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The 2011 ATD-B Beer League Draft

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Old
01-20-2011, 12:04 PM
  #101
Hedberg
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Archie McNaughton

Why he should be selected:
1890 Retro Hart
3rd in Scoring 1888 (only played twice compared to the leaders’6 games and 2nd place’s 7, with two less points)
1st in Scoring 1889
1889 AHAC Champion
1st in Scoring 1890
1890 AHAC Champions
3rd in Scoring 1891

Why he shouldn't be selected:
I can find nothing on him other than his stats. Statistically, he was the best forward of the first few years of the AHAC, but as we covered in the MLD, being the best during this period of time means little as so few games were played and so few played hockey.

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01-20-2011, 12:32 PM
  #102
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F Jack Armytage



Why he should be selected:
Manitoba Hall of Fame:
Quote:
An excellent player, a brilliant leader, and best remembered as the man who first organized a hockey club in the City of Winnipeg on November 3, 1890. This forward was captain until his retirement after the 1897 season. One of his greatest games was on February 14, 1896 in a sudden death game for the Stanley Cup when Jack Armytage scored the winning goal in 2-0 victory over Montreal; the first time the Cup came West.
- Led Manitoba League in scoring in 1894 and 1896. Second one time to Dan Bain (who had 3 more points).

Why he shouldn't be selected
- His legacy is greater for his off-ice work. I'm unsure what being the second best forward in the Manitoba League is the equivalent of, although I'm guessing it's pretty good if they could win a challenge.


Last edited by Hedberg: 01-20-2011 at 12:41 PM.
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01-20-2011, 01:10 PM
  #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
LOVE the Gilchrist pick at this point... HATE the Elik pick in comparison.
Me too! I had Gilchrist shortlisted for the 4th line LW slot when I picked Stephane Matteau in the Double-A Draft. I forsook the defensive advantage of Gilchrist for the chippier energy and opportunistic scoring of the more historically significant Matteau.

Elik is a one-trick pony: he can skate. Kozlov is much better because while he has one great skill in shootouts/breakaways, he also has all-around great sklll as he's demonstrated from time to time, inconsistently. He is a 9 with a minus. Elik is at best a 6 at his peak even with his one great skill. Bure was a better pick because he can skate and shoot a lot and has excelled on the powerplay at times, demonstrating a potential that could manifest itself in a hypothetical season played in all-time competition. Bench Elik, for the love of hockey.

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01-20-2011, 01:45 PM
  #104
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Wembley selects Eddie Martin, the captain of the Halifax Eurekas in 1899 and 1900, a coverpoint in the historically underappreciated Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes. In 1901 at the age of 25, Martin joined the Sea-Sides and led the team to the Maritime championship. The following season, according to George and Darril Foster in their 2004 book Black Ice:

Quote:
In 1902 Eurekas refused to play the Sea-Sides and walked off the ice. The two teams would not play again until 1904, and Martin, a star of the league would not play again.
The historians also contend that Martin is arguably the first player to use a slapshot. he would 'wind up' and use a swing, a skill he might have developed from baseball, the other sport he loved and tried to play professionally.

Quote:
Ask a hard-core hockey fan who took the first slapshot, and they will probably tell you it was hall-of-famer Frank ''Bun'' Cook.

But if you ask hockey historian George Fosty, he'll tell you it could have been Eddie Martin of the all-black Halifax Eurekas, 100 years ago. Most people have never heard of Martin, or the Eurekas, or the Coloured Hockey League, despite the fact the league marked the high point of a black hockey tradition among the Canadian children and grandchildren of freed slaves.

''What we see in Nova Scotia is these isolated communities that grew up around white communities, and they just seemed to develop this unique brand of hockey,'' says Fosty, who is speaking this week in Ottawa to mark the start of Black History Month.

Just how unique a brand it was became apparent when the league was founded in 1895. It numbered perhaps a dozen teams and eventually included 400 players from Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

No idle weekend association, the league was a professional body, taken seriously by players Fosty says may have been the source of many hockey ''firsts.'' Most black hockey players played baseball during the summer months, resulting in a style more prone to high-sticking than was normal at the time and possibly the source of Martin's slapshot.

