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Any advice for standing in front of the net?

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Old
11-12-2010, 05:41 AM
  #1
Pierre Gotye
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Any advice for standing in front of the net?

I've finally been able to play up front after just about every season as being a defenseman.

The team I play for slaughters everyone, but my puck handling and passing skills aren't exactly dazzling.

At any rate, I'm off to a good start, mostly due to my linemates. 3 games, 4 points(1g, 3 assists).

Being 6'7 standing in front of goalies tends to make the other team mad, and last game I got dumped down to the ice quite a bit.

What I am getting at is, and of you guys have any advice on how to stand in front of the net without getting dumped so much? Where should I keep my stick, is there a better place to stand?


Last edited by Pierre Gotye: 11-12-2010 at 06:09 AM.
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11-12-2010, 06:56 AM
  #2
vwg*
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brentbreakaway23 View Post
I've finally been able to play up front after just about every season as being a defenseman.

The team I play for slaughters everyone, but my puck handling and passing skills aren't exactly dazzling.

At any rate, I'm off to a good start, mostly due to my linemates. 3 games, 4 points(1g, 3 assists).

Being 6'7 standing in front of goalies tends to make the other team mad, and last game I got dumped down to the ice quite a bit.

What I am getting at is, and of you guys have any advice on how to stand in front of the net without getting dumped so much? Where should I keep my stick, is there a better place to stand?
If it's a competitive, physical league, you're going to get whacked and hacked no matter what, either by the d-man or goalie. If you're 6'7'' though, it's going to take a lot more than to move you out of the way.

Make sure you always follow and keep your body square to whoever has the puck.. it makes the goalie constantly have to look around your body to find the puck. For example, if your teammate has the puck along the boards, you should be on that side of the crease screening the goalie. If he's in the slot, you should be almost directly in front of the crease.

As for stick positioning, I usually keep it a little below knee level - that way I'm in good position to deflect a puck along the ice or in the air if it's a high shot. But if know you can't get your stick on the shot for a deflection do whatever you can to get out of the way of the shot while still doing your best to screen the goalie. For example, I'm left handed, so if my back is facing the goalie and the shot is towards the right side of my body, I try to hop over or sidestep the shot. Only really good shot deflectors can reach across their body and still have the hand-eye coordination to deflect the puck.. and I'm not one of them.

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11-12-2010, 07:55 AM
  #3
nesford2457
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Great advice from the first poster. All I would add is if your problem is mainly getting knocked down do two things. First widen your stance in front of the net and bend your knees a little more, this should provide a little more stability for you. Second don't be afraid to hit back, im not saying take a swing at the guy with your stick, but let them know its not just there ice its yours to. Give them a bump back when they knock down in front of the net is traditionally a pretty scummy place to be for a forward.

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11-12-2010, 08:52 AM
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First piece of advice, make sure everything is in your cup and stays there. As has already been said you have to get low wide stance knees bent, and if you are doing it right the Goalie is going to get frustrated, and a lot of them love the cup check. No matter how Non-checking the league you play in is, if you choose to park it in the Goalies face you are going to get hit from all angles and in my experience the Refs aren't going to call much.

Here's a couple things to try. Wait off to the side of the goalie til one of your guys is actually in a shooting position then move in front of the goalie, it seems to annoy them more to suddenly have their vision blocked.

But this is my favorite trick, works great on slappers from the point. Get square to the shooter low feet wide dig in on the inside edges. Defensemen now will try and front you and tie up your stick(they used to try and move you) so wait til the shooter winds up get your stick behind the D's thighs so he is more or less sitting on it. When the shot is released lift up and shove the D man forward and out of the shooting lane. The trick is to not try and knock them over, just propel them on their skates away from you. The nice thing is that this should give you a clear look at the shot, a free stick, and the room to turn and look for a rebound, but it takes work to get the timing down.

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11-12-2010, 09:17 AM
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Legs wide, bend the knees, sit your butt down a bit. You want to dig in with your inside edges so you're tougher to knock over. Being so tall, if they get you up high, you can lose balance, but get low and you'll be much harder to move.

I was told not to get directly in front of the goalie, but to stand a couple feet in front of him so he can't just look around you. If your team can actually cycle the puck well, pretend you're a goalie, meaning square up to the puck as it moves around, because that's exactly what the goalie will be doing.

Right when your teammate shoots from the point (not before), move out of the way and turn around to be ready to knock in the rebound.

Getting in front of the net is always good if your team can move the puck. It throws the goalie off his game and draws a defender towards you. That allows your team to get scoring chances on the back door too.

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11-12-2010, 01:54 PM
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Consider a padded shirt for lower back protection, shoulder pads don't really cut it(in my opinion).

