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Old
02-03-2011, 04:19 PM
  #26
Leafs Forever
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Pierre Pilote was one of the most outstanding defensemen of his time.- Joe Pelletier
Quote:
Playing the game full-tilt was Pierre's philosphy. He never held anything back, and went like heck every game.- David Dupuis, co-author of upcoming Pilote biography.
Quote:
Pilote was a superb defenseman at both ends of the ice. In his own zone he blocked shots fearlessly, but he also wasn't afraid to join the rush and he was a first-rate passer-Legends of Hockey

Quote:
He was one of the most feared defensemen of Original Six hockey-Legends of Hockey
Quote:
Pierre Pilote won the norris trophy in 1963, 1964, and 1965. Pilote was an eight time All-Star with the Chicago Blackhawks. Blessed with superb all-around skills, Pilote was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame.- Hockey's Most Wanted
Quote:
Headline: Pierre Pilote- The Best Before Orr

Pierre Pilote was an aggressive defenseman who could play the body and rush the puck effectively. Though he did not play organized hockey until 16, he became a skilled playmaker who consistently ranked amongst the top scoring defenseman of his day. -Hockey's Glory Days
Quote:
Pierre Pilote made his debut along the blueline for the Chicago Blackhawks in 1955. Pilote became a full-time starter the following season, becoming a fixture for the next 12 seasons. In that 2nd season of 1956-57, the tough and physical defender began a streak of not missing a game for five seasons, a total of 376 straight contests. A fine passer and shot blocker, Pilote was named the team's captain in 1961, helpind lead the Hawks to their 1st cup in 23 years. -Right on the Numbers
Quote:
Pilote also became renowned as a tough guy who should be avoided, a reputation enhanced when he knocked both Henri and Maurice Richard out cold during the same mix-up.-Legends of Hockey
Quote:
Pilote should be classed with the Orrs, Robinsons, and Macinnises in the playoff record books, given that he was the only Original six defenseman to earn top points in a post-season scoring race. He would win the Norris Trophy as top rearguard on three successive occasions...but perhaps Pilote's greatest achievement came mid-career in Chicago's breakthrough playoff year of 1961. The Hawks' D-man led the rush and worked the corners, besting Chicago's marquee gunners, Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita, to tie Gordie Howe as playoff scoring leader and record 15 points.- The Biggest Book of Hockey Trivia
Quote:
The Hawks became Stanley Cup champions in 1961. Pilote scored the winning or tying goal in every Blackhawks victory that year-Joe Pelletier
Quote:
The Blackhawks were quite confident they could shut down any team in the 1960s due to the terrific defensive play of Pierre Pilote.- 06/07 "Captains" Retro Card
Quote:
Pilote is definitely one of the best defencemen in the National Hockey League right now. He has been a key man this series and during the regular season he was one of the most dependable players we had. He has great defensive ability, can carry the puck and is extremely valuable on the powerplay. Above all, he is a team man.
He weighs only 170 pounds but he offsets this weight disadvantage, if any, by his smartness and effectiveness.- Rudy Pious, Chicago Coach via the Windsor Star, Apr 12, 1961, during Stanley Cup Finals Series.
The Toronto St.Pats are proud to select a fantastic all-around defenseman...


Pierre Pilote!

Awards and Achievements
1 x Stanley Cup Champion (1961)
1 x Retro Conn Smythe (1961)
3 x Norris Trophy winner (1963, 1964, 1965)
5 x First Team All-Star Defenseman (1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967)
3 x Second Team All-Star Defenseman (1960, 1961, 1962)

Norris Voting - 4th(1960), 4th(1961), 2nd(1962), 2nd(1966), 2nd(1967)

Scoring
Points amongst Defensemen - 10th(1957), 5th(1958), 3rd(1959), 1st(1960), 2nd(1961), 3rd(1962), 5th(1963), 1st(1964), 1st(1965), 1st(1966), 1st(1967), 6th(1968)

Play-off Points - 1st(1961), 7th(1963)
Play-off Pointsamongst defenseman - 1st(1961), 2nd(1962), 1st(1963), 1st(1964), 2nd(1965), 2nd(1967)


Last edited by Leafs Forever: 05-02-2011 at 08:58 PM.
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Old
02-03-2011, 06:04 PM
  #27
arrbez
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For the second draft in a row, Inglewood is pleased to select a big, tough defender who can do it all:

Bill Gadsby



Stats:

NHL First Allstar Team (1956, 1958, 1959)
NHL Second Allstar Team (1953, 1954, 1957, 1965)

NHL points: (9th, 16th, 19th, 20th)
NHL assists: (3rd, 3rd, 7th, 13th, 13th, 16th)

Defense points: 1,1,1,2,2,2,2,2,4,4,6,7,7
Defense assists: 1,1,1,2,2,2,3,4,4,4,7,8
Defense goals: 1,1,2,2,2,3,3,4,6,6,9

NHL Allstar Game appearances: (1953, 1954, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965)


An 7-time Allstar, Gadsby (or "G-Spot" as he liked to be called) earned his 3 first-team selections the hard way due to his prime overlapping almost perfectly with the prime years of Red Kelly and Doug Harvey. Three of his second-team allstar selections came behind that legendary duo. In a different era, it's not hard to imagine Bill Gadsby earning more than 3 first-team selections.

Gadsby led all defensemen in scoring 3 times, and finished second to Kelly or Harvey on another 5 occasions. He led all defensemen in goal scoring as a rookie in 1947. Gadsby was the first defenseman in NHL history to record 500 points, and the second player to play 20 NHL seasons.

On top of his elite offensive resume, Gadsby was a strong defensive player who played an extremely physical game. His willingness to sacrifice his body in the line of duty earned him a reported 600 stitches in his face over the course of his 20 year NHL career.

Sadly, Gadsby had the supreme misfortune of playing his first 15 seasons in Chicago and New York, where he never had a prayer of winning the Stanley Cup.


A few quotes:

Quote:
He is virtually indestructible - Eddie Shore
Quote:
A fan interviewing Stan Mikita:

I asked him who was the toughest defensive forward he faced and he demurred on
the question, telling me the term defensive forward was not applicable to that
era. He told me forwards were expected to be two-way players. However when asked
which defenseman gave him trouble I was delighted to hear him tell me that it
was Bill Gadsby who gave him the most trouble. I won't repeat what he called Gadsby but it confirmed what Gadsby told me when I interviewed him in 2007.
link
Quote:
He was a big rangy defenseman with tremendous offensive abilities who sacrificed his body on every shift to play a strong defensive game. link
Quote:
He was a three-time member of the NHL First All-Star Team, and was equally comfortable as a defensive or offensive defenseman. link
Quote:
In Detroit, Bill Gadsby was one of the best at it [shot blocking] when I was a kid in the early and mid-1960s. My Dad, who hated the Red Wings, used to complain that Gadsby blocked more shots than did the Red Wing goaltenders—Terry Sawchuk, Hank Bassen and later, Roger Crozier. link
Quote:
Think of great shot blockers and Bill Gadsby, Al Arbour, Mike Ramsey, Dave Lewis, Ken Morrow and Guy Carbonneau come quickly to mind. link
Quote:
The only rearguard who was consistently rated better was Doug Harvey of Montreal link


Last edited by arrbez: 02-04-2011 at 09:10 AM.
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02-03-2011, 09:48 PM
  #28
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Boston had Phil Esposito, Bobby Orr, Wayne Cashman, Ken Hodge and Johnny Bucyk. And they had another advantage - playing on home ice. In such a situation, coaches usually prefer to rely on experienced players, yet Al MacNeil took a chance on his novice. And Ken defeated the Bruins almost single-handedly. The series lasted for seven games, and Dryden rescued his team after quite a few sloppy plays and from goals that should have been scored.-Legends of Hockey
Quote:
Ken Dryden was far from the stereotypical NHL goalie. The average goalie is always edgy and a little nervous, and you really can not blame them for that. But Dryden was as cool and confident as could be.- Joe Pelletier
Quote:
During his short first season in the NHL, Ken Dryden demonstrated brilliant technique as a goalie and an ability to win even in unfavorable situations - qualities acquired with experience...Ken gained a reputation for his exceptionally quick reflexes and his brilliant work with the goalie stick. He even got 23 assists during his career. But the most important statistic of all is the six Stanley Cup wins in eight seasons.- Legends of Hockey
Quote:
More than any of his dazzling moves, big saves or stolen games, it was his "thinker's pose" that most people vividly remember about Ken Dryden. When the puck was cleared from his zone or when the play was whistled dead, Dryden would coolly dig the tip of his blade into the ice and fold his arms across the top. He simply relaxed until the puck came back down to his end.- Joe Pelletier
Quote:
The guy that showed he could step from anywhere right into the hot water, like he did when he was a rookie. He played only six games (in the regular season) and took on the role of goaltending for the Canadians against Boston in the playoffs in '71. He went on from there to show that he was one of the top goaltender of all time. Intelligent, very smart, and one of the very best conditioned athletes.- Bob Cole, for By The Numbers
The Toronto St. Pats are proud to select, our starting goaltender...



KEN DRYDEN!

Awards and Achievements
6 x Stanley Cup Champion (1971,1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979)
5 x First Team All-Star (1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979)
1 x Conn Smythe Trophy Winner (1971)
1 x Second Team All-Star (1972)

Stats
Hart Voting- 2nd(1972), 4th(1973), 4th(1976), T-10th(1977),

All-Star Voting: 2nd(1972), 1st(1973), 4th(1975), 1st(1976), 1st(1977), 1st(1978), 1st(1979)

S% Standings- 3rd(1972), 1st(1973), 6th(1975), 2nd(1976), 1st(1977), 1st(1978), 3rd(1979),


Last edited by Leafs Forever: 04-09-2011 at 01:11 AM.
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Old
02-03-2011, 10:06 PM
  #29
Dreakmur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Team Canada's players fully believed their scouts' observations early in game one in Montreal. Tretiak allowed a goal just 30 seconds into the game, and before the 7 minute mark it was 2-0 Canada.

But from that point on Tretiak shut the door. Tretiak emerged seemingly from nowhere to rob and frustrate Canadian shooters who peppered him relentlessly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by A September to Remember
Canada outshot the Soviets in 6 of the 8 Summit Series games including game 4 when Tretiak stopped 21 third period shots in a 5-3 Soviet win. And while Tretiak's save percentage of .884 isn't spectacular by today's standards, his play was spectacular by any era's standards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat McLean
Tretiak's positioning was excellent and the reality is that he makes very few fivebell saves. The puck just hits him. He looks the modern goaltender. All angles covered and no holes.



Vladislav Tretiak !!!
International Accomplishments:
3 x Olympic Gold Medalist (1972, 1976, 1984)
Olympic Silver Medalist (1980)
Canada Cup Gold Medalist (1981)
Canada Cup Bronze Medalist (1976)
World Championship Gold Medalist (1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983)

Hockey Hall of Fame (1989)
IIHF Hockey Hall of Fame (1997)

Centennial All-Star Team
3 x Golden Stick Winner (1981, 1982, 1984)
Golden Stick Voting – 1st(1981), 1st(1982), 1st(1984), 5th(1979), 6th(1980)

4 x IIHF Best Goaltender (1974, 1979, 1981, 1984)
3 x IIHF All-Star (1975, 1979, 1985)
2 x Izvestia Cup Best Goaltender (1978, 1980)
Canada Cup MVP (1981)
Canada Cup All-Star (1981)


Domestic Accomplishments:
Soviet League Champion (1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984)

5 x Soviet League MVP (1974, 1975, 1976, 1981, 1983)
14 x Soviet League All-Star (1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984)

Soviet League MVP – 1st(1974), 1st(1975), 1st(1976), 1st(1981), 1st(1983), 2nd(1978), 2nd(1984), 3rd(1973), 3rd(1977), 3rd(1982), 4th(1972), 5th(1971)


Last edited by Dreakmur: 02-08-2011 at 04:56 AM.
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Old
02-03-2011, 11:48 PM
  #30
overpass
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Chris Pronger, D



6'6, 220 pounds

2000 Hart Trophy Winner

2007 Stanley Cup Winner
2006, 2010 Stanley Cup Finalist
Arguably the best player on his team in all three Finals runs.

Team Impact
Chris Pronger has had a massive positive impact on every team he has played on.

St Louis: Pronger took a couple of years to come into his own. He did so with a vengeance in 1997-98, playing over 27 minutes per game with a plus-minus of +47. He starred for St. Louis until 2003-04. In the 2 seasons before Pronger’s prime, the regular season Pronger missed to injury, and the 2 seasons after Pronger left, St Louis had an average of 75 regulation points, made the playoffs 3 times, and won 1 playoff series. In the 6 prime regular seasons Pronger played in St Louis, they averaged 97 regulation points, made the playoffs 6 times, and won 5 playoff series.

Edmonton: During Pronger's one season in Edmonton, they went to game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals. Edmonton had not won a playoff series in the 7 years prior to that, and has not made the playoffs since.

Anaheim: In Pronger’s first season in Anaheim, they won the Stanley Cup. Anaheim averaged 101 points in the regular season with Pronger, and 94 points in the season before and after he left.

Philadelphia: Pronger has played one full season in Philadelphia. He led them to Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Finals.


Quotes

Michael Farber, SI, 2000:
Quote:
At 6'6" and 220 pounds, Pronger takes control of a game with his formidable strength and reach. The puck may enter the Blues' zone on an opponent's stick, but it most often comes out on Pronger's. He had been on the ice for a minuscule 43 even-strength goals-against this season, and he has helped hold the NHL's top five scorers—the Penguins' Jaromir Jagr, the Panthers' Pavel Bure, the Flyers' Mark Recchi, the Sharks' Owen Nolan and the Blackhawks' Tony Amonte—without an even-strength point in 14 games.
Michael Farber, SI, 2000:
Quote:
"He plays 30 minutes a game, but I swear he could play 60," says defenseman Marc Bergevin, Pronger's penalty-killing partner. "Well come to the bench after a minute, minute-and-a-half shift, and I'll be puffing, and he'll take a drink of water, look around and be ready to go again."

Pronger has learned to husband his energy, joining the rush only when he sees an opening and using his King Kong-like reach to strip the puck from a forward who has somehow slithered past him. "Of course, he makes mistakes," Bergevin says. "About every 10 games he'll do something wrong."
Kostya Kennedy, SI, 2001:
Quote:
The 6'6" Pronger, who has the certitude of a cop and the reach of a boardinghouse diner, is another of the accursed players whose size and skills are so manifest that his smarts haven't received sufficient credit. The Canucks' Burke, the general manager in Hartford when Pronger was drafted, says Pronger "reads the ice as well as any defenseman in the modern era." Invariably Pronger makes not only a good first pass but also the best first pass, the one that creates the most open ice. His and fellow defenseman Al MacInnis's ability to push the puck smartly makes St. Louis a formidable team in transition.

As Pronger moves the puck, he runs through a mental checklist of passing options, depending on the time and space available to him. Option 1 is the rare rinkwide bomb to a forward who's stretching the defense. Option 2, which is the primary pass for Pronger but one fraught with danger for almost everyone else, is the hard pass under coverage to a winger on the opposite side of the rink. Option 3 is throwing it back to the other defenseman, which is usually too static for his tastes. Options 4 and 5 are banging the puck off the boards or glass, generally safe plays. "Pronger can kill any forechecking scheme with that pass he makes to the offside winger," Blake says of Option 2. "That's dangerous unless you know you can make it, and he makes it every game. He beats two or three guys with that pass, and away the Blues go."
Michael Farber, SI, 2009:
Quote:
Pronger is convinced that that unpredictability is almost as important a tool as his hockey smarts, his laser first passes and his heavy shot. "You might spear a guy in the face, fight a guy, elbow a guy, slash a guy or just make a clean bodycheck... If they don't know what I'm going to do, I hold the trump card," says Pronger, who signed a seven-year, $34.45 million extension with the Flyers after being traded from salary-cap-strapped Anaheim last June. "They're nervous Nellies. Maybe they'll move the puck a little too soon because they don't want to get slashed or speared again. I get people complaining in SI that I'm the dirtiest player in hockey"—he tied Dallas's Steve Ott for first place in a poll of 324 NHL players last season—"and people say, 'I can't believe you like that.' I tell 'em, 'Why wouldn't I?' Means I'm doing my job."
Barry Melrose:
Quote:
Chris Pronger is going to go down as maybe one of the 10 best defensemen ever to play the game. He goes to Edmonton, they go to the finals. He goes to Anaheim, they win the Cup. He comes to Philly, they're in the finals. That's not by mistake, and he makes a living by shutting down not only the other team's best players but the best players in our game. And he's done that his whole career.
Doug Wilson:
Quote:
There's no doubt (Pronger's) one of the top players in the game. He certainly makes everybody around him better. That's the measuring stick that I use for players.
Paul Holmgren:
Quote:
I think he makes everyone around him better. He’s a winner, he’s won a championship. He’s a tremendous character player, he works hard. I wanted a guy who would make life miserable for the other team. Chris is one of those guys.
Sean O'Donnell:
Quote:
There are times when you know your partner is in a tough spot. Sometimes I'll go, 'I wish he was over there right now because all I can really do is dump the puck over there.' Well, (Pronger)'s there. Little things like that. A guy's going wide, he's got a step on me. Next thing I know, who's there to cut him off?
Pronger and Lidstrom: 2 best defencemen of the decade

Chris Pronger and Nicklas Lidstrom have both been in their primes since 1997-98. Over this time, they have been by far the best two defencemen in the league.

Even Strength: Best Shutdown* Defencemen at Even Strength from 1998-2010
Player GP $ESGF/S $ESGA/S R-ON R-OFF AEV+/- PK%
Chris Pronger 823 88 64 1.37 1.00 24 58%
Nicklas Lidstrom 961 99 70 1.42 1.09 20 59%
Wade Redden 912 87 68 1.29 1.08 12 40%
Bryan McCabe 904 83 74 1.12 0.99 10 42%
Keith Carney 756 73 65 1.13 0.97 11 46%
Scott Stevens 515 94 68 1.40 1.12 15 75%
Teppo Numminen 743 76 63 1.19 1.02 10 44%
$ESGF/S: On-ice even strength goals for per season, adjusted for scoring level.
$ESGA/S: On-ice even strength goals for per season, adjusted for scoring level.
R-ON: Even strength goal ratio with the player on the ice.
R-OFF: Even strength goal ratio with the player off the ice.
AEV+/-/S: Adjusted even strength plus-minus per season. Note that this and R-ON/OFF are affected by the role the player is used in, it's harder to do well in this when used in a defensive role.


Lidstrom and Pronger were far and away the class of the league at even strength, playing a lot of tough minutes and outscoring by a ton. I selected only defencemen with at least a 40% PK%, so we're comparing apples to apples. No offensive specialists here. And honestly, some of these guys weren't shutdown guys for much of this time.

Power Play
Player GP PP% TmPP+ $PPG $PPA $PPP
Sergei Gonchar 825 85% 1.10 10 29 38
Nicklas Lidstrom 961 77% 1.27 8 29 38
Sergei Zubov 761 84% 1.12 7 28 35
Chris Pronger 823 75% 1.18 7 27 35
Brian Leetch 556 83% 1.04 7 27 35
Kimmo Timonen 812 75% 1.00 6 24 30
PP%: Percentage of team's power play goals that the player was on the ice for.
TmPP+: Success of team's power play. 1.00 is average, higher is better. Includes shorthanded goals against.
$PPG/S: Power play goals per season, adjusted for scoring level and team PP opportunities.
$PPA/S: Power play assists per season, adjusted for scoring level and team PP opportunities.
$PPP/S: Power play points per season, adjusted for scoring level and team PP opportunities.


Pronger and Lidstrom have both been among the best power play defencemen in the past decade. Lidstrom has probably been a touch better, but he's had more talent to play with.

Penalty Kill
Player GP PK% TmPK+
Scott Stevens 515 75% 0.85
Richard Matvichuk 574 64% 0.83
Derian Hatcher 667 63% 0.85
Nicklas Lidstrom 961 59% 0.81
Chris Chelios 731 58% 0.85
Chris Pronger 823 58% 0.87
Adam Foote 749 57% 1.02
Mattias Norstrom 769 56% 1.02
Jason Blake 823 54% 0.93
Rob Blake 882 53% 1.01
Zdeno Chara 847 52% 0.96
PK%: Percentage of team's power play goals against that the player was on the ice for.
TmPK+: Success of team's penalty kill. 1.00 is average, lower is better. Includes shorthanded goals for.


Nobody has killed more penalties than Lidstrom and Pronger over the past decade. And both have done so for very successful penalty kills.

Overall
Pronger and Lidstrom have been the best defencemen in the league in every situation. Want to know the kicker? Only one other defenceman showed up in more than one of these lists. These two have been head and shoulders above the rest.

Durability
So why was Lidstrom taken at #12 and Pronger at #51? Right...durability. Over this time period, Lidstrom played 98% of his scheduled regular season games, and Pronger only played 84%. But at playoff time, Pronger and Lidstrom have each played all but three of their team games over this time, so don't overstate the difference here.

Playoffs
Since 1998, Chris Pronger leads all NHL defencemen with a +43 mark in the playoffs. Was it just his team? Not likely, since his teams have been -25 with him off the ice.

Nicklas Lidstrom is close behind Pronger, with a +38 mark over this time. When he's off the ice, his teams have been +48 in the playoffs.


Was Chris Pronger a Creation of Al MacInnis on the power play?
For Sturminator

Pronger played on the first unit power play with MacInnis from 1999 to 2002. From 2004 to 2010 he played on the first unit power play without MacInnis.

Player Years Seasons $PPG $PPA $PPP PP% TmPP+
Chris Pronger 1999-02 3.4 9 31 40 84% 1.24
Chris Pronger 2004-10 5.6 8 29 37 79% 1.14

Pronger's teams were better with MacInnis than without - although still well above average post-MacInnis. Pronger's individual scoring numbers were slightly better with MacInnis than without, but still very good without him.

No, Pronger was not a creation of Al MacInnis on the power play.


Last edited by overpass: 03-22-2011 at 04:54 PM.
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Old
02-04-2011, 01:48 AM
  #31
Nalyd Psycho
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Dickie Moore



6 time Stanley Cup Champion
2 time Art Ross Winner
2 time 1st team All-Star
1 time 2nd team All-Star



Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey News: Top 100
… a six-time Stanley Cup winner and one of the greatest two-way left wingers in the history of the game… He was tough, rambunctious and drove the net like a demon. Had the Selke Trophy been I existence when he played, Moore likely would have won an armful of them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Were the Days
On the ice, Dickie Moore was something else: a tiger in the corners of the rink where the timid fear to tread; a radar-like passer who also enjoyed superb accuracy when he took a shot on goal; and, more than anything, a man of leonine courage, as much as anyone who ever played in the NHL.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Were the Days
Dickie’s talent was all-inclusive. He shot hard and accurately, stickhandled and passes well, played wight or left wing, worked easily with all players, and at 5’11”, 170 pounds, played rugged and smart defense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ##### #######
When Maurice Richard and Doug Harvey faded, I expected Dickie to take over as leader of the team, and he did.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maurice Richard
Dickie was a fighter, a real worker. I remember seeing him in junior hockey against Jean Beliveau’s team, the Quebec Citadelles. Just about the whole team went after Dickie but he wasn’t afraid in the least. He fought everybody on the ice and held his own. It was the same way with him in the NHL, except he had to fight injuries as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Fisher
Moore deserved it (the scoring title). He’s the most valuable player on the Canadiens.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey’s Glory Days
An excellent stickhandler and skater with a hard, accurate shot, Moore became one of the NHL’s top offensive stars. He was also handy with his elbows and fists, and his aggressive play earned him the nickname Digger.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Hall
Since time began, players have tried to play the game without sweating, and it doesn’t work that way, and he was totally prepared to sacrifice everything. He sacrificed his body.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Johnston
He played hurt. He played through a lot of injuries and never talked about it – just went out and played. That’s a perfect example of one of the leaders in our organization, and on our team. That’s one of the reasons we won so many Stanley Cups. Everybody came to play every night, and Dickie was one of the ring-leaders on our club.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan Fischler
Dickie Moore was the most under-rated great player that I ever saw. He took more abuse and contributed more than any player. He was on a team that had glowing characters, like Rocket Richard, the Pocket Rocket, Bernie “Boom Boom” Geoffrion, Jacques Plante, Doug Harvey, and all these guys were flamboyant in various ways. Dickie Moore just went out there – he played very tough, like Ted Lindsay played tough, but he scored.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian McFarland
He was quite willing to play a back seat to Rocket and Beliveau and even Boom Boom Geoffrion. He was just delighted to be part of an organization that won Stanley Cups year after year. The sheer love of the game was so obvious in Dickie Moore, and they adored him in Montreal. They adored what he could do on the ice – they loved his pluck and his grit and the fact that he just fit right in.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Howie Meeker
Dickie Moore going to St. Louis, in the expansion draft, even at 60% of his potential, brought class, skill, hard work, and certainly a winning spirit, and he’s not going to cost you any headaches. That’s what you want in a fellow – just go out and do his job game in and game out, and always be plus.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Neale
When he came back from being nearly in the cemetery, he played for St. Louis and they got to the finals. Scotty Bowman raves about how well he played when everyone thought he was done. He didn’t have the wheels he used to have, but he had the know-how, and he was a fierce, competitive guy…. I always thought that Dickie Moore was the best Montreal Canadien player in my books. There was Richard, Beliveau, Harvey, and other guys too, but Moore seemed to have something they didn’t. I’m not saying he was as talented, but he got the job done.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Fisher
As dedicated to winning as any athlete I’ve ever known. Rough, tough, talented, and a brilliant guy in his own way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ###### ######
He was a great play-off performer. He scored real key goals for us.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickie Moore
I wasn’t the biggest built kid, but I felt I had a big heart. I could match anybody.
Thanks to Dreakmur for the quotes.