Even defensive play was more dynamic. Fosty says black goalies weren't afraid to get down onto the ice if that's what it took to stop a shot, a standard goaltending style today that was frowned upon 100 years ago. They were also more likely to skate out and take an active part in play.

The high point of the league was in 1905, says Fosty, after which he accuses the elite in the Maritimes of working to undermine it. However, he says the campaign to keep black players off the hockey rinks they shared with other leagues was subtle.

''Rather than banning the league or forcing them out, they simply moved their schedule further ahead one month, knowing that the ice conditions would be bad,'' he says. ''When half the ice is water, it's hard to skate. It slows down the game, people don't come to the games, they don't pay to see that.''

That, combined with subtle economic and social pressure, crippled the league, which lingered on a little into the 1920s before vanishing from the public record in 1925. Fosty says most newspapers, with the notable exception of the Acadian Recorder, barely covered the games, and when they did, they treated it as a joke.

''They just deemed these guys not worthy of recording,'' Fosty says. ''We've got almost 400 athletes that we've looked at, that we've got background information on, and they don't appear in 99.9 per cent of the sources.''

Fosty and his brother Darill spent years poring over archived Maritime newspapers and church records, and interviewing church elders, in the course of their research, culminating in their book, Black Ice: The Lost History of the Colored Hockey League, published in 2004.

He says they plan to continue to piece together this lost chapter of hockey and black history, and it will take ''time and evidence'' before the Coloured Hockey League becomes well known once more.

''When we wrote the book, we identified 173 hockey players,'' he says. ''Today, we're approaching 400. Over time, and as more information comes out, they myths will be dispelled. We're into the next stage of finding hopefully the final bits of information.''
http://www.canada.com/topics/sports/...bd48d8&k=68012

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01-20-2011, 01:48 PM
  #105
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How good were the black players of the Maritimes? We will never know. But they certainly seemed to be playing an advanced level of play given it was the earliest era of the game. They played like professionals:

Quote:
One of the most notable differences betweens the styles of play between the early white and black hockey players would be the physicality of play. The players in the black league played an extremely physical game. Spectators were guaranteed to see on-ice skirmishes, the players speeding end to end across the ice and deep seated rivalry. This greatly contrasted the restrained almost polite style that white hockeyists played. And the crowds responded. Whilst you may see two hundred people watching a game of white hockey players, the crowd swelled to well over a thousand if two black teams took to the ice. Savvy rink owners with an eye to making a quick buck took to promoting the games with advertisements in the local newspapers.

There was a little bit of something for everyone when you went to a black hockey game. Before the game, there were races or contests on the ice. Brass bands may be playing. Intermissions filled with acrobats or comedic antics on the ice. These are the roots for today's game format, combining sport and entertainment. Following the games there were banquets held by the host team. They were large affairs with turkey or goose dinners and all the trimmings. The games of the black hockey league were much more of a social event than that of the white league.

At the end of the season, there were playoff matches held to determine the annual winner. Unfortunately there was not a trophy that existed to be awarded, so the winner had only the title of the “Colored Hockey Championship of The Maritimes" to compete for.
http://media.fans.nhl.com/_The-Histo...86/111820.html

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01-20-2011, 01:59 PM
  #106
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Wembley selects Willie O'Ree, the WHL all-star who was the first black player in the NHL, even though for a short stint. He played professional hockey for 19 years and suffered racism and played despite a 95% loss of vision due to injury. Imagine what a healthy O'Ree might have done in another era.



Quote:
O'Ree noted that "racist remarks were much worse in the U.S. cities than in Toronto and Montreal," the two Canadian cities hosting NHL teams at the time, and that "Fans would yell, 'Go back to the South' and 'How come you're not picking cotton?' Things like that. It didn't bother me. I just wanted to be a hockey player, and if they couldn't accept that fact, that was their problem, not mine."

