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Positioning Questions

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Old
11-19-2010, 12:45 AM
  #1
nwharris74
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Positioning Questions

Hi all,

I've been playing since February having a great time and learning lots. I'm not scoring any which is annoying but perhaps not my bag. Either way I'm wondering what I should do when my line mate gets double teamed against the boards with the puck. Most of the time I head straight for the net hoping for a pass that never happens. I'm now realizing that this is not helping any. Should I go and dig the puck out or move in attempting to get more open for a pass or cut off a breakout of the opposing team?

Thank you.

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11-19-2010, 03:09 PM
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trtaylor
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If you are the closest forward, get over there to help and try to come away with the puck. Look for F3 to be in the slot and hopefully open for a pass. If he's not open, rim the puck around to the weak side for your D-man to pick up.

If you're not the closest forward, then you are F3 and you ned to get in a position to receive a pass and take a shot. Don't stand there waiting for the pass, but keep your feet moving, always trying to put yourself in good position to receive that pass.

Good luck. It's hard work and easier to read/write about than actually do.

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11-23-2010, 09:16 AM
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nwharris74
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Thanks for the reply, here's another one...

If I'm a winger covering the point in the defensive zone is there any time when I would come in down low to help the defense?

Occasionally I'll see a lapse in our defense where nobody is covering a winger on my side of the ice. When the puck gets to him often I'm the closest guy but at the same time, I''m leaving the defender open at the point. Many times that winger has got a free shot on goal.

Thanks to all who read this.

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11-23-2010, 11:07 AM
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OvenChicken8
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Yes you can drop down to support the defenseman, but look to see where your center is first. That is usually his job but if he is caught out of position, drop down to be between the puck carrier and the net and give your center a yell to switch with you. Communication is key.

If your center is already down low with the dman then move closer to the ringette line just incase their F3 is in the area looking for a pass that would leave him all alone.

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11-23-2010, 11:18 AM
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weber72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwharris74 View Post
If I'm a winger covering the point in the defensive zone is there any time when I would come in down low to help the defense?

Occasionally I'll see a lapse in our defense where nobody is covering a winger on my side of the ice. When the puck gets to him often I'm the closest guy but at the same time, I''m leaving the defender open at the point. Many times that winger has got a free shot on goal.
Just faced this dilemma myself last week. Is the winger along the boards, or is he moving into the high slot? If he's wide open in the slot, I'd stay close enough to him to disrupt an incoming pass. Sure, that's not your guy, but in lower tiers of hockey, I'd much rather allow a shot from the point than a shot from the high slot.

Also, make sure to build good on-ice communication with the rest of your team. Sometimes that opposing winger can slip into a scoring position without your teammate noticing. If you see it, let him know. That can save you from having to leave your cover on the point.

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11-23-2010, 11:33 AM
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Steelhead16
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To your first question. The net is probably the last place the puck will come to from a guy stuck on the boards. Go help out but make sure you help out to the goal line side. If the puck pops out to the blue line side your defenseman should be there so stay down low. Also don't just jump into the pile and clog it up even more. Keep yourself in a position to be able to do something with the puck should you get it.

This is something that you can work on off the ice with your other forwards. Let them know where you will be when they get in that situation. Let them know that he just needs to move the puck down the boards, with a stick or a kick or something, just free it up. You can also run a set play off of this as well, especially in a beginner league. Chances are that if you end up with the puck the 2 opponents will just both turn and come at you. If you just back a little deeper into the corner and your teammate who was stuck on the boards breaks for the net he should be wide open in the faceoff circle. If it helps to visualize this just draw it out on a piece of paper and it should make sense.

To your second question. Unless your out of position guy can cover your place before you can cover his or he can get back to his own spot, just stay put. I know you want to fix something that you see as broken but in reality it usually just creates 2 people out of position and a bigger mess than you already have. If you're doing someone else's job then chances are nobody is doing your's. If the puck comes back to your point man and he cruises up and scores, it's on you. Just concentrate on your job especially as a beginner. You can switch later on when everyone actually knows what everyone else's assignment is. Keep it simple and do your job well before you try and complicate the game. There are 100 different things to be done at one time during a game. Do your 20 and let everyone else do their own 20 and you'll have them all covered.

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