nothing worse than a groin pull to completely ruin your season (speaking from experience). As for learning different techniques, yeah, the Corso book is a good start. Also check into McEachern"s (sic?) DVD - there's a lot of good info there. Remember that the butterfly style is just a tool, just as the stand up style is a tool - the trick is to build up your "toolbox" to find the style that: A - works best for you, and B - what works in a given situation. The first will be easier than the second; again, ice time, game situations, and experience will be your best teacher.
In terms of equipment, I'm not sure of your location, but I would check into used sporting goods stores near you, especially if you live in a big hockey area. You can find some really good deals on "gently" used equipment that you can actually try on before you purchase it. Obviously on some things you will want to buy new, but there are many pieces you can find which will allow you to get started without having to break the bank. As you get further into it, then you can decide if you want to upgrade to new pads, blocker, trapper, etc., or if you're just not "crazy" enough to play goal!
In closing, all I can say is have fun - to me it's the best position you can play, but then again, apparently all my wires aren't completely connected!
Good luck, and PM me if you have any questions that I might be able to answer for you, or at least point you in the right direction.

fyrestorm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 12:20 PM
  #11
pelts35.com
Registered User
 
pelts35.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 11,612
vCash: 500
BTW, I would recommend to check out www.goaliemonkey.com for equipment. It looks like some of their clearance stuff is reasonably priced, which also includes some combo packages as low as $390 (leg pags, blocker, catcher). There is even one package for $480 that includes leg pads, blocker, catcher and mask!

pelts35.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 12:33 PM
  #12
Van40
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 6
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by fyrestorm View Post
Van -
You're obviously crazier than a ****house rat if you're thinking about playing goalie
Ha! Well some people would describe me as that...my other two hobbies are race car driving and doing Ironmans. So now I'm convinced that goalie is for me!

Van40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 12:46 PM
  #13
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
As a kid I loved playing goalie, but my folks couldn't afford goalie gear for a teenager, so it was play as a skater or don't play.

Seeing the kind of velocity some guys can get on their shots, I really have no interest in going back in net. I don't care how good they say the padding is, I'm really not interested in getting in front of a piece of vulcanized rubber flying at 75mph.

Just remember that goalies need to have above average flexibility and balance.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 01:04 PM
  #14
Kayen
Fire Eakins
 
Kayen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: South Korea
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,053
vCash: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
As a kid I loved playing goalie, but my folks couldn't afford goalie gear for a teenager, so it was play as a skater or don't play.

Seeing the kind of velocity some guys can get on their shots, I really have no interest in going back in net. I don't care how good they say the padding is, I'm really not interested in getting in front of a piece of vulcanized rubber flying at 75mph.

Just remember that goalies need to have above average flexibility and balance.
I have terrible flexibility and i make it work. I can't even touch my toes anymore. I just started playing at age 17, but i've had several hip issues, and loss of flexibility, and i still make it work.
It's how you think the game, and technique as well, in combination with natural latent abilities. I lack the latter.

Kayen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2010, 01:25 PM
  #15
Gino 14
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 812
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
As a kid I loved playing goalie, but my folks couldn't afford goalie gear for a teenager, so it was play as a skater or don't play.

Seeing the kind of velocity some guys can get on their shots, I really have no interest in going back in net. I don't care how good they say the padding is, I'm really not interested in getting in front of a piece of vulcanized rubber flying at 75mph.

Just remember that goalies need to have above average flexibility and balance.
I'm with Kayen, flexibilty is great but it's overrated. I'm by no means a good goalie but I stop an occasioanal puck and have fun doing it and no one really seems to mind too much. I do go to great lengths to stretch out to give myself the best chance at not getting hurt but I can only play with what I brung. Those 75 mph pucks are few and far between and guys who possess them aren't welcome very long if they knowingly unleash them on newbie goalies, there is a certain code out there, goalies are a protected species.

Gino 14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-28-2010, 01:21 PM
  #16
pelts35.com
Registered User
 
pelts35.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 11,612
vCash: 500
I went to Hockey Monkey last night and walked out with my first set of pads, catcher and blocker. I figure I'll add the rest over the next couple of months.

In the meantime I'll probably get used to skating with pads on while my son is taking his lessons. I know I'll look a little foolish out there, but I may as well take advantage of the time on the ice. I've already started some flexibility and core exercises with my personal trainer.

pelts35.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-28-2010, 02:21 PM
  #17
adaminnj
Leafs out = SPRING!
 
adaminnj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NJ
Country: United States
Posts: 675
vCash: 2466
Quote:
Originally Posted by pelts35.com View Post
I went to Hockey Monkey last night and walked out with my first set of pads, catcher and blocker. I figure I'll add the rest over the next couple of months.