In the minor leagues, O'Ree won two scoring titles in the Western Hockey League (WHL) between 1961 and 1974, scoring thirty or more goals four times, with a high of 38 in 1964–65 and 1968–69.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_O'Ree

Quote:
Willie O'Ree was an outstanding athlete and with his determination he could have been an outstanding baseball player. Once he decided on hockey and the NHL though there was no stopping him. So just how determined to make it in the NHL was he? O'Ree was playing for the Canadiens' farm team in Kitchener-Waterloo in 1955 when he took a puck to the right cheek and eye cavity. The bones in his face would heal, but the damage to his right eye was extensive. O'Ree lost 95% of the sight in that eye. Doctors told O'Ree that he would never be able to play hockey again. They did not count of the fierce determination burning inside nineteen year old O'Ree. Knowing something of discrimination, O'Ree decided to keep the extent of the damage to his eye a secret, knowing that if he was going to make his dreams of playing in the NHL come true the knowledge of his injury could very well end his career. Once the wounds healed and O'Ree was back on the ice, he developed a way of swinging his head back and forth as he skated to give himself some peripheral vision, something most of us take for granted. O'Ree continued his hockey career, joining the Quebec Aces of the prestigious Quebec Hockey League in 1956. It was during his second season with Quebec, the Boston Bruins of the NHL called up the 22-year-old O'Ree to replace an injured player. On January 18, 1958, Willie O'Ree made his NHL debut in a game against the Montreal Canadiens at Quebec's Montreal Forum. O'Ree took to the ice on the Bruins' third line as a forward, as the Bruins pulled off a 3-0 victory. He didn't score, or record a penalty, and what was a historic moment in time was barely noted. Red Fisher, then a reporter for the old Montreal Star, wrote: "Not even a murmur of interest greeted what a decade or so ago had rocked baseball to its foundation.”

After only two games, O'Ree was sent back to the Aces, but he also played several games that season with the Springfield Indians of the American Hockey League (AHL). For the 1959-60 season, O'Ree joined the Kingston Frontenacs of the Eastern Professional Hockey League, scoring 21 goals and 25 assists in 50 games. O'Ree then went to the Hull-Ottawa Canadiens, where he scored 19 points in 16 games. O'Ree rejoined the Bruins at the end of 1960, and on January 1, 1961, in another game against the Canadiens, and it was here that he scored his first NHL goal. O'Ree played 43 games with the Bruins that season, scoring a total of four goals and adding 10 assists.

The next season, the Bruins sold O'Ree's contract to the Los Angeles Blades of the Western Hockey League (WHL), and O'Ree spent most of the rest of his career out west, playing 11 years with the Blades and the San Diego Gulls and twice winning the WHL's scoring title. O'Ree spent just one season with the New Haven Nighthawks of the AHL, before returning back to California. After a two-year break from playing in the late 1970s, O'Ree then returned for a final season with the Pacific Hockey League's San Diego Hawks in 1978-79. He retired at the end of that season, at the age of 43, after a professional hockey career of 19 seasons and 10 teams.
http://media.fans.nhl.com/_The-Histo...86/111820.html

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01-20-2011, 02:31 PM
  #107
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I can get behind the O'Ree pick for sure. He made the NHL on merit, and knowing the times, it was probably begrudging, even. This most likely (but not definitely) means that in a number of other years he was an NHL-caliber player that was just not being given a proper chance. His WHL goal title agrees (and 4 times top-5). This was not just your run of the mill minor leaguer.

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01-20-2011, 04:52 PM
  #108
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The China Sharks select a good two-way checking 3rd line center, C Patrice Bergeron



20th Lady Byng(09-10)
11th Lady Byng(05-06)
5th Selke (09-10)
2x 70 point scorer
316 points in 422 career NHL games
20 points in 31 career playoff games
1x Olympic Gold Medalist
1x World Championships Gold Medalist
2005 WJC MVP

Quote:
Patrice Bergeron was born July 24, 1985 in Ancienne-Lorette, Quebec. The second pick, 45th overall selection of the Boston Bruins in the 2003 NHL Entry Draft, Bergeron is a graduate of the QMJHLs Acadie-Bathurst Titan. After playing only four games with the Titan in 2002-03, Bergeron tallied 73 points (23-50-73) the following year and impressed the Bruins scouting staff enough to draft him early on in the 2003 Entry Draft. Bergeron turned out to be the surprise of training camp and earned himself a roster spot with the parent club after only one full season of major junior hockey under his belt.

In his first full season with the Bruins, Bergeron finished fifth in rookie scoring with 39 points (16-23-39). His 2006-07 season, however, was short lived. On October 27, 2007 in a regular season game against the Philadelphia Flyers, Bergeron was hit from behind into the boards. The hit left Bergeron with a concussion and broken nose which resulted in his absence from the remainder of the season and NHL playoffs.

