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Old
03-04-2011, 01:02 AM
  #101
Dreakmur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey’s Golden Era
When Boston general managed Lynn Patrick was looking for a successor to tough guy Fern Flaman, he spotted young Ted Green who was playing with the Winnipeg Warriors of the Western Hockey League. In June, 1960 Patrick took the opportunity to draft Green before the Montreal Canadiens and the Bruins had a new leader for their blueline corps.



He needed to be physical since the Bruins were not once of the bigger team sin the league. Green forced the opposition to keep their heads up in the Bruins end of the ice.

Through sheer determination Green’s play steadily improved. A good shot blocker, Green was also used as a forward to kill penalties which gave him more confidence. He was effective at carrying the puck and showed he could handle the point position for the Bruins.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
In Green, the Bruins got a solid enforcer who provided the club with crease-clearing spine and leadership during the lean years of the early sixties.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Though he was brought in initially for his physicality and intimidation, Green developed into a good NHLer through sheer determination. A monster in his own zone, Green kept the other team honest. A hard hitting and willing fighter with a short fuse, Green became an integral part of the Bruins. An excellent shot blocker, Green saw time as a forward on penalty kills.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who’s Who in Hockey
For almost 8 years, Edward Joseph “Ted” Green epitomized the style of the Boston Bruins, bruising, roughhousing, and intimidating members of the opposing team every time he stepped out for a shift.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Greatest Players and Moments of the Boston Bruins
Pound for pound, Ted Green was the toughest of the post-World War II Bruins and – with the exception of Eddie Shore – the meanest player to ever don the black, gold, and white.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milt Schmidt
It’s really rough now with Green out too – especially offensively. They’re two of the best defensemen at getting the puck out of their own zone.




Ted Green !!!


Awards and Accomplishments:
Stanley Cup Champion (1972)
3 x Avco Cup Winner (1973, 1976, 1978)

Second Team All-Star (1969)

2 x All Star (1965, 1969)
Norris voting – 3rd(1969), 7th(1965), 10th(1967)
All-Star voting - 3rd(1969), 6th(1965), 6th(1968), 10th(1966)

Scoring:
Points among Defensemen – 2nd(1965), 2nd(1968), 3rd(1969), 8th(1971)
Goals among Defensemen – 3rd(1965), 3rd(1968), 5th(1966), 7th(1967), 8th(1969)
Assists among Defensemen – 1st(1968), 2nd(1965), 3rd(1969), 6th(1971)

Led WHA Defensemen in goals (1973)

Play-off Points among Defensemen - 2nd(1969)

1965 Coaches’ Poll:
3rd Best Bodychecker



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Green
I had one philosophy, and that was this – the corners were mine. Any man who tried to take corner away from me was stealing from me. I get mad when a man tries to steal from me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Green
One thing in my favor – when you play the way I did then – was reputation. Players on the other team knew I was going to get them. They had to be thinking about it.


Last edited by Dreakmur: 03-13-2011 at 06:35 AM.
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Old
03-04-2011, 01:26 AM
  #102
MadArcand
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Ed Belfour, G



Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeygoalies.org
Technically strong. Extremely quick, great desire. Aggressive and very acrobatic. Very stubborn; has an undeniable belief in himself. Trememdous work ethic, and maintains his focus, despite rarely seeing a large number of shots. Maintains good control of rebounds and takes away the low part of the net; in fact, Belfour's nearly impossible to beat low. Good puckhandler and skater - passing skills are top-notch, but he shows restraint in shooting the puck down the ice.
Quote:
"Eddie's like a lot of other goalies in this league now, with Hasek being the prime example: Play the odds and cover the bottom of the net. A lot of times he has his blocker and his paddle flat on the ice. If he has a weakness, it's the one-timer. I try to get him moving and then go five-hole. But mostly, he gives you nothing down low and makes you roof it on him. If you can, all the more power to you. But he knows the odds are in his favor."
Doug Weight, ESPN Sportszone, April 1998
Quote:
"Despite failing to win back-to-back championships, Belfour was spectacular during the 2000 Stanley Cup playoffs. His abilities have never been questioned but the mental aspect of his game has been. To his credit, however, he has greatly improved that part in recent years. Now that he has reached the 300-win club, Belfour can begin to stake a rightful claim among the game's great goaltenders. Capable of stealing a game, "The Eagle" is now a far more consistent performer. Getting older and better. Belfour should maintain his status among the league's best goalies for a few more seasons - as long as he can keep the mace out of his eyes."
The Sports Forecaster 2000-01, p. 198
Quote:
"It's time to give Eddie the Eagle his due - he has usurped Dominik Hasek as the best goalie in the game today. His playoff performance with Dallas last spring leaves no doubt about that."
The Hockey News 2000-01 Yearbook, p. 11
Quote:
"Eddie has cemented his status as one of the game's top goalies. A winner who raises his game when it counts. Eddie is the backbone of this hockey club and as he goes, so go the Dallas Stars."
The Sports Forecaster Online 2000-01
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
Belfour wore number 20 as a tribute to former Russian goaltending great Vladislav Tretiak, who coached Belfour in Chicago in the 1990s.
Awards:
1990-91 NHL Calder Memorial Trophy
1990-91 NHL Vezina Trophy
1990-91 NHL William M. Jennings Trophy
1992-93 NHL Vezina Trophy
1992-93 NHL William M. Jennings Trophy
1994-95 NHL William M. Jennings Trophy
1998-99 NHL William M. Jennings Trophy

1990-91 NHL NHL All-Rookie Team (1st)
1990-91 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1992-93 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1994-95 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)

All-Star Games: 1992, 1993, 1996, 1998, 1999

Hart voting placements:
10th 2003-04

Additional Vezina voting placements:
2nd 1994-95
3rd 2002-03
4th 1991-92
4th 1997-98
4th 1999-00
7th 1993-94
7th 1998-99
7th 2003-04

Additional All-star team placements:
3rd 1991-92
3rd 1997-98
3rd 2002-03
4th 1999-00
5th 1998-99
5th 2003-04
7th 1993-94
8th 2000-01

- led the league in save% twice, 3x top-3, 6x top-10
- led the league in GAA twice, 5x top-3, 10x top-10
- led the league in GP twice, 3x top-3, 6x top-10
- led the league in wins once, 8x top-3, 10x top-10
- led the league in shutouts four times, 7x top-3, 11x top-10

- 3rd in career playoff GP
- 4th in career playoff wins
- 4th in career playoff save% among goalies with 50+ GP, 2nd only to Hasek among those with 100+ GP, ahead of Roy and Brodeur
- tied for 5th in career playoff shutouts

- 4th in career GP
- 3rd in career wins
- 9th in career shutouts


Last edited by MadArcand: 03-04-2011 at 01:49 AM.
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Old
03-04-2011, 03:00 AM
  #103
MadArcand
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Harry "Punch" Broadbent



Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
He could dance around or skate over an opponent as the situation demanded. Many considered Broadbent to be one of the first true power forwards of the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
A multidimensional star, Harry "Punch" Broadbent was as talented as he was tough. He was an artist with the puck, at times scoring at will, but he also gained a notorious reputation for using his elbows to make a point. He could dance around or skate over an opponent as the situation demanded. Many considered Broadbent to be one of the first true power forwards of the game. And fame would likely have been far greater had he not lost three years in the prime of his career to military service during World War I.

In addition to goal-scoring skills and toughness, Broadbent possessed superior backchecking. This last quality helped the Senators play smothering defensive hockey when protecting a lead.

His offensive wizardry and robust style of play contributed significantly to the Senators' three Stanley Cup wins in 1920, 1921 and 1923. He was the right winger on one of hockey's top forward lines with Frank Nighbor and Cy Denneny. In the 1923 series versus the Edmonton Eskimos, Ottawa needed to find a way to stop the explosive Duke Keats. Everyone figured this responsibility would rest with defensive stalwart Frank Nighbor. Early in the contest, Keats skated close to Broadbent and took one of the latter's famous elbows in the midsection. The star of the western side failed to make much of an impression the rest of that evening.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Harry Broadbent was nicknamed "Punch" for a couple of reasons: he had knockout scoring punch with a knack for scoring at clutch times; and he was also one of the best fighters in his era in the NHL.

Punch put his hockey career on the backburner in order to serve his country for three years in World War 1. Punch returned triumphantly and sporting a Canadian Military Medal for his heroic combat service overseas.

The Senators were counting their lucky stars the following season. After trying to move Punch, he returned to team and had one of the greatest seasons in NHL history. He scored a league leading 32 goals and 46 points in 24 games. He also set the long standing NHL record of scoring at least one goal in 16 consecutive games!
Quote:
1918/19: Punch Broadbent, who had won the Military Cross overseas, during World War I, returned to the Senators in time for the last game of the first half of the season. The return of Broadbent helped the Senators turn it completely around as they finished the season with the best overall record at 12-6 with Frank Nighbor and Cy Denney led the team with 22 goals apiece.
Quote:
The cup's principal mystery concerns Ottawa-born Harry "Punch" Broadbent, whose name appears upside down along the outer rim of the bowl.

Broadbent won the 1926 NHL championship with the Montreal Maroons after being traded from his beloved Ottawa Senators. His name appears on the Stanley Cup's first ring with 17 of his Montreal teammates.

But Broadbent's name also stands virtually alone on the outer bowl. The inner bowl contains the names of 29 players from the 1907 Montreal Wanderers - the first team to engrave its roster - and the 1915 Vancouver Millionaires. Broadbent didn't play with either team.

Broadbent won three Stanley Cups while playing for the Senators in the early 1920s, but the names of his teammates do not appear on the trophy. (Engraving the rosters of victorious teams didn't become an annual tradition until 1924.)

"It's one of those great Stanley Cup stories: we're not sure why he's there," said Pritchard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, Jun 6 1962
"He was a great scorer" recalled Baz, "but he was also the best of backcheckers. He went all the way to the net. And interestingly enough, he never strayed more than a few feet off those boards, and woe to the player who tried to slip inside him. He had the greatest pair of elbows in hockey."

"Punch was so good" added O'Meara, "that he was called up to the old Cliffsides, and later in the same year, to the Ottawas themselves, as an extra player. He was only 16 at the time. He didn't get to play, but it was quite an honor, as well as indication."