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Last edited by Nalyd Psycho: 02-07-2011 at 04:14 AM.
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Old
02-04-2011, 02:53 AM
  #32
Nalyd Psycho
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Sergei Makarov


7 time World Champion
2 time Olympic gold medalist
2 time World Junior Championship
2 time World Championships best forward
6 time World Championship All-Star
3 time World Championship scoring leader
1 time Canada Cup winner
1 time Canada Cup All-Star
11 time Soviet league Champion
8 time Soviet league first All-Star
9 time Soviet league scoring leader
3 time Soviet player of the year
2 time "Golden Stick" winner (Most outstanding player in Europe)
Calder Trophy winner
IIHF Centennial All-Star Team member
Honoured Master of Sport

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Makarov was a crazy legged skater, blessed with dazzling speed and agility. He was as dangerous of a one-on-one player as there ever has been, emulating the bold and sudden dashes of his idol Valeri Kharlamov. He had a laser of a shot and as much of a goal scorer's mentality as the Soviet system allowed. But he was every bit as lethal with his great passing game, be it short give-and-goes or impossible breakout passes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Sergei Makarov was the greatest right winger in all of Europe during the 1980s, and the late Valeri Kharlamov's heir as the Soviet's most electrifying and deadly weapon.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Houda
Chelyabinsk native Sergei Makarov was a masterful one-on-one player with magical hands who could make the most incredible moves. He always put up big numbers regardless of what linemates he played with.
Quote:
Originally Posted by russianrocket.de
Makarov became the best right wing in Europe. After the tragic death of Kharlamov he became the successor of this great player. His marvellous stick handling, unbelievable speed and scoring instinct made him one of Coach Name Omitted’s most dangerous weapons. He became assistant captain and silenced the criticism of the past.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Boys of Winter
The 21-year-old Makarov had been creating mayhem from the beginning of the game, and indeed, from the beginning of the Olympics. If his teammates weren't playing with urgency, he sure was.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Let's Talk Hockey: 50 Wonderful Debates
He was a relentless offensive machine that never quit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
Tikhonov had a new Kharlamov. He was elastic-legged Sergei Makarov. Though not quite capable of the electricity generated by the bold and sudden dashes of Kharlamov, the lantern-jawed Makarov had the Russian right stuff. There was no better lateral skater in hockey. He dazzled as a one-on-one player and he had the prerequisite of all the best passers in the game – rink-wide eyes.


Last edited by Nalyd Psycho: 02-04-2011 at 03:17 AM.
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Old
02-04-2011, 03:54 AM
  #33
MadArcand
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Bobby Clarke bio

Bobby Clarke



Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
He had a famous, captivating smile - with about a dozen missing teeth. That is how Bobby Clarke will be remembered by those who saw him on ice. One of the best checkers in the entire history of the league, he was also a ruffian and a warrior. And a victor.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
No hockey player worked harder than Bobby Clarke, the tenacious leader of the Philadelphia Flyers for 15 enjoyable years. As a result, no one personified the Philadelphia Flyers better.

A wonderful talent blessed with great vision and playmaking skills, Clarke is better remembered for his physical talents - a relentless work ethic, a powerful leadership presence, and an unquenchable thirst to win complete with a willingness to do anything it took to capture victory.

Clarke immediately stepped in and succeeded. By the time he turned 23 years old, he was named captain of the Flyers - the youngest player in league history at that time to be so honored. The same year he won his first of three Hart Trophies as league MVP. And his 104 points made him the first player on a non-Original Six team to reach the 100 point mark.


Clarke was absolutely essential to the Flyers two Cups in the 1970s, the first time an expansion team won the prized trophy. Dave Schultz called him the "heart and soul of our club." Coach Fred Shero said there would be no championships in Philadelphia without Bobby Clarke. Clarke played with so much determination and all of his heart and soul, and he demanded it from every single one of his teammates.

It wouldn't be a stretch to say Clarke was the Pete Rose of hockey, a Charlie Hustle on skates. It could be game in the middle of January and up or down by 6 goals, but Clarke played every shift as if it was overtime in game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals.

His super-human will should not overshadow his high skill level. Clarke was an incredible defensive player. He was almost always the guy to take the big faceoff, kill a key penalty or defend a lead in the last minute of play. As the statistics suggest, Clarke was a great playmaker as well. Twice he led the NHL in assists, and had 852 in total in his career, compared to 358 goals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyershistory.com
When compiling a list of greatest leaders in sports history, Clarke's name would have to be included. Overcoming diabeties, Clarke lead the first expansion championship team. Although never the most skilled player, Clarke's tireless work ethic made him the most valuable player. In 1975 when the Flyers were battling the Sabres for the Cup, a reporter asked Sabres GM which player in the league he'd like to ask most. He replied, "If you want to put fans in the stands, I'd take Gilbert Perrault. But if you want to win, take Clarke"

Clarke ended the season with 37 goials and 104 points - second in the league only to Phil Esposito, becoming the first player from an expansion team to gather 100 points . Then came the playoffs. Their first round opponent was Minnesota. Midway during one game a stick hit Clarke in the eye breaking his hard contact lens. He was face down on the ice, legs kicking up and down screaming "I can't see !". Clarke was taken to hospital where parts of his contact were removed from under his eye. His cornea was scratched. Clarke returned the next game - and the Flyers ended up winning their first ever playoff series. The Flyers ended up losing their next round battle to Montreal, but at the end of that year the NHL announced that Bobby Clarke was their MVP for the 72-73 season.

During that season Clarke was named captain of the Flyers, becoming the youngest player ever to that point to be captain of an NHL team. He was now known as the best overall player in the league. In 1973, Clarke was named as the NHL's best checker and best at faceoffs in a poll of NHL coaches. Clarke was skilled both on the powerplay and killing penalties. His work ethic was second to none and set an example of all his teammates. His contageous drive lead the Flyers to the finals against the talent laden Boston Bruins. The Bruins won the first game of the finals as the second game headed into overtime. The Flyers won their first ever game in Boston in 1967 but had not won even a single game there since, and another Boston win would probably lead to a sweep. But Clarke would not have none of that. In what might be the greatest goal in Flyers history Clarke put a rebound over Gilles Gilbert into the Bruins goal. That goal is now depicted in the Bobby Clarke trophy which is awarded to the Flyers' MVP. That win was followed by 3 more as the Flyers skated, hit and worked past the more talented Boston Bruins to a Stanley Cup championship.

In the 1974-75 season Clarke set a then-record for assists by a centerman with 89. Wayne Gretzky's junior coach had the young Gretzky pattern his passing style to that of Clarke. But even though Clarke was achieving superstar status he never put himself ahead of his team. He put it on himself to make sure that his teammates were taken care of both on the ice and off. All the worries about how diabeties might affect Clarke seemed to be unwarranted, as Clarke had only missed 2 games in his career up to the 74-75 season.

Before the '79-'80 season began Clarke was named an assistant coach (Aug 10, 1979), and due to NHL rules had to give up his captaincy, which was taken over by Mel Bridgman. That season the Flyers would set a record for longest unbeaten streak (35 games). Once the playoffs started , Clarke began to shine again. His overtime goal helped eliminate Gretzky and the Oilers. His playoff point totals ranked amongst the league leaders once again. The Flyers would meet the New York Islanders in the finals that year and unfortunately bow out in 6 games. Clarke would be named that season as co-winner of the Lester Patrick Award and in a fitting tribute to the close of the decade, Clarke was named to Hockey magazine's "Team of the Seventies"

When things seemed to be ending for Clarke, help came along the way. Drastic improvements to insulin tracking plus good health gave Clarke his best season in 5 years for the 82-83 season. For the 8th time in his career he lead the Flyers in points with 85. Ironically, in the season that saw Clarke have the most points in 6 seasons, he was honoured as the league's best defensive forward, winning the Selke trophy.

Clarke as a player set the standards by which every other Flyer player will always be marked. His work ethic and leadership lead his team to two Stanley Cup championships. With Clarke now as the Genenal Manager, all Flyer fans hope that these same qualities will lead the Flyers to more championships.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1972summitseries.com
Clarke earned the respect of many in the series for his determined play, his near-flawless faceoff ability and his solid two-way play.

"There were guys on Team Canada who took their game to new heights in that series. A perfect example would be Bobby Clarke," stated Wayne Cashman.

Paul Henderson, who benefited greatly from playing with Clarke, admired him greatly.

"Bobby Clarke turned out to be one of the most dedicated hockey players that ever played the game. The best thing that could have happened to Ronnie (linemate Ron Ellis) and me was to get this young kid making plays for us. He was terrific!" Henderson enthusiastically stated.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Outsider's intangibles compendium
Best backchecker 3rd 1981
Best checker 1st 1974
Best checker 1st 1976
Best defensive forward 2nd 1981
Best forechecker 1st 1981
Best on faceoffs 2nd 1974
Best on faceoffs 1st 1976
Best on faceoffs 1st 1979
Best on faceoffs 1st 1981
Best on faceoffs 4th 1984
Best penalty killer T-1st 1974
Best penalty killer 1st 1976
Best playmaker 3rd 1974
Best playmaker 1st 1976
First player to build team around 1st 1976
Hardest worker 1st 1971
Hardest worker 1st 1974
Hardest worker 1st 1976
Hardest worker 1st 1979
Hardest worker 2nd 1984
Smartest player 3rd 1974
Smartest player 2nd 1976
Smartest player 4th 1979
Awards
1971-72 NHL Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy
1972-73 NHL Hart Memorial Trophy
1972-73 NHL Ted Lindsay Award
1974-75 NHL Hart Memorial Trophy
1975-76 NHL Hart Memorial Trophy
1982-83 NHL Frank J. Selke Trophy
1972-73 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)
1973-74 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)
1974-75 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1975-76 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)

Additional Hart top-10 voting placements:
1970-71 10th
1971-72 8th
1973-74 4th
1976-77 2nd
1977-78 6th
1979-80 10th
1982-83 6th


All-Star Games (8): 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978

Top 10:
Points:
1971-72 NHL 81 (10)
1972-73 NHL 104 (2)
1973-74 NHL 87 (5)
1974-75 NHL 116 (6)
1975-76 NHL 119 (2)
1976-77 NHL 90 (8)
1977-78 NHL 89 (8)

Assists:
1972-73 NHL 67 (3)
1973-74 NHL 52 (10)
1974-75 NHL 89 (1)
1975-76 NHL 89 (1)
1976-77 NHL 63 (6)
1977-78 NHL 68 (4)
1978-79 NHL 57 (9)
1979-80 NHL 57 (8)
1982-83 NHL 62 (5)

Plus/Minus:
1974-75 NHL 79 (2)
1975-76 NHL 83 (1)
1979-80 NHL 42 (8)
Career NHL 506 (5)

Short-Handed Goals:
1972-73 NHL 2 (7)
1973-74 NHL 5 (1)
1974-75 NHL 3 (9)
1975-76 NHL 4 (6)
1976-77 NHL 6 (1)
1977-78 NHL 2 (9)
1979-80 NHL 2 (9)


Last edited by MadArcand: 02-04-2011 at 06:12 AM.
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Old
02-04-2011, 02:13 PM
  #34
TheDevilMadeMe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Our History
The fearless Richard worked the corners, battling along the boards and crashing the net while still finding the back of the net with ease. As potent an offensive threat as his older sibling, Richard proved that he was a highly skilled two-way player, his speed allowing him to play as doggedly in a defensive role as he did offensively.
Henri Richard, C

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Selke, Sr
Over the years I have been blessed with a great number of superstars. But game in, and game out, Henri Richard was the most valuable player I ever had
Among the drafted players who Selke managed were: Rocket, Beliveau, Harvey, Geoffrion, Plante, Apps, Kennedy, Clancy

Henri Richard might not have been the most important player on the Habs in any one year, but an argument can be made that over his entire career he was. In fact, as I've noted above, Frank Selke Sr. even said as much. (tommygunn from the last Top 100 list discussion)

Summary

-Ranked 30th on the THN Top 100 list
-Ranked 55th on the HOH Top 100 list
-Ranked the 5th Best (non-goalie) Montreal Canadien of all time by Red Fisher (behind only Beliveau, Rocket, Lafleur, and Harvey).

-11 Stanley Cups, 5 of them centering his brother Maurice at even strength.

-From 1955-56 to 1966-67, (over a period of 12 years), Henri Richard was the best even strength scorer in the league. Post-prime Howe was 2nd, Beliveau and Bathgate tied for 3rd. Richard falls below them on overall leaderboards because one of the best PP players of all time (Beliveau) usually played the full PP during this time (as was customary).

-Henri Richard scored these points while being arguably the best even strength shut down center in the league.

-Richard's coach always had him out there for the first shift after every PP or PK to control momentum for the Canadiens and generally matched him against the opponent's best center.

-Won the Masterdon Trophy in 1974
-Inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979
-First Team All-Star in 1958 (over Jean Beliveau)
-Second Team All-Star in in 1959, 1961, and 1963 (to Beliveau, Beliveau, Mikita)

-The writers who vote on Post-Season All Star Teams do not like voting for 2 centers from the same team. In fact, since the All-Star Teams were created at the end of the 1931 season, both center spots have been taken by teammates only 3 times - all of them by Jean Beliveau and Henri Richard (in 1958, 1959, and 1961). For a modern example, neither Forsberg or Sakic could make it onto the 2nd Team when the other was on the 1st Team.

Playoffs
- 2 Stanley Cup winning goals - 1966 Game 6 OT and 1971 breaking a 2-2 tie to win Game 7 3-2.
- Led the cup winner in scoring in in 1960.

Offense

The best even strength point producer in the league over a 12 year period:

Quote:
Originally Posted by overpass
Here are the top even-strength scorers in the NHL from 1955-56 (when Richard broke in as a 19 year old) to 1966-67, a 12 year period.

Player Years GP Pts ESG ESA ESP PPG PPA PPP ESP/G PPP/G
Richard 56-67 764 710 222 343 565 41 97 138 0.74 0.18
Howe 56-67 826 920 245 330 575 120 192 312 0.70 0.38
Beliveau 56-67 745 830 217 300 517 126 181 307 0.69 0.41
Bathgate 56-67 811 825 232 326 558 55 205 260 0.69 0.32
XXX 56-67 817 703 233 290 523 55 102 157 0.64 0.19
XXX 56-67 816 691 191 267 458 65 144 209 0.56 0.26

This table doesn't cover Gordie Howe's prime, and doesn't include Mikita and Hull who starred during the latter part of this period. Still, it's very impressive that Henri Richard was (probably) the best player in the league at even-strength over a 12 year period.
Overall finishes:

Points: 2nd, 4th, 5th, 9th, 9th, 9th, 10th
Assists: 1st, 1st, 4th, 7th, 8th, 8th 10th
Goals: 5th, 7th

All these finishes are despite receiving very little PP time.

Defense

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckoning
In Larry Robinson's book, he tells a story about how after Philly (led by Bobby Clarke) beat Montreal in Game 1 in the `73 semis, (Richard's coach) pointed at Bobby Clarke then said to Richard simply "He's yours." Richard completely shut down Clarke the rest of the series.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Henri also earned a reputation as one of hockey's most relentless forecheckers of all time....one of the best two way players of all time
Dark Shadows and Canadiens1958 are long-time hockey fans who watched Richard play:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Shadows
Henri Richard was a phenomenal defensive player. Such a Dogged/tenacious player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Shadows
...one of the greatest two way forwards ever to play...Henri Richard was always matched up against the opposing teams top line. That much is 100% certain.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958
Henri Richards was definitely the best that I've ever seen at the transition game from offense to defense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958
Claude Provost defensive game zoomed after he became the RWer on Henri Richard's line circa 1962. Took awhile for their strengths to come together but once they were used to each other combined with a support from the defense and a solid LWer they were a force defensively. Previously Provost had the usual defensive responsibilities and was solid not outstanding. While Henri Richard and Claude Provost were pivotal in the Canadiens defense against Bobby Hull there is a view that it was a team effort spearheaded by Henri Richard's ability at limiting the Hawks defense at transitioning the puck to Bobby Hull. This view is somewhat supported by the 1971 finals where a rookie - Rejean Houle assumed Provost's role and limited Bobby Hull to 1G and 3A at even strength over 7 games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958
Henri Richard, independent of the wingers that he played with, was the best at transitioning from an offensive attacking role to a defensive role hounding the other team's d-man who managed to get the puck,hindering the important first pass or outlet pass, forcing the short safety valve pass to the second defenseman or lagging winger.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Desjardens
Henri Richard, who was always somewhat of a defense of specialist was one of four Habs killing the penalty (when Gordie Howe tied Rocket's goal scoring record).
http://goarticles.com/article/Henri-...ecord/1257097/

Puck Possession and stickhandling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toe Blake
We had to sign him. At camp, he took the puck and nobody could take it away from him. He was just too good not to sign
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideHockey: The Golden Years
While Maurice excelled from the blue line in, Henri held his own all over the ice. He had speed and maneuverability as well as the capability to hold the puck for as long as he wanted to keep it.Within a few days of the camp’s opening, veterans were impressed; some suggesting that scrimmages ought to have two pucks, one for Richard and one for the rest of the guys to play with.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toe Blake
when Richard was on the ice, nobody else had the puck.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudy Pilous
Looks like Henri Richard brought his own puck to the rink again
Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
renowned for his excellent stickhandling and playmaking abilities.
Speed

-Finished 3rd in a 1965 coach's poll for "fastest skater" (posted on the HOH board)

-In 1967 (when Henri was 30 years old), Lloyd Percival measured the attributes of a variety of NHL players. He found Henri Richard to be 2nd fastest in the league (to Bobby Hull) without the puck and 5th fastest with the puck. Source=February 1968 issue of Popular Mechanics via nik jr

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Henri Richard was a tireless skater. Smooth and fast, the Pocket Rocket employed his superior skating ability to beat opposing

Toughness

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Fisher
(Toe Blake said, ) "At the start of training camp, we had no idea what we had. At the end, we couldn't send him back. The only thing we had to find out was how this little guy would react to the rough stuff. We didn't want a situation where Maurice would have to ride shotgun for him."

Henri was tested early and often, as Canadiens management had feared. What they discovered quickly was that Richard didn't want, nor did he need, help from his older brother. He was fearless. He was a Richard.

You should know that in the six-team NHL, bench- clearings were the rule rather than the exception. Teams met 14 times during the regular season, often on back-to-back nights. The benches cleared in Boston one night, and there was young Richard in the middle of it, taking on four Bruins, one after the other. He won the first three fights, including one over Jack Bionda, who towered over him. An exhausted Richard fought to a draw in a fourth against Fern Flaman, who was among the NHL's best and most feared fighters.
Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/sport...#ixzz1D1tnwdkv

Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideHockey: The Golden Years
It was tough enough to be a rookie in the NHL of the 1950s, but when a newcomer was the brother of the game’s biggest name, he had a rough go of it the first few times through the league as veterans put him through the time-honored process of proving he deserved to be there. Richard never backed down, met his challengers head-on and rarely lost a fight against his much bigger tormenters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Referee Matt Pavelich
But this may surprise you, pound for pound, little Henri Richard is as good as any (fighter).
-Hockey Sports Stars of 1973

Endurance

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Reardon
You can take Beliveau and all the others. Give me Henri. That little bugger could skate for five minutes without getting tired
Leadership

-Captain of the Canadiens for the last 4 years of his career, after Beliveau retired. Led them to the 1973 Cup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideHockey: The Golden Years
As fierce a competitor as anyone to ever play the game...Fast, shifty and absolutely driven to win at any cost, the kid from Montreal led by example. Never vocal, he let his game do the talking, excelling in every aspect and coming through when the stakes were the highest.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette
one of hockey's greatest stars, and perhaps its most lion-hearted leader...a fearless, tireless leader
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean Beliveau
I had enormous admiration for Henri from his earliest days and not only for what he did on the ice....He was a great team player and a superb captain after I retired. It is not by chance that Henri Richard holds the all-time record of 11 Stanley Cup wins.
http://www.montrealgazette.com/sport...#ixzz1D1jkJxUP

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean Beliveau
Henri was definitely a leader, even before he became captain. His leadership came from his determination on the ice and the fact that he was a team player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Crisp, Flyers forward after Richard's Canadiens beat the Flyers in 1973
He's the most inspirational player they have. You nail him to the beam and he comes back and kills you. He didn't surprise me, because I've seen him do it before
Infuriating

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Clarke
Henri is always there. Every time I pick up the puck he's coming at me from somewhere. He's been hit quite a few times; by me, by our defense, but he doesn't stop. It's frustrating when you outweigh a guy by 20 pounds, knock him down and he's up and gone before you are
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Esposito
Henri Richard. That son of a ***** was the best centre I ever played against. He was good on faceoffs. He was fast. The little ******* could score. He was a tough little guy and I respected him. Henri was the most underrated player on the Canadiens.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fern Flaman
One of the things he used to when he went wide on me was lean into me and actually grab my knee. We'd both go down, and I would get the penalty for holding, because it was impossible to see what Henri was doing! It used to drive me crazy!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fern Flaman
In all the years I played in the league, there was only one player I hated. Henri Richard!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henri Richard
In all the years I played in the league, I was never afraid of Fern Flaman
Maurice vs. Henri

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Maurice was a powerful monster who struck fear in the hearts of the opposition. Henri too struck fear in the opposition, but with his incredible stickhandling and skill.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toe Blake
The Pocket became a better all around player than Rocket was. But its asking an awful lot of any man to be the scorer that Rocket was. He was the greatest scorer under pressure that I've ever seen
Sources:

Montreal Gazette
http://insidehockey.com/?p=49
legendsofhockey.com
GreatestHockeyLegends.com
Hfboards, history of hockey board. Many of the quotes come from the 2009 Top 100 list discussion thread: http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=676644


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 02-17-2011 at 03:51 PM.
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Old
02-05-2011, 10:55 AM
  #35
BillyShoe1721
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RW Jari Kurri



Hockey Hall of Fame Member
#50 THN's 100 Greatest Players of All Time
8x NHL All Star Game Participant
1x Lady Byng Trophy Winner
2x 1st-Team NHL All Star
3x 2nd-Team NHL All Star
5x Stanley Cup Champion
4x Top 10 Goals (1, 2, 3, 5)
6x Top 17 Assists (9, 9, 10, 16, 16, 17)
8x Top 19 Points (2, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 13, 19)
7x Top 10 Goals in Playoffs (1, 1, 1, 1, 7, 8, 9)
7x Top 10 Assists in Playoffs (3, 4, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10)
6x Top 10 Points in Playoffs (2, 3, 3, 4, 6, 7)
2x 1st in NHL GWG
5x Top 10 SHG (3, 4, 5, 6, 10)
6th All-Time SHG
2x 1st in NHL GPG
1,398 points in 1,251 career NHL games
233 points in 200 career playoff games
6x Top 11 Selke Voting (2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 11)
6x Top 3 Selke Voting Among RW (1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3)
14th Hart Trophy Voting 84-85
3x Top 5 Lady Byng Voting (2, 3, 4)
2x WC All Star Team
2nd in Playoff Points, 1st in goals, 3rd in assists during peak (80-90)
3rd in Points, 2nd in goals during peak (80-90)

Quote:
Playing the majority of his career both with Wayne Gretzky and in Gretzky's shadow as his so called, "Right-hand Man," Jari Pekka Kurri was considered by many to be perhaps the best defensive forward in the NHL. His two-way abilities were the perfect complement for his hard, accurate shooting and scoring proficiency.

By age 17, Kurri had realized part of his dream by playing with Jokerit's senior club. He spent three seasons in the Elite League, steadily progressing from two to 16 to 23 goals. During that time he also realized another dream by playing for the Finnish Junior National Team in 1978, 1979, and 1980. Kurri scored what proved to be the biggest goal of his early career at the 1978 European Junior Championship against the Soviet Union, in double overtime, to capture Finland's first gold medal. For his efforts, Kurri was named the Best Forward at the tournament. Later he tied for the tournament scoring lead at the 1980 World Junior tournament, capturing Finland's first WJC medal, a silver. His efforts earned him a berth on Finland's 1980 Olympic Team and led the Edmonton Oilers to select him 69th overall in that summer's Entry Draft.

xxx started the season on the number-one line with Wayne Gretzky, but things were not working and by Christmas it was Jari's turn to play with Wayne. Instantly the magic was created and one of the most lethal combinations in NHL history was born.