On the international stage, Bergeron helped Canada capture gold at the 2004 World Championships in Prague, Czech Republic and with the NHL lockout in 2004-05, he was named to Canada's World Junior Team. As the only NHLer on the roster, Bergeron was instrumental in helping Canada capture the Gold Medal and earn tournament MVP honours.

At the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, Bergeron would again don the maple leaf and would help the Canadian team to the gold medal.
-loh.net

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Old
01-21-2011, 07:50 AM
  #109
VanIslander
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Martin Erat




* averaged 50 points a season over a six-year stretch
* scored 372 points in 583 NHL games
* scored 14 points in 16 World Championship games
* played in two Olympics and was a star of the 2001 Memorial Cup

Quote:
During the 2006–07 NHL season, Erat emerged as a legitimate first line player, tallying 57 points in only 68 games. Most often, Erat teamed with Paul Kariya and David Legwand to form the team's top unit. Erat missed the final 5 weeks of the season with a torn MCL.

Once again playing for Nashville in 2007–08, Erat posted a career high 23 goals, and added 34 assists to once again reach the 57 point plateau.

He is also known for his wrist shot and his speed.

Erat played for the Czech Republic at the World Junior Championships in 2001. He helped the team to win the gold medal. In 2006, Erat played for the bronze medal winning Czech national team at the Turin Olympics. In the same year, Erat was a member of the silver medal winning team from the IIHF World Championships in Riga, Latvia.

Following the 2007–08 season, Erat signed a 7 year, $31.5 million dollar contract with the Predators.

He has two career hat tricks, the first against the Edmonton Oilers, and the second versus the Vancouver Canucks on December 8, 2009.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Erat

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01-21-2011, 08:17 AM
  #110
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Murray Baron



* 6'3 215 lbs.
* 988 NHL games, 73 playoff games
* five times top-7 in powerplay goals on-ice against
* averaged 19 minutes a game over career

Quote:
Nicknamed "Bear" Murray Baron attended the University of North Dakota where he teamed with goalie Ed Belfour to win an NCAA title in 1987. An eighth round draft pick of the Philadelphia Flyers in the 1986 NHL Entry Draft, Baron spent three years at UND before making his professional debut with the Flyers AHL affiliate in Hershey in 1988-89.

Baron joined the Flyers for part of 1989-90 and most of 1990-91 but was traded prior to his third season to St. Louis with Ron Sutter for Dan Quinn and Rod Brind'Amour. Baron stayed in a Bluenote for more than five years, providing the team with a huge physical presence on the blueline. His forte clearly was hits, not goals.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=10063

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01-21-2011, 08:51 AM
  #111
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Baron averaged 18.7 minutes a game, actually.

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01-21-2011, 12:03 PM
  #112
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D Petteri Nummelin



Why he should be selected
- Record 15 appearances at the World Championships
- 2006 Olympic Silver Medal
- 5x World Championship All-Star (2000, 2001, 2006, 2007, 2010)
- 2x World Championship Best Defenseman (2000, 2010)
- 2x Most Assists at the WC (2001, 2006)
- 1995 World Championship Gold Medal
- 4x World Championship Silver Medal
- Like Viktor Kozlov, was elite at shootouts

Why he shouldn't be selected
- Brief career of three seasons in the NHL, one with the expansion Blue Jackets and two with Lemaire's Wild. His first with the Wild wasn't terrible production wise. If those were one's experiences in the NHL, I don't blame him for spending his career mostly in Switzerland

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01-21-2011, 01:35 PM
  #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedberg View Post
D Petteri Nummelin

- 5x World Championship All-Star (2000, 2001, 2006, 2007, 2010)
- 2x World Championship Best Defenseman (2000, 2010)
- 2x Most Assists at the WC (2001, 2006)
- 1995 World Championship Gold Medal
- 4x World Championship Silver Medal
Indeed. An elite international stage performer on the blueline. I loved watching him play for Team Finland, the only team other than Canada I root for in the worlds. I had forgotten about him, though he was on my radar during the AAA draft, the negative being his limited success in the NHL, though being 35 years old at the time limits the negative. I wish I had drafted him. Good pick.