They also say, Punch can deny this if he wants too, that the hockey's badman, Sprague Cleghorn, alway gave the Ottawa winger a wide respectful berth. There must've been a sound reason.

But, overall, it has to be Punch's great ability at hockey which won him recognition. He was, indeed, a great scorer, and save for the circumstances, probably would've been an even greater one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, Feb 27 1939
We remarked to Tommy Gorman: "How would you like to see [Murray] Patrick mauling Punch Broadbent around like that, when Punch was at his best?" "Humph," replied Gorman, "Punch would part his hair for him in a hurry."
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette, 28 Dec 1927
Broadbent tied up Joliat on his rail, but Gagne outfooted Kilrea and was the most dangerous man on the crimson attack.

Louie Letourneau created a diversion when Broadbent and Mantha clashed by rubbing Broadbent playfully across the face. He was cautioned by the gendarmes for his zeal.

It was spectacular individual hockey at this stage of the game. Broadbent was playing hard hockey for Ottawas.

Nighbor was performing prodigies of poke-checking and Broadbent was working in sensational fashion.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader, 20 Nov 1923
In Broadbent, the Senators have a great goalie, who saved two sure goals by laying across the goal mouth...

Ottawa defense strong
Nighbor, Broadbent and Denneny were always back in the center ice after their rushes and in this way frustrated the Regina efforts at combination.

...Broadbent rushed the length of the ice to test McCusker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Press, 17 Nov 1927
..the Senators were handed a mighty useful player in the veteran Harry "Punch" Broadbent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader, 26 Nov 1923
Denneny and Broadbent received such close attention that they seldom got away, though they both were very useful in back checking.

When Broadbent took a pass from Nighbor at the right board and drove a rifle shot into the corner of the net for the first counter of the game, it opened up the play considerably.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, 15 Dec 1927
The play of Punch Broadbent was a standout feature. He was great in every department of the game and his engineering of the solitary goal was the ? bit of the game.

..two players who came in for more applause from the fans than the rest and they were Harry Broadbent and Frank Nighbor. "Punch" played a sterling game against his old teammates. He never looked better.

"Punch in Grand Form"
Bearing the great Nighbor close companionship throughout the entire trip, came Harry Broadbent. Probably never, has the famous Punch been seen to better advantage. His work was gilt-edged from the start to finish, and for the length of time he was on the ice he was one of the most useful men in the game. On numerous occasions he tricked his way through for close-up shots on Benedict, or from long range peppered staggering drives at his former teammate. His back-checking was timed just right and he was an all-important factor in scoring the only goal of the game.
Awards:
Art Ross Trophy (1922)
Maurice Richard Trophy (1922)

Top 10s:
Goals
1919-20 NHL 19 (10)
1921-22 NHL 32 (1)
1922-23 NHL 14 (8)
1912-13 NHA 20 (7)
1914-15 NHA 26 (4)

Assists
1921-22 NHL 14 (2)

Points
1919-20 NHL 25 (10)
1921-22 NHL 46 (1)

- led the playoffs in scoring en route to a Cup win in 1926


Last edited by MadArcand: 04-06-2011 at 06:58 AM.
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Old
03-04-2011, 03:24 AM
  #104
vecens24
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With selection 419, the Inglewood Jacks are going to continue in the process of attempting to win games 0 - -1 and be proud to welcome defenseman Glen Harmon (yes, an arrbez special from what I’ve found haha) to the squad. Harmon was a member of two Canadiens Stanley Cup winning squads, one in 1944, the other in 1946. Along with the Stanley Cups, he was also a two time Second team NHL All Star (1945, 1949). Harmon combined physicality with finesse to make him one of the best defensemen of his day. From the day he stepped into the NHL, he was immediately an impact player, which can be evidenced by his runner up Calder Trophy finish in 1943, despite only playing in half of the games that season as a call-up. He twice led all defensemen in goals scored. And to show his well rounded game (and this is taken from a past bio by my esteemed colleague arrbez), he went 34 games without allowing a goal against. Also, he was a Second Team All Star in 1945 at Right defence so despite being left-handed, he will fit perfectly next to either Gadsby or Ragulin, depending on who we decide to put with him. Harmon was known primarily around these parts as a defensive DMan from what I’ve seen in the past, but hopefully some of the stats and quotes will prove him to be a very well rounded DMan good at both ends of the ice.



Accomplishments:
Two-time Second Team NHL All Star (1945, 1949)
Two Time Stanley Cup Winner (1944, 1946)
Played in NHL All Star Game in 1949 and 1950
Defensemen goals: 1st: 1948, 1949. 4th: 1946, 1947 6th: 1945
Defensemen assists: 7th : 1946, 1950 8th: 1949 9th: 1951 10th: 1944

Quotes:
From the Canadiens History website:

Quote:
A sound positional defenseman with the offensive skills to support his forwards, Harmon was an able skater who could carry the puck himself or relay it to teammates with his crisp, sharp passes.
Quote:
His stocky frame and low center of gravity were put to good use, thrilling the Forum crowds as Harmon laid some of the league’s most jarring bodychecks on enemy players.
The Windsor Daily Star April 5, 1945:

Quote:
Glen Harmon was the other member of the Canadiens to get all-star rating, being named to the right defence position…
Montreal Gazette December 7 1945

Quote:
XXX teamed up with the speedy Glen Harmon…
Montreal Gazette November 12 1945

Quote:
The Habitants finally scored when Glen Harmon pulled the trigger from well out on a ganging play….. the rubber winding up in the back of the net without the goalie making a move.
New York Times October 22, 1948

Quote:
In the final period, the Canadiens tallied when Glen Harmon flat-footed for a breakaway while his own team was a man short
Windsor Daily Star April 5 1946

Quote:
…Ken Mosdell was standing on the Boston goal crease when he deflected Glen Harmon’s 40 foot forward pass to chalk up the first of his two goals of the night.
Ottawa Citizen February 3 1947 (which as you’ll see next was apparently a very busy day for Harmon)

Quote:
Glen Harmon fired the puck through a maze of players from the blue line and XXX and Richard also added a pair more before the period ended…
Montreal Gazette February 3 1947

Quote:
A half minute later Glen Harmon and Bryan Hextall rolled on the ice, clawing at each other and when Harmon got up he went berserk and pushed referee Hayes....
I just Kinda like that one haha.

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Old
03-04-2011, 04:05 AM
  #105
Nalyd Psycho
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Art Duncan


I'm having trouble getting a read on Duncan, from everything I've read and found, he sounds like a cross between Dit Clapper and Larry Robinson. Obviously Clapper has a longevity edge, but, there has to be more than that. There has to be some reason for cannon? There has to be some reason Duncan isn't one of the greatest of all time. But from what I've read, he just may have been.

The first issue is that Art Duncan is not in the Hall of Fame. Is this proof that he is less than peers that are? Or is it an oversight? Unfortunately I didn't save the quotes and links, if desired, I can, but I believe it to be an oversight. The reason being that he pissed off people who would have had sway in the Hall of Fame. First he held out on the Patrick family when he played in Vancouver. Then he held out in Toronto, causing the NHL to suspend him until he reported to camp, the first player suspended for holding out. Then after he was fired as the Leaf's coach, he sued Conn Smythe for back pay. In the first 20 years of the Hall you could get in if one of Patrick or Smythe was against you, but both? Probably not. By the time the people who would oppose Duncan were out, the Western leagues were no longer historically appreciated. But he (and Hugh Lehman) was the star player of the four time PCHA champions in the early 20's and would have been the unified MVP of major pro hockey in the 1923-24 season when he lead the PCHA in scoring playing solely as a defenceman. Whenever the Millionaires/Maroons are mentioned in papers, Duncan and Lehman were the players highlighted as the teams stars and star attractions. References to Duncan as an elite and sensational player were frequent.

Accomplishments:


1924 PCHA Scoring Leader (the only defenceman other than Orr?)
PCHA First Team All-Star (1920, 1922 & 1924)
PCHA Second Team All-Star (1919 & 1923)

Style of Play:


Duncan was first and foremost an offensive defenceman. Known for his strong skating and stickhandling, where he used his size and strength to protect the puck against defenders, his hard shot and his ability to draw defenders to him and then thread the pass to his fellow attackers. He was also noted as a strong defensive player, using his mind to defend rather than physically overwhelming opponents like he probably could. One possible flaw is that he was an either or player, his offence came at the expense of his defence and visa versa. I can find no evidence of this, but it is a possibility. It is noted that when he rushed, forwards would hang back, but, that is just good tactics, and when Cook took over as coach, defensive play became a priority for the team. Duncan was noted as one of the most gentlemanly players of his era. He likely would have been a Lady Byng contender. But there are examples where he would play rough very effectively. It just wasn't the norm. He was generally noted as a calm and jovial player.

The likely picture of Art Duncan is that he was a very effective rushing defenceman who could shoot and score like a winger, and an effective back-checker, but, he could be caught up ice due to his rushing. But when he had to focus particularly on defence, he was more than just effective in his own zone. A leader with a strong mind for the game. A gentile giant.

Quotes:
(sorry, these are scattershot) More will be provided during the Lloyd Cook bio, where I will place quotes that put them both together as a unit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Feb 4, 1922
The sterling performances put up by Art Duncan in recent games at the Arena have been the talk of fandom. Duncan has cut loose with a burst of speed which has often left many a lighter forward standing still. There are not many men of Duncan's stature who can break away as fast as the big Millionaire defence man can. He is a strenuous checker but very seldom does the referee find it necessary to even warn Art.
On Friday evening at Victoria Tommy Dunderdale started out to get Duncan's goat. He did not succeed in doing so until the third period. Then Art took the naughty Tommy in hand and boxed his ears in such a manner that the Victoria winger will think twice before starting anything with Lloyd Cook's partner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Feb 20, 1922
The big fellow who holds down the right defence position on the Vancouver Millionaires, Art Duncan, is playing the game of his life this season. The P.C.H.A. boasts some pretty good defence players and the fact that Mickey Ion selected Arther for a place on his mythical all-star septette speaks for itself. Duncan is also high man in scoring among defence men.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - Mar 10, 1922
Regina fans will see in Art Duncan, defense star of the Vancouvers, one of the cleanest and most effective puck propellers in hockey history. Standing over six feet in height and weighing around 185 pounds, Duncan has starred throught the Coast League season.