Over the next eight seasons, the duo wowed NHL crowds everywhere they went, not only breaking records...but obliterating them. Similar to his years in Finland, Kurri's play steadily improved. He recorded a 100-point season in 1982-83 and reached the 50-goal mark the following year, the first Finnish-born player to reach both marks. The Oilers also captured the Stanley Cup in 1984, beginning a run of four championships in five years. During that time, Kurri recorded career highs of 71 goals and 135 points in 1984-85 (a single season record for goals by a right-winger), capturing the Lady Byng Trophy and finishing second to Gretzky in the scoring race. During the playoffs he recorded 19 goals on the way to the Stanley Cup, tying the playoff goal scoring record set by Reggie Leach in 1976. From 1984 to 1988, the "Master of the One-Timer" recorded four consecutive 50-goal seasons and led the playoffs in goals each time the Oilers won the Cup. Despite capturing only one major award throughout this period, Kurri was honoured with two First Team and two Second Team All-Star berths. As Barry Fraser, the Oilers' Personnel Director, once put it, "We've got some outstanding people, eh? All-Stars, right? But Kurri is by far our most complete player."

Following Gretzky's trade to Los Angeles in 1988, there were those who believed Jari Kurri's success would come to an abrupt end. But over the next two years, like a man on a mission, he recorded 195 points in 154 games, leading the Oilers to their fifth Stanley Cup in 1990 and earning another berth on the Second All-Star Team. Kurri also became just the 25th NHL player to reach the 1,000th point milestone.

Because of the Oilers' domination throughout the 1980's, Kurri managed to play in only four World Championships throughout his career--1982, 1989, 1991, and 1994. Finland won a silver medal in 1994 and Kurri was named the All-Star right-winger in both the 1991 and 1994 tournaments. He also played in the 1981, 1987, and 1991 Canada Cups and 1996 World Cup, and during his final year of competitive hockey he captured the bronze medal at the 1998 Olympic Winter Games. Kurri played a total of 65 tournament games for the senior national team, recording 26 goals and 52 points against top-level world competition.

After a season in Italy and an NHL trade to Philadelphia, the Los Angeles Kings managed to pry Kurri away from the Flyers and he was back in North America, re-united with his longtime pal, Wayne Gretzky. By the 1992-93 season, they had re-kindled the old magic, leading the Kings to their first Stanley Cup finals appearance. Kurri also became the first European-trained player and 18th NHLer to record 500 career goals, although he accomplished the feat with Gretzky in the press box with an injury, a fact he truly regretted. He spent five seasons with the Kings, the latter time of which were injury-riddled. In 1996, he was traded to the New York Rangers where he played only 25 games before signing that summer with the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim. He played a full season and was a mentor for many of the young European stars the Ducks had acquired, notably xxx.

Kurri contemplated retirement following the 1996-97 season, but with an offer from the Colorado Avalanche and a chance to reach the 600 career goal mark and win another Stanley Cup, he couldn't resist. Late in the season, he did, in fact, score his 600th goal, becoming just the eighth NHL player in history to do so. However, the Avalanche was upset in the first round of the playoffs.

Jari Kurri finished his career as the highest scoring European-born player in NHL history with totals of 601 goals, 797 assists, and 1,398 points. He also finished with 106 career PLAYOFF goals and 233 PLAYOFF points, third all-time behind only Wayne Gretzky and Mark Messier. While he wasn't the flashiest player, Kurri was consistent and this ability alone enabled him to become an icon for thousands of fans and young players, both in Finland and throughout North America.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...io&list=#photo

Quote:
But it takes an extraordinary athlete to be able to excel with Gretzky that way Jari Kurri has.

Contrary to popular belief, it is not easy to play on the wing of a superstar like Wayne Gretzky. You have to be thinking on the same level as he is, or at least close to that level. Very few players can achieve this level of hockey sense and anticipation. Only a true superstar can. A true superstar like Jari Kurri.

Jari Kurri has teamed with Wayne Gretzky to form one of sports' most dynamic duos. Montana-Rice, Kareem-Magic and Canseco-Maguire have nothing on these guys.

For most of the 1980s, hockey fans in Edmonton enjoyed the Gretzky-Kurri magic on a nightly basis - the Great One's feathery passes complementing the flying Finn's finishing touch. In fact the duo teamed up for 429 goals while in Edmonton. Not bad for what coach Glen Sather described as "a hunch" as to why he teamed the two together in the first place.

With 601 career goals and 1398 career points, Kurri retired the highest scoring European in National Hockey League history. (he has since been surpassed by Jaromir Jagr.) On four occasions he scored at least 50 goals, and tallied at least 40 three other times. The five time all star also had six 100 point seasons.

In 1984-85 Kurri established a record for goals in a single season by a right winger with 71 (since surpassed by xxx, xxx and xxx) on way to a career-high 135 points. He added a NHL record-tying 19 goals (tying xxx in 1976) in 18 playoff games. He recorded four hat tricks in that playoffs, including one four goal game, to help Edmonton capture the second of five Stanley Cup titles during his playing days in the City of Champions.

Jari Kurri played his best hockey in the playoffs. He almost singlehandedly destroy the myth that European players are soft and disappear in the heat of NHL playoff competition. Jari has 5 Stanley Cup rings. He led all playoff performers in goal scoring in 4 different post seasons. The Oilers won the Cup each year Jari led the way in goals.

Overshadowed by superstar teammates Gretzky, Mark Messier, xxx and Paul Coffey, Jari Kurri was described by Edmonton chief scout Barry Fraser as "by far our most complete player." An excellent skater blessed with speed and agility, Kurri always knew how to dart into openings for Gretzky's deft passes. He rarely had the puck long if he was in scoring position. His release was quick but deadly accurate.

"Jari had a great shot and he had a great ability to find holes and to find openings out on the ice," said Mike Gartner. "Playing with a guy like Gretzky for a good part of his career where Wayne could get him the puck and there weren't too many guys who were ever better at finding those holes on the ice than Jari was."

Kurri was also a strong defensive presence which allowed Gretzky to concentrate on offense. He was never considered a physical player, but was unafraid of the corners and sacrificed his body to make a play.

When #99 departed for Hollywood, some people though that Kurri's production would plummet. That was definitely not the case. In the first Gretzky-less season in Edmonton Kurri was named the Oilers’ team MVP. In the 154 Oilers regular-season games Kurri played following Gretzky's departure, he registered 195 points, well more than a point-per-game average. His 25 playoff points were third highest on the team when the Oilers captured the Stanley Cup just two season's after Gretzky's goodbye.

Kurri remained in Los Angeles through 1996, though his ice time and role were reduced to that of a defensive specialist. Kurri would also spend time with the New York Rangers, Anaheim Mighty Ducks and the Colorado Avalanche before retiring in 1998.

One of the game's classiest men was a shoo-in for the Hockey Hall of Fame when he first became eligible in 2001. In addition to his impressive regular season totals (601 goals, 1398 points) his 106 career playoff goals in 200 career playoff games rank third all time, behind fellow Oiler legends Gretzky (122) and Messier (109). Likewise his 233 career points are third best behind Gretzky (382) and Messier (295).
http://oilerslegends.blogspot.com/20...ari-kurri.html

Quote:
Kurri had a few unique attributes that made the most of their collective talents. Gretzky was the greatest passer in NHL history, but Kurri was one of the best ever at shooting off the pass without stopping the puck (the one-timer).

Even his excellent defensive skills could be an offensive plus, since the Oilers employed Kurri and Gretzky on the penalty kill, and they set new records for shorthanded goals.

Kurri's defensive skills were often overshadowed by his marvelous offensive numbers.
http://books.google.com/books?id=wpb...0kurri&f=false

Quote:
Future stars Paul Coffey and Jari Kurri...
http://books.google.com/books?id=jO-...0kurri&f=false

Quote:
One of the best defensive forwards of the era, the right-hand man was the perfect compliment to the Great One. Over an 8 year period, the two broke record upon record.
http://books.google.com/books?id=vHs...0kurri&f=false

Quote:
Jari Kurri, the fanciful Finnish sniper...
http://books.google.com/books?id=rEI...0kurri&f=false

Quote:
He would also turn out to be a winger who could actually make Gretzky even better. His name was Jari Kurri.
http://books.google.com/books?id=gO7...0kurri&f=false

Quote:
Jari Kurri was one of the primary offensive weapons of the great Edmonton Oilers teams of the 1980s.

A clutch performer, four times Kurri led all scorers in the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

One of the best hockey players ever to come out of Europe, Jari Kurri...
http://books.google.com/books?id=0bb...0kurri&f=false

Quote:
Give WAYNE GRETZKY an assist for helping the Los Angeles Kings reunite the lethal line combination of Gretzky and JARI KURRI
http://www.google.com/search?q=jari+...fb7ddc50c08107

Quote:
Kurri is making Oilers' fans forget 'Great One'
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ri+kurri&hl=en

Quote:
The heat was rising in Joe Louis Arena, but as far as Edmonton Oilers coach Glenn Sather was concerned, there was no sweat. Jari Kurri had the puck.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ri+kurri&hl=en

Quote:
The Great One's artistry, Kurri's speed, his accuracy and his defensive skill
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/thestar/...e&pqatl=google

Quote:
Kurri had learned to read him like a book. It seemed he always knew where to go. The puck would be waiting or about to arrive, a shipment from Wayne.
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/thestar/...d&pqatl=google

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Old
02-05-2011, 10:56 AM
  #36
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D Rod Langway.



6'3", 218lbs.
2x Norris Trophy Winner
Washington Capitals Captain(82-93)
6x NHL All Star Game Participant
Hockey Hall of Fame Member
2x 1st-Team All NHL
1x 2nd-Team All NHL
1x Stanley Cup Champion
1x Canada Cup 1st-Team All Star
5x Top 11 Norris Trophy Voting (3, 5, 5, 9, 11)
3x Top 4 Hart Trophy Voting (2, 4, 4)
2x 5th in All Star Voting Among Defensemen ("3rd team")

Quote:
Rod Langway was the prototypical defensive blueliner - a hard hitter who more often than not cleared the puck from danger. In other words he was a goaltender’s best friend, and the perfect team player.

Craig Laughlin described his former teammate in awe.

“Rod’s presence made a statement to all the other teams. Nobody wanted to play against him when he was in his prime. The statement that I heard most from opponents was that he was like playing against an octopus. He had the size, the reach and the strength.”

Few were better than Langway. He was so good that he won the James Norris Trophy twice, in 1983 and 1984 as the league’s top defenceman. This is an amazing accomplishment when you consider how rare it is for a defensive d-man to win the award since the arrival of Bobby Orr in the late 1960s. Since Orr revolutionized the role of a defenseman from defender to attacker, the trophy almost always went to the best offensive defenseman. For Langway to capture the Norris trophy twice based on his defensive excellence and not his offensive elements is the best tribute to how good he was. And to make it even more impressive, Langway beat out superstars Ray Bourque, Denis Potvin and Paul Coffey. Coffey in particular dared to come close to Orr's offensive exploits, yet the NHL recognized Langway's great play over that. Langway was also the first American player to win the award.

The Montreal Canadiens drafted Langway 37th overall in 1977 after his final year of college. Langway attended the University of New Hampshire where he was on a football scholarship. But hockey soon took over as his love and scouts were noticing him. Rod left school after his sophomore year as he felt he was ready for the professional ranks. The Habs actually urged him to stay in school and develop more as the Habs were in the midst of a dynasty and already boasted a blueline that included Larry Robinson, Serge Savard and Guy Lapointe.

Langway spent some time in the American Hockey League and with Birmingham of the World Hockey Association before joining Montreal for the 1978-79 season. In his first year in the NHL, he recorded seven points in 45 games and was a member of the Canadiens’ Stanley Cup championship squad.

In his first full season in the NHL with Montreal, 1979-80, Langway scored seven goals and 36 points in 77 games. The following year he set career-highs in goals (11), assists (34) and points (45) and in 1981-82 he notched 39 points.

After four years with the Habs, Langway was part of a blockbuster deal prior to the 1982-83 season that sent the veteran defenceman along with Craig Laughlin, Doug Jarvis and Brian Engblom to the Caps for Ryan Walter and Rick Green. The deal is often considered to be one of the worst trades in Montreal history, mainly because of the level of greatness Langway would achieve in a Washington uniform. Laughlin, Jarvis and Engblom all went to lengthy careers as well. Walter and Green proved to be valuable players and helped the Habs win the 1986 Stanley Cup, but couldn't match the career that Langway had.

Rod made a huge impact on hockey in the US Capital. He won the Norris trophy in each of his first two seasons there, and played with heart and desire that few others could ever match. When Langway arrived in Washington, the Capitals had never made the playoffs. In his 11 seasons with the organization, the club never missed them. Rod was a great leader and a greater teacher. He learned from some of the best while in Montreal - Larry Robinson, Serge Savard and Guy Lapointe - and he taught some of the best - Scott Stevens, xxx and xxx.

There was little doubt that Rod Langway was not only the leader of the Capitals, but many believed he was the most valuable player to his team. In 1984, Langway finished second to Wayne Gretzky in Hart trophy balloting. The Hart trophy goes to the league's MVP. Imagine that - in an era dominated by mindboggling offense and The Great One, a defensive d-man was considered by many to be the league's most valuable player.

For Rod it was his single greatest personal achievement.

"People don't remember the guy who came in second but to be considered one plateau below Gretzky that year was a great honor for me, more than the Norris Trophy."

But Langway wasn't worried about personal honors, rather he wanted team success. While Langway was part of a Stanley Cup team in his rookie season in Montreal, Langway never again got his name on the Cup. That would be is his only real regret in hockey.

"I was probably more disappointed every year I didn't win the Cup." he said. "I have my ring and myname on the Stanley Cup. To this day I feel we should have won a couple more in Montreal and truly believe we should have won a couple in Washington."

When Langway left the NHL in 1993, he had career totals of 51 goals, 278 assists and 329 points in 994 regular season games.

Later, the Caps retired Langways jersey to honor him.

"I'd like to be remembered as a player who came to play every night," said Langway. "I remember when the trade happened. I remember 8,000 people who made noise like 18,000."
http://washingtoncapitalslegends.blo...d-langway.html

Quote:
The combination of natural ability and an obsessive work ethic epitomize the traits portrayed by Rod Corry Langway throughout a lengthy career. Along with a true passion for the game, he would complete a 15-year Hall of Fame NHL career earning the respect of all he encountered.

Now recognized as a potential hockey star, Langway was selected during the summer of 1977 in two different leagues. The Montreal Canadiens used their 3rd round choice, 36th overall in the NHL Draft to select the hard-nosed defenceman. Meanwhile over in the rival World Hockey Association, the Birmingham Bulls used their 1st round selection, 6th overall to choose Langway. Despite his selection to captain UNH the next season, Langway decided the money was too good to refuse and signed with the Bulls. He would split the first year between the Bulls and the Hampton Gulls of the AHL, posting an impressive combined total of 43 points in 82 games. However, when the rampant rumours of a merger between the NHL and the WHA failed to develop, he was quick to exercise a special clause in his contract allowing him to terminate the deal and begin his 15-year NHL odyssey.

Immediately, the Capitals named Langway their captain and the tide had begun to turn. After missing the playoffs in every season since their conception in 1974, the newly charged club marched to a winning record and its first playoff berth, led by their captain's Norris Trophy performance and 1st Team All-Star berth.

Over the next ten seasons, Langway was a pillar of strength on the Capitals blueline. A knock-off of old school defencemen from yesteryear, he became known for his fearless shot blocking and goal stopping expertise as confirmed by this Mike Gartner testimony in 1983, "They're the guys (along with xxx) you want out there in the last minute of a 3-2 game because you know they're going to get the puck out." Known in Washington D.C. circles as the "Franchise Saver", he was always willing to sacrifice his body for the club, never giving less than his best effort and expected nothing less from those around him. Teammate Al Jensen once stated, "You have to respect a guy who works as hard as Rod does." Langway would capture a second Norris Trophy in 1984, along with another 1st Team All-Star selection and a 2nd Team All-Star selection in 1985, while participating in five more All-Star contests, including the Rendez-vous '87 match-up versus the USSR National Team.

An extremely patriotic person, Langway rarely missed an opportunity to represent his country on the international stage. He was the captain and leader of Team USA on four separate occasions, the 1981, 1984 and 1987 Canada Cup's, along with the 1982 Pool 'A' World Championship. Despite never tasting team success during the high-calibre tournaments, Langway was always considered one of the best at his position, earning All-Star honours along with the USSR's Viacheslav Fetisov at the 1984 Canada Cup.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...io&list=#photo

Quote:
Few players have earned the title "majestic" and perhaps only one Hall of Famer, Jean Beliveau, comes immediately to mind when the word is mentioned. Even fewer players can legitimately be called "Franchise Savers" in the true sense of the word.

Nevertheless, any man who can save a franchise almost single-handedly merits mention, and no one deserves it more than Rod Langway.

"If I had to pick between Langway, Coffey, and Bourque, I'd rather have Langway because he had a better approach to the game. He was more of a team player with a lot more character. And that's the thing you want most of all on a hockey team".-Undrafted Player

When the towering defenseman...

He was not only the chief upper-shaper, the leader-with-words-and-deeds, but a commanding figure like few others in professional hockey.

On top of that, at one point, Langway was the best defenseman in the NHL. Despite the fact that he was known as a defensive defenseman, Langway was able to outdo Ray Bourque and Paul Coffey for the Norris Trophy in 83 and 84.

Langway had blossommed into a superstar for the Caps...

...a franchise maker...
http://books.google.com/books?id=wpb...angway&f=false

Quote:
He was a fearless leader, best known for his shot blocking skills.
http://books.google.com/books?id=Xua...angway&f=false

Quote:
Langway's leadership on the Capitals helped him earn the title "Secretary of Defense".
http://books.google.com/books?id=31z...angway&f=false

Quote:
Barring injury, xxx will likely become the best Capital of all time, but may never have the impact that Langway did.

The helmetless tough guy...
http://books.google.com/books?id=4_X...angway&f=false

Quote:
In an era of offense, Langway won consecutive Norris Trophies for his outstanding defensive play...
http://books.google.com/books?id=T9J...angway&f=false

Quote:
As usual, the Capitals' Langway, the US captain, contributed more than just his physical presence on the ice.
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/washingt...2&pqatl=google

Quote:
Unlike the obscure entries elsewhere on this site, Rod Langway's heroics are known to even casual Caps fans.

He was a two-time Norris Trophy winner as best defenseman, longtime captain, a 2002 Hall of Fame inductee, and the Capitals averaged a robust 92 standings points during his 10 full seasons.

Yet none of these represent Langway's greatest achievement. After the 1981-82 season, financial woes caused owner Abe Pollin to consider moving or folding the team.

That triggered a "Save The Caps" ticket-selling campaign.

Then, newly-hired G.M. David Poile engineered a blockbuster offseason trade with Montreal for Langway,
Brian Engbloom, Doug Jarvis, and Craig Laughlin.

Dividends were immediate. In 1982-83, wins went up by 13. Not coincidentally, goals-against went down 55. In 1983-84, wins increased by another 9, while goals-against decreased a staggering 57. Langway's leadership and skill had provided the rising tide that lifted all his teammates.

"He recognizes what he does best," coach Bryan Murray told Sports Illustrated . "He doesn't gamble. He plays very safe.

"He'll go back and make the pass to the same winger time after time if the guy's open, and he's so strong that even when he's being leaned on he can get the puck to his man. He never gets in trouble in his own end."

Even in the '80's, Langway considered himself a throwback. "My style is physical and simple," he wrote in a washingtonpost.com chat. "I focused on clearing the puck and quick transitions from defense and offense.

"I consider myself a proud hockey player. I honor the game and the people who played before me. I like the physical hooking and holding. You made people work to score."

Rod had a similar no-nonsense reaction to stardom. "It was simply my time," he told legendsofhockey.net.

"If I had stayed in Montreal, I would have been the same player, but I wouldn't have received the accolades. Larry (Robinson) was there, and was put on the ice during certain situations that I was getting in Washington.

"Being the captain and being recognized as a key player with the Capitals, along with the way I played, helped me win the Norris Trophy."

As wins increased, so did sales. Attendance peaked in 1989-90 at 17,251 per game - just a few hundred under capacity. And hockey in D.C. was safe.

Laughlin later told sportsfanmagazine.com, "Rod Langway just about single-handedly saved the Washington Capitals. He put hockey on the map here."

Hockey observers around the NHL agree. In his book, "Who's Who of Hockey", Stan Fischler calls Langway no less than a "Majestic franchise-saver."
http://caps-retired.blogspot.com/200...1982-1993.html

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Old
02-05-2011, 01:52 PM
  #37
TheDevilMadeMe
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Bill Quackenbush aka "Lidstrom-lite"

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Defenseman Hubert "Bill"Quackenbush excelled at both offensive and defensive aspects of the game. During 14 seasons, he was among the NHL's elite rushing blueliners. More significantly, he was a superior defender in his own end who relied on positioning and discipline rather than physical intimidation for his success. Consequently, his penalty minute totals were remarkably low considering his role on the ice.
Summary

- 5'11", 190 lbs
- Inducted into the HHOF (1971)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1945, 1948, 1949, 1953)

- NHL 1st All-Star Team (1948, 1949, 1951)
- NHL 2nd All-Star Team (1947, 1953)
- NHL "3rd" All-Star Team (1944)
- In total, was 1st, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 6th in All-Star Voting (this would be two Norrises if the Norris existed)

-7th in Hart Voting (1951)
-Named the Red Wings MVP in 1946-47

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordie Howe
He's one of the best all-around players I've ever played with
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
Quackenbush was one of the top blue-liners in the NHL, controlling the puck in a way not unlike the Montreal Canadiens' Doug Harvey. Quackenbush was an unique specimen, especially for his time. Not a body-thumper, he liked to poke- and stick-check enemy rushers. He was the single biggest influence in the development of Red Kelly's style of play.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Globe and Mail, 1949-08-17
Quackenbush is considered the best all-around defenseman in the game today. yet, the 27-year old last year won the Lady Byng Trophy - a rare feat among defensemen who usually emphasize their ruggedness with rough play. Quackenbush was also a unanimous choice for the all-star team last season.

Offense

- Top-10 in scoring by defensemen 11 times (2nd, 2nd, 2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 4th, 7th, 7th, 9th, 10th)
- Top-6 in Playoff Scoring among defensemen 5 Times (1st, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 6th)

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
Quack's rushes with the puck helped endear him to the Beantown supporters who hadn't seen this type of daring play from the blue line since the days of Eddie Shore.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup, vol 3
By the end of 1946, he had established himself as one of the most effective rushing defenseman in the game....
He could control the puck, in much the same way as Doug Harvey, until he spotted one of his forwards in the clear or took off on one of his end-to-end rushes. His assist record indicates how well he performed as a playmaker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings on Fire
Perhaps the smoothest rushing defenseman the game has ever known
-When he retired, Red Kelly was the only defenseman with more assists in his entire career than Quackenbush

Defense

- Named the best poke-checker of the 1950's by Ultimate Hockey

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF
To many observers, he was the prototype of efficiency and finesse in defensive zone coverage. Quackenbush was also considered a master at diffusing any forward's attempt to generate offense from behind his opponent's net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
The 5'11" 180lb blueliner was not only one of the best defensive blueliners, but also, much like Niklas Lidstrom in the modern NHL, was as gentlemanly as he was efficient.