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11-12-2010, 03:20 PM
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noobman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brentbreakaway23 View Post
I've finally been able to play up front after just about every season as being a defenseman.

The team I play for slaughters everyone, but my puck handling and passing skills aren't exactly dazzling.

At any rate, I'm off to a good start, mostly due to my linemates. 3 games, 4 points(1g, 3 assists).

Being 6'7 standing in front of goalies tends to make the other team mad, and last game I got dumped down to the ice quite a bit.

What I am getting at is, and of you guys have any advice on how to stand in front of the net without getting dumped so much? Where should I keep my stick, is there a better place to stand?
With regards to the shot... if it's a low shot, you'll want your stick blade on the ice with the face of the blade pointed towards the ceiling. If it's a higher shot, you'll want to get a piece of it with the shaft of your stick. Sometimes just screening the goalie will be enough, as the shooter will be able to pick a hole and the goalie will have no idea that the shot is coming.

As soon as the shot is taken you're going to want to spin quickly towards the goalie and start looking for loose pucks. This is another benefit of staying a little ways away from the goalie instead of right up in his grill. You'll have a better look at loose pucks, and will have the space to get it up instead of jamming at his pads.

Oh, and don't try to deflect the puck with your foot if it's in the air. A loose ankle doesn't like 80mph slapshots being rifled at it.



Honestly though, with your size you should be able to make a living grinding it out behind the net. If the crash the net play doesn't work, set up behind the goal line and off to the side a little bit, and work the puck down there. You can really use your size to create distance between the puck and the defender, giving yourself the chance to find the open man... be it the point man or the winger floating around the high slot.

If you don't want to get dumped... have a deep knee bend and a wide stance. Really dig those blades into the ice. Make sure that their only option is to tie you up instead of knocking you to the ground. Sometimes it can be hard b/c the shorter guy will have a leverage advantage over you (especially if he's strong). Keep your feet a little loose. If he pushes you forward, point your toes together to stop the momentum. If you get pushed from the front, point your heels together to stop the momentum. Think of it like sculling.


Last edited by noobman: 11-12-2010 at 03:26 PM.
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Old
11-12-2010, 04:07 PM
  #8
SJGoalie32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brentbreakaway23 View Post
Being 6'7 standing in front of goalies tends to make the other team mad, and last game I got dumped down to the ice quite a bit.

What I am getting at is, and of you guys have any advice on how to stand in front of the net without getting dumped so much? Where should I keep my stick, is there a better place to stand?
Sure....if you don't want to get dumped, go stand in the neutral zone

But seriously though, if you're standing in front of the goalie, you're going to get whacked and dumped. I don't know if that necessarily makes other teams "mad," per se (unless you make contact with their goaltender or whack them back, of course). But if you're standing in a position that is blocking the other team's goalie from seeing the puck, the goalie and his defense are going to try to.....you know.....NOT let you do that. It's just the way it is.

Other posters have given you good advice about your stance, and I particularly like standing just off the post and then sliding in front of the goaltender when you know that the shot is coming so that the defense doesn't have enough time to cover you or move you from your position.

But the bottom line is that area right in front of the crease is prime real estate, so everybody else is going to battle for it. You either have to take your lumps to score goals and draw penalties, or you have to move far away and let the goaltender have all the space he needs to see shots and cover rebounds. You're going to get dumped. That is the price you pay for standing in that prime area.

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Old
11-13-2010, 10:24 AM
  #9
dannythekid
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I'm a short guy (5'9) so I'm on the other end of the spectrum as you.

But as far as being in front of the net, I love being the guy to go in the dirty areas and try to create plays for the defense.

I try and stay out in front of the goalie a little bit so I can catch a rebound, or if I am in tight I like to try and get the defenseman off of his game and out of my way.

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11-13-2010, 03:36 PM
  #10
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Ok, well a lot of good thing you can do from players on this thread. However, please keep this in mind.

1.) This is the nature of the position. If you are in front of the goalie, you are going to get smacked by the goalie, the defenseman, and the shooter on your team out at the point as he launches the puck towards your head.

2.) If you are going to stand in front, cycle your weight from leg to leg, this will make you sway back and forth in front of the goalie while he changes sides to look around you. By shift weight back and forth, it will force him to readjust his sight. Yeah, that sucks for him.

3.) If the goalie is smacking you, he is giving more attention to you then he is to the puck. So, in this sense, you are doing a great job because you have unfocused the goalie from the puck, to you....good job

4.) Like others have said, wide stance helps and being square to the shooter.

5.) Last understand how to deflect the puck properlly.

A lot of players have a tendency to keep the blade perpendicular to the arriving puck, with it tilted at an angle towards the net so that the puck flies up into the top corner.
However, this move, 90% of the time, just stops the puck and helps make the save for the goalie.