Fredrickson, former Winnipeg star, prior to leaving home a few days ago, informed the writer that he considered Duncan the cleanest and most gentlemanly player he had ever gone against.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - Mar 13, 1922
Art Duncan, as clean and fine a player as ever skated on any ice, was the outstanding star of both aggregations. Individually the flying ace accounted for three of his team's tallies. He seemed at home on the heavy ice and time after time swept down the length of the rink and generally finished by testing Laird by a rifle shot from his stick.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - Oct 25, 1924
The peerless defence leader of the Maroons will be back at his old place in front of Hugh Lehman, and once again will inspire his team-mates to greater prowess on the ice by his gallant example. Duncan's record in Canadian hockey annals lest season when he led the PCHA in goal scoring, and Duncan's driving power, which so often carried him through opposing defences, gave him a grand final of 30 points, exclusive of playoff games and world series battles, 21 goals and 9 assists.

It was Duncan's big year. Not only did he show the scorers the way from a defence position, but he captained the club and bore the brunt of attack and defence.

Standing well over six feet, built in proportion, heady and a clever stick-handler, Duncan is the terror of opposing defenders. He is about as easy to shift from the puck as a mastiff from a snippy "pom." He shoots with dead accuracy and although he takes many falls in the course of a strenuous season and sometimes mops up acres of ice and athletes, he is certainly the outstanding defence star in wester hockey circles, and stands out as one of the great modern super-stars of the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald - Mar 17, 1924
To lead all others in such a league of stars is a remarkable and rather unusual scoring record for a defense man, and suggests that such a one must be possessed of at least two qualities which are essential for candidates to the "perfect player" class.
First he must be wonderful on the attack, since as a defense man he has oppertunity to attack much less frequently than his scoring competitors: secondly he must be a great defense man and must not neglect that department in order to keep his rivals down and in order to help win a championship.

If he were a dirty or hot tempered player he would not be on the ice long enough to accomplish what he has to: and if he were not clean of life as well as play he would not have the stamina to play practically the whole time, as he has done.

Had he not brains in plenty he could not have taken advantage of openings and he could not have made the wonderful openings for others to score, and so credit himself with assists. He is adept at drawing the opposing defense to one side so that a team-mate will have an easier passage. To do this sucessfully he must be a clever stick-handler and a good shot, so that opponents will be greatly concerned when he is on the rampage or else using his strategy in their territory.

He must be unselfish enough to pass the puck to a contender for scoring honors like Mackay and he has the nerve to draw punishment his own way so that a less robust team-mate may be spared. He must also be a fast skater to get back to his position in proper time. He is a good passer and a good one-hand artist.

Lovers of clean sport everywhere admire him and wish him all kinds of luck when he does not happen to be opposing their favourites.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette - Feb 3, 1928
Toronto were without big Art Duncan, the 200-pound defence star, who has been the chief block on the Leafs' guard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Mar 2, 1928
Duncan threw a scare late the Pirate camp when he carried the rubber to the net, only to see the perfect pass fanned by Cox.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette - Mar 21, 1924
Excitement was added to the proceedings by the tilts between Art Duncan, Maroon captain and sturdy defence player, and Joliat, who renewed their feud of the first game.

Big Art Duncan gave the Canadien defence a busy two minutes, keeping the locals to their own territory.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen - Nov 20, 1928
Hap is back in his best form teaming with Art Duncan to make one of the best defences in the National Hockey League.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald - Dec 14, 1925
Vancouver is anxious to see how Art Duncan, stury defense man, once held as the pride of the Maroons, will perform against his former mates.

The smart shooting of Duncan thrilled the crowd.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald - Mar 12, 1924
Art Duncan will be going great guns as usual and the fans will get plenty of excitement when he starts off down the ice and he will give them plenty of thrills when he lets drive one of his wicked shots.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Mar 22, 1921
Darragh and Nighbor staged several excursions toward the Vancouver goal, but either failed to get by Cook and Duncan or were turned back by Hughie Lehman.

Art Duncan cashed in on one of his sensational solos and made it two to nothing for the home crew.

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Old
03-04-2011, 03:04 PM
  #106
Velociraptor
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Vic Hadfield, LW

Position: Left Wing
HT/WT: 6'0'", 190 lbs
Shoots: Left



- 1 acknowledgement for NHL Second All-Star Team (1972)
- 323 goals, 712 regular season points in 1002 games played.
- 27 goals, 48 playoff points in 73 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Not many players start out with reputations as enforcers and end up with equal billing for their goal scoring and puck handling abilities. While playing for St. Catharines and the Buffalo Bisons, Hadfield regularly posted far more penalty minutes than points. He continued in his tough guy roll for the New York Rangers after they claimed him from Chicago in the 1961 Intra-League draft.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Hadfield was put on a line with Jean Ratelle and Rod Gilbert in 1968, creating a combination so effective that they were nicknamed the Goal-A-Game line. That was the first year that his point total came close to equaling his penalty minutes. He consistently scored twenty or more goals a season for the rest of his career.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Hadfield posted a personal best during the 1971-72 season with 50 goals and 106 points. During this same season he was again in triple digits in penalty minutes, with 142, demonstrating that it was possible to do it all. The Rangers made him their captain in 1971, a position he held until being traded to Pittsburgh in 1974.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
In the 1960's the New York Rangers were a small speedy team who were often beaten up by their counterparts. They scouted for big aggressive players to remedy their shortcomings. The best of their finds was Vic Hadfield. Hadfield came to the Rangers as a Blackhawk's prospect who earned that status due to his abrasive physical pursuits of the enemy. He wasn't known for his finesse, but soon would blossom into a fine scorer, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
That 1971-72 season was even more memorable for Hadfield as he was a big reason why the Rangers returned to the Stanley Cup finals, but they did not win that elusive Stanley Cup, but Hadfield had a great spring. He, along with Rod Gilbert, led the way with 7 goals. Only Bobby Rousseau had more points by a Ranger that spring, 17 compared to Hadfield's 16.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Hadfield was one of the scarcely used forwards on the 1972 Canadian Summit Series team, he playe two of the first four games. And when the team arrived in Moscow he was told he wouldn't dress for the remaining games. An upset and outspoken Hadfield, who had just come off his 50 goal season, was angry and packed his bags and went home.

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Old
03-04-2011, 07:28 PM
  #107
BillyShoe1721
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LW Brian Sutter



3x NHL All Star Game Participant
4x Top 23 Goals (9, 12, 16, 23)
1x Top 26 Assists (26)
1x Top 18 Points (18)
2x Top 10 Power Play Goals (7, 9)
2x Top 10 Shooting percentage (7, 9)
3x Top 15 Hart Trophy Voting (6, 10, 15)
2x Top 16 Selke Trophy Voting (6, 16)
5x Top 6 All Star LW Voting (4, 5, 5, 6, 6)
31st All-Time Career Shooting Percentage
During peak of 1978-1979 to 1984-1985:
2nd in goals among LW
4th in assists among LW
2nd in points among LW

Quote:
But Brian stuck with the team and became the heart and soul of the team. Budding superstar Bryan Trottier was the MVP, but Brian was every bit as important.

Brian was rewarded for every drop of blood and every bead of sweat when he was drafted in 20th overall by the St. Louis Blues in 1976. Not bad for a kid who openly admits he never expected to do anything other follow in his father's footsteps and work on the farm. It was a great move for the Blues too. Other than Bernie Federko, perhaps no player symbolizes the St. Louis Blues. He played 12 seasons in the NHL, all with the St. Louis Blues, 9 of them as a captain. When he retired he became the head coach.

But he also impressed the Blues with his heart and his desire, plus his good defensive play. Soon the Blues were using him more and more.

By 1978-79, his third year in the league, he scored 41 goals and 80 points. And he did that without changing his physical game one bit. From that point forward he would be a consistent 35 goal, 70 point threat, as well as someone who would spend 200 minutes or so in the penalty box each season.

The 1982-83 and 1983-84 seasons were tough on Brian. He bled St. Louis blue, yet the season was a tumultuous one for Blues fans as the team owners - Ralston-Purina - allowed the Blues to go bankrupt and it was said the Blues were all but officially moving to Saskatoon, although the NHL never allowed any move. The Blues were in limbo until Harry Ornest stepped in as the new owner. His pockets weren't overly deep however. The Blues only kept 25 players under contract and took no frills travel and accommodations in order to meet their bills. Players such as Joey Mullen were traded away because of the financial situation. Brian, who by this time was team captain, somehow kept the team together during all this and playing their heart out. Brian led by example and had his two best seasons during this time - scoring a career high 46 goals in 1982-83 and a career high 83 points in 1983-84.

Things got better for the Blues franchise shortly, but by 1985-86 things hadn't gone as nicely for Brian. Years of rugged play finally caught up with the usually durable winger who stood just 5'11" and weight around 170 pounds. He had broken his scapula that season, a rare hockey injury. He hurried back to the game, and reinjured it, costing him about half the NHL season. He felt better the following season, but had little strength due to the recovery process. Doctors wouldn't let him play anymore than the 14 games he did dress for. Sitting out those games was probably the toughest thing Brian had ever gone through in hockey - not because of the pain he was in, just because he was forced to sit and watch his teammates and he wasn't able to help out at all.

Brian made a full recovery in 1987-88, but was placed on a checking line with Rick Meagher and Herb Raglan. Brian thrived in the reduced role. He didn't care that he wasn't on the top line. He was just glad to be back on the ice. And he gave it his usual 100%.

Brian had a great deal of influence on his younger brothers, so much so that you'd have to think things might have been different had Brian not been the first to junior and then the pros.

"He works so unbelievably hard in the summertime", xxx said, and continued. "I worked with him at a hockey school over the summer and I couldn't believe how hard he was working. It was because of him that I had such a good rookie camp and made the team (NY Islanders). He just works his ass off all the time. The harder he's worked, the more he's improved."

Brian retired with 303 goals, 333 assists and 636 points in 779 games plus 1786 well earned penalty minutes. The Blues retired his jersey number 11 back in 1988 and are forever grateful for Brian Sutter's contributions to their franchise.
http://stlouisblueslegends.blogspot....an-sutter.html

Quote:
Brian Sutter is the eldest of the six Sutters who played in the NHL and was drafted by the Blues in 1976. Growing up in Alberta on a farm, the Sutters all pushed each other in everything they did, especially hockey. They weren't the most talented players but had an amazing work ethic that made them the grinders of success.