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01-21-2011, 03:11 PM
  #114
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Melville selects Billy Baird, D



We figured we had better grab Baird before VI took him along with the rest of the good pre-merger defensemen.

In the Rockett Power bio from A2010, the defense duo's immense effect on their team's GAA in the 1910 OPHL was outlined. Baird's resume outside of the OPHL may not be as nice as Power's, nor as long, but he was a three-time all-star in three leagues: 1906 in the IHL, 1909 in the TPHL and 1910 in the OPHL. With baird, Galt won the 1911 OPHL title and the right to get their ***** handed to them by the NHA Champion Senators.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trolley League
The difference seemed to be on defence where Billy Baird and Rocket Power of Waterloo formed an impenetrable wall to the Brantford forwards...

The Waterloo defence tandem of Baird and Power stood up the Brantford forwards for the second straight game as the Colts beat the Braves 6-3 for their third consecutive win...

The Berlin forwards, particularly Dumart and Frood had a tough time getting by the Waterloo defence pair of Billy Baird and Rocket Power..

Rocket Power and Billy Baird played another strong game for Waterloo completely shutting down Brantford‟s offence....

The play was clean throughout with the exception of one fight between Billy Baird of Waterloo and Oren Frood of the Dutchmen....

Billy Baird‟s play was solid despite playing the entire game with one eye completely swollen shut, the result of a collision with a stick in practice the previous day....

Tommy Smith with five goals and Billy Baird who played a strong defensive game were the stars for Galt....

Billy Baird made his first of many trips to the penalty box for checking too aggressively in the mind of the referees...

...teamed with Rocket Power to form the league‟s top defensive pairing. The duo formed an almost impenetrable defence for the Colts on many nights. With the turnover of the entire Waterloo team in 1911 due to the admission of Quebec into the NHA, Billy Baird left the Colts to anchor the Galt defence along with Ras Murphy. Baird was noted as a strong body checker, the “Ottawa Citizen” reported following Galt‟s 1911 Stanley Cup match against the Senators that Baird “had a knack of throwing a man into the boards with surprising speed and suddenness.”

John Cross is a testament to the difference that strong defensive play makes to a goalkeeper‟s statistics. In the first five games of the 1910 season Cross allowed an average of 8.46 goals against per game, but after the Colts signed Rocket Power and Billy Baird his average dropped to 4.67 goals against per game, second only to Hugh Lehman; the following season without the benefit of playing behind Power and Baird his goals against average ballooned back up to 8.23 on a weak Brantford team.


Last edited by seventieslord: 01-23-2011 at 02:37 AM.
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01-21-2011, 03:13 PM
  #115
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Baird was on my to-research list.

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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Kevin Slater's book "The Trolley League" will have a lot more on Baird, which I will post later.
Looking forward to it.

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01-21-2011, 03:38 PM
  #116
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Melville selects Mike Johnson, RW



Mike Johnson had a very respectable 661-game career that kinda flew under the radar. He was not a great physical player despite his size, but he was a good producer, particularly at even strength, and a very frequent penalty killer (27%). Most of the best point producers left are one-dimensional types who never killed penalties. Those who did kill penalties to the degree Johnson did, didn't or haven't yet come close to his 661-game track record. This makes him a much more useful and established offensive player than the available defensive guys, and a much more useful and established defensive player than the available offensive guys. A classic tweener. Not really a 9-5=4 guy, maybe 6-2=4 (a bit soft and injury prone are his downfalls)

Johnson played 10 NHL seasons, strangely being remarkably durable in 7 of them (76+GP), but playing just 11-57 games in the other three.

Johnson can be useful in small doses to an MLD/AAA team. With 376 dead puck era points, he wouldn't be the worst offensive player there, and he certainly wouldn't be the worst player in a defensive/PK role either. Just don't expect him to carry a line - he is a complementary player.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2004
has an advanced knowledge of how to use the ice offensively and defensively... protects the puck on the boards... knows then to dart and doesn't just stand around waiting for defensemen to tie him up... puck movement on the PP is exceptional... a terrific skater with the kind of speed that will always earn him an NHL job... can tary puck carriers when killing penalties and has the one-step quickness to be a shorthanded threat...