Instead of using violence and brute strength, he would use a clean, pure version of defense. He seemingly knew what the opposing team would do before it would happen and he'd break-up the play without having to resort to physically manhandling the player. His positioning was perfect, his defense as elegant as it was disciplined

Quackenbush was an extraordinary thinker. To play NHL defense and to do it without taking many penalties requires an incredibly intelligent level of hockey sense. That being the case, Quackenbush certainly would have to qualify as one of the games most intelligent players ever.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
he played tactically clever defense and manoeuvered players off the puck with a minimum of effort. This allowed him to play upwards of 40 minutes a game and, it kept him out of the penalty box.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey's 100
Although the temptation to join the brawlers was quite apparent, Quackenbush resisted the lure and played a pure defense. In doing so, he made a greater impact on the game than some of his more violent teammates... It is a measure of his influence that some hockey writers have suggested that the NHL name a trophy in his honour to be given to the league's best defensive defenseman... known for his sturdy, inconspicous, mistake-free play...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail of the Stanley Cup, vol 3
He was an excellent checker, which he learned to do without holding or tripping. He was not a body checker and his big attribute was the ability to stop a rush without thumping an opponent into the boards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty Pavelich
-''He wasn't a bodychecker, but he was a great standing pokechecker. Defensively, he was as good as they come.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty Pavelich
He analyzed players (to learn their tendencies)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Wilson
He was always there defensively, but kind of never heard from. He'd come in close and get that stick out somehow. He was very productive in terms of getting the puck and getting it out of your end.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milt Schmidt
He grabbed a lot of people and was very cagey at holding in the corners.
Discipline

- Named the cleanest player of the 1950's by Ultimate Hockey

-Won the Lady Byng in 1949 with 52 of 54 1st place votes (also finished 3rd, 4th, 4th, 4th in voting)
-Only defenseman other than Red Kelly to win the Byng

-Quackenbush managed 131 games without drawing a penalty, from 1948 to 1950
- He only draw one major penalty in all his career, a result of a quick wrestling match with Gaye Stewart
- With a ratio of 0.12 minute of penalty per game, Quackenbush is far and away the cleanest defenseman of history

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Kelly
He taught me how to play the game without taking penalties'
Despite being a Byng Winner, Quack was no Shrinking Violet

Quote:
Originally Posted by Globe and Mail, 12-20-1948
Quackenbush, despite the fact that he continued to play, sustained a very severe face injury and lost a section of his dental crockery.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey Scene, a book from about 1950
He can hand out a jarring body check along with the rest of them but seldom resorts to illegal use of hands or stick.
(Most of this profile is a cut and paste from the excellent profiles made by seventieslord and EagleBelfour)

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Old
02-06-2011, 07:30 PM
  #38
jarek
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Cy Denneny, LW



5'7, 168 lbs.
Left handed shot
5 Stanley Cups

NHA Scoring

Goals: 4th (1916)
Assists: 4th (1916)
Points: 5th (1916)

NHL Scoring

Goals: 1st (1924), 2nd (1918, 1921), 3rd (1922, 1923), 4th (1919, 1925, 1926), 8th (1927)
Assists: 1st (1918, 1925), 2nd (1926), 3rd (1923), 4th (1922), 8th (1919)
Points: 1st (1924), 2nd (1918, 1922, 1923, 1925, 1926), 3rd (1921), 4th (1919)

NHL Playoff Scoring

Goals: 1st (1922, 1923, 1927), 2nd (1921, 1924), 5th (1919)
Assists: 4th (1919)
Points: 1st (1923), 2nd (1922, 1924), 3rd (1921, 1927), 4th (1919)

Stanley Cup Series Scoring

Goals: 2nd (1921)
Assists: 1st (1921, 1923), 2nd (1920)
Points: 2nd (1921, 1923)

From 1918 to 1927
1st in Goals (244)
---2nd place had 200 and 3rd had 145.
2nd in Assists (83)
---Frank Nighbor was 1st with 89.
1st in Points (327)
---2nd had 247 and 3rd had 227.

From 1919 to 1927
1st in Play-off Goals (16)
---2nd had 11 and 3rd had 7.
1st in Play-off Points (18)
---2nd and 3rd had 13 each.

Denneny missed the play-off in 1918. That season was Newsy Lalonde’s otherworldly play-off run. His 11 goals and 13 points would put him ahead of Denneny in points, but not goals!

At the time of his retirement, he was the NHL’s career leader in both goals and points.

2nd best goals per game (career) in NHL history, and 1st in his era.

Ottawa Senators’ captain from 1923 to 1927.

Legends of Hockey
Quote:
One of the top-scoring left wings of his era, he topped the 20-goal mark eight times in his stellar career. Although he wasn't the swiftest skater, he used his shot to deadly effect. Much to the chagrin of opposing netminders, he also became one of the first players to experiment with a curved stick… He was a productive scorer despite the fact that he was often in charge of protecting his good-natured linemates xxxxx and Frank Nighbor. ... One of the most dangerous shooters in league history… He contributed valuable leadership and savvy while helping the Beantowners win their first Stanley Cup in franchise history by defeating New York Rangers in 1929.
Joe Pelletier
Quote:
Though best remembered as a sniper, he was also quite a physical player, not afraid to mix things up with the opposition...
Ultimate Hockey
Quote:
After joining the Senators in 1917, he made protecting Frank Nighbor and xxxxxxx, his sweet-natured linemates, job one. Later, he played with xxxxx. The two were referred to as the "Gold Dust Twins" on account of their ability to keep opposition bad boys honest…Short and stocky, he looked more like a bulldog than a goal-scorer. Not an exceptionally fast skater, he possessed one of the more accurate shots of his day and was one of the first players to use opposing defensemen as screens..
SIHR
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XXXX was called "one of the fastest skaters of all-time" by Cy Denneny, a fine skater himself.
THN
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But boy, could he ever skate, score goals and guide his team to titles.
Who's Who in Hockey
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A rough-and-tumble player...sometimes cast in the enforcer's role when looking out for smaller, mild mannered players..a fantastic scoring machine...
Because of the nature of Denneny, specifically issues of his intangibles, I will look at these parts of his game in more depth than I normally would otherwise.

Fighting/Toughness/Some Defense Too

Quote:
A fight between Lalonde and Denneny occurred in the game, and Lalonde was blamed as the starter of the trouble. He was checked by Denneny in a scrimmage near the Ottawa nets, and was prevented from getting a shot. (some defense here) He retaliated by clinching with Denneny and the pair engaged in fisticuffs. They were separated, and Lalonde poked Denneny in the mouth with his stick, the upshot being that they began to mix it up with each other, and both players were given a match penalty. - Globe and Mail, Jan. 14, 1918
Quote:
In this chapter Randall created a little excitement when he mixed matters with Cyrill Denneny. The two started into furnish a lively battle, but both were banished...Denneny attempted to start a fracas with Mummery, but the Blue Shirts Hercules grasped him around the waist in a bear-hug and held him helpless until the Ottawa's temper cooled. - Feb. 5, 1918
Quote:
Something of a general fracas was precipitated by Denneny and Corbeau coming to blows just after the former had scored Ottawa's fourth goal. They clinched and were rolling around on the ice before officials could separate them... - Feb. 18, 1918
Quote:
Cy Denneny had to drop off for a few minutes in his first period when he received a blow across the left foot from Harry Mummery, but he came back fresher than ever in a few minutes. - Jan. 10, 1919
Quote:
Corbeau and Denneny came to blows in the second period, and each drew a major. They swung at one another and then grappled. - Jan. 8, 1920
Quote:
Denneny checked Wilson rather hard and when the latter expressed his views on the matter, the Ottawa wing player struck him on the shoulder with his stick. - Mar. 1st, 1920
Quote:
There was no sign of undue roughness, although the Americans set out to resort to heavy body-checking. At this style they gained no appearable advantage, for Boucher, Clancy, Hooley Smith, and Denneny body checked right back. - Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 1, 1926
Quote:
Denneny was put off for putting Dye into the fences. - Mar. 14, 1922
Defense

Ottawa played a rather tight checking defensive system during Denneny's time there, and not once have I read anything bad about Denneny during this time. To elaborate on Ottawa's defensive system, I will first provide things about how they played, then some specific references to Denneny's defensive work.

Ottawa's Defense

Quote:
The Senators checked George Kennedy's Frenchmen to a standstill. At times the Montreal habitants cut loose and unworked some terrific rushes, but for the greater part of the time they were tightly bottled up. Ottawa certainly outskated the visitors, but it was the remarkable checking of the red, white, and black team which really paralized the efforts of Newsy Lalonde and his teammates. There was no question of Ottawa's superiority, but the score should not have been so one-sided - unknown source
Quote:
Ottawa used their safety-first five man defensive system and St.Pats used very poor judgement in trying to get through. Coach Green's system won a champion for Ottawa last season, and unlessthe other teams find a way to offset it, the Senators will repeat this year. - Dec. 30, 1920
Quote:
When the Hams started for the Ottawa net they found a five-man defense waiting for them, and it was only on a few occasions they were able to penetrate it. - Jan. 7th, 1921
Quote:
"Pete" Green has the best material in the league, and in the second, he has perfected a system that to date has baffled all attempts to break it down. He uses a five-man defensive system, goes on the assumption that nine out of every 10 players will not pass the puck, and instructs his players to play the man. It is a defensive system, the kind that has received many hard knocks in the past, but the results obtained by Ottawa are proof that Green knows what he's doing. - Jan. 17, 1921
Quote:
There was no scoring in the second period- the defenses being air tight and the checking of the forwards being close and hard. - Jan. 5th, 1922
Quote:
The failure of the visitors to get more than four counters was undoubtedly due to their bad passing bearing down on the Hamilton defense and time after time passes from Nighbor to Denneny and Broadbent went astray and saved the situation for Hamilton. The Senators checked the locals to a standstill, and seldom did Malone and company get inside the outed defense. Only twice in the opening frame did they succeed in doing this, and one resulted in a counter when Carey took a pass from Arbour. From then on to the dying moments of the game the Hams found the Ottawa forward line hard to pass. - Feb. 20, 1922
Quote:
The Ottawa defense was particularly vunerable, and but for the yeoman work of Frank Nighbor, the Ottawa centre, the Irishmen would have piled up a commanding lead in the first two periods. - Mar. 2, 1922
Quote:
The Irish played good combination all evening, and the famous checking of the invaders failed to worry them much. Nighbor was effective, but the other players failed to keep him company. - Feb. 27, 1922
Quote:
Although beaten, the Americans were far from disgraced. They played brilliantly at time but were practically powerless to crash through a superb Ottawa defense ... With their impregnable defense in perfect working order the Americans were at a terrific discount. - New York Times, Dec. 15, 1926
Quote:
The Ottawa defensive tactics were strong and held off the New York charges more than once. - New York Times, Feb. 16, 1927
Quote:
Both teams (Ottawa and Toronto) checked hard and never at any time was there a let up in the whirlwind skating. - Toronto World, Jan. 5, 1918 (no negative mentions of Denneny in this context in this article)
Quote:
Eleven thousand spectators saw a fast first period followed by two seassions in which the visiting Ottawa squad displayed nothing but airtight defensive hockey, against which the luckless local attacks broke time after time. - Evening Sun, Dec. 15, 1926
Quote:
Ottawa, minus Broadbent and Denneny, were outplayed and outclassed from the goal-mouth out by the fast climbing Hamilton team in a NHL fixture here on Saturday night, finishing on the short end of a 5-1 count. - Morning Leader, Jan. 28, 1924 (sounds like Denneny was really a huge part of the team)
Quote:
During the opening moments, the rival goalies had nothing to do but set nervously as both defensive systems were proving impregnable. Attack after attack at both ends broke with regularity against five man bulwarks. - Ottawa Citizen, Apr. 5, 1927
Quote:
It was in the early part of the second period that Ottawa looked best. The forward line checked the Hamiltons to a standstill, broke up their rushes and gave Forbes the best and busiest ten minutes he has had in many a game. Smith, Nighbor and Denneny were all over the Hamiltons until Nighbor was injured and the change put a different light on affairs. - Morning Leader, Dec. 1, 1924
Quote:
However, the Maroons came to life with a vengeance half way through the final session and only luck, splendid work by Connell and dogged plugging by the forwards kept the Senators in position to take down the verdict. - Morning Leader, Feb. 16, 1925
The below is not Ottawa, but it demonstrates that even Denneny's NHA club, the Blueshirts, played solid defense as well, and in the first article not once was he ever mentioned as a black sheep. In fact, at the end, it mentioned he had a strong game (they specifically singled him out for this).
Quote:
Torontos came to life at the Arena last night and beat Ottawa, 1 to 0, in the most stirring game of the year. Good, hard back-checking turned the victory for the locals. - Toronto World, Jan. 13, 1916
Quote:
The blue shirts played effective hockey. The forwards followed their men right back, and the defense was sturdy at all times. - Toronto World, Feb. 17, 1916
Denneny's Defense

Quote:
Reg Noble smothered Jack Darragh, and Cy Denneny was unable to hold Skinner. - Feb. 14, 1918
Quote:
Ottawa played magnificant hockey with Sprague Cleghorn, Cy Denneny, and Clint Benedict as the Outstanding heroes. - Jan. 3rd, 1919, after long paragraph on Ottawa's defensive work
Quote:
Cyrill Denneny checked well, but he roamed from his position and was seldom in line to take a pass. - Jan. 29, 1919
Quote:
Denneny shone in all departments except shooting, and in this particular he was way off-colour. He got in the Seattle defense at least a half-a-dozen times, and was either outguessed by Holmes, hit the letter, or shot wide. - Mar. 31, 1920
Quote:
It was Boucher who began the rush on the New York Cage. Clancy, quick to see the possibility rushed with "Buck", and Denneny and Nighbor dropped back in the places of the two defensemen. - Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 1, 1926
Quote:
Corbett Denneny, Randall, and Cameron were good in flashes, but Dye was too closely checked to be useful. - Jan. 17, 1921 - Whose job would it be to check Dye in an Ottawa vs Toronto game?
Quote:
Clever pokechecking by Smith and Denneny on the Ottawa forward line often broke up the New York attacks almost before they got started. ... Clever pokechecking by the Ottawa forwards spoiled several New York sorties ...- New York TImes, Dec. 15, 1926
Quote:
Denneny sniped one of his heady goals and drove a dozen other near-goals at Lehman from all angles. He backchecked well and his all-around game was great. - Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 4, 1927
Quote:
Adams and Denneny played sound hockey while they were on the ice and each came very close to scoring, Denneny on several occasions with his whistling shots from the portside gave Benedict plenty of trouble. ... Jack Adams and Cy Denneny, the ever reliable veterans, subbed effectively and held the fort when Ottawas were riddled by penalties. - Ottawa Citizen, Mar. 9, 1927
Quote:
Hooley Smith and Denneny on the wings played their positions to perfection. ... Billy Boucher worked hard throughout but was too closely looked ater on his side of the ice by brother George and Cy Denneny to get many shots on Connell. - Ottawa Citizen, Jan. 20, 1926
Quote:
Denneny was on the job all the time and he and his brother had several little encounters and Cy drew a penalty for hooking brother Corbett. - Morning Leader, Mar. 13, 1922
Quote:
Lalonde and Corbeau rushed, but Denneny stood them off. - Montreal Gazette, Feb. 26, 1920
Quote:
Morenz had a chance to score, but Denneny held his stick and was ruled off. - Montreal Gazette, Jan. 29, 1926
Quote:
Manager Cleghorn used his double-shift forward line and, although they cut out a fast pace, the battered Senators seemed always able to stay with their checks, the wings repeatedly saving dangerous situations with splendid back checking. - Montreal Gazette, Mar. 9, 1926
Quote:
Their olive crab uniform is a negative looking garment, and their lack of finish was painfully apparent against such smooth and subtle performers as Nighbor, Denneny and Boucher. ... Cyrus Denneny played a fine game on his wing and helped in two timely counters. His back-checking was a big feature. - Montreal Gazette, Jan. 1, 1925
Quote:
Leading the victorious Senators came the veteran Cy Denneny with an outstanding game. He scored twice and was in the picture every minute he was on the ice. - Montreal Gazette, Feb. 12, 1926 (either he contributed defensively at every possible moment he could or he always had the play in the offensive zone)
Quote:
Americans tried hard to get their passes working right but they failed utterly before the magic stick of Frank Nighbor, the close back-checking of the Ottawa wings, and the sturdy work of George Boucher and Frank Clancy in front of Alex Connell. - Ottawa Citizen, Dec. 15, 1927
Quote:
It is probable that Denneny who did quite well against Canadiens (the rest of the team was said to have a forgettable night) may well be started out Saturday night. Cy imparts a steadying influence, and his shot is always a potent offensive weapon. - Ottawa Citizen, Jan. 12, 1928
Quote:
Denneny played his best game of the season on local ice as his two counters indicate. In this contest he out-played his old team-mate, Punch Broadbent, all through, and was never out of place when the right moment arrived. ... Punch Broadbent was looked after too closely to be very effective. - Ottawa Citizen, Jan. 6, 1926
Quote:
Cy Denneny, while never flashy, played a steady game throughout. His shooting was always deadly. - Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 4, 1926
Quote:
Boucher and Denneny did strong comebacks ... - Toronto World, Mar. 26, 1921
Quote:
Tallying three goals and turning in a splendid game in every particular, Cy Denneny again shone for the winners. - Morning Leader, Feb. 19, 1926
Rushing

Quote:
In two minutes, Denneny made an end-to-end rush, and passed to Nighbor who evened the count. - Dec. 30, 1920
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Denneny on a lone rush added the third and final goal of the period. - Jan. 7th, 1921
Quote:
..Gerard scoring after a well engineered rush with Denneny.. - Dec. 22, 1921
Quote:
..and Denneny put the locals ahead when he beat Roach after going from end to end alone. - Jan. 31, 1924
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Once, when Denneny squirmed through the entire American team, he sent a hot drive into Forbes, but the diminutive tender took it easily. - New York Times, Nov. 21, 1926
Quote:
Denneny tricked his way the entire length of the rink and then stopped when Spring set him down. ... Cy was through all by his linesome ... - Ottawa Citizen, Jan. 14, 1926
Quote:
Denneny was the most bothersome of the Ottawa crew owing to the fact that he was let sail down unchecked nearly every time he had the puck. He packs a bad shot, and the result was that he grabbed all three of the Ottawa goals. - Toronto World, Feb. 17, 1921 (weird use of the word bad but I assume it means he had a good shot)
Quote:
About the middle of the second session he weaved his way through the entire Maroon team only to have his effort nullified at the goal-mouth when Benedict made a miraculous save. - Ottawa Citizen, Mar. 9, 1927
Quote:
Denneny sailed through to cut loose one of his famous drives from left wing. It was like one of Cy's old time smoking drives and it shook Benny from stem to stern. A moment later Cy was rushing through to try a repeater when Ward spilled him headlong with an intended trip. - Ottawa Citizen, Mar. 19, 1928
Quote:
Denneny wormed in alone, and Vezina made the crowd gasp with his smart save. - Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 19, 1923
Quote:
Denneny rewarded the confidence of the fans with three wicked drives in the first seventy seconds. ... Denneny then swung wide on the French defence and his back handed shot swung from Vezina's foot against the post. Denneny got through alone, but the finish was weak, as he was heavily checked as he shot. - Ottawa Citizen, Mar. 10, 1923
Speed

Quote:
Play opened in a whirlwhind style with the Senators having a slight advantage. "Cy" Denneny threatened when after a rush with Broadbent he eluded the Toronto defense and borded in on Mitchell. - Dec. 22, 1921
Quote:
The most effective man on the ice for either team was "Cy" Denneny. He led the attack by the Senators at all times, and his pace never slowed during the game. - Jan. 11, 1923
Quote:
Two minutes and eight seconds after the overtime period began Denneny intercepted a pass from Keats in centre ice and raced in to beat Winkler and give Ottawa the victory. - Mar. 30, 1923
Quote:
Cy Denneny sank the good ship Boston with all hands on board when he blazed in that third goal. He checked Shore at the Ottawa blue line (some defense), streaked away through centre and then swerved wide on the weakened Boston defense. As he rounded the outer coron, he sent himself and crashed the puck at the net with such force that, although it hit Winkler's pad, it swept on and nestled in the near corner of the twine. - Ottawa Citizen, Apr. 14, 1927
Quote:
Both last night's goals were made by the swift Cy Denneny early in the opening period of the game. ... The Senators opened a fierce offensive, Nighbor, Denneny and Hooley Smith driving down in perfect team play. They slipped swiftly through the New York defense and Denneny taking a nice pass from Smith, scored the first counter of the game on an angle shot that Forbes could not block. Ottawa kept right on going like wildfire and on another swift drive by Smith and Denneny the latter made it a doubleheader in just eleven seconds more of play, making the visitors two up on the home boys. - New York Times, Dec. 15, 1926
Quote:
... speedy Ottawa club ... Individually and collectively, Dave Gill, the manager of the Senators, has gathered together a great hockey outfit. It has developed team play to a high point of perfection and as skaters and stick handlers Ottawa has stars who are masters at their particular lines of endeavor on the ice. On the forward line there are Frank Nighbor at centre and Hooley Smith and Cy Denneny at the wing position. Here is a trio which can sweep down the rink in unison and with speed which is likely to upset the most stubborn wall of defense at any time. - New York Times, Jan. 10, 1926
Quote:
His brother Cy was also a big factor in the play, and, while not quite so brilliant as Cor., notched the same number of counters and carried well and passed well. - Toronto Sunday World, Feb. 22, 1915 (not sure what carried well means, but I can only imagine it means he was skating well)
Quote:
In the first stage of the game the Ottawas seemed to excel in stickhandling, but were not so speedy on the ice as their opponents. In the last period, however, the easterners appeared to grow faster and made long rushed down the ice. Gerard, Nighbor and Denneny were particularly brilliant. - Saskatoon Phoenix, Mar. 22, 1921
Quote:
Eddie Shore dealt out some severe checks but the Ottawa boys as a rule were so nifty on their skates that they escaped damage. - Ottawa Citizen, Apr. 5, 1927
Quote:
Cy Denneny intercepted a pass when offside and raced in, when the Saints stopped playing, thinking the referee would call it. - Toronto World, Feb. 17, 1921
Quote:
Quick as a flash Cy Denneny dashed upon the loose puck and whipped it behind Doc. Stewart for Ottawas' first tally. - Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 4, 1926
Quote:
Clancy fed Denneny a perfect pass. The "Old Master" took it on the run and laid it right in the Bruin corner to tie the score in 15:16. ... Denneny raced in on an uncovered wing, but Shore took care of him. - Calgary Daily Herald, Apr. 12, 1927
Quote:
Ottawas started a furious bombardment with Denneny and Clancy charging through wildly on Roach. Thrice Denneny was through, only to be fooled by Roach. Finally Denneny came down centre, faked a pass to H. Smith, went by Corbeau, and sailed in to beat Roach. ... A clancy-Denneny combination saw Ottawas whirl through for another hard shot. ... Denneny and Clancy had double drives on Roach. - Montreal Gazette, Mar. 25, 1927
Quote:
Cy Denneny who had gone out on left wing in place of Kilrea, obtained the puck near center ice and set sail down the portside. He circled the outer defense to get in for a close shot and made no mistake, scoring from a few yeards out. ... The forwards with the possible exception of Cy Denneny, have all played better previously this season. Cy was at his best and did some accurate sniping while he was in action. - Ottawa Citizen, Mar. 14, 1927
Quote:
Denneny stopped Shore, raced around the defense and scored from the wing in 11:33. He drove the puck between Winkler's pads and the post. - Calgary Daily Herald, Apr. 14, 1927
Quote:
Cy took it while travelling at top speed and when even with the Bruin defence, sniped one of his characteristic whistlers. - Montreal Gazette, Apr. 12, 1927
Quote:
Broadbent and Denneny, the veteran Ottawa relief wings, have slowed down and take too long to warm up when thrown into action. - Montreal Gazette, Mar. 26, 1928 (suggesting he did indeed have some fine skating skills before age started taking its' toll)
Quote:
Hainsworth had to pick them from all corners as Denneny, Smith and Nighbor raced in on the Canadien net. - Montreal Gazette, Apr. 5, 1927
Quote:
Cy Denneny came tearing down his wing and took a pass from Alex Smith to score. It was a flashy effort. - Montreal Gazette, Feb. 23, 1927
Quote:
Ottawa, with Clancy out of it entirely and Cy Denneny in rather poor condition, was handicapped for spares and the pace told. The Bruins kept their speed better and forced the play in the second and third periods. - Ottawa Citizen, Mar. 7, 1928 (the only time I've ever seen Denneny described like this is in this year)
Quote:
The King checked him at center and at the blue line rifled a perfect pass through Stewart's feet over to Denneny. Cyril was under a full head of steam when he got it, and before Noble could turn on him he had skipped by and driven the pellet into the meshes behind Benedict. - Ottawa Citizen, Jan. 6, 1926
Quote:
They banged away with individual rushes and finally Hooley got an opening. He slipped out of the defence and Cy went tearing up to pair with him on right wing. - Ottawa Citizen, Jan. 6, 1926
Quote:
Denneny was traveling like a house afire ... - Quebec Telegraph, Mar. 20, 1920
Quote:
The Senators rushed with a relentless attack from the opening whistle to the closing gong, to completely outplay their opponents. Standing out in the ranks of the pace-setters was the veteran wing, Cy Denneny, who bagged to goals. - Morning Leader, Mar. 25, 1927
Combination/Passing