Brian played junior hockey in Red Deer and Lethbridge while also playing for team Canada at the 1975 World Junior Championships where he won a silver medal. He made his NHL debut in 1976-77 while splitting the year with the team's CHL affiliate in Kansas City. The next season, he was up with the Blues for good. Sutter became the team's captain in the 1979-80 season and held the captaincy until retiring as a player in 1988 to step behind the Blues' bench. Sutter played in three All-Star Games--1982, 1983, and 1985.

The Sutter family is known in hockey circles as a group that promotes leadership, hard work and an honest work ethic that makes them one of hockey's great families.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=14489

Quote:
The Sutter name has been synonymous with intensity, honesty, tenacity, and hard work.
http://books.google.com/books?id=bA9...sutter&f=false

Quote:
The Blues remained regular playoff contenders, thanks to stars Brett Hull, Brian Sutter, and Chris Pronger.
http://books.google.com/books?id=C5i...hockey&f=false

Quote:
Brian Sutter has become the heart and soul of the St. Louis Blues.
http://books.google.com/books?id=IvU...ed=0CEYQ6AEwBg

Quote:
As a player, Brian Sutter combined grit and skill, scoring 46 goals and amassing 254 penalty minutes with the St. Louis Blues in the 1982-83 season. "Sutter hockey" has come to represent many things to many people: Unflinching effort. Withering frankness.
http://books.google.com/books?id=T6L...ed=0CFQQ6AEwCQ

Quote:
Brian Sutter was an excellent player, yet he only did it twice... After all, Sutter was only the best two-way hockey player in Blues history.
http://books.google.com/books?id=-Su...ed=0CEsQ6AEwBw

Quote:
Brian Sutter was a little Barclay Plager, he worked and he banged.

Nobody wore the bluenote with more pride than Brian and Bernie.
http://books.google.com/books?id=bnh...page&q&f=false

Quote:
A successful career coupled with his passion for the game led Brian Sutter behind the bench soon after retiring in 1988
http://books.google.com/books?id=T6L...=0CDsQ6AEwBTgy

Quote:
Brian Sutter is that type of person, the kind of guy that franchises are built around. ... The NHL could use a lot more guys like Brian Sutter
http://books.google.com/books?id=67i...=0CEEQ6AEwBjgy

Quote:
The leader of our team, forward Brian Sutter
http://books.google.com/books?id=3j1...=0CDsQ6AEwBTg8

Quote:
Thousands of words were written about Brian Sutter during his 12-year playing career with the St. Louis Blues. But two words summarize what he meant to the Blues: heart and soul.

Sutter feared nothing and no one. His drive and determination and ability to withstand punishment while standing in front of the net were legendary. Somehow, No. 11 would fend off the nastiest of hacks and whacks by agitated opponents to bat home a rebound near the crease, or convert a feed into the slot.

When people reflect about Sutter, they go far beyond the 303 goals and the 636 points he scored, or the club record 1,786 minutes in penalties that spanned 779 games. Sutter was much more than numbers. He was about the will to win. The Blues could be down by four goals with 10 minutes to play, and while most players would subconsciously surrender and look forward to the next tilt, Sutter would be his manic, eyes-wide-open self every time he hit the ice.


"I hate to lose," he would say while looking a reporter in the eyes after a loss. It didn’t matter what time of year - all losses were like taking a bullet. After those games, an icy stare would fill his face as media gather near his dressing stall. He agonized over defeats, but it didn’t take long to refocus on the next game.

"Brian is the kind of player who helps a coach keep his job,
" xxx once said. "He’s a perfectionist on the ice. And never blames anyone else for making mistakes… but he crucifies himself if he makes one."

xxx should know. Sutter was an integral part of his veteran core of players that help the Blues reach the Stanley Cup semifinals in 1986. They took the Calgary Flames to the seventh and deciding game of that series, which was highlighted by perhaps the greatest game in St. Louis history — the Monday Night Miracle.

In that game, Sutter was at his grittiest, despite a serious shoulder problem. He could barley raise his arm above his neck, but that didn’t stop him from helping the Blues come back from a huge third-period deficit to tie the Flames at 5-5 and then win it before a delirious home crowd at The Arena. Doug Wickenheiser’s goal in overtime won it for the Blues, but Sutter and linemates Doug Gilmour and Greg Paslawski were in the zone during that furious third — period comeback.

One of six brothers to play in the NHL, Sutter poured his heart into every game. He was drafted in the second round by the Blues in 1976 and quickly established himself as a player to be reckoned with. Sutter was fearless, and he fought all comers. Some of his more frequent and memorable fights came against Chicago Blackhawks captain xxx. But Sutter wasn’t a one — dimensional player. If he sensed the Blues needed a lift, he’d drop his gloves and go after anyone just to light a fire. Or he might risk getting mauled in front of the net to poke home one of his many "garbage goal." Or he might savor the thrill of killing a penalty or wreaking havoc in front of the net during a Blues power play.

He didn’t fancy himself a goal-scorer, but Sutter had seasons of 41 and 46 goals in his productive career. He was a fixture on the left wing with longtime friend Bernie Federko, who set up many of his 303 career goals. Numbers in general didn’t mean a lot to Sutter. It was all about winning.

"As a player, I was miserable to be around when we lost," he says. Sutter never got closer to winning the coveted Stanley Cup than that ’86 series against Calgary. Shortly after hanging up his skates, Sutter was named coach of the Blues in 1988. He went on to coach at Boston and Calgary, but he still remains hopeful of winning the Cup.
http://blues.nhl.com/club/page.htm?id=34442

Quote:
He opted for the Blues and spent his entire playing career as their starting left winger. Sutter was a solid player although not a superstar and was incredibly scrappy on the ice. Of the six Sutter boys who played in the NHL Brian led not only his brothers in career penalty minutes but he still remains the St. Louis Blues’ all-time leader in career penalty minutes.

From 1978-1985, Sutter was a mainstay of the Blues (combining with center Bernie Federko to supply the scoring punch for the team) while serving as team captain. Demers considered Sutter one of his “character players”.
http://insidehockey.com/?p=16494

Quote:
Federko, who centers a line with Currie and Brian Sutter that is one of the best offensive units in the league,
http://www.google.com/search?q=brian...a1291fdd569703

Quote:
Brian Sutter, the captain for the St. Louis Blues, is staking no claim as an exception. Sutter, following an injury-enforced absence of 2 games, returned Thursday night to spark an 8-3 triumph over the Minnesota North Stars.

"He gave us the lift that we needed," St. Louis coach xxx said in reflecting on a four point performance consisting of two goals and two assists. "Just his presence in the locker room makes everyone a little better player. He won't accept anything less than a full out effort. It was a much better team effort as compared to without Brian."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...n+sutter&hl=en

Quote:
Sutter, the oldest of the four Sutter brothers in the NHL, is a Terry O'Reilly who can skate.
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/boston/a...R&pqatl=google


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 03-04-2011 at 11:33 PM.
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Old
03-05-2011, 10:32 AM
  #108
EagleBelfour
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C/RW Aloyisus Martin Sloan



Nickname: Slinker
Height: 5'10''
Weight: 175 lbs
Position: Center / Right Wing
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: November 30, 1927
Place of Birth: Pontiac, Quebec, Canada

Memorial Cup Champion (1945)
Memorial Cup Finalist (1946)
Ontario Hockey Association Junior MVP (1946)
Calder Cup Finalist (1950)
Stanley Cup Champion (1951, 1961)
World Championship Silver Medal (1962)
NHL Second All-Star Team Centre (1956)
NHL Unofficial Third All-Star Team Centre (1954*)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1951, 1952, 1956)
J.P. Bickell Memorial Award (1956)
Team Assistant Captain (1954-1958)

* Tod Sloan finished half-a-point behind Ted Kennedy for the second All-Star Team Centre position. (The Windsor Daily Star (04/23/1954))


SeasonsGPGAPTSPIM
13745220262482831

Top-15 Scoring (5th, 8th, 8th, 13th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (3rd, 4th, 8th, 9th)
Top-15 Assist (8th, 11th, 12th, 14th)
Top-10 Penalty Minutes (6th, 8th, 9th, 9th)


PlayoffsGPGAPTSPIM
8479122147

Top-10 Playoff Scoring (4th, 8th)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (3rd)
Top-10 Playoff Assist (2nd, 9th)
Top-10 Penalty Minutes (3rd)


Awards Nomination:

Hart Memorial Trophy:
1955-56: 2nd position (Jean Beliveau) (-8.5%)


SeasonPosition
1950-51RW
1951-52RW/C
1952-53C
1953-54C
1954-55C/RW
1955-56C
1956-57C
1957-58C/RW
1958-59C
1959-60C
1960-61C

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Known as a tough forward who could give and take a check with the best of them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier's Greatest Hockey Legends
Sloan was a creative center who relied on quick, shifty movement to get the puck into dangerous scoring positions. He was unique to say the least, so unique that not everyone new what to make of him and his unorthodox style of play in those days.

Tod had an excellent career, highlighted by his 8 full years as a Leaf. The small but resilient center had a great rookie season in 1950-51. After a 31 goal rookie season, Sloan picked up 9 points (third highest on the team) in 11 playoff games en route to the Stanley Cup championship.

Sloan was a top player for the Leafs for the next seven years, although they never were able to duplicate their playoff success for the remainder of the decade.

Sloan returned to lower scoring totals over his final two seasons in Toronto, thanks in part to a bad shoulder. however the Leafs traded their pint-sized fireball to Chicago in 1958.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Three Stars and Other Selections: More Amazing Hockey Lists for Trivia Lovers
An excellent all-around forward, Sloan played nearly a decade with the Maple Leafs including the 1951 championship season. Twice he topped the 30-goal mark and he was placed on the NHL 2nd All-Star Team in 1956.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tales from the Chicago Blackhawks
Glenn Hall was in his second season, captain Ed Litzenberger was a 33-goal scorer, veterans Ted Lindsay and Tod Sloan provided experiences for youngster Bobby Hull, Elmer Vasko, Ken Wharram, and Pierre Pilote was establishing himself as a top flight defenseman.