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01-21-2011, 03:49 PM
  #117
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D Irek Gimayev



Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame
11 goals in 93 Soviet national team games
40 goals in 356 career Soviet league games
2x World Championships Participant
2x Canada Cup Participant

Quote:
Then, Irek Gimaev and Tim Thomas punched each other out, Gimaev ripping the US flag off Thomas' sweater.
http://books.google.com/books?id=0h7...ed=0CCgQ6AEwAQ

Quote:
Late in the game, all heck broke loose after Slava Fetisov pounded Jim Johnson and then decked another American with one punch; Tim Thomas and Irek Gimaev slugged each other to a standstill.
http://www.google.com/search?q=irek+...a368afbc2e5567

Quote:
Tikhonov also inserted the kid line of Makrov, Irek Gimayev, and Viktor Tyumanev for the last game, and all three sparkled.
http://books.google.com/books?id=0h7...ed=0CC0Q6AEwAg

Quote:
Irek Gimaev was given minor and misconduct penalties for spearing Kirk Muller.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...k+gimaev&hl=en

These quotes indicate that not only did he have a mean streak, a rarity for a Soviet player, but that he may have also played some forward as well.


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01-21-2011, 03:51 PM
  #118
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D Tapio Levo



2x Pekka Rautakallio trophy winner
Captain of Assat 83-92
2x Finnish 1st-Team All Star
69 points in 107 career NHL games
Finnish Hockey Hall of Fame
1x SM Liiga champion
152 Finnish National Team games
19 points(13G, 6A) in 45 career WC games

Quote:
Defenceman Tapio Levo played briefly with the Colorado Rockies and New Jersey Devils in the early 80s. He was better known as a domestic and international player in his native Finland.

Born in Pori, Finland, Levo played his first game with the local Assat club in 1972-73. This began a long association with the club which lasted until the end of the 1988089 season. Along the way he was one of the top offensive rearguards in the country and was a key part of Assat Pori's national championship in 1978.

Internationally, Levo made his first international appearance for Finland at the 1975 World Championships. He later played on five Finnish teams at the World Championships as well as the Canada Cup in 1976 and 1981. The slick blueliner was also named to the Finnish first all-star team in 1984 and 1985.

Levo's NHL career materialized after he signed with the Colorado Rockies in July, 1981. He scored 22 points in 34 games as an NHL rookie on the weak club in 1981-82. In the off-season his rights were transferred to the New Jersey Devils after the Colorado franchise relocated. Levo scored 47 points for the club but still finished with a plus/minus rating of -41 on the defensively horrid Devils. He returned to Finland the next season and played six more years with Assat Pori before retiring in 1989.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13388

Quote:
When I discussed with others how good Leppanen was, I continued to hear about Finland's best defenseman, Tapio Levo. Leppanen was a smooth and polished thirty, and Levo was twenty-four, so their experience made them vital parts of the dangerously explosive Finnish team...
-Herb Brooks(http://books.google.com/books?id=z2e...20levo&f=false)


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01-21-2011, 03:57 PM
  #119
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Glad to see them both get mentioned. I was considering both.

Are you scanning the old AAA/AA/leftovers threads for picks? It seems like everyone you take is from there.


Last edited by seventieslord: 01-21-2011 at 04:10 PM.
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01-21-2011, 04:13 PM
  #120
BillyShoe1721
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LW Yuri Blinov

1x Olympic Gold Medalist
6x Soviet League Champion
Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame
23 goals in 37 career Soviet National team games
119 goals in 236 career Soviet league games


Quote:
One of the keys for the Soviets in the 1972 Summit Series was surviving the 1st period of game one. The team was nervous and Canada, while nowhere near their peak shape, were expected to come out like gangbusters.

"And that's exactly what happened," said Yuri Blinov, reminiscing about Canada's quick 2-0 lead in the game. "By the middle of the first period the Canadians slowed down very noticeably. After Zimin scored our first goal we found our game and, slowly increasing the tempo, achieved success."

Indeed they did. They humiliated Canada 7-3 in that first game. They went on to be Canada's equal throughout the series. Often they were the better team.

Yuri Blinov, a star left winger, only got into 5 games, scoring 2 goals and 1 assist for 3 points. It was his goal at the 3:34 mark of the third period in game number five that sparked a Soviet 5 goal third period to comeback from a 3-0 deficit and win 5-4.

