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Martin St. Louis 2005-2006

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08-04-2014, 10:34 AM
  #1
Terry Yake
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Martin St. Louis 2005-2006

I was looking through MSL's career stats and saw something I found odd. In TB's cup year of 2003-2004 MSL had his breakout season and put up 94 pts in 82 games with a +35 rating

Fast forward to the 05-06 season and his numbers take a huge nosedive to 61 pts in 80 games and a -3 rating. Why did his numbers fall so noticeably that season? It's even more odd considering that 2005-2006 was such a high scoring season.

With 70 pts in 82 games in 02-03 and 94 in 82 the season after, were people calling MSL a fluke after his down season of 05-06?. Plus it's not like the Lightning were a bad team that year either.


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08-04-2014, 10:53 AM
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Big Phil
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I found it weird when it was happening too. I think at the time he was a guy people thought just had a spike year and returned back to earth. Of course, things changed immediately next year in 2007. He had over 100 points and has never taken his foot off the pedal since. I'm not sure people figured St. Louis would be elite throughout his whole 30s and carve out a HHOF career, at least not after his dismal 2006 season. Lecavalier as well had a weird year. 75 points. You'd think the NHL would be tailor made for him right in his prime. Alas, he broke out next year with 52 goals, so maybe he just hadn't hit his prime yet.

A lot of great players have that unusual year in the middle of their careers. Ron Francis I think had a weird 1992 season. Bill Barber had a strange year right after 112 points in 1976. Joe Mullen, I think 1990 was a big dip for him after 1989. So I think it is nothing more than just this.

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08-04-2014, 12:44 PM
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TheDevilMadeMe
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Did St Louis play hockey during the 2005 lockout or did he just sit around?

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08-04-2014, 12:49 PM
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Dancing Plague
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Did St Louis play hockey during the 2005 lockout or did he just sit around?
He played a handful of games in Switzerland.

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08-04-2014, 12:58 PM
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feffan
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Another from that 04 Finlas had a surprising weak year - prime Iginla. But unlike the Tampa-players mentioned he didn´t play at all during the lockout, and that can explain his "heating up" a season.

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08-04-2014, 01:00 PM
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LeBlondeDemon10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
A lot of great players have that unusual year in the middle of their careers. Ron Francis I think had a weird 1992 season. Bill Barber had a strange year right after 112 points in 1976. Joe Mullen, I think 1990 was a big dip for him after 1989. So I think it is nothing more than just this.
Add Marcel Dionne. In the midst of numerous consecutive 100+ pts seasons he had 79 pts in 1977-78. He missed 10 games, but its still possible to have an off year. As with St. Louis and Lecavalier, coming off that Cup run and then a lockout, you have to wonder what was up. Did they feel they had reached their ultimate goal and weren't as hungry? Did the celebration go on right through the lockout? Did they lose their work ethic after having achieved their goal? Or was it just an off year?

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08-04-2014, 06:11 PM
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I definitely thought at the time that '03-04 was just a spike for him. I think in some ways it was probably an off year, but not playing much during the lockout could be one of the issues. One thing as well though is, he didn't get to take advantage of the extra powerplays that season as it seems the powerplay ran completely through Brad Richards, who led the team with 46 powerplay points. With so many offensive options, it seems the rest of the points were spread out among LeCavalier, Prospal, Boyle, Kubina and St. Louis. With St. Louis being more of a playmaker, having Richards be the man on the powerplay probably hurt him the most. St. Louis only scored 20 powerplay points after scoring 30 in '04.

I'm not sure why LeCavalier's season is considered such a disappointment. He didn't take advantage of the increased scoring as much as one might think until the next year, but it was still the second highest total of his career to that point, and only 3 points off his career high.

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08-04-2014, 07:42 PM
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Terry Yake
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i know it's very common to have an off year

but MSL's case sticks out to me mainly because he had his off year in one of the highest scoring seasons in recent memory. i don't really pay much attention to the lightning so i don't recall MSL having such a down season until i saw the stats today. i too would have probably thought that 03-04 was an anomaly and that he'd be a 50-60 pt player for the remainder of his career but his 06-07 sure proved that wrong

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08-04-2014, 09:10 PM
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BenchBrawl
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It's very likely the lock-out is responsible in one way or another given St.Louis consistency after that year.