Newspaper Clips:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Lewiston Daily Sun; Leafs Tip Hawks (11/23/1950)
Sloan started the Leafs on the way to their 11th victory by scoring in the first period on a passout from behind the Chicago nets. The puck went in off Harry Lumley's skate. Then Sloan capped the night by blazing a shot past Lumley early in the third period.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen; Tod Sloan Scores 27th Tally As Leafs Tie Habs (02/16/1951)
Aloysius Martin Sloan, better known to hockey fans as Tod, has the misfortune of playing right wing in the same league as Detroit's Gordie Howe and Montreal's Maurice (Rocket) Richard.

Otherwise, the 23-year-old Toronto Maple Leafs star, would be sure to find himself more often in the spotlight reserved for players with exceptional ability to put the puck in opposing nets.

While National Hockey League writers plod along, continually discussing the merits of Howe and Richard, Tod Sloan is running up a record that rate more than casual mention.

The little guy from Vinton, Que., who has been commuting between the majors and minors for six years, demonstrated his dependability once again last night by scoring a goal as Toronto played a 2-2 tie with Montreal Canadiens.

It was Sloan's 27th tally of the season, only two less than Howe and five below Richard who was held scoreless in last night's meeting. In addition it moved Sloan into a tie with Richard for fourth place in the NHL point standings.

Still young, Sloan appears to have found his scoring eye in the last couple of years. Last season he scored 37 goals for Cleveland Barons. In two previous seasons with Toronto he had a total of three.

It's only recently that Tod was moved from center to right wing and since it tallies with his increasing scoring punch it might be an indication that Sloan will be a serious threat in coming years to the domination of the right wing spot by Howe and Richard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Herald; Trade Rumors Fly In N.H.L. (06/02/1952
Speedy forward Tod Sloan
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette; Tod Sloan Tallies Two goals To Pace Leafs; Kaiser Scores
The first was a spectacular play. Sloan took a pass from Max Bentley at his own blue line, started toward his own goal, then turned and streaked down the ice all alone. He went by all four Montreal defenders and slid a backhand past Gerry McNeil. The right winger capped his night's work by helping Johnny McCormack score late in the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ottawa Citizen; Loss of Tod Sloan Terrific Blow To Leafs in Series With Detroit (03/24/1956)
Toronto's brittle-as-bone chances for the Stanley Cup appear at the breaking point.

The Maple Leafs' hopes were shaken Thursday night on the rinkside boards of Detroit Olympia when ace center Tod Sloan crumpled on the ice with a fractured shoulder bone.

Sloan, whose 37 goals during the regular 1955-56 National Hockey League campaign made him the most productive Leaf player in 10 years, is out for the rest of the Stanley Cup semi-finals against Detroit Red Wings.

It was a big blow to Leafs. Sloan, center on their big line with rookie left winger Dick Duff and right winger George Armstrong, was the key man in Toronto's run to the fourth and last playoff spot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen; Bonuses at 6000$ As Jean Beliveau Wins Hart Trophy
Beliveau polled 94 votes out of a possible 180 to narrowly edge Tod Sloan, of Toronto Maple Leafs, as ''the player adjudged to be the most valuable to his team.''

The voting was divided into half seasons, with Worsley carrying the majority in the opening half and Sloan finishing ahead in the second half, but Beliveau's consistent strength was enough to give him the trophy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette; Playing the Field by Dunk Caroll (10/15/1958)
Sloan scored 13 goals last season for the Leafs and the latter didn't see fit to protect him from the draft. The Black Hawks picked him up for 15 000$ and he is already beginning to show his gratitude, since he hasn't made any secret of the fact that he wasn't too happy with the Toronto club for several seasons. He was a good hockey player for the Leafs away back when he was happy, and if he is happy in his Chicago surrounding he could become a good one again for the Hawks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Windsor Daily Star; Pilous Certain He Has 'Answer' (03/26/1959)
Otherwise, Pilous is expected to repeat with his other two lines. His big scoring punch admittedly rests with Tod Sloan, who scored two goals Tuesday, Eddie Litzenberger and Ted Lindsay.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen; Youthful Bob Hull Leader For Oncoming Black Hawks(12/09/1959)
Last year Sloan, pivoting the ''pappy line'' with Litzenberger and Ted Lindsay, was a eye figure in Chicago's upsurge.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Star Weekly, Toronto; Stars of the World's Fastest Game - Tod Sloan's magic means goals for Chicago (01/18/1960)
Aloysius Martin ''Tod'' Sloan is give him his full name, is a real magician inside the blue line, and the closest he gets to the goal the greatest his magic.

Purchased by Chicago from Toronto Maple Leafs at start of the '58 season, the Slinker centered the highest scoring line in the NHL last season. With Eddie Litzenberger on right wing and Ted Lindsay on left, the line ran up a total of 197 points for the Black Hawks.

Ted potted his 200th goal this season in his 11th NHL campaign.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago Tribune (12/21/1969)
Tod Sloan, the hard working veteran.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Windsor Star; Solution came at left wing (04/01/1967)
For years, the Chicago Black Hawks tried to find a centreman who could mae an effective third line.

They tried Len Lunde, Gerry Melnyk, Fred Stanfield, Bill Hay, Murray Hall, Camille Henry. There were few fellows they didn't try. It was considered by one and all to be the Chicago dilemma, the reason for a failing in depth, and, consequently, failures to win championships, some of them startling.

When Tod Sloan retired in 1961, which was the last time the Hawks won a Stanley Cup, they began to have trouble making a third line.
Hockey Cards:
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1953-54 Parkhurst #5
Known as ''Slinker Sloan because of his deceptive style of play, he came to the Leafs in 1950 via Pittsburgh and Cleveland. He has been alternated between Right Wing and Center, being able to play both position equally well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1954-55 Parkhurst
A clever man with a hockey stick. Tod can work his way through opposing players to set up a goal, or score one himself. He finished 14th in scoring last season, and while he only garnered 11 goals, his 31 assists boosted him well up the scoring ladder. A fiery aggressive player, Sloan sometimes let lets his temper overrule his better judgment and he picks up a lot of penalties. But when he settles down to play hockey he is as good as any pivotman in the league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1955-56 Parkhurst #10
As good a stickhandler as there is in the NHL, Tod works hard for every point he gets. He was a standout junior, but needed 3 chances to make the big league. Teamed up with Kennedy and Smith in his first season in 1950-51 and formed the league's most feared forward line. However, he has since shifted to centre and hasn't been able to find the wingmen who can convert his plays.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1957-58 Parkhurst #T5
Tod is on his way to his greatest season scoring goals like he did in 1955-6 when he potted 37 to tie Gaye Stewart's record of most goals by a Leaf. Next to Smith Tod is the oldest player on the Leafs team but his speed and play does not indicate any slowing down. Tod took a bad beating in the 1955-56 playoff which hurt his play last year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1958-59 Topps #42
Called ''slinker'' because of hulahula shift which makes him too elusive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1959-60 Topps #13
Purchased by Hawks from Toronto, ''Tod'' centered so-called pappy line and jumped goal-scoring from 13 in previous year to 27. Sometimes called ''Slinker'' by his slippery skating style, needs 11 more to achieve 200 as big leaguer.

Quotes:

- ''Tod is his own boss. He does what he likes with the puck. It took us a few years to discover the best way to handle him is to leave him alone.'' - Conn Smythe


Biography & Personal Life:

Of Irish descendant, Aloyisus Martin Sloan was born on November 30, 1927 in Pontiac, Quebec, while his mother was visiting relatives in this little town of a little more than 5000 souls. However, Sloan grew up in Falconbridge, Ontario. Sloan played his minor hockey in Copper Cliff, which was one of the only three towns across Ontario that had an indoor rink. The Toppazzini brothers, Tim Horton and George Armstrong were all huddled together under that one roof, raising the level of each other's play.

Sloan is one of the greatest products in a long line of greats who played for the Saint-Michael's College. He had two stellar seasons for Saint-Michaels, leading the league in goals with 45, assists with 32, and points with 75 in just 25 games during the 1945-46 season. Not surprisingly, Sloan was named as the Junior Ontario Hockey Association's Most Valuable Player that season. In two season of junior hockey, Sloan participated both time at the Memorial Cup, winning the trophy in his first season.

The next season, Sloan moved up to the AHL with the Pittsburgh Hornets were he played his first season of professional hockey, notching 15 goals in 64 games. For the next two seasons, Tod split his time between Toronto in the NHL and Pittsburgh in the AHL, playing 1 and 29 games respectively. In 1949, although he had played 29 games with the Leafs, his name was left off the Stanley Cup.

During his time in the AHL, Sloan was already very adept in playing either the right wing or at the centre position. However, it is the latter where he would play the most. It is also reported that the Maple Leafs demoted Sloan in his first two try with the club because of his diminutive size. It would take Sloan to gain 15 pounds and stop smoking before he was able to earn a full-time spot with the big club.

The 1949-50 season would be his last season in the AHL. Indeed, his impressive play for the Cleveland Barons during the 1950 playoffs, were he recorded 10 goals and 14 points in 9 games, earned him a full time job with the Leafs the following autumn, and he never had to look back.

In his rookie year, Sloan played in his first All-Star Game and saw his first action in the Stanley Cup playoffs. On a line with Sid Smith and Ted Kennedy, all three of them were recognize as one of the most fearful line in the National Hockey League. Including the playoffs, Sloan registered an impressive total of 65 points that season, but none of them were as big as his goal at 19:23 of the final period of the final game against the Montreal Canadiens. His goal tied the game and forced overtime, setting the stage for the heroics of Bill Barilko and a Maple Leafs Stanley Cup championship. With 32 seconds remaining, while goaltender Turk Broda was already on the bench for an extra attacker, Sloan fired the puck through a maze of bodies and past goaltender Gerry McNeil. Actually, before Barilko overtime goal, Sloan was the definite hero of this game, as he had scored the two regulation goal for his team.

After his second complete season in the NHL and a 25 goals season, there was a strong rumour sending Tod Sloan to the Detroit Red Wings for defenceman Leo Reise. At the time, Jack Adams stated that he knew nothing about those rumours, but the newspaper of the time said that they were given this piece of information by a reliable source. This rumour seemed to make sense, as the Toronto Maple Leafs were in need of a defenceman while the Red Wings needed a body up front. However, this trade never happen, and Sloan remained a Maple Leafs.