However, if the shot is coming from anywhere (points, sides...anywhere) It's also good to have two things at work, to make this deflection work 90% percent of the time.

First, you must have a shooter that knows how to shoot. He must be able to read the situation once he has the puck and what is going on in front of the net while you screen the goalie and he has to do all of this in under 2 seconds.

Plus, you have to know how to read the situation that you are in, so that you can make the deflection work. For you...you have to be in a situation that will allow you to have full access to the use of your stick. This means that if the shot will be coming off to one side and the defenseman has placed you into a position which doesn't allow you access, you pivot, swing around, or move into position to get the deflection or shot off. However, you also need to know when to get away and when to stay.

Plus, it is also the shooter responsibility to read what you are doing and where you are going to go to get open to help deflect the shot or get open to make that defelection work. As a shooter at the point, you just don't send it to the net. You need to see of you have a better chance at scoring the goal if you place it off angle to the guy standing off to the side or in front.

Here's an example: Let's say the shot is coming from the point and you are the guy that is getting ready to launch this puck towards the net. But, you see two defenseman in front of the goalie, your centerman, and an on winger or an off winger off to each side. Which direction do you shoot it in? Here are your three choices again. On wing side, Center (in front) or off wing side?

Ok, let look at this. If you send it to the on wing side, the goalie had the angle set on you and the on wing side delector. Can the on wing side get the deflection off and in the net? Yes, but it is a low percentage scoring shot because of the goalie has the angle on his side.

Ok, so let's say the shot goes at center (in front) remember you 2 defenseman a center and maybe on or off wings around and moving. That's about 8 pairs of legs in the way...more or less and then you add the two goalie pads that are going to take up more room. What are the odds of the puck going in the net on a straight shoot through all of those legs? Not bad odds, I would say about 30 to 40% might go in.

Ok, let's look at the off wing deflect shot. First, the shot is going to be in the direction of the weak side (weak side means less legs in the way). Second, the goalie will read the shot as moving across his body towards the other side, which will put him in a concern of being scored on by the off winger that might be there.

You see, he might know and might not know if the off winger is there because he is focused on the shooter out at the point. But when he see the angle of the approach of the puck, he, within a split second, has to detemine if it is a threat or not (read and react) to that angle. There are better odds that the goalie will make a slight adjustment on that angle of the approaching puck comes.

But what he has done, is readjusted his position from the actual launch point, thus changing the coverage angle. In short, he is now out of angle with repect to the puck. At this moment, because the goalie feels it is going wide, the centerman needs to get his stick on the incoming path and it will redirect the puck in the other direction in which the goalie is moving.

Yes, he can be in that wonderful butterfly that they all like going down in, but if the puck is going wide (off wing side) we will have to make that wonderful butterfly move across the ice as well. To do this, he opens up that "5" hole and allows scoring room.

Now, I have found that great deflectors keep their stick blade pointing towards the shooter. This allows the defector in front to just move the stick from side to side without having to repositioning themselves so that the blade is at a certain angle for the shot. Now, this works great on front hand or back hand deflections.

But, it is also nice to have a pointman with the puck, to understand which side the shot need to go and which side the defector stick is on to get the best delection. Again another example: Let's say, if you were in front of the goalie, and coach say the best angle for defection is on the "Off Wing" angle side, and the shot is coming from your right side of you, out at the point, then this means you will have to get your stick, for the defection, on the left side of your body. If you shot left...you have it made. Not a whole lot of movement with your stick.

So this means that if you are out at the point, look to see how far you can launch that puck to the off wing side away from the deflector. If he has his stick on the "on wing" side, this means when you shoot, you will have to place the shot a little off his off wing outside leg, so the get's his back hand deflection on it.

Hope this was clear!
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11-13-2010, 05:52 PM
  #11
Jimmy Carter
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Be the lower man. If you're low in your stance, it's hard for the D man to get leverage to move you. Also, minimizing the distance between you and him helps for that as well as not giving him space to get much force behind those slashes or crosschecks (hence, it is less painful for you). If it's a particularly rough battle, lean on your stick to keep your balance. It's nice to be able to get a good tip on a shot coming in, but keeping the screen on is more important.

Take pride when the goalie or D man start whacking away at you. It means that you're getting in their head and doing your job perfectly. One of the most satisfying feelings is getting a goalie to push, shove, and whack at you, then your teammate puts one over the goalies shoulder and the goalie doesn't see it till it's in the net because he was so focused on you. Then just skate away with a smirk on your face, and next time your team has the zone skate right back and do it all over again

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Old
11-19-2010, 07:32 AM
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make sure you watch the play. I'm 6'2" and am in front of the net every game. when you play teams over and over again as most beer leagues do guy will start to know you as "that guy" if you use some or all of the suggestions above the other team will consider you a threat.