Quote:
Cy Denneny and Jack Darragh executed a pretty combination play, which gave Ottawa the first goal. - Jan. 28, 1918
Quote:
Some of the Ottawa combination work at this stage was the best of the series. Finnigan fed Denneny and the latter dropped a "delayed" pass back to Hooley on one of the brightest plays of the season. - Apr. 14, 1927
Quote:
...Geo.Boucher took a rebound off Denneny's shot and batted it home. - Jan. 28, 1918
Quote:
Jack Darragh made it 3 to 0 for Ottawa on the prettier play of the night, taking a perfect pass from Cy Denneny after the latter had dodged the Toronto defense on a beautiful rush. - Feb. 7, 1919
Quote:
The only goal in the second period was tallied by Cyrill Denneny, and when the same player passed neatly to Cleghorn for Ottawa's sixth counter early in the final lap, St.Pats went completely to pieces. - Dec. 30, 1920
Quote:
The forward line with Darragh, Nighbor, and Denneny alternating at the head of their attack displayed some pretty combination play, and had Forbes jumping out from one side of the net to the other to stop their numerous shots. - Mar. 11, 1921
Quote:
The seven-man game seemed to suit Otaawa very well, and their forwards worked combination plays and three-man rushes nicely. - Mar. 29, 1921
Quote:
..while Frank Boucher beat Vezina in the closing minutes of the game on a pass from "Cy" Denneny. - Dec. 26, 1921
Quote:
Three minutes after the second period had opened, Boucher and Cy Denneny went up together and Boucher succeeded in getting the rubber into Hamilton's net on a neat pass from Denneny right in front of the twine. - Jan. 2nd, 1922
Quote:
Seven minutes after the start a Denneny to Nighbor to Broadbent combination saw the last named player shove the puck past roach. - Jan. 5th, 1922
Quote:
G. Boucher got Ottawa's first goal on a pass from Denneny and 25 seconds later Denneny scored on a shot almost from centre ice. - Feb. 20, 1922
Quote:
..it was going to be Ottawa after Denneny's shot had been batted behind the net. It rebounded in front and G. Boucher bagged the twine. - Feb. 23, 1922
Quote:
The fans, pleased with St.pats to tie the score, but near the end of the period Boucher and Denneny broke away, and the latter's shot beat Roach. - Jan. 3rd, 1924
Quote:
Smith, Clancy and Denneny collaborated and Denneny scored. - New York Times, Feb. 16, 1927
Rebounding/Net Prescence/Driving to the Net

Quote:
Denneny scored for Ottawa in a mix-up near the net.. - Jan. 1st, 1919
Quote:
The visitors, nothing daunted, came back strong and in a mix-up near the Ottawa net Cyrill Denneny scooped the disc past Lindsay, but the umpire failed to see it. - Jan. 1st, 1919
Quote:
The winning goal in the period came after the puck had struck Vezina in the chest, and lay at his feet. Before he could clear, Denneny pounced on it, and tapped it into the net for an Ottawa victory. - Feb. 16, 1920
Quote:
Denneny netted the final tally for the Senators during a scramble in front of Hamilton's net, after Clancy had hit the post with a sizzling drive from close in. - Jan. 2nd, 1922
Quote:
The latter saved nicely, but Denneny, coming in at top speed, scooped the puck over Roach's head and into the net. - Jan. 5th, 1922
Quote:
Four minutes later poor defensive play by Cameron Saw Braodbent get to close quarters, and although Roach blocked his shot, Denneny was on hand to bat into the net. - Jan. 16, 1922
Quote:
..and near the close of the first period, Denneny crashed into him and..the injured optic was so badly damaged that Lockhart was forced to reitire. - Jan. 23, 1922- Denneny crashing into the Hamilton goalie.
Quote:
..and Cyrill Denneny tied the count one minute later when he secured possession of a rebound from Broadbent's shot. - Mar. 13, 1922
Quote:
Cy Denneny tied the score eleven minutes after the final session got under way, batting the puck into the net from a mix-up in front of Vezina's cage. - Dec. 27, 1923
Quote:
It brightened up in the second round, with Toronto showing the better, but they found Benedict a hard man to beat. He stopped them from every angle, but Cyril Denneny finally managed to get one by him. Keats stick-handled his way thru the bench, shot, and Cyril closed fast to bat in the rebound. - TOronto World, Feb. 17, 1916
Miscellaneous

Quote:
The only redeeming feature of the locals' performance was the good showing of Cyril Denneny, the younger brother of Corbett. The new man tried every inch of the way and it worthy of a regular place on the team. - Toronto World, Feb. 11, 1915
Quote:
Along the boards "Punch" Broadbent played a steady and, at times, spectacular game. He outplayed Cy Denneny from start to finish, and the latter seemed lost whenever he tied up with Broadbent. The latter is thinner than in years and played a very effective game. - Montreal Gazette, Dec. 24, 1924


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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
One of hockey’s all time great centers, Norm Ullman excelled at many things, including avoiding the limelight. Had he been a media darling, he would have gained a more prominent position in hockey lore. Ullman was a consistent scorer and playmaker and one of the more tenacious forecheckers ever to play. His longevity was also something for the record books. It was often said that he did things in such an efficient yet unspectacular fashion that only true students of the game could appreciate him.

… fit in well and developed into a superior two-way center

Ullman’s skating style symbolized his career. He wasn’t the flashiest to watch, but he always ended up where he wanted to be when he wanted to be there. Diligence and deception were his hallmark qualities, as he seemed to be everywhere without giving himself away. His tireless effort could be partially attributed to his affection for running in the summer and on non-game days. When interviewed, he was reticent and thoughtful when responding, but typically he focused on the team rather than himself. He earned the apt title “the Quiet Man”, but few who tried to keep the puck away from him would say his presence wasn’t felt.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Norm Ullman was an incredibly underrated star for 22 years in pro hockey, maybe the most underrated superstar ever. A hard worker who took immense pride in his defensive play, Norm, much like __________, quietly amassed one of the greatest careers in National Hockey League history.

…Ullman was a productive two way player on a bad Wings team…

Ullman was a wonderful little player. He always had his head up. Only on rare occasions would he peak down at the puck - a unique characteristic for most NHLers even. As a result he was almost impossible to line up for a big body check. Opposing players had to resort to illegal stick checking to slow him down. As a result Ullman often had sore or damaged hands and fingers as a result of all the slashes. He was truly a complete player, as good in his own zone as he was offensively. And while he never played for a Stanley Cup championship team, he had a reputation as a big game player - twice he led all playoff scorers in scoring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leaf Legends
Ullman’s game was anchored by his great skating abilities. He was dedicated to staying physically fit and kept his legs in great shape by running in the off-season; his powerful skating allowed him to be a dogged forechecker. A very focused player, he was efficient rather than flashy, though he had a knock for showing up at just the right moment to set up a teammate or knock in a goal. He was a good goal scorer and very skillful playmaker. His work in the slot was excellent and he was known for his quick release of a shot or pass.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
One of his patented moves was to skate across the other team's blue line, delay, pass the puck to his wings and move down the slot for a return pass or rebound. His powerful arm strength and quick anticipation made him one of the game's toughest forecheckers and faceoff men. More often than not, Ullman would go into the corners or along the boards and emerge with the puck.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leaf Top 100
A bulldog of a forechecker, Ullman’s game was built around his determined skating. He always kept his legs in great shape, and he was always focused on succeeding. He could score a goal or make a nice pass to set one up with equal ability, and he was often in the top 10 of NHL scoring. He did all of this with little fanfare, yet he was liked by his teammates for making younger players feel welcome.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey’s Glory Days
An excellent skater and stickhandler who was noted for his consistency and durability, Ullman shunned the spotlight during his 20 years in the NHL but still ranked among the game’s best players.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
Ullman performed with cold competence, without a trace of flamboyance. __________ called him "The Hardest working man in hockey".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
One of the quietest men the game has ever seen... Ullman developed into a great two-way player... master of the give-and-go...in his game, timing and positioning were everything. He and the puck always arrived at the same place at the same time...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey’s Golden Era
A top forechecker and digger, Ullman’s playmaking skills made him a consistent goal scorer and point getter. Good at shooting quickly from the slot, Ullman was also especially adroit at making pinpoint passes to his wingers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honored Members
“Hardnosed but a sportsman, a superb passer and strong positional player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trail of the Stanley Cup
He was a big man who could skate fast, was an excellent playmaking center, and proved a potent scorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey’s All-Stars
A tireless skater, Ullman was relentless in pursuit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Wings Alumni Accociation
His incredible mixture of production and durability made him an invaluable asset to his team and a respected and disruptive force to his opponents.

Ullman is widely considered one of the best stick handlers and forecheckers to have ever played the game. His trademark move involved skating to the opponent's blue line, delaying, passing to the wing and then moving down to the slot for a return pass or rebound.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Detroit Red Wings official website
Ullman employed his skating speed as an effective weapon. That fierce forechecking helped him produce a Detroit playoff record two goals in five seconds in an April 11, 1965 game with Chicago. Ullman was Chicago's personal nightmare in post-season play.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Oilers Heritage
Ullman was also responsible for being a role model for the players like __________ and __________, and was recognized as a lynchpin to—thanks to the erratic ownership of Harold Ballardan—an increasingly troubled club.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Kelly
Ullman has perfected the sweep-check and the poke-check, and that permits him to avoid being trapped.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emile Francis
He was the greatest forechecker in hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Dulmage
His checking style reminds you of one of those old movies where the hero is trying to free his girl’s foot from the railroad tracks as the train bears down on them.



Norm Ullman !!!


Awards and Achievements:
Hockey Hall of Fame (1982)

1st Team All-Star (1965)
2nd Team All-Star (1967)

Hart Voting – 2nd(1965), 5th(1966), 9th(1969)

11 x All Star (1955, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1974)

Scoring:
Points – 2nd(1965), 3rd(1967), 6th(1961), 6th(1966), 6th(1971), 7th(1968), 8th(1962), 10th(1957), 12th(1960), 12th(1969), 13th(1959), 15th(1958), 16th(1963), 17th(1972), 19th(1964)
Goals – 1st(1965), 3rd(1966), 4th(1968), 6th(1967), 7th(1961), 7th(1969), 8th(1962), 10th(1960), 10th(1963), 12th(1971), 13th(1958), 14th(1959), 18th(1964)
Assists – 4th(1967), 5th(1965), 7th(1966), 8th(1957), 8th(1961), 8th(1962), 9th(1959), 10th(1970), 10th(1971), 11th(1972), 13th(1974), 14th(1960), 15th(1968), 15th(1969), 17th(1963), 19th(1964), 20th(1958)

From 1960 to 1964, Ullman was 9th in Points and Assists, and 8th in Goals
From 1965 to 1969, Ullman was 5th in Points, 2nd in Goals, and 6th in Assists
From 1970 to 1974, Ullman was 15th in Points and 10th in Assists

From 1960 to 1969, Ullman was 4th in Points and Goals, and 5th in Assists
From 1965 to 1974, Ullman was 5th in Points, 7th in Goals, and 4th in Assists

From 1960 to 1974, Ullman was 5th in Points and Goals, and 2nd in Assists

Play-off Scoring:
Play-off Points – 1st(1963), 1st(1966), 2nd(1964), 6th(1965)
Play-off Goals – 1st(1966), 2nd(1964), 4th(1965), 5th(1963)
Play-off Assists – 1st(1963), 2nd(1964), 2nd(1966)

1965 – 1st in PPG and GPG

From 1963 to 1966, Ullman was 1st in play-off Points and Goals, and 2nd in play-off Assists
1st in play-off PPG and GPG, and 3rd in APG

From 1960 to 1969, Ullman ws 5th in ply-off Points, Goals, and Assists
4th in play-off PPG, 12th in GPG, and 5th in APG

1971 Coach’s Poll:
1st Best Checker


Quote:
Originally Posted by Years of Glory
Detroit moved into the finals with 5-3 and 3-2 triumphs in the nex two matches, with veterans Norm Ullman, __________, and Andy Bathgate leading the way.

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Old
02-07-2011, 04:13 AM
  #40
Nalyd Psycho
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Yvan Cournoyer


10 Stanley Cups (4 as Captain)
1 Conn Smythe
4 time 2nd team all-star

Coaches Polls:
Best shot 4th 1971
Best skater 2nd 1974
Fastest skater 1st 1976



Quote:
Opponents couldn’t hit what they couldn’t catch and Cournoyer was untouchable. Turning on a dime at full throttle without losing speed or control of the puck, Cournoyer defied the laws of physics night after night. By filling nets around the league with rubber, Cournoyer carved out a place for himself among the most celebrated Canadiens of all time.
Source

Quote:
In 1975 Henri Richard, the team's captain, retired and the leadership focus shifted to Cournoyer. He was made the Canadiens captain and he responded by playing with even greater determination, spurred by his desire to show the way for the whole team.
Source

Quote:
For those who got to witness Yvan Cournoyer apply his trade live and in person knew they were seeing something special. One of the best skaters and stickhandlers ever to grace a sheet of ice, Cournoyer played with an affection for the game of hockey that was as obvious as it was rarely matched.
Quote:
Yvan was not only fast but was also an impressive stickhandler, and had a booming slap shot that was deadly accurate. Yvan was actually a pretty tough player and was never intimidated by bigger stronger players.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yvan Cournoyer
I was never the kind of guy who was going to hit first. But if a guy dropped his gloves I didn't back down.
Source

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Old
02-07-2011, 12:31 PM
  #41
Leafs Forever
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Quote:
Between 1940 and 1952, Nels Stewart was the NHL's all-time goal-scoring leader. One of the most lethal offensive players of his day, he earned the nickname "Old Poison" because of his deadly accurate shot. Stewart also had a dark side, and he was more than willing to use his stick or mix it up with members of the opposition whenever the mood struck him. -Legends of Hockey
Quote:
He earned the nickname "Ol' Poison" in part because of his deadly shooting around the net and in part for a mean streak that made him doubly dangerous to opponents.-Canadian Sports Hall of Fame
Quote:
Stewart, whose ability to score from almost any angle caused fans to say he was a dose of "Ol' Poison"...A big, rugged, 200-pounder, Stewart was hard to knock off stride and at the peak of his career possessed cat like speed in front of the net.- Canadian Press
Quote:
The fiery center burst onto the NHL scene in 1925-26, scoring a league-high 34 goals in his first season...In 1929-30, Stewart was teamed with Siebert and Hooley Smith to form the dreaded S Line. This formidable trio fused talent and physical play at a level rarely seen in NHL history.- Legends of Hockey

Quote:
"In today's game," said Smeaton back in the 1980s, "Nels would have scored 100 goals. He was terrific in front of the net, a big strong fellow who had moves like a cat. Stewart never seemed to be paying any attention to where the puck was and, if you were checking him, he'd even hold little conversation with you; but the minute he'd see the puck coming his way he'd bump you, take the puck and go off and score."- Cooper Smeaton, NHL referee
Quote:
Stewart was a big man for his day, standing six foot one and weighing nearly 200 pounds. Clearly, he was no shrinking violet and the ice. He was involved in two of the more spectacular fights of the thirties.- Liam McGuire, "What's The Score?"
Quote:
This sensational NHL rookie who won the MVP for the regular season went above the call of duty in the playoffs for the Maroons. Usually a center, he played almost every shift on defence when captain Dunc Munro was slowed down by a severe flu. Despite playing out of position he scored six of the Maroons ten goals as Montreal completely outplayed Victoria. Had the game winner in all three wins over Victoria and a goal in the 3-2 loss. -Retro Conn Smythe 1926 explanation
Quote:
Truculent Nels Stewart was nicknamed "Old Poison" as he was the most feared goal scorer of his time.-Joe Pelletier
Joe Pelletier thoughts on some of the Nels Stewart detractors:

Quote:
Its hard to believe a Hart Trophy winner and NHL goal scoring champ could have scored 324 goals by being lazy. Perhaps Stewart was more deceptive than lazy. After all, detractors also mislabeled more modern big men of the game such as Frank Mahovlich and Mario Lemieux.
Quote:
After fifteen years of organized hockey one would imagine that a man would just about be ready to retire to a quiet life. But not so Nels Stewart, star centre and defence man of the Montreal Maroons of the national hockey league. Nels is still at it and they still call him "Old Poison". There are plenty of big men in the NHL, and there are plenty of brainy men, but there are few who combine both weight and brains. Nels Stewart is one of the few. He tips the scales at over two hundreds pounds but only uses his weight when necessary. He relies more on the gray matter between his ears. Perhaps that is why he has lasted so long. Stewart set the hockey world on fire almost over night....The remarkable thing about it all is that he is just about as effective now as he ever was.- Ottawa Citizen, Jan 27, 1931
Quote:
He is a two-fisted fighting player and the greatest inside player in the game.- Art Ross on Nels Stewart
Quote:
Nels Stewart stopped a rush by Ching Johnson, got the puck and skated back to be stopped by Murdoch, Ranger spare.- The Pittsburgh Press, Apr 15, 1928
Some proof of Left-Wing eligibility:

Quote:
Nels Stewart, Montreal Maroon Left Winger, is leading all scorers in either section of the National Hockey League...- The Border Cities Star, Dec 4, 1928
Quote:
....came off the stick of Stewart, Maroon wingman....-Ottawa Citizen, Jan 28, 1931
Quote:
Stewart, high scoring left wing of the Montreal Maroons, is now the undisputed scoring leader of the Canadian section of the national hockey league- New York Times, Mar 12, 1929
Quote:
Nels Stewart, Montreal Maroon left winger, is leading all scorers in either section of the National Hockey League.- The Border Cities Star, Dec 4, 1928
Quote:
Nels Stewart, high scoring left-wing of the Montreal Maroons, is now the undisputed scoring leader of the Canadian section of the National Hockey league- New York Times, Marc 12, 1929
Quote:
Nels Stewart, big Montreal Maroon left winger, has been a powerful factor in leading his club in (word cut out) rush from a lowly position to top most position in the National Hockey League race.- The Pittsburgh Press, Dec 7, 1928
A post from Sturminator:
Quote:
I can help with this a bit. I've got a NYT article from April 11th, 1928 on a Cup finals game between the Maroons and Rangers in which Stewart is clearly a left wing - both described as one in the text and listed as one on the lineup card. Smith centered him and their right winger is undrafted. [left_wing] was on the blueline for that series. Yeah...he got jerked back to defense during his prime, as well. This is not out of line with a whole lot of what I've read about the Maroons teams of that period. The famed S Line doesn't seem to have spent really all that much time together as a line, with both Smith and [left_wing] getting periodically moved back to defense and Stewart getting moved around between center and the left wing, depending upon where everyone else was playing.

Center seems to have been his "natural" position, as in, he played center most often, but considering that his game was basically to stand in front of the goal and hack at the puck (while spitting tobacco juice at whomever was foolish enough to approach him), I see no reason why he can't do that just as well on the left wing. It's not like his game would have varied much from one position to the next. I'm sure that his talent for ignoring defensive responsibilities was in no way reduced by moving him from center to the wing. You could probably make him a goalie, and he'd play the same game, just with more pads on.
A writer picks his all-star teams for the first half of the 1928-29 season picked Nels Stewart as the first AST LW. Here is what the writer said about him(credit to TDMM for the find):
Quote:
"a big man, dangerously rough at times, a very hard man to check, and one of the most finished players around the goal. In one game at Montreal I saw Stewart back-check like a most enthusiastic rookie, but after his team had scored two goals, he assumed his careless manner, merely standing around until someone brought the puck up to him... must drive a manager frantic... but when bearing down, he is the best left wing in the game."
The Toronto St. Pats are happy to select, an extremely tough player who is also one of the greatest goalscorers of all-time...



NELS STEWART!

Awards and Achievements
2 x Hart Trophy Winner(1926, 1930)
1 x Stanley Cup Champion(1926)
1 x Retro Conn Smythe Winner(1926)
1 x Retro Art Ross Winner(1926)
2 x Retro Maurice Richard Trophy Winner(1926, 1937)

Scoring
Ranking Finishes:
Goals: 1st(1926), 1st(1937), 2nd(1929), 3rd(1928), 3rd(1934), 4th(1930), 4th(1931),5th(1935), 7th(1932), 8th(1927), 8th(1938), 9th(1933), 9th(1939), 15th(1936),

Assists: 6th(1926), 8th(1928), 11th(1931), 12th(1934), 14th(1928), 14th(1933), 18th(1939), 19th(1930), 20th(1935), 22nd(1936), T-25th(1938),

Points: 1st(1926), 2nd(1929), 4th(1934), 5th(1928), 6th(1930), 7th(1931), 8th(1937), 9th(1933), 10th(1935), 10th(1938), 15th(1939(, 17th(1932), 17th(1936), 18th(1927)

% finishes(of 2nd place scorer):

Goals: 128%, 104%(of 3rd place; T-1st) 100%, 96%, 95%, 95%, 83%, 83%, 81%, 78%(of 3rd; tie for 1st), 68%, 67%, 67%, 61% Total: 1111%

Assists: 67%, 67%, 63%, 58%, 57%, 57%, 56%, 53%, 52%, 51% 50% Total: 630%

Points: 117%, 100%, 89%, 87%, 85%, 85%, 82%, 81%, 79%, 78%, 72%, 72%, 66%, 58% Total: 1151%

Long-Term Percentages
From 1926-1940 (career), Nels Stewart is 1st in goals(141% of 2nd place Morenz), 4th in assists(93% of 2nd place H.Smith in 6 more games), and 1st in points(123% of 2nd place Morenz).

He is 2nd in GPG(only a 200+ less game Conacher is ahead), T-34th APG, and 6th in PPG(playing at least 150 games more than everyone ahead of him)

From 1926-1936 (10-year peak), Nels Stewart is 1st in goals(114% of Bill Cook in 25 more games), 8th in assists(77% of 2nd place Joe Primeau), and 2nd in points (1 less point than 1st place Morenz playing 12 more games)

He is 2nd in GPG (to Conacher who played over 100 games less), T-23rd in APG, 4th in PPG amongst 100+ game players(playing 100 or more games than everyone ahead of him except Morenz)

From 1926-1931 (5-year peak), Stewart is 2nd in goals(3 less than Morenz playing 7 more games), 8th in assists(80% of 2nd place Morenz), and 2nd in points(17 less than Morenz in 7 more games)

He is 2nd in GPG amongst 76+ game players, 22nd in APG, and 3rd in PPG amongst 100+ game players.
-----------------------
Playoffs
Goals: T-3rd(1926)*, T-2nd(1928)*, T-7th(1933)*, T-11th(1938)*

Assists: T-1st(1926)*, T-3rd(1928)*, T-8th*(1938),

Points: T-3rd(1926)*, 3rd(1928), T-8th(1938)

*Achieved with particularly low totals due to era


Last edited by Leafs Forever: 04-29-2011 at 04:55 PM.
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Old
02-07-2011, 02:04 PM
  #42
TheDevilMadeMe
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I'm thrilled to bring the best playoff goal scorer of all time to the Swamp.

Maurice "Rocket" Richard, RW

Quote:
Originally Posted by ESPN Obituary
Maurice Richard was the essence of hockey in its golden age. The 5-foot-10, 170-pound Richard [B]had those eyes that seemed black as coal, that blinding speed, that devastating shot, that nasty streak, that passion to vanquish every opponent.[/B

These were the ingredients that enabled him to become the first National Hockey League player to score 500 goals in a career. He also was first to score 50 goals in a season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toe Blake
He was the greatest scorer under pressure that I've ever seen


- #5 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players
- #6 on History of Hockey list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players (2008 edition)
- #9 on History of Hockey list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players (2009 edition)

- Named the best instincts of the 1940's by Ultimate Hockey
- Named the best sniper of the 1940's by Ultimate Hockey
- Named the best sniper of the 1950's by Ultimate Hockey

-1947 Hart Memorial Trophy
-6-time Hart finalist (overall Hart record: 1st, 2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 8th)

-Led the League in Goals 5 times (also finished 2nd, 2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 4th, 5th, 6th)
-Runner up for the Art Ross 5 times (also finished 3rd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th)

-Assist finishes (6th, 7th, 9th, 10th)
-PIM finishes (1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 7th, 8th)

Elite longevity: 14 straight years as a postseason All-Star. From 44-45 to 56-57, only Gordie Howe finished ahead of Richard in AS voting.
-8 Times First Team All Star Right Wing
-6 Times Second Team All Star Right Wing (1 in his 2nd season, 5 to Gordie Howe)

Playoffs:
-8 Stanley Cups (Captain for 4 of them)
-13 Stanley Cup finals
-Retro Conn Smythes in 1951 and 1958

-82 career playoff goals (8th all-time, 1st among pre-expansion players)
-0.617 playoff goals per game (5th All-time, 1st among pre-expansion players. Bobby Hull is 2nd among pre-expansion players with 0.521)

Playoff goal scoring (please click)

-His record 6 playoff overtime goals wasn't broken until 2006, despite the fact that teams only needed to win 2 playoff rounds to win the Cup in Richard's era.

Led the playoffs in scoring twice (also finished 2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 6th)
Led the playoffs in goals 5 times (also finished (2nd, 2nd, 2nd, 2nd, 4th, 7th, 10th)
Playoff assist finishes (2nd, 3rd, 4th, 4th, 5th, 10th, 10th)

Quote:
The most dangerous man when he was in the opposition's end of the ice, Maurice Richard was a legendary, fiery competitor who fought through anyone who stood between him and the net.
http://www.squidoo.com/maurice-richard

A special thanks to my competitor EagleBelfour for some of the following quotes:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
''The Rocket'' was given on account of his mad, whirling-dervish rushes, his edge-of-your-seat charges into enemies territory. He was an excellent stickhandler and could often be seen carrying a player on his back on breakaways. His tricky dekes attracted a lot of holdings, tripping and slashing from checkers. He had an amazingly accurate shot and could score from just about any angles. From 10 feet inside the opposition blue-line, he was the most deadly assassin of all-time.