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08-04-2014, 10:47 PM
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Big Phil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeBlondeDemon10 View Post
Add Marcel Dionne. In the midst of numerous consecutive 100+ pts seasons he had 79 pts in 1977-78. He missed 10 games, but its still possible to have an off year. As with St. Louis and Lecavalier, coming off that Cup run and then a lockout, you have to wonder what was up. Did they feel they had reached their ultimate goal and weren't as hungry? Did the celebration go on right through the lockout? Did they lose their work ethic after having achieved their goal? Or was it just an off year?
I'm not sure. I do know that they lost Nikolai Khabibulin after the lockout. I think John Graehme was in net for them that year wasn't he? If so, that is a big drop off. They played the Senators in the first round which was just an uneven match.

I'll put it this way, after the 2007 season when St. Louis had 102 points I predicted he'd be in the HHOF. I honestly did. I wasn't sure after 2006, but after his big year in 2007 I figured he'd be on his way. Boy, did I get laughed at around here, on the HFboards. I just figured he was for "real" after 2007 and figured if he had a prosperous time in his 30s he'd be a lock. Well, I hate to brag...................but this is just an example of how he was viewed at that time. A guy on the back nine of his career who had a couple of lucky seasons.

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08-05-2014, 12:02 AM
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Sticks and Pucks
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Lecavalier and St. Louis both signed big contracts during the offseason. I believe it was the first big contract for both of them. It's pretty common for players to have an off year the first year after signing a big contract. On the other hand, Brad Richards was in his contract year and that's probably why his numbers were better than the other two that year.

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08-05-2014, 02:35 PM
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LeBlondeDemon10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
I'll put it this way, after the 2007 season when St. Louis had 102 points I predicted he'd be in the HHOF. I honestly did. I wasn't sure after 2006, but after his big year in 2007 I figured he'd be on his way. Boy, did I get laughed at around here, on the HFboards.
It seems to me that if a guy with size even has one good year, many of us would be predicting he'd be HOF bound. Rick Nash comes to mind. A smaller guy with all the talent in the world still has to prove many of us wrong...and not just in hockey. I wonder how Jose Altuve's, the current leading hitter for average in the AL, journey to the big leagues went? He's 5'5" 174 pounds (probably with catcher's gear on and a whole bag of chew in his mouth), but what a spark plug!

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08-05-2014, 02:57 PM
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Ishdul
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Originally Posted by LeBlondeDemon10 View Post
It seems to me that if a guy with size even has one good year, many of us would be predicting he'd be HOF bound. Rick Nash comes to mind. A smaller guy with all the talent in the world still has to prove many of us wrong...and not just in hockey. I wonder how Jose Altuve's, the current leading hitter for average in the AL, journey to the big leagues went? He's 5'5" 174 pounds (probably with catcher's gear on and a whole bag of chew in his mouth), but what a spark plug!
Pretty smoothly for Altuve, although part of that is being a cheap rookie on one of the cheapest and worst teams in history. Altuve has been permanent on the Astros since his age 21 season, which is pretty quick in baseball terms.

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08-05-2014, 04:29 PM
  #14
Regal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Phil View Post
I'm not sure. I do know that they lost Nikolai Khabibulin after the lockout. I think John Graehme was in net for them that year wasn't he? If so, that is a big drop off. They played the Senators in the first round which was just an uneven match.

I'll put it this way, after the 2007 season when St. Louis had 102 points I predicted he'd be in the HHOF. I honestly did. I wasn't sure after 2006, but after his big year in 2007 I figured he'd be on his way. Boy, did I get laughed at around here, on the HFboards. I just figured he was for "real" after 2007 and figured if he had a prosperous time in his 30s he'd be a lock. Well, I hate to brag...................but this is just an example of how he was viewed at that time. A guy on the back nine of his career who had a couple of lucky seasons.
I remember you saying that a few years ago and even then it seemed like a bit of a stretch to me. Looks like a good call though.

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