In the meantime I'll probably get used to skating with pads on while my son is taking his lessons. I know I'll look a little foolish out there, but I may as well take advantage of the time on the ice. I've already started some flexibility and core exercises with my personal trainer.
you might want to suck it up and but some goalie skates because that is a huge learning curve too.
you wont want to play net w/o goalie skates because the first good shot you take to the toe or soul of your foot will send you into a new place of pain.

Or if you have a goalie stick since you have a blocker and catcher you might spend the time to learn to handle the puck with the stick, blocker, catcher. It's different to move the puck with the blocker and catcher and the longer wider blade too.

The stuff above are the things I found to take a bit of time to get use to when I first started playing net.

adaminnj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-28-2010, 03:07 PM
  #18
GreatCanadian
Registered User
 
GreatCanadian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Brunswick
Country: Canada
Posts: 126
vCash: 500
I am not nearly the same age as some here, I started goaltending (again) at age 22. It is not easy by any means because most people have a head start experience-wise, but once you get the hang of it and can do good, basic saves.. the rest starts to fall in place as you go along

I say go for it, and have fun! Being a goalie is really cool, and people LOVE it and gentlemen's/beer leagues are always on the lookout for goalies, so you have the potential for a lot of ice time if you want it!


Last edited by GreatCanadian: 12-05-2010 at 10:44 PM.
GreatCanadian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-28-2010, 03:13 PM
  #19
pelts35.com
Registered User
 
pelts35.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 11,612
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by adaminnj View Post
you might want to suck it up and but some goalie skates because that is a huge learning curve too.
you wont want to play net w/o goalie skates because the first good shot you take to the toe or soul of your foot will send you into a new place of pain.

Or if you have a goalie stick since you have a blocker and catcher you might spend the time to learn to handle the puck with the stick, blocker, catcher. It's different to move the puck with the blocker and catcher and the longer wider blade too.

The stuff above are the things I found to take a bit of time to get use to when I first started playing net.
Thanks for the advice. Actually my first purchase about 6 weeks ago was goalie skates, and I'm slowly but surely getting used to them. I am skating 2 times per week and now that my son's soccer season is over it will be 3 times per week (an hour at a time).

I played street hockey with a catcher and blocker, so I have a little experience with that, but I figure I'll practice that in the basement during the week while my son can take shots on me.

pelts35.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-29-2010, 12:57 AM
  #20
dpixel8
Registered User
 
dpixel8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Wisconsin (MSN/MKE)
Country: United States
Posts: 92
vCash: 500
thinking of doing the same thing: http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=847249

Going to watch your thread and see what others say.

dpixel8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-29-2010, 02:26 PM
  #21
Van40
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 6
vCash: 500
Well I've taken the plunge and bought myself a set of entry-to-mid-level gear. My first time on the ice will be tomorrow in a lesson. I figure I need to get started on the right foot! Meanwhile I'm driving my wife nuts with my new gear all over the bedroom floor.

Van40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-29-2010, 02:42 PM
  #22
pelts35.com
Registered User
 
pelts35.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 11,612
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Van40 View Post
Well I've taken the plunge and bought myself a set of entry-to-mid-level gear. My first time on the ice will be tomorrow in a lesson. I figure I need to get started on the right foot! Meanwhile I'm driving my wife nuts with my new gear all over the bedroom floor.
What gear did you end up getting?

pelts35.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-29-2010, 03:23 PM
  #23
Van40
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 6
vCash: 500
I got a matching set of Brian's G Series pads, blocker, trapper. Reebok for the pants and chest. Bauer One75 goalie skates. Itech Envy7 mask. Can't wait!

Van40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-29-2010, 03:33 PM
  #24
pelts35.com
Registered User
 
pelts35.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 11,612
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Van40 View Post
I got a matching set of Brian's G Series pads, blocker, trapper. Reebok for the pants and chest. Bauer One75 goalie skates. Itech Envy7 mask. Can't wait!
Did you get it all new? How much did you spend in total?

I spent about $500 for my leg pads, blocker and catcher.

pelts35.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-29-2010, 03:37 PM
  #25
Van40
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 6
vCash: 500
Yes, all new. I couldn't stand the thought of wearing someone elses stuff. Leg pads maybe. Anyway, I spent about C$2200 in total. The pads, blocker and trapper were about $650 of that. They're actually the lowest quality/price part of my package because I figure if I get heavily into it and learn more about the gear I'll probably want to upgrade those before anything else.

Van40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:20 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2015 All Rights Reserved.