Peak Years 1947-51
In a Word ASSASSIN
Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Richard was often at his best in the most important games. His six career overtime goals set an NHL record.

Remember, a rocket in 1943 was a new, terrifying, and effective weapon. So, too, was Maurice Richard on skates.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
The stare was Rocket Richard's trademark. When he came at a goalie with his eyes lit up, the opposition was terrified.

Rocket Richard did everything by instinct and brute strength. He would run, not glide, down the ice and cut fearlessly to the slot. Some describe him as the greatest opportunist the game has ever known. He was probably the greatest goal scorer from the blue line in.

Richard's fierce temper and dedication were also hallmarks of his. Winning at all costs best sums up Richard's approach to hockey.

In a playoff game, the Bruins XXX knocked Richard unconscious and doctors said he was done for the series. Richard refused to be hospitalized and returned to the game as the teams battled. Rocket Richard scored the game winning goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by IHL (from a bio of a Soviet player)
XXX once had a conversation with the Rocket, where Richard said his secret to success was to not worry about the two or three burly defensemen that are about to crush him as he shoots on goal. He concentrates only on finding the open spot in the net, and takes whatever punishment the other team can dish out. After all, as long as Richard scored, he would be handing out the ultimate punishment

Not Great doesn't Mean Bad, or the story of Maurice Richard's defensive ability


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Coleman, 1979
His defensive ability has been unjustly overlooked by hockey historians. The left wingers who played against him, seldom scored goals.
The Calgary Herald, Friday, November 2, 1979

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ulmer
Away from the net, Richard liked to double-back fairly deep into his own territory. He rarely, if ever, handled the puck in his own end and initiated bodychecks very infrequently. "I have found it usually shakes me up as much as the fellow I have checked," he wrote. Still, while a middling defensive player, Richard was far more diligent than the procession of superstars - Hull, Gretzky, Lemieux - who followed him and Irvin used him in defensive situations. On a turnover, he always headed back first to his own zone and once there he picked up his man. The Canadiens kept track in 1950-51; while Richard scored 43 goals, his check scored 11 times. Still, Richard rationed his strength for offense. He was, Jean Beliveau wrote, "a highly-tuned, specialized hockey instrument, not a well-balanced, all-around player
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Ulmer
When, inevitably, Harvey got hold of the puck, opponents feared his passing touch and peeled back. The Canadiens' forwards, secure in the knowledge that Harvey would be beaten very rarely, were afforded the luxury of hanging higher in the defensive zone or even lurking in neutral ice. Harvey's natural skills bought him more room and, unimpeded by forecheckers (Harvey woul quickly lose anyone who challenged him), he was free to bring the puck up ice. "He was like a big glider moving with the puck," remembered television analyst Howie Meeker, a veteran of the Harvey era. "He controlled the play so well, his forwards could cheat."
Canadiens Captains, Michael Ulmer (via BM67)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean Beliveau
Every star has his critics and Maurice was not immune. It was said that he was a lousy backchecker, that he had little interest in the defensive game and that this shortcoming drove his coaches to distraction. It was baloney of course.

Admittedly the kind of all-out attack that Maurice launched at an opponent's net usually ended with him sprawled in front of the crease or over in the corner. He wouldn't be able to rejoin the play right away, esp if the other team transitioned to offense. Even when he scored he'd always have two defenders on top of him.
What long-term hockey fans said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter9
I saw Richard play many times, both live and on the television. His tremendous will to win did not magically disappear when the puck was possessed by the opposition and/or when the puck was on the Canadiens' side of the opposing team's blue line. Richard had tremendous upper body strength, and when it was necessary, he used it on defence. He was excellent defensively. Because of the Canadiens' overall strength, however, he was usually able to pick his spots in using his defensive capabilities. He was not a selfish player, by the way. More than anything, he wanted his team to win, and that meant doing whatever was necessary to see that it won. Because of his peculiar talents, that usually meant trying to score goals, but he could, and did, excel at other parts of the game, including playmaking and defending.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Shadows
I would say he was good defensively. Not great like his brother, but still good. Certainly not a liability in any way. You had to be at least Okay defensively to last in the NHL back then, or the coaches would send you down.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens1958
Maurice Richard was better defensively than Geoffrion and Rousseau as he had more of a physical game on defense, was stronger and solid on his skates.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClassicHockey
1. Did he backcheck? Yes he did . Did he forecheck? Yes he did.

2. Did he kill penalties? Rarely (didn't need to) Was he logging heavy amounts of ice time? Yes, for sure although maybe not as much as Howe because the Montreal teams were so powerful.

3. How was he regarded as a playmaker/skater/puckhandler? Great on all three.

4. How good was he without the puck? About average maybe - hard to say.

5. How was he regarded defensively? - He wasn't regarded as a defensive player which is obvious considering his offensive prowess. But you must remember that in the Original 6, all players had defensive responsibilities. It wasn't like recent times that players hung around centre ice. Those players doing that wouldn't have last another shift.
Thanks to overpass for the first quote, the rest is from this thread: http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=655336


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 04-28-2011 at 07:17 PM.
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Old
02-07-2011, 08:11 PM
  #43
overpass
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Doug Bentley, LW/C



#72 on the list of top 100 players of all time by The Hockey News in 1997.

LOH:
Quote:
Doug played left wing and was known as a "complete" player. Although he weighed only 145 pounds during his heyday, he had tremendous speed and was a natural goal scorer. Six times he had 20 or more goals in a season, and in 1942-43 he led the NHL in points even though the team finished in fifth place and out of the playoffs. It was during that season that the Bentleys made history. Their youngest brother, Reggie, was called up from the minors and played 11 games with Doug and Max, the first time three brothers played as a complete forward line. Doug was also exciting to watch and frequently had more ice time than anyone else in the game. Because of his speed, he was one of the great backcheckers of his era as well.
Scoring Finishes (regular season)

Goals: 1, 1, 6
Assists: 1, 1, 4, 5, 5, 9, 9
Points: 1, 2, 2, 3, 6, 7

Postseason All-Star Teams
1942-43 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1943-44 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1946-47 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1948-49 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)

Note: At least one of Doug's big seasons, 1943-44, came in a war-weakened NHL.

In general, Doug was more of a goal-scorer while playing the wing and more of a playmaker while at centre. He left the NHL at the age of 35 to play and coach at home in Saskatchewan, although he was still capable of playing in the NHL.

Doug on the power play
1954 (Doug was making his comeback to the NHL after 3 years off):
Quote:
The Leafs may have some trouble with Doug and Max Bentley, the two power-play experts who will be showing at the Gardens together for the first time since they were teammates with Chicago Black Hawks six years.

"Max is the greatest player at the point position on power plays that I've ever seen" says Hap Day, assistant general-manager of the Leafs. "Max and Doug together make up the two best point men in the business."
Quotes:

Great Left Wingers: Stories of Hockey's Golden Age:

Quote:
For the next 12 seasons with the Black Hawks, the 145-pound "ghost", Doug Bentley, was indeed "terrific". Using his tremendous speed and natural goal scoring ability, Bentley scored more than 20 goals in a season six times. He was an all-star three times and won the NHL scoring title once. Bentley also used his blazing speed to help out his defence. He was considered one of the most ferocious back-checkers of his era.

...

Max Bentley: "We had so much fun playing together. Doug and Bill were the best I ever saw, the fastest. They had different styles. When we were coming up to the other team's blue line, Mosie liked me to pass him the puck before he hit the defence and he'd carry it around them. With Doug, he wanted me to dump the puck between the two defencemen and he'd swoop around and pick it up."

...

In 1950, he was awarded the Half-Century Award as Chicago's best player by the Chicago newspaper Herald American.

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Old
02-08-2011, 05:41 PM
  #44
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Sid Abel is one of the most underrecognized elite players in the history of the game.

The fourth highest-scoring player of the six season period of 1946-47 to 1951-52, behind only Maurice Richard and Abel's linemates Gordie Howe and Ted Lindsay, some may consider Sid Abel's numbers to be a product of his legendary teammates. Those who had the privilege to watch him, however, didn't. In fact, they saw fit to give him the Hart trophy as league-wide MVP in 1949, and put him on the post-season all-star team four times, two first and two second. This in an era where he had to compete simultaneously with three of the greatest forwards of all time.


He started his career as a left-wing and captained the Detroit Red Wings to a Stanley Cup in 1943, before Gordie Howe and Ted Lindsay even made it to the scene. Once Howe and Lindsay had the opportunity to join Abel, he centered perhaps the most dangerous scoring line of all time, Detroit's famous "Production Line," under the strength of which the Red Wings would win two more Stanley Cups. As the center, he was most likely responsible for most of the non-offensive duties while this line was in action, and put up spectacular numbers regardless. History may remember Howe and Lindsay's names first, but in the year this line was put together, it was Abel who was given the Hart trophy by those who saw them play. Abel was the backbone to the legendary line, and one of the most dangerous players in the game as part of or without it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RedWingAlumni.com
Born on February 22, 1918 in Melville, Saskatchewan, Sidney Gerald (Sid) Abel began his NHL career in 1938 with the Detroit Red Wings. He spent nine full seasons and parts of two others in a Detroit uniform.

He was the first player to attain All-Star status at two different positions, center and left wing. He won the Hart Trophy as the league's most valuable player in the 1948-49 season. He was named captain of the Wings at the young age of 24. Sid's leadership was an integral part of the Wings 1943, 1950 and 1952 Stanley Cup winning teams.

Sid established himself as one of the league's great centers on Detroit's legendary Production Line. On that line, Sid centered two other future Hall of Famers - Gordie Howe and Ted Lindsay.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LegendsofHockey.net
Sid Abel excelled in a number of capacities during his extended hockey career. On the ice, he was an accomplished playmaking center and team leader who contributed to three Stanley Cup championships in Detroit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LegendsofHockey.net
In only his second full NHL season, he averaged more than a point per game playing on the Liniment Line with Don Grosso and Eddie Wares and was selected to the NHL Second All-Star Team. Abel's excellence contributed to the Wings' Stanley Cup championship run in the 1943 playoffs. That year he also served as the team's captain at the age of 24.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LegendsofHockey.net
In 1946-47, he was teamed with wingers Gordie Howe and Ted Lindsay for the first time. The line clicked and began to dominate opposing defenses. In 1948-49, they were dubbed the "Production Line." Abel led all Detroit scorers and was the recipient of the Hart Trophy--only the second Detroit player so honored after Ebbie Goodfellow, in 1940. The next year, Abel set career highs with 34 goals and 69 points. That same year, Lindsay, Abel, and Howe finished 1-2-3 in the NHL scoring parade and the Red Wings won the Stanley Cup.

Along the way, Abel picked up the nickname "Boot Nose" after he taunted Maurice Richard and paid for his insult with a punch that broke his nose. Abel topped the 60-point mark for the second time in his career in 1950-51, then earned his third Stanley Cup ring with Detroit in the 1952 post-season.
That's why the San Jose Sharks are proud to select with the 80th overall pick, Sid Abel.

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Old
02-08-2011, 05:42 PM
  #45
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Bobby Orr. Dominik Hasek. Mario Lemieux. These are the types of names people think of when the subject of dominant peaks comes up. If the purpose of the HoH board is to bridge the gap of time, however, then one of our major goals should be to make it so that the name Bill Durnan is remembered with those.


Bill Durnan played seven seasons in the NHL. It may not sound like a long career to you, but to an athlete like Durnan, it was enough. Enough to win six Vezina trophies. While the last three of his Vezina trophies were given at a time when it was based on your team's goals against, he also won first team post-season all star each of those three seasons (and six times in his career). By the consensus method of substituting first ASTs for Vezinas in seasons where the Vezina was a team award, Bill Durnan (6) is tied with Dominik Hasek (6) for second only to Glen Hall (7) in most Vezina wins.

Before a rule-change made it impossible, Bill Durnan served time as captain of the Montreal Canadiens, and was considered as safe and reliable a leader in the dressing room as he was in net, leading the Habs to two Stanley Cups, one in 1944 and one in 1946.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LegendsofHockey.net
That first season the Canadiens had the offensive services of the Punch Line - Elmer Lach, Rocket Richard and Toe Blake - but it was the often spectacular play of Durnan that took Montreal back to the Stanley Cup after 13 years of frustration. He led the league in games played, wins and goals-against average in the regular season and in the playoffs, when he allowed only 1.53 goals per game as the Canadiens skated to the title. Durnan was awarded the Vezina Trophy, the first rookie to win the award, and was selected to the league's First All-Star Team.

It's hard to imagine a better four-year introduction to the NHL than Durnan's. He won the Vezina Trophy for the four consecutive seasons and cemented himself on the First All-Star Team. Montreal won the Stanley Cup again in 1946 and finished first in the league after the regular season each year. Durnan suffered his only losing season in 1947-48. For the first and only time, he didn't lead the league in goals -against average and Montreal missed the playoffs. Broda, with the powerhouse Maple Leafs, took Durnan's spot on the First All-Star Team and had his name engraved on the Vezina Trophy as well as the Stanley Cup. Durnan returned to his winning ways in 1948-49, setting a modern league record with a shutout streak that lasted over 309 minutes and four games. In the next two seasons he was once again the best goalie in the league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Habslegends.blogspot.com
Bill Durnan had a short but absolutely brilliant career with the Montreal Canadiens.

Durnan had a very peculiar trait that helped him excel: he was ambidextrous. Instead of wearing a blocker, he would wear modified gloves on both hands. He would then switch which hand he used to hold the stick depending on which side of the rink the opposition was attacking from. Thus, the shooter would always be facing his big catching glove. He became known as Dr. Strange-Glove.

It wasn't a natural thing for Durnan though. A natural rightie, he worked very hard at it under the tutelage of church league coach Steve Faulkner.

"His idea of switching the stick hand really impressed me when I played against better teams, since the goalie always keeps his catching hand out toward the big part of the net," said Durnan. "At first it felt as though I was transferring a telephone pole from one hand to the other, but after a while I'd hardly realize I was doing it. Soon I noticed the opposition was unaware that I was switching hands, and later on when I was in the NHL it often took years before the other guys knew I was ambidextrous."
This is why the San Jose Sharks are proud to select, with the 81st overall pick, Bill Durnan.

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Old
02-09-2011, 01:19 AM
  #46
EagleBelfour
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Monsieur Anatoli Vasilievich Firsov



Russian Name: Анатолий Фирсов
Height: 5'9''
Weight: 154 lbs
Position: Left Wing / Centre
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: February 01, 1941
Place of Birth: Moscow , USSR
Date of Death: July 24, 2000 (Age: 59)

Soviet League Champion (1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973)
Soviet League Finalist (1967, 1969)
European Cup Champion (1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973)
Olympic Gold Medalist (1964, 1968, 1972)
IIHF WEC-A Gold Medalist (1965, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971)
Soviet First All-Star Team Left Wing (1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969)
Soviet Second All-Star Team Left Wing (1971)
IIHF WEC-A Best Forward (1967, 1968, 1971)
IIHF WEC-A All Star Team1 (1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971)
Soviet Most Valuable Player (1968, 1969, 1971)
Olympics Most Valuable Player (1968)
Russian Hockey Hall of Fame (1964)
IIHF Hall of Fame (1998)
#11 retired by the Soviet Hockey
1- The best 3 forwards were selected on the team, independently of their respective position

Domestic League:

SeasonsGPGAPTSPIM
1622434765412181
No Data:
Game Played: 1958-1967
Assists: 1958-1961, 1963-64, 1967-1971
Penalty minutes: 1958-1961, 1963-64, 1968-71


Top-10 Scoring (1st, 1st, 1st, 3rd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 6th, 9th, 9th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (1st, 2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 5th, 7th, 8th, 9th)
Top-10 Assist (1st, 1st, 1st, 1st, 9th)
Top-10 Penalty minutes (2nd, 4th, 5th, 5th, 6th)

Finishes in his last two complete hockey season, only complete database available
- His scoring finishes are affected positively due to having his assists total record in 1961-62, 1962-63, 1964-65, 1965-66, 1966-67
- His scoring finishes are affected negatively due to not having his assists record 1958-59, 1959-60, 1960-61, 1963-64, 1967-68, 1968-69, 1969-70, 1970-71


Assists Results in Detail:

YearsAgeAss.Rank on TotalNotable(Age)
1961-6220321 on 61 
1962-632171 on 21 (+0%)Vitali Davydov(23) Alexander Ragulin(22)
1963-6422  NO DATA
1964-6523131 on 22 (+46.2%)Vitali Davydov(24) Alexander Ragulin(23)
1965-6624111 on 22 (+27.3%)Vitali Davydov(25) Boris Mikhailov(21) Vladimir Petrov(18) Alexander Ragulin(24)
1966-6725111 on 23 (+18.2%)Vitali Davydov(26) Boris Mikhailov(22) Vladimir Petrov(19) Alexander Ragulin(25)
1967-6826  NO DATA
1968-6927  NO DATA
1969-7028  NO DATA
1970-7129  NO DATA
1971-7230109 on complete 
1972-7331820 on complete 


International Games:

(Exhibition Game, Olympics & World Championship)
Games by Opposing Countries
----CountryGPG
Canada3526
Sweden3124
Czechoslovakia2816
Finland2515
United States1514
West Germany1216
East Germany1013
Poland62
Switzerland11
Japan11
Italy14
Hungary12


World Championship:

# ParticipationGPGAPTSPIM
64746398526

Years in Detail:

YearsGPG#A#PTS#PIM
1964-656511th46th98th8
1965-666322nd221st525th4
1966-67711T-1st111st (+27.3%)221st (+13.6%)2
1968-6910101st (+10%)410th14T-1st6
1969-708611th102nd165th2
1970-7110111st (+9.1%)82nd191st (+10.5%)4


Olympics:

In the 1960's and 1970's, no professional hockey player from North America were playing in the Olympics. Therefore, the World Championship and the Olympics should be viewed as equal tournaments in term of quality.

# ParticipationGPGAPTSPIM
3202012326

Years in Detail:

YearGPG#A#PTS#
19648614th314th910th
19687121st (+50%)411th161st (+25%)
19725228th53rd77th

Top-10 All-Time Scorer at the Olympics

RankPlayers Name# ParticipationCountryPTS
1Harry Watson1Canada46
2Vlastimil Bubnik4Czechoslovakia37
2Teemu Selanne5Finland37
4Valeri Kharlamov3Russia35
5Boris Alexandrov3Russia33
6Anatoli Firsov3Russia32
7Vladimir Krutov3Russia31
8Wally Halder1Canada29
8Viacheslav Fetisov3Russia29
8Sven Johansson4Sweden29
- Different sources indicate different results for Vlastimil Bubnik and Harry Watson

All-Time Top 10 Soviet Players at the Olympics

Ranked by the IIHF (2002)
RankPlayers NamePos
1Vladislav TretiakG
2Anatoli FirsovLW
3Slava FetisovD
4Vitaly DavydovD
5Boris MikhailovRW
6Valeri KharlamovLW
7Sergei MakarovRW
8Vladimir KrutovLW
9Alexei KasatonovD
10Alexander MaltsevRW


- All-Time Winner of most Olympics Gold Medal (3), alongside Vitali Davydov, Viktor Kuzkin, Alexander Ragulin and Vladislav Tretiak
- Since 1952, no one has scored more goals in a single Olympics tournament than Firsov 12 goals at the 1968 Olympics
- Anatoli Firsov is the All-Time goalscoring leader at the Olympics, with 18
- Firsov is 2nd All-Time in Olympics scoring by a left winger, with 32 points in three Olympics. He's only bettered by Valeri Kharlamov 36 points in 17 games


Awards Nomination:

Most Valuable Player

SeasonsRanking
1967-681st
1968-691st
1969-707th
1970-711st
1971-726th
- The award was first presented in the 1967-68 season

Sturminator Analyse Firsov's MVP Nomination:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sturminator
We begin to see an interesting incongruity between Firsov's scoring finishes in the Soviet League and his MVP voting finishes in same. He finishes 2nd in goals on the way to his 1st MVP award (67-68) - ok, no problems so far. He finishes 5th in goals and again wins the MVP the next year (68-69). Ok. He finishes 5th in goals again in 69-70, but drops to 7th in MVP voting. He wins his 3rd Soviet League MVP award the next season (70-71) without placing in the top-5 scorers, and is not even an all-star. [sic 2nd All-Star]So what's happening here? Firsov's third and final MVP award is particularly interesting, given that he wasn't one of the league's top scorers, nor was he a 1st team all-star. It is reminiscent of Ted Kennedy's Hart season, or Bobby Clarke's first Hart in 72-73, in which he was only a 2nd team all-star at center. Was Firsov that kind of player? The differences between his performances in 68-69 and 69-70 seem to have nothing to do with scoring (both times he placed 5th), and yet in one season he was 1st in MVP voting and in the other 7th. Are the Soviet MVP voters taking more than scoring into account when casting their MVP votes? It appears so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
Tarasov always admired Firsov, and together they were a fortunate combination. They both valued hockey above anything else in their lives. For them, hockey was where you could be creative and invent new strategies every day.For Tarasov, Firsov's total dedication to hockey was backed by a unique combination of abilities. Firsov's style of play was based on his speed in several aspects of the game. The first was his ability to think fast. Firsov's game was a continuous flow of actions. In tough situations, he got his bearings instantly and came up with the most unexpected solutions. He also displayed uncanny speed in executing any technical maneuver in handling or passing the puck. And finally there was his terrific skating speed.

Each of these abilities compounded the others. During a play, his thoughts and actions were synchronous and usually resulted in a complete and correct solution.Firsov's game on the ice consisted of a blend of his own peculiar manner of back and forth skating, stickhandling and sudden and covert passes topped of with a variety of shots on goal. He moved all the time without knowing it, even when taking a shot on goal. He was especially good at the trick of "losing" the puck by letting it slide towards his foot. Naturally the opposing defenseman would make a grab for it, but Firsov would pass the puck with his skate up to the blade of his stick, all the time picking up speed.

No one was as selflessly dedicated to hockey as Firsov or as hard on himself and fanatical in workouts. He even augmented the tough drills designed by Tarasov. Coming down the ice with the puck, he would perform a variety of hops, skips and jumps at the same time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
Of all the Russian players Seth Martin faced in the 1960s, none, he said, compared with Firsov. To Martin, he was the Gretzky of his time, a creative scoring machine. Firsov wasn't a big man but possessed a whiplash shot. An unselfish player, he enjoyed setting up goals as much as scoring them. The Soviet coaches had tried teaching their players a "skate-stick" feint. The player would pass his stick over the puck, as if missing it, and then, when the defending player went for it, kick it around him with the skate. Only Firsov would perfect it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1972 Summit Series: A September to Remember
It is a common argument by proud Canadians that if Bobby Orr was not unable to play due to injury, the 1972 Summit Series would have been a much different story. Orr was at the prime of his career and the best in the world. Russia too was missing one of their biggest stars, if not their biggest: Anatoli Firsov

Firsov was perhaps faster than Kharlamov, who of course wowed Canadian audiences with awesome speed. It was Firsov's scoring exploits that helped establish the Soviet Union's dominance of the international hockey scene. Firsov, along with names like Vyatcheslav Sharshinov, Vsevolod Bobrov and Victor Populanov paved the ways for the powerfully awesome Red Army squads that would prove that they were the equals of the professionals in the National Hockey League.

In all fairness, by the time 1972 rolled around, Firsov was near the end of his career and was not the dominant player in Soviet hockey at that time. The torch had been handed to Valeri Kharlamov earlier in 1972 as Kharlamov led the Red Army to Olympic Gold. The Soviets believed that young hockey players were better because of their fitness level and biological clock, and almost as a rule would retire hockey players in their early 30s. That changed after the 1972 and 1974 Summit Series after they saw first hand the greatness Canadian aging stars like Gary Bergman or Gordie Howe.

Firsov likely would have been a part of the 1972 series had Anatoli Tarasov been the coach. Tarasov and Vsevolod Bobrov, who ended up coaching the 1972 team, were undergoing a power struggle at the time, and Bobrov was winning at that point and time. Firsov however was a staunch Tarasov loyalist, and refused to participate in the series against Canada. The official reason for his absence was injury.Anatoli Firsov never had the chance to prove to the world that he could play and excel against North American professionals. That's a shame because that means only a precious few saw perhaps the greatest Russian hockey player ever.
Quote:
Originally Posted by International Hockey Legends
Anatoli Firsov also missed the 1972 Summit Series showdown between the Soviets and the NHL. He is of legendary status in Russian hockey. Some old time Russian observers will tell you he was the best ever. Legendary coach Anatoli Firsov was probably his biggest fan. Then again, he was also Tarasov's most dedicated disciple.