The mid 1950's were difficult for Tod Sloan and the Toronto Maple Leafs. From the 1952-53 season up to the 1954-55 season, Sloan registered only a total of 39 goals and 96 points in 200 games. Even with less than half a point per game, Tod still finish 1st, 4th and 6th in team scoring, which show the overall poor performances of the Maple Leafs at that time. Sloan was now playing mostly at the centre position, as the magic of the first season with Sid Smith and Ted Kennedy was long gone. It was also reported that the various winger who played alongside 'Slinker' couldn't convert the plays Sloan was setting up. The Maple Leafs playing a more defensives style of hockey during those years might also partially explain those sub-par performances.

Nonetheless, with a poor 1954-55 season to his standard, Sloan salary was drastically cut prior to the 1955-56 season. As he explained: ''I have to take the worst salary cut of my career but I have a chance to make it my richest. My contract calls for bonuses if I get 20 goals, then 25 and so on.''

Perhaps the bonuses clauses motivated Sloan to switch gears and perform his best season of his career, but by his own admittance, Sloan decided to take his own physical health before and during the season more seriously. As he recall: '' I knew I wasn't producing, so I gave myself a good talking and decided to do something about it. [...] giving up smoking put the weight on me. I went 167 playing weight and I stayed on a diet to keep it there. I also ran for four weeks every morning regularly, four and five miles. When I hit training camp, I was breezing.''

At the tail end of the 1955-56 camp, Sloan and 25 years old Georges Armstrong, who could also play centre of the right wing, switch position. Now Sloan being the centre, the duo clicked immediately. It was a 19 years old rookie of the name of Dick Duff, who also played his junior hockey in Saint-Michael College, that would finish the trio.

It would be a career year for the 27 years old veteran, who would finish first in his team scoring with 37 goals and 66 points, in 70 regular season games. His 37 goals campaign was the best a Maple Leafs ever registered, equalizing the mark of Gaye Stewart, the shifty left winger, who had done the same 10 years ago. Astoundingly enough, the second goalscorer on his team was Dick Duff with 18 goals, less than half Sloan's total! For this remarkable season, Sloan was named to the NHL's Second All Star Team and barely miss on the Hart Memorial Trophy, both time slightly outperform by the great Jean Beliveau.

The Toronto Maple Leafs played the Detroit Red Wings in the 1956 Stanley Cup semifinals. Toronto fans were incensed when their star player, Tod Sloan, broke his shoulder in a collision with Detroit's Gordie Howe in the second game of the series. Indeed, in the second period, Ted Lindsay and Sloan engaged in a nasty stick swinging incident that left Lindsay with a bloody gash above his eye. Later in the game, Gordie Howe hammered Sloan into the boards. Sloan had to be carried outside the ice with a broken right shoulder blade. He would not play again in those playoffs and the Red Wings breezed through the Leafs in only five games. That shoulder injury would be a recurrent and nagging problem for the rest of Sloan's career.

Although he deservedly receive an enormous pay increase after his 1955-56 campaign, the Maple Leafs organization started to get wary and unhappy of some of Sloan's action. Indeed, Jimmy Thomson, the veteran defenceman, and Sloan begin the process of unionization, as they reveal plans to form a labour. Because Sloan and Thomson took an active part in organizing the NHL Player's Association and that Conn Smythe was a man to carry a grudge, both players were traded to the Chicago Blackhawks for cash; Thomson first, followed a year later by Sloan.

Although he had played many games as a right winger in his last season with the Leafs, it's as a centre that Sloan would help the Blackhawks. He found himself centering Ed Litzenberger and the key man in the players' association movement Ted Lindsay while with them. Nicknamed 'The Pappy Line', due to the relatively old age of the three players, the trio clicked immediately and were the highest scoring line in the NHL in, with 197 points.

In his last two season in the league, Sloan settle as the third line, defensive center for the Hawks. It's with them that Sloan would registered his 200th goal of his career. As one newspaper stated that he was happier than a kid on Christmas morning, Sloan told: ''I never thought I'd get it. After all, I don't have much longer to go in this game, but now maybe after this, they'll bring me back for one more crack next year.''

The Blackhawks indeed brought the hard working veteran back for a final season, a move they would never regret, as his contribution helped them winning their first Stanley Cup in 23 years.

After playing a single season in the Senior Ontario Hockey Association, Sloan sought reinstatement as an amateur. Once he was granted that status, he joined the Galt Terriers and represent Canada in a silver medal performance at the 1962 World Championships. Even at 35 years of age, he lead all players in assists, while finishing two points off the league leader. After this tournament, Sloan announced his retirement of the game he loved for good.


Fun and Interesting Facts:

- Tod Sloan and Dave Keon are cousins
- During the summer of his playing days, Tod worked as a brewery salesman
- Winning the Stanley Cup with the Blackhawks in 1961, Tod Sloan was engraved as Martin A. Sloan
- For thirteen NHL seasons, Tod Sloan's pension paid him 4176$ a year, which even at the time was below the poverty level in Canada


Signing & Trades:

- On April 30, 1946, Sloan was signed as a free agent by the Toronto Maple Leafs (NHL)
- On September 6, 1949, Sloan, Sloan was loaned to the Cleveland Barons by the Toronto Maple Leafs with the trade of Ray Ceresino and Harry Taylor for Bob Solinger (AHL)
- On June 6, 1958, he was traded to the Chicago Blackhawks by the Toronto Maple Leafs for 15 000$


Injuries & Fines:

- Sloan missed some games of the 1947-48 season due to a pull groin
- On October 17, 1952, Sloan received 5 stitches when Leo Labine cross checked him into the board. Eight days later, Sloan was fine 100$ for a stick swinging incident with Labine
- On November 26, 1954, Sloan lost a tooth and had 11 stitches taken in his lips
- On March 23, 1954, Sloan received a game misconduct and a 75$ fine for pushing referee Ed Chadwick by the throat
- On March 18, 1956, Sloan received a cut on the back of his hand by defenceman Larry Hillman that required eight stitches
- On February 15, 1957, the Maple Leafs lost the service of Sloan for at least a week with the recurring problem at his right shoulder


Miscellaneous:




- The Toronto Maple Leafs played the Detroit Red Wings in the 1956 Stanley Cup semifinals. Toronto fans were incensed when their star player, Tod Sloan, broke his shoulder in a collision with Detroit's Gordie Howe. Both Howe and Ted Lindsay received death threats. It was suggested that rookie Cummy Burton wear a Red Wings jersey with Lindsay's number 7 on the front and Howe's number 9 on the back. The idea was for Burton to skate onto the ice to see if anything happened. Wisely, Burton refused to be the guinea pig.
- Rudy Pilous, Chicago BlackHawks Coach: ''Now, we had some players on that team who liked to bet on the horses. I guess that I was the leader in that department. But a group of us used to go out to Sportsman's Park when we were home in Chicago. There was Tod Sloan and Murray Balfour and myself and occasionally, Stash Mikita. But you never could get Hall or Hull to go out to the racetrack. They stayed downtown, watching their money.''


Abbreviation:
AHL: American Hockey League
JOHA: Junior Ontario Hockey Association
NHL: National Hockey League
SOHA: Senior Ontario Hockey Association


Internet Sites:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=14342
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=3541&mode=2
http://mapleleafslegends.blogspot.co...tod-sloan.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tod_Sloan_%28ice_hockey%29




Special Thank You: overpass


Last edited by EagleBelfour: 03-07-2011 at 02:27 PM.
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Old
03-05-2011, 07:34 PM
  #109
BillyShoe1721
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C Pit Lepine



4x Top 15 Goals NHL (10, 10, 10, 15)
1x Top 18 Assists NHL (18)
1x Top 19 Points NHL (19)
2x Top 5 Goals NHL Playoffs (4, 5)
1x Top 6 Assists NHL Playoffs (6)
2x Top 4 Points NHL Playoffs (3, 4)
2x Stanley Cup Champion
3x Retro Selke Award Winner (31, 32, 34)
1937 NHL All Star Game Participant
143 goals in 526 career NHL games

Quote:
Frank Finnigan rated Lepine as one of the greatest defensive forward of all-time.
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?p...e#post24560479

Quote:
Best Shadow of the 1930s
-Ultimate Hockey

Quote:
This tall, gangly veteran of the montreal city Senior Hockey League joined the Montreal Canadiens in 1925-26[...]Early on, sportwritters were comparing his style to that of former Ottawa Senators great Frank Nighbor.

A honey-smooth skater and playmaker, Lepine was the head-coach's go-to guy when it came to shadowing or penalty-killing.

As it often the case when a good player play behind a great player, Lepine was overshadowed (by Morenz)
-Ultimate Hockey

Quote:
Tall and thin the center was a speed merchant and a fluid skater besides being a master at the art of handling the puck. In short, a threat whenever he touched the puck.

Capable of playing the game defensively, Lepine was fast enough to cover opposing forwards, and despite weighting 170 pounds, physically strong enough to win most battles along the boards and all over the ice.

Lepine would regularly draw the puck off the opponent by sliding on one knee in their direction, with his stick stretched in front of him. After taking the puck from his opponent, he would quickly get back on his feet and take control of the puck under the applause of the Montreal fans.

Playing in the shadow of the main attraction of the NHL and the number one center of the Canadiens, Howie Morenz, Lepine did not get the same time he could have with another team. Nevertheless, he held the fort without complaining, maximizing his time in the spotlight.

Sweeping the Boston Bruins in the finals, again a two-game series, the Canadiens won their 3rd Stanley Cup and repeated the feat the following spring with Pit Lepine making a considerable contribution to the two championships.
http://translate.google.com/translat...Lepine&act=url


Quote:
Lepine was a very competent center who, in addition to his playmaking ability, was very adept with a sweeping poke-check. However, he was destined to play for many years under the shadow of the great Howie Morenz who centered the first line.

Canadiens manager Frank Selke Sr. was a big fan of Lepine's.

"Lepine brought to the game a polish seldom seen before. On any other team Pit would have been a blazing meteor, but he was doomed to play all his hockey in the shadow of the truculent Morenz, who at the time, was the fiercest competitor in all of hockey."

He was very prominent when the Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup the next two years, playing with xxx and xxxbut frequently relieving Morenz on the first line. He had the distinction of scoring 5 goals in a game against Ottawa in 1929-30.