Blinov got off to a terrific start in his career while playing with Mikhailov and Petrov. Blinov impressed with his speed and heavy wrist shot. However the Blinov experiment soon ended and coach Tarasov returned Kharlamov to the line.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...ri-blinov.html

Quote:
In the early 1970's, Blinov earned the reputation of one of the top rankings scorers in CSKA. His most successful year on the international level was 1972 when he became an Olympic champion in Sapporo and played against Team Canada in September 1972. According to Kharlamov's biography, Tarsov was experimenting with the so-called "systema" and Kharlamov was teamed with Anatoly Firsov on a new line. As a result, Blinov joined Vladimir Petrov and Boris Mikhailov and was able to demonstrate his great scoring talent. Aside from this, Blinov was known for his very good physical conditioning, strong wrist shot and fast skating.
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...oster/ru09.htm


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 01-22-2011 at 06:05 PM.
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01-21-2011, 04:18 PM
  #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Glad to see them both get mentioned. I was considering both.

Are you scanning the old AAA/AA/leftovers threads for picks? It seems like everyone you take is from there.
Yeah, pretty much.

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01-22-2011, 08:15 AM
  #122
VanIslander
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Frantisek Kaberle



* Most points (13) by defenseman in 2006 Stanley Cup championship, including cup-winning goal
* 30 points over 9 World Championships, winning five gold medals
* played in 1996 World Cup and won Bronze in the 2006 Olympics

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When Frantisek Kaberle's younger brother Tomas stepped into the Toronto Maple Leafs line up and started turning heads as a solid puck moving defenseman, NHL clubs took a longer look at him.

Kaberle assisted on nine goals for L.A. in 37 games before he was packing his bags as the result of a trade. The Kings felt they needed some veteran leadership in their locker room for the playoffs and the price they paid was diminutive sniper Donald Audette and Kaberle. Both were shipped to the Atlanta Thrashers in exchange for Nelson Emerson and Kelly Buchberger.

In Atlanta, Kaberle was an instant success. The defenseman fit in well and managed seven points in 14 games to finish out the season. The following year, in 51 games he was able to post 15 points but more importantly set a franchise record with his plus-11 rating. That spring he joined team Czech Republic and won his third straight gold medal at the World Championships.

In 2001-02 Kaberle elevated his play and flashed some offensive skills by tallying five goals and 25 points despite missing 17 games because of a groin/hamstring injury and would once again represent his homeland at the 2002 World Championships. Kaberle returned stronger in 2002-03 and led all Atlanta defencemen in minutes played averaging nearly 22 minutes per-game before establishing a career high 29 points (3-26-29) in 2003-04. Kaberle went on to play a little over four seasons with the Thrashers before being acquired by the Carolina Hurricanes in the summer of 2004.

In 2004-05 due to the NHL lockout Kaberle skated with Modo of the Swedish league prior to competing for his hometown club in Klando of the Czech league. When NHL play resumed, he returned for his for first full season as a Hurricane and produced his most offensive season at the time tallying 44 points. Heading into the playoffs healthy, Kaberle suited up for each of Carolina's 25 playoff games. In game seven Kaberle scored the game-winning goal which granted the Carolina Hurricanes the Stanley Cup in 2006.

Throughout his playing career, Kaberle has represented the Czech Republic at the 1993 World Junior Championships as well as the 2006 Winter Olympics and is a seven-time member of its World Championship team (1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2005)

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01-22-2011, 08:29 AM
  #123
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Donald Brashear



* 1025 NHL games, 205 points, averaged 13+ minutes a game for years
* 2634 PIMs as agitator, enforcer and feared fighter
* Enforcer of the Decade, according to The Hockey News
* scored 5 points in 8 games at 1997 World Championships

Quote:
Brashear was a tenacious forechecker, who could create momentum by playing aggressive and delivering body checks, while possessing an underrated shot. When fighting he uses a combination of balance and upper body strength while taking his time trying to control his opponents before landing punches. Although left handed by nature, he became adept at using either hand during fights. He was considered one of the toughest players in the NHL as well as one most feared.