Firsov was perhaps a faster than Kharlamov, who of course wowed Canadian audiences with awesome speed. It was said that Firsov's fast skaters were only out-paced by his mind, as he was always a play or two ahead of everyone else on the ice. He was also known for creativity, especially in his variety of shot selection.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
No one was as selflessly dedicated to hockey as Firsov or as hard on himself and fanatical in workouts. He even augmented the tough drills designated by Anatoli Tarasov. Coming down the ice with the puck, he would perform a variety of hops, skips and jumps at the same time.

He strengthened his body by choosing the roughest, toughest defense men as his opponents, Alexander Ragulin and Viktor Kuzkin.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey: Time Capsule
Anatoli Firsov One of the great early Soviet forwards, Firsov was named a Directorate Award winner at the World Championships three times in five years (1967, 1968, 1971) and led the Worlds in scoring three consecutive years (1967 to 1969).
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Voice of Russia in New York City: Russia remembers Soviet star puckster
Hockey fans appreciated Firsov’s professionalism that often helped him score eyebrow-raising goals, which was, for example, the case with one scored during the decisive match between the USSR and Canada at the 1968 Olympic Games in Grenoble. He managed to score a goal from a long distance without even looking at renowned Canadian keeper Seth Martin.

Being himself was Firsov’s trait that helped him to adequately perceive his skyrocketing popularity ratings in the 1960s, and that was especially thumbed up by his fellow players, fans and journalists.
Quote:
Originally Posted by History of Russian Hockey – Part 1
The next torch-carrier of Soviet hockey was Anatoli Firsov. He was a forward and played from 1958 to 1974. Firsov was one of the best hockey players ever because of his brilliant skills and extremely hard slapshot. He also innovated many of the moves that today’s forwards use to beat defenders.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Globe and Mail; Boisterous Crowd Sees Red Impress With Passing Plays (12/27/1969)
Anatoli Firsov, the hard shooting Russian centre, played a strong, vigorous game, consistently setting up linemates Vladimir Vikulov and Victor Popupanov.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chidlovski: 1974 Summit Series
Known for his booming slapshot, Firsov might have rivalled Canada's Bobby Hull if he had been permitted to play in the NHL; enjoyed three straight Olympic gold medals from '64 to '72.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vellu Ketola - Ässien Ässä (authorized biography on Veli-Pekka Ketola) by Jyrki Laelma, 1979
A perfect hockey player? To me Anatoli Firsov was one. Anatoli had it all. [...] That man (Firsov) was a shooter, skater, passer, playmaker. And he was tough - which was rare among the Russian forwards at the time. [...] A top player in every way; he had incredible vision.At his best, Kharlamov might have been a better 'solo artist' and a better dangler, but he lacks Firsov's skills in many other areas.
Quotes:

- ''Coming down the ice with the puck, he left his rivals dumbfounded by performing a variety of hops, skips and jumps at the same time. His famous feint, 'the club-skate-club' is still used by many in Russia and beyond." - Igor Romishevsky, Olympic champion and Firsov’s fellow hockey player

- ''I can hardly name another forward who could perform such a feint. It is still Greek to many defenders, which is why it is still in use." - Igor Romishevsky

- ''His persistent push for victory helped his fellow players put theirbest foot forward to prevail over their rivals. In this regard, Firsov contributed greatly to his team’s winning streak in the 1960-70s.'' - Igor Romishevsky

- ''A continuous succession of brilliant thoughts.'' - Anatoli Tarasov describing Firsov's game

- ''My first idols were Boris Mayorov and Anatoli Firsov. When I was growing up, they were big in our game.'' - Alexander Yakushev

- ''He's a star who never fell prey to the egoism of stardom." - Anatoli Tarasov

- ''He played with irrepressible rage.'' - Vladislav Tretiak

- ''I was also helped to the top by such world-renowned players as the brilliant forward Anatoli Firsov.'' - Vladislav Tretiak

- ''That devilish Russian!'' - Seth Martin

- ''On the other hand - well, I was now playing side by side with Anatoly Firsov and Vladimir Vikulov, teammates who ruled out the possibility of playing badly right out. I have learned a lot and benefited greatly from playing in a new group.'' - Valeri Kharlamov

- ''I have gained a new vision of ice hockey. Playing alongside a master of Anatoly Vasilyevich Firsov's calibre, I kept rediscovering many nuances of ice hockey - to put it in other terms, I got a deeper understanding of the tactical side of the game. Playing with new partners has taught me to be more thoughtful on the rink, to follow the plans laid out before the match more consistently, and to prepare for tactical formations thought out by the coaches in order to confuse the opponent in advance. In general, I became more circumspect and ceased to act rashly. - Valeri Kharlamov

- ''In virtually every match Vikulov and Firsov demonstrate their creativity, improvise, and confound the opponent with one riddle after another - they were also doing a great deal of work, and very eagerly so, pulling back whenever they would lose the puck. So if I had played more offensively with my former partners (Petrov and Mikhailov), caring little about defence, now that I was on ice alongside such eminent players, it would be embarrassing to carry on playing instead of going back and helping them. To play any different from how they played or to work any less on the rink would be tantamount to disrespecting them.'' - Valeri Kharlamov

- ''Probably Hull would win, but if they played two on two, it would be more interesting. Three on three, Firsov would win. Four on four, Firsov would win easily. Five on five, it wouldn’t even be a game.'' - Anatoli Tarasov, asked about who would win a one-on-one contest between Bobby Hull and Anatoli Firsov
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Game In Crisis: Part 10 of 12
Tarasov’s point was that Hull’s terrific individual skills and sensational slapshot would be countered and bettered by the passing, playmaking and teamwork of the European player.

The 1972 Summit Series: Study of Anatoli Firsov Absence on the National Team:

The 1972 Summit Series was one of the most exciting hockey event to ever happen. As the best players of both Canada and Russia were facing each others, it should come as a surprise that one of the best hockey player of his generation, Anatoli Firsov, was left off the Russian squad. As multiples explanations were given after the event, I will try to rationalize the reasons why Firsov didn't play on the Summit Series. At first, the official reason given by the Russian authority is that, at the time of the event, Anatoli Firsov had sustained an injury which disabled him to play in the series. Almost four decades later, it is now well known that Firsov was fully healthy. The 1972 Summit Series website write that ''Both Firsov and Davydov had been officially listed as injured for the series, but it was later learned that Firsov wasn't injured.''

One of the first suggestion given as to why Firsov was left off the team is that his performances over the last few seasons did not warrant him to be on the squad. Let's take a closer look at this. At the end of the 1971 season, Firsov was awarded his third and final MVP awards as Russia most outstanding performer. However, it is quite difficult to understand how the 30 year old received the honour over legendary left winger Valeri Kharlamov. Indeed, Kharlamov finished first in the standing with 40 goals, a whole 23 goals over 9th place, veteran Firsov. It wouldn't be far fetched to believe that Firsov was a well more rounded hockey player than Kharlamov, but the dispensary in goalscoring is still quite astonishing. However, Firsov had played brilliantly on the international stage, finishing as the top scorer of the 1971 World Championship tournament while receiving the honour as the top forward of the tournament. If international play had an effect on the MVP results, then Firsov's award might not be that surprising after all. At last, it is also argued that Russians were giving extra points for style. Although historically it seemed like a valid point, it would difficult to apply in this situation, as the 24 years old Valeri Kharlamov was arguably the most exciting player in hockey. Nonetheless, Anatoli Firsov was still arguably the second best left winger in Russia. Indeed, Firsov was second in scoring among left winger in the 1970-71 season and third in the 1971-72 season, behind Kharlamov and talented Yuri Blinov. Looking at statistics alone, it's quite astonishing that a legend like Anatoli Firsov, perhaps the brainiest Russian player of All-Time, who could of bring leadership and experiences into the squad, was not deemed as one of the best four left winger in the country.

Taking his performances on the ice aside, two other reasons were retrospectively given. At first, after coach Anatoli Tarasov was left off the coaching staff for the National Team, both Firsov and Vitaly Davydov protested by refusing to play for the National Team. Firsov was very vocal about Tarasov departure, whom he taught as a father figure. ''Bobrov is a perfect nobody'' he stated, talking about Vsevolod Bobrov, the legendary hockey player who would coach in the Summit Series. It is unclear how Bodrov and assistant coach Boris Kulagin treated Firsov from the start, but Anatoli himself was definitely part of the problem. As he later recalled: ''We immediately got a gap. [...] I psychologically could not obey to other coaches. When they gave me an exercise, I either laughed at them in my soul, or, in reality, behaved so that they were angry at me; understood, that I, as they say, was making fools of them.'' It's not hard to imagine that friction existed between the coaching staff and Anatoli Firsov. It would be quite an coincidence that the two best players who were vocals on their disapproval of the new coaching staff, Firsov and Vitaly Davydov, were left off the Summit Series, both written down as injured. Anatoli remember how he was threated by the National Team: ''I was completely barred from visiting games themselves. These were directives of coaches Bobrov and Kulagin, because I would have psychologically prevented our team from winning over the Canadians, and therefore it was forbidden to me. [...] I was not allowed for the games. I had already been ''an enemy of the people,'' once I refused to play with these coaches and I was not let to the games.'' Martin Lawrence, the author of the book ''The Red Machine'', believes in that theory.The second reason given was that there had been rumour that Firsov was putting effort to defect in North America. Some 25 years after the end of his career, it was indeed revealed that Firsov had been contacted by Larry Regan in 1968. Regan was then the general manager of the Los Angeles Kings and they were holding discussions concerning Firsov's defection from the Soviet Union and playing in the National Hockey League. The arrangement fell through, as it is believed Russian authorities must have learned of this possibility. In the suppressed Communist Soviet Union, the story never been revealed until Gorbachev's Glasnost. This might also be a reason why Firsov was left off the team.

In retrospect, I believe it is difficult to agree that Anatoli Firsov was left off the the Summit Series, either due only to his degrading overall abilities on the ice or that he was in fact, injured. In my opinion, it is far more believable that a mixture of Firsov vocal dissatisfaction of the coaching situation and the rumours of him defecting to North America were the main reasons why he wouldn't compete in the Summit Series. It would also not be surprising that Anatoli Firsov just flat out refused to play in that series, as he did for the World Championship in 1972.


Biography, Professional Career & Personal Life:

Anatoli Vasilievich Firsov was born on February 1st, 1941, in Moscow, Soviet Union. Firsov had an unfortunate childhood. As he wrote in his autobiography: ''There were three kids in the family. My father was killed in the war when I was just a month old. My mother worked as a stoker at the kindergarten, and we didn't have any extra money.''

As a kid, he used to play 'bandy', a form of ice hockey using a ball, carving his own stick using cherry-trees in order to make a hook. As his family couldn't afford skates, Firsov had to fix a blade directly onto his boots. All this made his first few experiences on ice a difficult one: ''[...] That's why the leaders of our backyard team put me on the defense line. At that time, defensemen were considered to be second rate players. So kids without skates or a stick, and smaller kids, were put in that position.'' To his recollection, Firsov didn't learn that pucks existed until the age of 14 or 15 years old.Firsov believed he gain his skating abilities and speed by playing on the larger, 100 meters, bandy field: ''An ice-hockey player could stay in the field 1-5 minutes,'' he said, ''while we could play ice hockey about 5-7 minutes without leaving the field. Why? Because those same long distances of ice were working out our lungs.''

Already at a very young age, he established himself as a phenomenal hockey player. He played for the Zenit and Almaz home town teams and also for the Spartak club and the Krasnyi Bogatyr. To his recollection: ''For the 1st men team, I played guys who had already served in the Army, and I was taken, a boy of 11-12 years, too. Practically, I was not any worse than them.''Anatoli gives credits to his former coach, Alexey Ivanovich Igumnov, for learning him his first skills: ''When I came to Spartak, there was an outstanding coach there. He was called ''Satan'' in the Russian hockey. He gave my first skills already in the 2nd youth team. [...] gave me an opportunity to practice my hands and to learn to correctly put my body, feel where a goalkeeper is and certainly to feel weak places of a goalkeeper, how he holds a stick.''

At 19, he flew to Colorado with the Spartak in his first encounter with hockey outside his country: ''So these first meetings had left an impression for my entire lifetime. Then, we were coming, our boots with skates such that they were falling apart. We looked at American hockey players. Their speed capabilities were better, they manoeuvrer better, while we were not somehow used to everything. Although we had a first trio which met with them.''In the 1960's, talented hockey players had the choice to either serve their time in the army playing for the CSKA Moscow, SKA Leningrad or various other hockey clubs around the country, or enlist themselves into the regular army force, unable to play hockey for the next two years. For Firsov, the choice was very easy and in 1961, at the age of 20 years old, Firsov joined the CSKA Moscow, a team he would play with for the next 13 years. His coach at the time, Aleksandr Novokreshchenov, strongly suggested to go play with the CSKA, under the grip of Anatoli Tarasov, because: ''That gifts which you've got, only Tarasov can develop it.''

So Firsov first came to the Central Red Army and coach Tarasov as a scrawny kid, his bones protruded from under the thin layer of muscle. To Firsov, the training ''were the most horrible suffering. I came puny (67 kilograms), I was light. Technical and mental abilities were so much faster that physical capabilities were not good enough. And so Tarasov started 2-3 trainings per day with me. I did not imagine before what were these trainings. Guys, who were trained under Tarasov before that, sustained it. But I, during the first days, fell down after trainings and could not even stand up.'' Although Tarasov's training were gruesome to the newcomer, he persevered and after a certain while, he couldn't see himself taking a days off: ''First time under his leadership I could not train quietly; I could not understand what he demanded from me. But then, when he rooted me to love those trainings, I trained permanently until the age of 27. I did not understand how it was to not train once or twice a day. Even on vacations, when I went to Zhemchuzhnyi, there was a stairway of 150 steps. In the morning, I went down on my left foot, than on my right foot, then went to swim, made big exercises with a weight in the afternoon, played tennis in the evenings, forces permitting and run on a hill in the evenings.''

In the early 1960's, Anatoli Firsov and his teammate considered themselves professionals, and then definitely trained harder than any players in North America. Winning was always the most important thing for Firsov. Although they were sometimes rewarded with extra money when he and his teammate were able to collect many victories on their trips away from home, they always gave their best mostly for the love of playing the game. Hockey, for them, was everything: ''We devoted ourselves completely, without any pity to ourselves. [...] we forgot about families, about kids. We only knew that we only had a hockey stick. We went to bed and woke up thinking about hockey. During the latest years, my spouse was travelling along with me, but even she did not exist for me at that time. Even though she sat somewhere on a rostrum, I did not see anything. As soon as we went out to the field, we forgot everything. No matter what they shouted or what they hang out there. Communists or no Communists, we just had a game. That was the most important.''

In the mid-1960's, Firsov contributed to organizing the Golden Puck junior hockey tournament. He had repeatedly instructed young hopefuls to show their best traits when on ice and during training sessions, warning against envy, cowardice and spleen. It's in 1967, when Firsov won his third World & European Championship in a row, that he felt that Russia could compete with the best in the world: ''There was a first very strong impression in 1967 on a championship in Vienna, when the strongest team in the world played against us, the Canadians. This amateur team won four games from the Montreal Canadians. That's where we felt the strength of our hockey.''

Around the same period, it is clear that sports and politics were crossing path on a regular basis. The Russian ambassador in Sweden, Dima Maltsev, was keen to remember the players that winning could solve many political issues back in their country. However, that added pression didn't seemed to hinder their abilities, as the Russian team won the WEC six times between 1965 and 1971.

The last couple of years playing were bitter ones for Firsov. When Tarasov was left out of the National Team, Firsov never was able to cop with the new coaching staff: ''Once Tarasov was not taken, I, relating to him like to a father, just said, that I don't want to work with these coaches [...] I was devoted to Tarasov, and it was psychologically fixed at me that once there is no Tarasov, there won't be a victory. I already did not believe into any of other coaches.''After being left off the famous Summit Series and a couple of mediocre seasons, by his standard, later, Firsov hanged up his skates, 4 games into the 1973-74 seasons and decided to become an assistant coach for the CSKA team for the rest of the season.

During his playing days, in 1965 and 1968 precisely, Anatoli received two Orders of the Badge of Honor. That civilian award is still given to citizens of the USSR for outstanding achievements in production, scientific research or social, cultural and other forms of social activity. He also received an order of the Red Banner of Labour in 1972, an order given in the Soviet Union for accomplishments in labour and civil service.

Before the 1987-88 season the Vancouver Canucks and the Soviet Union had reached an agreement allowing the NHL team to choose an assistant coach from four Soviet national team members. The deal was worked out between Vyacheslav Gavrilin, the Soviet Union's vice president of the State Committee of Sport and Physical Culture, and two members of the Canucks' board of directors: Frank Griffiths and Ray Perreault. The new assistant was to be chosen from among Firsov, Alexander Yakushev, Sergei Kapustin and Victor Shalimod. At the end, it seems that none were selected on the coaching staff. (I need confirmation?)

At year later, Firsov went into politics. In 1989, Firsov was elected to the Congress of People's Deputies, running on a policy of improving health conditions and sporting facilities. Hundreds of people were requesting his assistances and Firsov was renown for trying his best to answers the request of his electors. He served in the Russian parliament through the 1990's.

In the late 1990's, Firsov began creating large international Olympic school. His idea was that the more children were playing sports, the less they would be attracted to the vice of drugs, vodka and cigarettes: '' [...] in order to make an international strong nation. In general, if we have a strong nation of the world, we will have less weak and useless people. Therefore my task now, if I manage to, is to create an Olympic base. I will give away literally everything to deviate children from all these nasty things.''


Fun and Interesting Facts:
- Firsov first international game was on December 21st, 1962 against Czechoslovakia in Prague
- In the 1960's, Firsov was paid around 50$ a month
- During one world championship, Tarasov did not allow Anatoli Firsov to take a day or two off even though he had a fever of above 41 degrees celcius
- Firsov didn't smoked on drinked until the age of 27 or 28 years old
- Firsov is the Soviet player to ever record a hat trick in consecutive games at the Olympics (2/07/68 3 goals and 2/09/68 3 goals)
- In the 1972 WHA General Player Draft, Anatoli firsov was selected by the Calgary Broncos/Cleveland Crusaders
- Firsov last international game was on February 16th, 1972 against Japan in Toyko
- Firsov is one of only 4 players to have his number retired in Soviet hockey. Viacheslav Bobrov, Valeri Kharlamov and Vladislav Tretiak are the others
- Later in his life, he owned a hotel in Switzerland
- Anatoli Firsov was the hockey hero of Ulf Nilsson
- In Zhemchuzhnyi, there was a stairway of 150 steps named after Firsov


Miscellaneous:

- ''I was lucky to see many professionals, to see professionals of that Original Six, to see both Maurice Richard and Henri Richard and many others, and Jacques Plante, an outstanding goalkeeper. Although many consider Vladislav Tretiak the strongest, I believe, that Plante was an outstanding goalkeeper. I happened to meet with Jacques Plante on an ice hockey field and me, not only me, but our entire team could not drive him a single puck past him at all.'' - Anatoli Firsov

- '' He was cruel on trainings, cruel to games. He did not admit sicknesses. [...] I played with a broken rib, like it is normal. He believed that if your legs pain, you must train on arms, if legs and arms pain, let even train on ears, but you must make a training. Even when I got a pneumonia, I could not stand up; three days later I went to world championship in Finland. So, for him disease did not exist. Full devotion to hockey. It was a real dictator.'' - Anatoli Firsov on Anatoli Tarasov method of training

- ''At Olympic games, we certainly always admired our sportsmen. We made very many trainings with wrestlers, because they are very abrupt, with boxers, with basketball players. But basketball players began to get very serious traumas and they stopped meeting with us, while with wrestlers and boxers we met to learn to strike back in our meetings with professionals. That was Tarasov's sickness: no matter with whom you meet, you should expose a little bit of boxing, should be able to strike back. In order to be able to strike back in a future meeting with professionals. - Anatoli Firsov

- ''No, there was never anything like this with hockey players. Even when I had a temperature 42 degree Celcius, I did not take neither aspirin nor anlagen.'' - Anatoli Firsov, when asked about steroids


Abbreviation:
IIHF: International Ice Hockey Federation
WEC-A: World & European Championship Pool A
WHA: World Hockey Association

YouTube Videos:




Sounds:
http://english.ruvr.ru/data/2011/02/...2001_02_11.mp3

Internet Sites:
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...d=44499&mode=0
http://www.chidlovski.net/1954/54_pl....asp?p_id=f010
http://www.1972summitseries.com/otherfirsov.html
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...li-firsov.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatoli_Firsov
http://english.ruvr.ru/2011/02/01/42332104.html
http://www.hhof.com/html/r&rWO.shtml
http://www.goironpigs.com/?p=2707
http://russkiyhockey.wordpress.com/2...history-part1/
http://www.truthandrumours.net/a-gam...part-10-of-12/
http://kotisivu.dnainternet.fi/ruskeeah/english_e2.htm
http://www.ithappenedinhockey.com/ca...ayers/goalies/
http://www.goironpigs.com/?p=2447
http://www.thehockeynews.com/article...f-Nilsson.html
http://www.hockeyarchives.info/histo...CanadaURSS.htm
http://articles.philly.com/1987-02-1...n-soviet-union
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=565254
http://www.1972summitseries.com/1979...enArticle.html
http://www.pbs.org/redfiles/sports/d...oly_firsov.htm
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...s/rutop10i.htm

Special Thank You: Sturminator, VMBM


Last edited by EagleBelfour: 03-26-2011 at 11:33 PM.
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02-09-2011, 01:54 AM
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With our 2nd selection, the 77th overall in this year All-Time Draft, the Detroit Falcons are extremely please to select Monsieur Elmer James Lach



Nickname: The Nokomis Flash, Elegant Elmer, Elmer the Unlucky
Height: 5'10''
Weight: 165 lbs
Position: Center
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: January 22, 1918
Place of Birth: Nokomis , Saskatchewan, Canada

Awards received and feat accomplished during the World War II
Stanley Cup Champion (1944, 1946, 1953)
Stanley Cup Finalist (1947, 1951, 1952, 1954)
Saskatchewan Senior Hockey League First All-Star Team (1940)
NHL First All-Star Team Centre (1945, 1948, 1952)
NHL Second All-Star Team Centre (1944, 1946)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1948, 1952, 1953)
Art Ross Trophy (1945, 1948)
Hart Memorial Trophy (1945)
Conn Smythe Trophy (1946**)
Stanley Cup Game Winning Goal (1953)
Pantheon des Sports du Quebec (2000)
Hockey Hall of Fame (1966)
#16 Retired by the Montreal Canadiens (4th of December, 2009)

- #68 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players (1998 edition)
- #76 on History of Hockey list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players (2008 edition)


SeasonsGPGAPTSPIM
14664215408623478

Top-10 Scoring (1st, 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (2nd, 6th, 10th)
Top-10 Assist (1st, 1st, 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 5th)


PlayoffsGPGAPTSPIM
117619456436

Top-10 Playoff Scoring (1st, 3rd, 3th, 9th, 10th)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (3rd, 6th, 10th, 10th)
Top-10 Playoff Assist (1st, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th)


Awards Nomination:

Hart Memorial Trophy:
1944-45: 1st position (+31.9%)
1947-48: 3rd position (Buddy O'Connor) (-63.9%)
1951-52: 2nd position (Gordie Howe) (-25.8%)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
One of the top playmaking centers ever to compete in the NHL, Elmer Lach spent his entire 14-year career with the Montreal Canadiens. He helped "les glorieux" win the Stanley Cup three times and gained much acclaim as the center on the club's dreaded Punch Line with Toe Blake and Maurice Richard. Lach also received accolades for his determination on the ice and his resilience in battling a host of serious injuries.

Most observers were particularly impressed with his blinding speed and devotion to defensive play. He was brash and confident but quickly earned the respect of the coaching staff and his peers through his dogged work ethic, which was evident on every shift.

A tireless and fearless style of play also became characteristic of the Nokomis Flash. (Lach had) a reputation as one of the game's toughest competitors.

Lach's wizardry and spirit were crucial to the team's good fortunes. Many in the league felt his touch with the puck and ability to flip it to teammates were unrivaled.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey: One on One
The rookie scored 7 goals and 14 assists that season, but impressed with his dogged determination; battling in the corners, backchecking and pursuing the puck at all costs.

Few NHL'ers have been able to match the determination to return to the ice after suffering a major injury like Lach did throughout his extraordinary career.

The toughness and talent of the Punch Line led the Canadiens.

But the points, as impressive as they are, reflect but one aspect of an outstanding career. The skilled centre was master of the faceoff and was effective defensively as he was in the offensive zone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Greatest Hockey Legend
Lach was, above all else, a great playmaker. His incredible hockey sense and intelligence, combined with blessed skating skills were the perfect match for the Rocket. He was able to spring perhaps the greatest goal scoring machine of all time on countless occasions. Playing most often with Toe Blake on left wing, Lach was centering the famed Punch Line.