When Morenz was traded to Chicago, Pit became the center for Aurel Joliat and Larochelle and led the team in scoring points in 1934-35. He missed many games in 1935-36 when he broke his thumb, and with the return of Morenz in 1936-37 was dropped to second line with Mantha and Toe Blake.
http://habslegends.blogspot.com/2008/07/pit-lepine.html

Quote:
Centre Alfred Pierre "Pit" Lepine played over 500 games for the Montreal Canadiens in the 20s and 30s. He was an excellent goal scorer who could also check and battle for the puck in the corners.

Born in Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Lepine played senior hockey in Montreal with the Royals, Hochelega and Nationale squads. During his rookie NHL season in 1925-26, he scored nine goals and played on the same line as a his older brother, Hec. Before retiring in 1938, he spent nearly 13 seasons with the Canadiens and won consecutive Stanley Cups in 1930 and 1931.

Overall, Lepine reached double figures in goals six times. In 1929-30 he scored a personal best 24 goals in 44 games while forming a dangerous line with xxx and xxx. In 1937 he was on hand for the Howie Morenz Memorial Game in the aftermath of the former Habs star's tragic death.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13376

Quote:
Pit Lepine epitomized the French-Canadian hockey player who gave it his all for Les Canadiens, the sporting symbol of French Canada.

If Lepine had a problem, it was the fact that he was chronically overshadowed by Canadiens' superstar of the late '20s and early '30s Howie Morenz.
http://books.google.com/books?id=wpb...lepine&f=false

Quote:
Wonderful player, smooth, gifted with a great shot. His superb all-around abilities wooed Canadiens fans almost from the first moment he stepped on the ice. A marvelous two-way pokecheck ... the embodiment of grace on the ice, a man whose skill and dexterity only became tremendously apparent after Morenz had left
-Sportswriter Baz O'Meara

Quote:
Still, he helped the Canadiens win back to back Stanley Cups in 1930 and 1931 behind such stars as Howie Morenz, Auriel Joliat, and Pit Lepine.
http://books.google.com/books?id=vxP...ed=0CDgQ6AEwAw

Quote:
By this time, two of the Canadiens best forwards, Aurel Joliat (left wing) and Pit Lepine (alternate center)...
http://books.google.com/books?id=V0P...=0CDwQ6AEwBTgU

Quote:
A clever one such as Frank Boucher of the Rangers, or Pit Lepine of the Canadiens, or Johnny Gottselig of the Blackhawks could dominate the center zone, breaking up attacks before they got organized.
http://books.google.com/books?id=feW...=0CEEQ6AEwBjgU

Quote:
Inspired by the home crowd, Les Canadiens jumped into a 3-0 lead, thanks largely to Morenz and Pit Lepine.
http://books.google.com/books?id=NX5...=0CDkQ6AEwBDge

Quote:
Among the immortal players he directed were Howie Morenz, Auriel Joliat and Pit Lepine.
http://books.google.com/books?id=Agm...=0CD4Q6AEwBTge

Quote:
Pit Lepine, veteran hook-check center
http://www.google.com/search?q=pit+l...e96c95c947f3f0

Quote:
The absence of Pit Lepine was greatly felt by Canadiens last night. The tall center, who suffered a broken leg in Sunday night's game, would have meant much to the Canadiens' attacking forces.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...t+lepine&hl=en

Quote:
Joliat and Pit Lepine, working well together, were the most effective of the Canadien forwards
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...t+lepine&hl=en

Quote:
They will be matched against such proved money players as Aurel Joliat, Howie Morenz, Pit Lepine, and xxx
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/chicagot...t&pqatl=google

Quote:
The Montrealers will have variety in the centre ice spot with silvery haired Pit Lepine blocking traffic with a sweeping hook check...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+defense&hl=en

Quote:
Editor's Note: Pete Lepine ranks with the most powerful centers in big-time hockey. Defensively Lepine is the last word in hockey class.
-Providence News, February 28th, 1928

Quote:
"Players like Walker, Frank Nighbor, Hooley Smith and Pit Lepine," says Fergy, "would coast around centre ice when the opposing team attacked, crouch to one knee, reach their stick as far as possible along the ice, and hook or poke the puck smoothly and efficiently off an opponent's stick. Timing and judgment of distance played a great part, of course, in successful operation of the play."
-Saskatoon Star Phoenix, March 2nd, 1950

Quote:
The hook check has been made of late years by players on their knees. It rather tends to slow up the game. Nighbor is though (sic) as an active player, so is Jack Walker who is credited with its invention. "Hooley" Smith is adept at the sweeping check, but the best in the business today is "Pit" Lepine of the Canadiens. When he sets himself out to play a straight defensive game, Lepine is almost impossible to pass.
-Calgary Daily Herald, January 7th, 1932


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 04-13-2011 at 03:52 PM.
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Old
03-06-2011, 02:37 AM
  #110
seventieslord
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With the 107th pick in ATD2011, The Regina Pats are pleased to select:

Johnny Bucyk, LW



- Member of the HHOF
- Stanley Cup (1970, 1972)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1956, 1958, 1974, 1977)
- NHL 1st All-Star Team (1971)
- NHL 2nd All- Star Team (1968)
- Top-5 in NHL LW All- Star voting six other times (3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 5th, 5th) - only seasons with significant votes are counted
- Top-20 in Goals 11 Times (2nd, 6th, 9th, 9th, 9th, 11th, 11th, 14th, 15th, 15th, 17th)
- Top-20 in Assists 17 Times (3rd, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 11th, 12th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 15th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 19th)
- Top-20 in Points 18 times (3rd, 7th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 9th, 11th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 13th, 14th, 14th, 15th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th)
- Top-10 in Playoff Goals 4 Times (1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th)
- Top-10 in Playoff Assists 4 Times (4th, 4th, 8th, 10th)
- Top-10 in Playoff Points 4 Times (3rd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th)

Basic Online Sources:

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey.net
A member of the so-called Uke Line in Boston with fellow Ukrainian-Canadians Bronco Horvath and Vic Stasiuk, Bucyk set an astounding number of Bruins records (some of which have now been surpassed By Ray Bourque) - for the most seasons (21), the most games (1,436), the most goals (545), the most assists (794) and the most points (1,339).

Bucyk's seasonal scoring totals got better as he got older. Unfortunately, his career almost ended when he was in his mid-30s because of a back injury. From then on he had to wear a harness, but he continued to play left wing well into his forties. It wasn't the only extra bit of equipment he wore, either. Bucyk also sported a special medallion for good luck that four of his teammates gave him after his 500th goal.

In 1976, as he neared the end of his playing career, Bucyk was aware that his age was showing. But it didn't seem to be affecting his game as he continued his streak of 10 straight seasons of more than 20 goals. Bucyk ended his career with the Bruins as the fourth-leading scorer in NHL history at the time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Given lots of ice time, Bucyk immediately stepped in and established himself as the star the Bruins had hoped for. Starring on the "Uke Line" with fellow Ukrainian-descent players Vic Stasiuk and Bronco Horvath, a former junior teammate. For six years their line was as good as any in the National Hockey League, however team success would not follow. The Bruins only made the playoffs twice.

The 1960s were a bad time for the Bruins, finishing last overall in 5 consecutive seasons. Bucyk, much like Marcel Dionne with the L.A. Kings in the 1980s, was the lone star but he could not carry the team on his back despite physically being the biggest player in the league. Yet "The Chief," as he was tagged due to his appearing to be more Native Canadian than Ukrainian, garnered respect around the league. Johnny toiled with some awful teams in Boston through the 1960s. He was almost the only bright spot on a team that lacked a supporting cast for their star. He average an impressive 20 goals a year during that time. In fact Bucyk scored 20 or more goals in 16 of 23 years in the NHL.

By the late 1960s the Bruins fortunes began to change. Captain Bucyk witnessed the arrival of superstars like Bobby Orr, Phil Esposito, Gerry Cheevers and a strong supporting cast. Despite being the old man on the team, Bucyk remained a top player. That's in spite of the fact he mostly played on what was considered to be the Bruin's second line. When he was teamed with Fred Stanfield and Johnnie MacKenzie, Bucyk was at his most dangerous. He scored 51 goals as a 35 year old in 1970-71. The Bruins finally emerged as the class of the league, winning Stanley Cup championships in 1970 and 1972.