In the January 2010 issue of The Hockey News, Brashear was named enforcer of the decade, noting that although he did not lead the NHL in number of fights, during the decade, he would have been involved in more if "he wasn't so feared". Hockey analyst Bill Clement states that "Brashear has a great sense of when his fighting skills are necessary and he picks his spots before dropping the gloves. He’s excellent at understanding when a bit of pugilism might well provide the push or nudge to get some momentum going for his team." The Hockey News also assessed his skills by saying he possessed one of the most intimidating packages in the league, had a decent skating stride and was one of the best pugilists in the NHL. He was a bit too deliberate when handling and passing the puck, and fought much less as he got older, while slowly breaking down over time.

His aggressive style of play has led to being among the league leaders in penalty minutes six times, while currently ranking 15th all-time in NHL history, and has resulted in multiple suspensions as well. He remains the Vancouver Canucks all-time single season leader in penalty minutes, which he set in the 1997–98 season.

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01-22-2011, 11:55 AM
  #124
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The China Sharks select a guy that brings a unique combination of size and skill to the table,RW Anson Carter.



3x 55 Point Scorer
421 points in 674 career NHL games
13 points in 24 career NHL games
1x Top 10 PPG (10)
2x Top 10 Shooting % (3, 4)
2x World Championships Gold Medalist

Quote:
A true, feel good story. Carter was one of the last players drafted in the 1992 NHL Entry Draft, 200th to be exact, by the Quebec Nordiques. After four years of patience at Michigan State, where he fine tuned his hockey skills in hopes of making the NHL, Carter was traded to the Washington Capitals for nothing more than a 4th-round draft choice.

Undetered, Anson went to camp and impressed the Caps coaching staff enough to play part of the season with the team. But after just 19 games, he was dealt to the Boston Bruins with Jim Carey, Jason Allison, and a draft choice for Bill Ranford, Adam Oates, and Rick Tocchet in the year's biggest trade.

In Boston, Carter developed into a bona fide NHLer. Big and strong, with soft hands around the net, Carter averaged 20 goals a season with the Bruins. He held out as a free agent in 2000. Boston replied by trading Carter to the Edmonton Oilers, along with two draft picks for fellow power-forward Bill Guerin and future considerations. Anson reached star status with the Oilers, nearly making Canada's roster for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games.

In the stretch run of the 2002-03 season, the financially-strapped Oilers traded Carter, a soon-to-be free agent, to the New York Rangers. Carter failed to catapult the Rangers into the playoffs, but matched his career high of 60 points.

Carter has also experienced considerable success internationally for Canada, winning gold at the World Juniors in 1994 and at the World Championships in 1997 and 2003, including scoring the gold-winning goal in overtime in 2003.

In 2003-04, Carter and the Rangers were struggling and the team had been contemplating the acquisition of Washington Capital forward Jaromir Jagr. Shortly after the Christmas break, all the rumours became true as Jagr landed in the Big Apple and going the other way was Carter. The former Michigan State Spartan played in a mere 19 games with the Caps before being dealt to the Los Angeles Kings just prior to the trading deadline.

Upon his arrival with the Kings, Carter went on to play 15 games with the club before opting to sign as a free agent with the Vancouver Canucks following the 2004-05 NHL lock out season.

As a member of the Canucks, Carter tallied a career high 33 goals on a line with twins Daniel and Henrik Sedin. Carter however was not re-signed by the club following his most productive season at the time.
-loh.net

Quote:
They have in Anson Carter potentially the best black stickhandler to skate in the bigs.
Quote:
Carter only played 19 games for Boston at the tail end of a non-playoff season but impressed by averaging almost a point a game. Then, Pat Burns took over as coach and the ambiance changed at Fleet Center. Carter had not only become a regular but a meaningful part of the offense.

"He became a power forward with great hands," Joe Thornton said.
Quote:
There were now less than 3 minutes to play when Carter simply turned the game around by himself.
Quote:
"He's got size, speed, good balance, doesn't get knocked off the puck, and he's a fast, strong skater. He's a good offensive player and is going to get better."-Harry Sinden
http://books.google.com/books?id=Zfl...carter&f=false


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 01-22-2011 at 12:09 PM.
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Old
01-22-2011, 03:36 PM
  #125
TheDevilMadeMe
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Frantisek Kaberle is a fantastic selection at this point. Can't go wrong with the primary PP QB of a Stanley Cup champion this far down!

Donald Brashear.... meh. I wouldn't select that type of player, but if you want a one-dimensional goon, I'm sure he's one of the best ones left.

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