While he was an excellent offensive threat himself, Lach proved to be an ultimate team leader as well. Playing with Richard and Toe Blake for much of his career, Lach was the best of the three defensively. He often sacrificed his own offensive output and personal achievements in order to help his team win. The 5'9" Lach was never afraid of the physical game either, drawing comparisons to a fire hydrant because he was small but incredibly hard to budge.

In many ways Lach was an early day Jean Beliveau. He was a classy person and a classic center iceman. He was very humble, which perhaps explains why history remembers him only quietly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Canadiens: Our History
Spending his entire career under the direction of Dick Irvin, Lach played 14 years of the hardnosed brand of hockey that distinguished the NHL play of his era. When he went into the corners for the puck, Lach almost invariably emerged with it, often leaving opponents with a painful memory of the encounter.

Lach quickly established himself as hockey’s top playmaker, doing the heavy lifting and effortlessly making the puck appear on his linemates’ sticks.

Lach asked for no quarter and gave none, be it in practice or against other teams. He paid the price for his approach to the game without complaint or recrimination, despite suffering a number of career-threatening injuries.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBS Sport: No Punch Line
While he played in the large shadow of the Rocket, Lach's skills were more appreciated by his teammates and coach, Dick Irvin Sr.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey News: Habs hero Elmer Lach deserves recognition
No. 16 has already been raised to the Bell Centre rafters, in honor of the very worthy Henri ‘The Pocket Rocket’ Richard. The oversight, in my opinion, has been not paying similar homage to an equally worthy No. 16, Elmer Lach.

And one of the things I learned was Lach’s value to the Habs teams of the 1940s. Probably the greatest testament to his merit is the fact he won the Hart Trophy as league MVP in 1944-45, the season ‘Rocket’ Richard registered his legendary 50-goals-in-50-games performance. Lach was Richard’s center and had seven more points than his “Punch Line” right winger.

From a heart perspective, he was also a giant, willing to do whatever it took to win. He suffered seven broken noses, a broken jaw, a badly broken arm and won the scoring title a season after suffering a fractured skull.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who's Who in Hockey
(In 1942) Lach elevated to first-line status, where the aggressive forward took a regular shift, skated on the power play, and killed penalty as well.
Quotes:

- ''When I came to training camp, I had no intention of staying or being offered a contract. I came with an overnight bag. I talked with the manager back in Moose Jaw and he told me, 'You can't make that kind of money ($4,000 a season) here!' That was a lot of money back in 1940. He told me to try it because if it didn't work out, I could always come back. So my girlfriend went to my house, picked up all my clothes and sent my wardrobe.'' - Elmer Lach, on his first training camp with the Montreal Canadiens

- ''The three of us did like to win. We made sure that we didn't have any goals scored against us. We hated that more than wanting to score. As for Rocket, he enjoyed scoring the goals and I enjoyed watching him.'' - Elmer Lach on his linemates

- ''Buddy O'Connor and I were tied going into the last game. We played Chicago the night before in Montreal and headed to Boston for our last game. I got a high stick that cut my eye and when I went to Boston, it was completely closed. We liked Bill Head, our trainer, to sew us up because he did a better job than the doctors. Bill got the swelling down so I could see. That night, I was very fortunate that I scored two goals against Frank Brimsek. He didn't move on any one of my shots, so he was on my side [laughing]. I was able to win by one point.'' - Elmer Lach, recalling the final moment of the 1948 season, the year he won the inaugural Art Ross Trophy

- ''Just get in the clear, keep your stick on the ice and I'll get you the puck'' - Doug Harvey, talking on Elmer Lach before the last game of the 1948 season

- ''I never saw it go in!" - Elmer Lach, yelling at his teammate after scoring his Game Winning Stanley Cup goal

- ''I took the hardest check of my life when the Rocket jumped on top of me when the puck went in.'' - Elmer Lach, after scoring the Game Winning Goal of the 1953 Stanley Cup final

- ''I would say scoring the winning goal when we beat Boston in overtime to end the series in 1953. It doesn't get any better than that!'' - Elmer Lach, when asked for the highlight of his playing career

- ''The greatest centerman that ever came into this league.'' - Dick Irvin Sr.

Biography & Personal Life:

Elmer James Lach was born January 22, 1918 in Nokomis, Saskatchewan, a small town 133 kilometres north of Regina. Lach played a couple of games in junior with the Regina Abbotts in 1935-36, then played two seasons with the senior Weyburn Beavers followed by two seasons with the Moose Jaw Millers, both in the Saskatchewan Senior Hockey League.

In 1938-39, he led the loop in assists (20), also scoring 17 goals. That spring, Lach was the leading playoff scorer. The next season, he scored 15 goals and added 29 assists, then followed by leading the playoff scoring parade for a second straight spring: he was firmly established as the loop's top star.

The next year, Lach was invited to sign with the New York Rangers, but a member of that team told the prospect to steer clear because the Rangers were ''too cheap.'' Instead, Lach participated to the Montreal Canadiens training camp, held in Ste-Hyacinthe. Elmer was excellent, made the team and on October 24th 1940, he signed with them. The New York Rangers were not the only team disappointed about Lach's decision: ''He came east to play hockey at St-Michael's College in Toronto, a Leaf-sponsored team,'' recalled Conn Smythe.'' He agreed to sign with me. But he deserted, went back home without saying a word to play some senior hockey, and then returned to star for Montreal.''

Lach debuted with a respectable 21 points in 43 games as an NHL rookie. He was brash and confident but quickly earned the respect of the coaching staff and his peers through his dogged work ethic, which was evident on every shift.

In the 1943-44 season, an experiment in practice by head coach Dick Irvin Sr. yielded a bountiful return when Lach combined beautifully with Maurice Richard and Toe Blake to form a forward line. The trio became known as the Punch Line and served as one of the most potent units in league history.

Unsurprisingly, his first experience of Stanley Cup glory came the same season. First, ''Les Habitants'' beat the Toronto Maple Leafs in a five-game semifinal. After losing the first game against the Maple Leafs 3 to 1, the Canadiens dusted the Leafs in four straight games, including an 11 to 0 thrashing in Game 5, to move from the semis to the Stanley Cup final. Elmer Lach collected 8 points in the series.

In the Stanley Cup finals, the Montreal Canadiens were facing the Chicago Blackhawks. Game 1 ended in a 5 to 1 win for Montreal. The line of Maurice Richard, Toe Blake and Elmer Lach was unstoppable, and single-handedly beat the Hawks in Game 2. After Richard's third goal, the game had to be halted. It was the contention of Chicago coach Johnny Gottselig that Elmer had held Clint Smith on the play that resulted in the tally, and the Chicago fans agreed, showering the ice with programs and other debris. A win in Game 3 set up the final game of the 1943-44 season. Lach scored 2 goals and Toe Blake scored the game winner in overtime, beating Mike Karakas.

The following year, ''Elegent Elmer'', as he was called by his coach Irvin, reached the pinnacle of individual accomplishments. He won the NHL scoring title with 80 points and led all playmakers with 54 assists. He was one of the key reasons behind linemate Richard's becoming the NHL's first 50-goal shooter. Lach was also presented with the Hart Trophy and voted to the NHL First All-Star Team. In addition, the Punch Line accumulated a startling 220 points as a trio, an NHL record that lasted until the late 1960s.

Few competitors in the NHL history have matched Lach's resolve to return to action after suffering a major injury. This endeared him to the Montreal fans but also contributed to a career-long battle with injuries. Additionally, he earned acclaim by never complaining about his health. In one game against Toronto in February 1947, a Maple Leafs blueliner checked Lach so hard that he fell head-first to the ice and suffered a fracture skull. It was widely felt that his career was over, but Lach persevered and enjoyed a stellar year in 1947-48, winning the very first Art Ross trophy, as the league points leader.

In the last game of the 1948-49 season against Detroit, an opponent's elbow broke Lach's jaw. He first tried to downplay the injury because he desperately wanted to be ready for the upcoming semifinal series with the Red Wings in the playoffs. The fact that he could barely open his mouth to speak was an obvious sign of the severity of his injury, but that didn't stop him from trying to get a plastic helmet/mask device approved by NHL president Clarence Campbell. However, Lach was only able to play one game in the post-season.

After four more productive season, even leading the league in assists for a third time in his career in the 1951-52 season, Lach was forced to retire after the 1954 season because the fractured leg injury he sustained in mid-season robbed him of his speed.

His playing days behind him, Lach accepted an offer to coach the Montreal Royals of the Quebec Hockey League. In his first year with the club, Lach was able to establish his team as the league's best, winning the QHL championship. Still making the playoffs the following season, the Royals were quickly dismissed in straight games. It was Lach's last game behind a bench. The next year, he quickly established himself in business, working in sales and public relations for Maislin Transport.

In 1966, Elmer Lach incredible career was forever recognize as he was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame: ''Being elected to the Hall of Fame was the climax for me,'' told Lach. ''I was surprised and I couldn't describe I how felt at the time. When I think about it now, I probably should've shown more emotion, which I didn't.''

But a prestigious honour was still missing on the ''Nokomis Flash'' impressive resume. More than 50 years after the end of his illustrious career, on december 4th 2009, Elmer Lach finally received the ultimate recognition as the Montreal Canadiens retired his beloved #16. This honour was also given to fellow Henri Richard 34 years earlier, playing with the #16 in honour of Lach.

Even today, Lach is a very active man. An always avid golf player, he still plays with his wife, Lise. A couple of years ago, at age 90, Lach's objective was: ''to shoot my age again this summer," happy that the additional candle he put on his cake back in January allowed him one more putt. Last year, he also "shovelled all winter," he said, "and the snow was almost to the top of that fence!"

Elmer's abrasive and reckless style probably hurt his career, considering his many injuries. Indeed, Lach missed over 150 games due to injury, averaging one out of every five games. Only five times was he able to play a complete season. However, there were no regrets for him. And none should he have, as after his 14th and last NHL season, all of them played with the Montreal Canadiens, the Nokomis Flash was the NHL’s all-time leader for assists and total points. Over a half century after hanging up his skates, Lach is still among the top 10 all-time Canadiens in both categories. One can imagine what kind of records and accolade an injured-free Lach could of accomplished. Quite a legendary career for a man who had planned to spend his life as a meter reader for a Moose Jaw power company!


Fun and Interesting Facts:

- The first NHL game Lach ever saw was the first contest in which he played
- On February 6, 1943, Elmer set a team record that still exists by picking up 6 assists in an 8 to 3 game against the New York Rangers
- In the 1945-46 playoffs, Lach recorded 12 assists, an NHL record beaten 12 years later than Fleming Mackell
- In 1945, Lach recorded 54 assists, an NHL record beaten 6 years later by Gordie Howe
- The same year, although Maurice Richard manage to registered 50 goals in 50 games, Lach was awarded the Hart Memorial Trophy
- In the 1946-47 season, Lach was the league leading point producer before a fractured skull prevented him to play any more games that season
- On February 23, 1952, he recorded his 549th point to pass Bill Cowley as the NHL's all-time leader in scoring. His record was broken by only three players: Maurice Richard, Gordie Howe and Wayne Gretzky
- In the 1953 Stanley Cup final, Lach registered the Cup-clinching goal against the Boston Bruins at 1:22 of the first overtime period
- At his heyday, Lach achieved a 4 handicap playing golf


Signing, Trades & Injuries:

- Signed as a free agent by the Montreal Canadiens on October 24, 1940 for an annual salary of 4000$
- On November 1st 1941, the first game of the season and against the Detroit Red Wings, Lach crashed into the board and broke his arms in two places. He missed the remainder of the season.
- In February 1947, he suffered a skull fracture
- In the last game of the 1948-49 season against Detroit, an opponent's elbow broke Lach's jaw
- In 1953, after his decisive Stanley Cup game winning overtime goal, Lach suffered a broken nose and rib, compliment of Maurice Richard over excitement
Over his career, Lach suffered a fractured skull, a badly broken arm, two broken jaws, which he played through, a fractured leg, the same cheekbone shattered twice, a sliced foot, 100s of stitches and 7 broken noses


Coaching:

SeasonPosition/TeamLeagueGWLTOutcome
1955-56Head CoachQHL64342372nd in standing
 Montreal RoyalsPlayoffs1385 Won final vs Shawinigan Cataractes
1956-57Head CoachQHL68283464th in standing
 Montreal RoyalsPlayoffs404 Lost Semi-Final vs Chicoutimi Sagueneens


Abbreviation:

NHL: National Hockey League
QHL: Quebec Hockey League
SSHL: Saskatchewan Senior Hockey League


Youtube Videos:





Internet Sites:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...=P196606#photo
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=1914&mode=2
http://habslegends.blogspot.com/2008/04/elmer-lach.html
http://www.cbc.ca/sports/hockey/stor...edth-lach.html
http://www.thehockeynews.com/article...cognition.html
http://www.hhof.com/html/exSCJ05_32.shtml
http://psdq.blogspot.com/search?q=lach
http://www.hhof.com/html/exSCJ05_32.shtml

**Retroactive Award attributed by the Society of International Hockey Research



Last edited by EagleBelfour: 02-13-2011 at 10:36 AM.
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Old
02-09-2011, 08:04 AM
  #48
Velociraptor
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Cameron "Cam" Neely, RW

Position: Right Wing
HT/WT: 6'1", 215 lbs
Shoots: Right
Nickname(s): "Bam-Bam Cam"



- Recipient of the 1994 Bill Masterson Memorial Trophy
- Member of the Hockey Hall of Fame (2005)
- 395 goals, 694 regular season points in 726 games played.
- 57 goals, 89 playoff points in 93 games played.
- 4 acknowledgements for the NHL Second All-Star Team. (1988, 1990, 1991, 1996)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Cam Neely was the ultimate Boston Bruin. Character, perseverance, team work, physical play, play to death, win - all traits that can be easily used to describe both Neely and his B's.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Cam would score 36, 40, and 38 goals in his first 3 seasons with Boston. Cam would go on to record two straight 50 goal seasons before he suffered a major blow to his knee. Cam returned for the 93-94 season scoring 50 goals for the third time. It took Cam only 44 games to reach the 50 goal plateau, only Wayne Gretzky has done it faster. (Mario Lemieux in the 88-89 season also scored 50 in 44 games.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
As amazing of a goal scorer that he was, lighting the lamp did not define Cam Neely. He was the ultimate power forward of his time. His hands were as soft as a feather when he handled the puck, yet hard as a rock when handled an enemy. Defensemen feared going back into their corner to chase a loose puck knowing Neely was right behind them. As a forechecker he was relentless and imposing. He was an insane body checker and a dangerous fighter. Through his physical play he set the tone of games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The physical game took it's toll on Neely's body, yet he handled diversity with the utmost of class. He showed courage and perseverance, and a deep love of the game. Cam Neely gave everything he had to the game of hockey - his blood, sweat and tears, his hip, quad and knee, and most of all his heart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Cashman
"If you are going to write the description of a power forward, you just put down Cam Neely. You don't need to put anything else."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
In spite of nagging injuries, in the ten seasons Neely played for the Bruins, he still led the team in scoring seven times, including three campaigns with fifty or more goals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Cam Neely is considered the pre-eminent power forward of his era. It was talent and dogged determination that set the competitor above his peers and earned Neely a spot in the Hockey Hall of Fame.


Last edited by Velociraptor: 02-14-2011 at 01:55 PM.
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02-10-2011, 02:50 PM
  #49
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Aleksandr "Alex" Maltsev, C/RW

Position: Center/Right Wing
HT/WT: 5'9", 175 lbs
Shoots: Left



- Maltsev was an All-Star at the World Cup 5 times. (1970, 1971, 1972, 1978, 1981)
- World Cup Best Forward (1970, 1972, 1981)
- World Cup Scoring Leader (1970, 1972)
- Won Olympic Gold twice (1972, 1976)
- 5 acknowledgements for IIHF All Stars (1970-1972, 1978, 1981)
- 339 goals, 626 points in 520 regular season games played in the Soviet League.
- Inducted into the IIHF Hall of Fame (1999)

Maltsev is forever renown as an immaculate offensive forward, who could be a playmaker between any two linemates and he could score goals. Many people point out a glaring flaw in Maltsev, his physical ability and his softness. This quote by Bobby Clarke, someone who played against him during the Summit Series, could potentially end all question whether Maltsev was an incredibly soft or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Clarke
But when I played against Maltsev, I thought to myself that he was the best forward I had ever met on the ice. And I still think so now. He was great in everything – from controlling the puck to face-offs to physical play
Quote:
Originally Posted by International Hockey Legends
It is often said that if you were some how able to rank the top players in the history of hockey, a number of the members of the Soviet Red Army would be included near the top. Some would say Alexander Maltsev would top that list, While it is virtually impossible to compare hockey players from different eras, it is also almost as hard to compare international legends to National Hockey Leaguers. However there is little doubt that Maltsev ranks among the most talented hockey players ever.
Quote:
Originally Posted by International Hockey Legends
Having never had the chance to play in the NHL, he is mostly long forgotten in North America nowadays. Except maybe in Washington, where his name piques some interests now and again. That is largely because Capitals superstar Alexander Ovechkin identifies Maltsev as his idol growing up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by International Hockey Legends
In Soviet League play Alexander played in 530 games from 1967 to 1984. In that time he scored 329 goals while leading Dynamo Moscow to 6 silver medals and 7 bronze medals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by International Hockey Legends
Maltsev is of course best known to North Americans for his starring role in the 1972 Summit Series where he teamed with CCCP's most dangerous individual player, Valeri Kharlamov. He was a set up man for Kharlamov who was the trigger man. His five assists tied him for second on the Series' assist list. When Kharlamov scored his two goals in game one to shock the Canadians and take a demanding lead, Maltsev, was the guy who set him up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by International Hockey Legends
Maltsev was "born to be a hockey player," and it showed. He loved to be on the ice, even if it was just practice. He was said to be "out of sorts" when away from the rink, anxious to get back to it. He seemed to crave the attention he could generate with his game. Retirement from the game was said to be extremely tough for him.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...r-maltsev.html

http://www.1972summitseries.com/maltsev.html

Quote:
Like Ovechkin, Maltsev was a creative player who was not afraid to try unique plays in practice or in games. In a game against Dynamo Berlin he was once reported to have scored a goal by flipping the puck over net while he darted out in front to knock the puck passed the goalie baseball style. Valeri Kharlamov, Pavel Bure and Pavel Datsyuk, amongst other Russian stars, have tried to emulate the famous goal, but with no success.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1972summitseries.com
Alexander Maltsev is one of the all time greats in Russian hockey. And he made a favorable impression on Team Canada stars in 1972. Along with Vladislav Tretiak, Alexander Yakushev, Boris Mikhailov and Valeri Kharlamov, speedy Maltsev was a most-often named player who impressed the Canadians.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Stapleton
"And number ten, who was that? Oh yeah, Maltsev. He was a smooth athlete, very smooth stride, he moved the puck well."
Alexander Maltsev also starred in the 1976 Canada Cup. He scored 3 goals and 7 assists in 5 games and was the only Russian named to the tournament All Star team.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HHOF Time Capsule: 70's
Alexander Maltsev starred with the Soviet National Team during its 1970s domination of international play. He earned Olympic gold in 1972 and '76 and played on nine World Championship winning teams. Maltsev was named best forward at the Worlds three times and earned a berth on the 1976 Canada Cup all-star team.
Alexander Maltsev scored 77 goals and 89 assists in Senior World Championship Play, he won nine World Championship Titles and two Olympic Titles.

Go to the table on the bottom for complete stats of HHOF-eligible skaters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chidlovski
Alexander Malstev is one of the brightest stars in the history of Soviet and international hockey. Throughout his hockey career, Maltsev was an advocate of the so-called "creative hockey". His talents included fascinating 1-on-1 skills and uncanny puck handling, very stylish and speedy skating, fast decision making on ice and incredible tactical sense of the game. He was a master of magnificent improvisations on ice. Being very strong individually, Maltsev was also a team player. He was famous for being able to play successfully in any forward position based on the needs of the national team.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sturminator View Post
Soviet League top-5 scoring finishes:

1st (70-71), 2nd (73-74), 3rd (75-76), 3rd (76-77)

Soviet League MVP voting finishes:

1st (71-72), 2nd (69-70), 2nd (80-81), 3rd (70-71), 4th (73-74), 4th (75-76), 4th (77-78), 4th (79-80), 6th (76-77), 8th (72-73), 8th (74-75)

*note* - beyond Mikhailov's win, no Soviet League MVP voting data is available for the 78-79 season. Maltsev was injured this season, and certainly didn't factor into the voting.

*note* - Maltsev tied Kharlamov at 130 in total MVP voting points in the 71-72 season, but got two more 1st place votes, and was thus the winner. Their respective vote totals were: Kharlamov [25-25-5] / Maltsev [27-22-5].

Soviet League all-star:

(69-70) - (70-71) - (71-72) - (73-74) - (77-78) - (79-80) - (80-81)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

IIHF Best Forward:

1970 - 1972 - 1981

IIHF all-star:

1970 - 1971 - 1972 - 1978 - 1981

World Championships top-5 scoring:

1st (1970), 1st (1972), 3rd (1971), 3rd (1978), 3rd (1981)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Olympics top-5 scoring:

1st (1976), 5th (1972)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other:

Canada Cup 1976: allstar

All-time Soviet international goal leader: 213

Notes and comments on Maltsev's career:

- Maltsev's career seems to have been somewhat a compromise between Kharlamov's and Mikhailov's. On the one hand, his style of play and scoring-to-MVP voting results are very Kharlamov. On the other hand, his career looks a lot more like Mikhailov's in that he has a brief peak of true dominance (69-70 through 71-72 in Maltsev's case) and a long career at a very high level.

- Maltsev is perhaps the greatest international forward (leaving Tretiak and the defensemen out) in Soviet history. His achievements on international ice outshine all of the players thus far profiled, and there is a good argument that he was superior to Makarov, or at least on the same level.

- given the similarities in overall quality between Maltsev's career and that of Army Line bookends Kharlamov and Mikhailov, it is strange that he goes largely unheralded among North American fans. This is probably due to nothing more profound than a lack of press. Maltsev didn't stand out like Kharlamov in 72 (though his 0-5-5 was good for 9th in scoring in the tournament, tied with Mikhailov, Cournoyer and Park), and was never a member of a famous line, nor Soviet captain like Mikhailov. He played for Dynamo and not for CSKA, and was never a Soviet champion. In short, Maltsev's greatness was quieter than that of his better-known countrymen. There is good reason to believe, however, that he was of similar quality.


Last edited by Velociraptor: 04-01-2011 at 02:48 PM.
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Old
02-11-2011, 09:34 AM
  #50
arrbez
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Sylvio Mantha

Position: defense
5'10, 178 lbs
Shoots: right



Inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1960
NHL First Allstar Team (1929*)
NHL Second Allstar Team (1928*, 1930*, 1931, 1932)
* = speculative (but realistic), as there were no allstar teams prior to 1931
Captain of the Montreal Canadiens 1926-1937
Stanley Cup Champion (1924, 1930, 1931)
Defense scoring: 3,3,5,6,9,10



Quote:
"A defensive bulwark" - King Clancy
Quote:
"No, I wouldn't say so. **** is harder to get by. Shore is a rusher. But for tackling you when you come in and blocking you away from that net, **** is tougher. Not that Shore is easy, you know. No, sir. But fellows like Shore and Clancy catch the eye of the spectator when they buzz up and down the rink, while fellows like **** and Sylvio Mantha can do great defensive work without attracting half as much notice." - Frank Boucher on defensemen, when asked if Eddie Shore is the hardest man to get past
Quote:
“A tough, strong, and mobile defenseman, opposing forwards had no easy way to get around him.” – Canadiens.com
Quote:
He ranked among the best defensive defensemen in hockey... It was he who anchored the Morenzes, the Joliats, and the *********s as an ever-present defensive conscience.” – Ultimate Hockey
Quote:
“He was no wallflower, but he was certainly not the violent player that Cleghorn was... He established himself immediately as a superb player... He could rush the puck and hurry back to make defensive plays when necessary...” -- Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played In the NHL
Quote:
“He went on to enjoy a long successful career, establishing the standard of excellence for stay-at-home defensemen for generations to come.” – Canadiens.com
Quote:
“While his main charge involved preventing the opposition from scoring, he also found the twine with regularity.” – Canadiens.com
Quote:
"Mantha, one of the all time best defensive blue liners, was twice named to the Second All Star team." - Joel Pelletier
Quote:
"By this time (1931), Mantha was entrenched as one of the most revered defensive defensemen in the game." - Legends of Hockey
Quote:
“I remember one game with the Leafs we were playing the Canadiens and Sylvio Mantha was the key to their defense. XXXX was our coach for us then and he called me over to the bench. “Get that Mantha,” he told me. First chance I got, I caught him with a cross check and broke his jaw. - King Clancy
Quote:
“You know that Sylvio Mantha is a tough customer on that Montreal team. If we could just slow him down a step or two, we’d make it a lot easier on ourselves." - King Clancy
Quote:
"His offensive zone rushes aided the club’s transitional play, while his disciplined checking in the defensive zone rounded out his game." - Kings of the Ice


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