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11-19-2010, 09:01 AM
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Simple thing I give my kids is keep your feet wide knees bent for stability. As far as positioning it's simple....Pretend you are the goalie. If you are in the same position as the goalie then you have to be screening the real goalie unless he is out of position. Keep your stick out in front of you centered between your feet so that you can deflect passes that go to either side of you.
One thing to keep in mind is where the defenseman who is playing you is. Most shots you won't defelect and also won't score so be ready to spin and collect rebounds. Make sure you spin to the opposite side of the defenseman who is covering you even it is the long way around. Guys tend to spin toward the shot so they can see if it goes in. But if the shot is coming in at an angle it will most likely rebound at that angle in the opposite direction. If the puck is coming from the point at the goalies (and your) right I have my kids spin to the left. The goalie goes down and makes a kick save with his left foot and hands you the puck with half the net wide open. Don't chase....anticipate.

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11-19-2010, 09:14 AM
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby 77 View Post
make sure you watch the play...when you play teams over and over again as most beer leagues do, guy will start to know you as "that guy" if you use some or all of the suggestions above the other team will consider you a threat.
...and your point is what? That if he is getting better and all of the other guys he is playing against will now have to worry about their beer league trophy being lost?

Most beer leagues that I have seen, are leagues where guys playing a game, go to the local bar, slam down a couple of beers and talk and brag about how they were in the right spot, at the right time, to catch that POS of a pass you just give then and then they just put it high in the top corner.

At that point, chips and bar nuts are flying out of their mouths trying to explain how they should have pushed the guy out of the way but they couldn't move him. I don't see any beer leaguers at a point, are ready to go in the first round of the NHL draft. If that is the case, maybe someone is playing down a little and should be playing up in their upper skill level or taking that game a little to serious.

Either way, it's still a beer league, an area to have fun and not worry about if Dave or Ted is getting better and now how do we punish him for getting better.

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11-19-2010, 10:10 AM
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Just do whatever players did against you when you were playing D .

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11-19-2010, 03:55 PM
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Just think like you are the goalie, and want to stop the pucks, then you're having good positioning for screening him

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11-21-2010, 04:59 PM
  #17
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To echo what has been already mentioned....

1. Getting hacked at is the nature of playing infront of the net. If you don't like it, play in the open ice. It's also a good thing, because if the goalie is hitting you, he's not stopping the puck. If defenceman are coming after you, they're not pursuing the puck carrier. If you're on the PP, you've just turned a 5on4 into a 4on3.

You could also get more protective pads / a padded shirt. Most hockey pants sold today have spine protectors which are pads that extend above the normal height of the pant at your spine. While this may prevent a serious injury, it also gives defenceman something to jam their stick in to knock you off balance by pushing down it (they'll never get called for it), and at 6'7 that might be a problem for you. Another thing -- if your pants are getting pushed down, get suspenders. Also, make sure your cup is protecting what it needs to.

2. For positioning, you basically want to stand where the goalie would want to stand. Just on the outside of the crease, square to the shooter as if you were the guy trying to make the save.... because that means you're exactly where the goalie would want to be. To get a guage of just how much space you have, you can usually back into the goalie very slowly to get a feel of where he's standing, drive him nuts, and usually not get called. When battling with a defenceman, I personally try to get between him and the goalie, most beer leaguers wont go down to block a shot anyways.

3. If you're being pushed out, as others have reccomended, widen your stance and bend your knees. Remember that the shoulders are the widest part of the body, so ideally you want them infront of the goalie's face. No goalie is going to be looking over you, so get down as low as you're comfortable doing.

4. In terms of movement, you want to stay square to the shooter at all times. If someone on your team takes the puck below the goal line. You will usually be in a good spot to drop into the slot for a pass.

5. This may be a controversial topic, but if you get a serious whack like a cross check to the back of the neck, a really hard slash to the legs, or a big slew foot, going down isn't the worst thing in the world. Obviously don't stay down and milk it, get right back up, but sometimes the action (especially if it makes a lot of noise) is enough to draw the penalty. It'll keep both the goalies and players honest, because otherwise, if you do become really strong on your feet, they'll be able to get away with anything and not take penalties.


Last edited by seanlinden: 11-21-2010 at 05:54 PM.
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11-21-2010, 06:16 PM
  #18
Reverend Mayhem
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Make sure you keep a low centre of gravity, but make sure you aren't crouched too much so the goalie can see.

Now, the other team isn't going to let you play there without taking some punishment, so stand up for yourself when the situation warrants it (you don't want to take a penalty 200 feet from your net )

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