Bucyk continued to play an important role until his retirement in 1978, tallying some of his most productive statistical seasons. Though he retired with 556 goals and 1369 points, then the 4th highest total of all time, it should be noted Bucyk was far more than finesse player. He was tough as nails and a heavy body checker especially noted his devastating hip checks. Despite his aggressive physical play, he was a clean player, as evidenced by his twice being twice named as the NHL's most gentlemanly player.
Published Sources:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Detroit Red Wings Greatest Moments and Players
a left-wing par excellence...
Quote:
Originally Posted by THN Top 100 NHL Players of All Time
"it breaks your heart when the club lets your buddies go," Bucyk once told the writer. "But you can't be soft about it. It's a hard game and a hard life and you do the best you can." Bucyk did the best he could for as long as he could and he was a champion on both counts. 21 Boston seasons, 545 goals, both club records.… Blessed with good size, Bucyk willed himself into being an NHL player. "It's an old saying, but if you want something badly enough, you'll get it," said Ken McCauley, one of Bucyk's minor hockey coaches. "Johnny Bucyk wanted it a little more than the next guy."… In Bucyk's first 10 years in Boston, he tasted defeat often and with unfailing reluctance. In 1967, at 32, Bucyk found himself on the winning club and posted his first 30 goal season. "Management had to weed out in trade-off the guys who couldn't stop thinking like losers, said Derek Sanderson. "They had to have guys who think of winning and nothing else. The chief always have that, never will lose it."… The offense of element of his game never changed. Bucyk, 6 foot one and 215 pounds, operated within spitting distance of the crease. "Johnny Bucyk," wrote Toronto Star columnist Milt Dunnell, "is as obvious as a goalpost." "I thought of myself as a spear carrier, not a star, really, "Bucyk once said. "I'm not a glamour guy and I've just gone along getting what I could out of every game. It has added up."… When his career ended at 43, Bucyk stood as the fourth leading NHL goalscorer and point producer of all time. The kid from Edmonton had proven again that the race to the Hall of Fame goes not always to the fastest, but to the steadiest in body and heart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey All-Stars
in six different seasons, Johnny Bucyk came first or second in Lady Byng trophy voting. Yet despite his gentlemanly demeanor, Bucyk was also an important member of the "Big Bad Bruins". Veteran defenseman Alan Stanley saw the left-wingers other side. "The guy is deceptive, "he said. "he's much heavier than he looks, and he hits low, with his hip. Whenever he's on the ice, you can never afford to stand admiring your passes. Not the way Bucyk hits." Bucyk was named team captain for 1966-67, but after one season, he requested an A for assistant captain instead of the C. however, there was never any doubt that The Chief was a team leader. "Bucyk has been Boston's most talented individual over the past decade," wrote Dan Proudfoot in the Canadian magazine, "even though he's never been voted the seasons All-Star and he's never one of the trophy." That soon changed. Dusek notched his first 30 goal season in 1968 and added 39 assists to join the top 10 league scorers. He placed second in Lady Byng trophy voting and made the second All-Star team. "I always knew the wheel would turn some time," said Bucyk. "I knew we'd start winning one of the seasons."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Years of Glory
a man who would become of Bruins legend and play for 21 seasons for the club… In Boston, Bucyk became one of the game's greatest left-wingers. He was a key man on three of Boston's best lines, first with Vic Stasiuk and Bronco Horvath on the Uke line, then with Murray Oliver and Tommy Williams on the BOW line, and later, with Fred Stanfield and Johnny McKenzie on Boston's Stanley Cup championship clubs of 1970 and 1972. Harry Sinden, general manager of the Bruins since 1972, rates Bucyk as "one of the best passing forwards of all-time."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean Ratelle
John was the kind of player I didn't appreciate until I played on the same line with. When I played in New York, I knew he was good, but I didn't appreciate how much he did for the team on the ice with his knowledge and how much he did for the team off the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tales from the Boston Bruins
Bucyk was a player who like the rough, tough style of hockey, the didn't really care for fighting. It only took him manhandling a few opponents who challenged him early in his career to drastically reduce the number of opponents who dared. Johnny was capable of delivering devastating but clean body checks, and the fact that he was able to routinely dish out such punishment yet still win the Lady Byng trophy twice is a testament to his cleanliness and sportsmanship.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Searching for Bobby Orr
"hello, Mr. Bucyk," Orr said, a little startled at the sight. "It's Johnny or Chief," he six said, without getting up. "It's never Mr. Bucyk."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black and Gold – Four Decades of the Boston Bruins in Photographs
"bronco said I took care of business. I would do all the running around, arranging things," Bucyk remembers. "I also scored goals, so he called me the chief. Hey, you get everything done, you're the chief, he said."

"Chief could do it all, on and off the ice." Says Bruins legend Milt Schmidt. "He had a great hip check. He was a solid defender. He reminded me of my teammate Woody Dumart in that area..."

"When you think of the Bruins, you think John Bucyk," says former Bruins captain Wayne Cashman. "He was a great leader, a leader on winning clubs, and he's a great guy on and off the ice. To this day, he helps Bruins players and ex-players."

Guy Lafleur recalls "Bucyk was late in his career when I played against him but he was strong, a scorer, and a real gentleman on the ice. He was very good with the younger guys. He'd help of the younger guys a lot, I remember."

"He was very sneaky," adds Pierre Bouchard. "You wouldn't chase him up and down the wing or anything; he'd just know where the puck was going to be."

Known for his hip checks and lower body strength… For the most part, rather than fists, Bucyk preferred to leave the physical impression with his hips. He had a devastating old-fashioned hip check… Even during the time when they didn't have a formal captain, chief was the unnamed, de facto captain...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey's Glory Days – Stories from the Original Six Era
during the 1968 season, the Boston Bruins held the night for one of their most popular players, veteran Left-winger Johnny Bucyk. Bucyk had played spectacular hockey for the Bruins for the past decade as a member of the uke line. Now it appeared as though he was beginning to lose his touch: his goal production had slipped to 18 in 1967. Perhaps he should consider retirement while he was still on top, but some observers. Bucyk was given a new car, and hope Ford Motor and other gifts, as well as much praise for serving the Bruins so well and for so long. At the end of the on ice ceremony, it seemed that everyone expected Bucyk to announce that he was in his final year of hockey.

But that was never his intention. At the age of 32, Bucyk had no plans to buy a rocking chair, to fish from his new boat or to what golf balls into the sunset. In 1968 he recorded a 30 goal season. Then, playing as if rejuvenated, he scored 24, 31 and, incredibly, 51 goals at the age of 35. He became the only player of that vintage to score 50 or more goals in a season, and in the 33 season since then, no one older has ever scored 50.

Even then, Bucyk gave no thought to retirement. Five years after that 51 goal campaign, he connected from 36 goals only when he turned 43, more than a decade after his night, did he decide it was time to step aside – after a "disappointing" season in which he scored a mere 20 goals. by that time, the car and the boats motor had long since worn out… When it comes to durability, the man they called the chief ranks right up there with Gordie Howe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Rangers, the Bruins, and the End of an Era
Orland Kurtenbach: "… Another guy like that is Johnny Bucyk. When I played with Johnny in Boston, I would say the two or three years I was there, Johnny, when he was going, he was like 220 pounds, 6 foot, 6 foot one, he hit guys, put 'em out for the year, scored 20 goals in a month. He was fantastic. He played what? 22 years?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston Bruins – Celebrating 75 Years
only a few truly gentlemanly players who disdained rough stuff won the Boston hearts. Hall of Famers Jean Ratelle and John Bucyk were among the best examples, both being near technically perfect players and so fundamentally sound they were in another orbit... Bucyk's niche can be undervalued. When he was at his physical peak he played for a lousy team. When the team got good, he was overshadowed by more explosive and colorful comrades. It's instructive that he could not have cared less. Among hockey people, Bucyk's stature is monumental. He lasted 23 seasons and 1540 games; only Gordie Howe and Alex Delvecchio played more. And yet stats don't do him justice either, for they don't convey how sound he was in every aspect of play at both ends of the ice while also being indestructible. Built like a minivan, the chief was more durable than any other player. The subtle works hockey people consider beautiful were his specialty: digging the puck from the corner, tipping shots at the goalmouth, feeding the point man on the power play, tying up an opponent, delivering thunderous body checks that were also exquisitely clean, which scholars say he did better than any other winger who ever played the game. That's so physical a player could win the lady Byng trophy for gentlemanly play twice was astounding as well is a measure of his perfection of basic technique.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
the modesty is probably how Bucyk got the reputation as being one of the game's classic nice guys – and a hard worker to boot.… Bucyk seasonal scoring totals got better as he got older. Again, the modest Bucyk said it was all because he played on better teams. "Don't forget the quality of the team we had, with Orr and Esposito and the rest," he liked to remind people. But his fans argued that it was only because Bucyk picked up his game a notch when paired with those other high-quality players that the Bruins rose to into Stanley Cup victories.

In 1976, Bucyk was aware that his age was showing. But it didn't seem to be affecting his game as he continued his streak of 10 straight seasons of more than 20 goals. "It's hard to believe. I just keep going. I guess it helps that I'm a positional player, "he explained. "I skate up and down my wing, doing the most I can with the least amount of effort. I get tired at times and stuff to go on at times, especially by the end of the season. By the start of the new season, after a summer of rest, I'm ready to go again. I can still go – I got a good legs. I'm old enough to be a father to some of these kids, but if they call me pop, I'll lay one on them! I take the cuts and bruises in stride by now. But I've been lucky. It takes longer to recover from injuries than it used to. But if you're going to get goals, you got to get in where the action is."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who's Who in Hockey
John Bucyk, one of the most unobtrusive players on a strong and flashy Bruins squad, spanned two decades of Boston hockey history, performing his tasks on left wing through some of the best and worst years that team ever witnessed… It was Horvath who coined Bucyk's nickname,, the chief, after his straight ebony hair, swarthy complexion, and stoic visage... In 1959, Bucyk was so good at digging the puck out of the corners for linemate Horvath that bronco came within two points opening the scoring title, behind Bobby HUll... Bucyk life then became more about setting records well his more spectacular teammates, or and Esposito, broke bigger ones or more of them, leaving the chief in the shadows, which he seemed to prefer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
"I always work the corners and get the puck out," Bucyk explained. "You can't score from the corners. If you pass off and the other guy scores, what's the difference? A goal is a goal."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
despite a lousy supporting cast, he managed to average more than 20 goals a season. It was said he could "mine the puck out of the crowd." His needle threading passes on the power play are the stuff of Beantown legend. The big, stocky winger earned a reputation for hanging tough around the enemy net. "Lady Byng or not, I never knew anyone who could hit a guy harder than chief, especially with a hip check," said teammate Bobby Orr.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of The Stanley Cup, Vol. 3
6 feet tall and weighing 215 pounds, Bucyk have the build of the defensemen but he was a forward and probably the biggest left-wing in the game. He was remarkably agile and fast for such a big man and his rotund figure was somewhat reminiscent of Didier Pitre, a speedy star of an earlier era. After a couple of years with Edmonton of the WHO, Bucyk joined Detroit shortly after the start of the 1956 season and, 20 years later was still out skating younger players… Although very potent offensively, the Uke Line was not the best back checking combination. In 1961, coach met did some juggling and tried Bucyk centering Stasiuk and Toppazzini with Horvath on other lines. By the next year, Horvath and Stasiuk had been traded and, Bucyk played with McKenney and Mohns... When expansion came, Bucyk was the only one of the old guard left but he would more than hold his own when Boston became a powerhouse.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Orr and Big, Bad Bruins
thanks to Horvath, Bucyk was given an identity immediately. Bronco linked Bucyk start complexion without of some Indians he once seen and promptly knighted him "chief". Horvath also ladled several hundred excellent passes to Bucyk, who for the first time in his NHL life enjoyed a 20 goal season. Horvath was repaid by Bucyk's diligent "infighting", which produced loose pucks from the sideboards were angels fear to tread… The hitting has brought destruction to opponents for years and has also dented Bucyk's armor; more than 200 stitches punctured his anatomy. His most debilitating injury, however, was a slipped disc in his back.… His phlegmatic exterior – he's often related how nervous he is before again – has often led bring fans to believe that Bucyk doesn't care whether his team wins or loses and doesn't try hard enough. It is a mistaken impression that he was have had other big players whose loping style is deceiving. "Besides," Bucyk has replied in legitimate self-defense, "how many players are fired up all the time? Hull isn't. Frank Mahovlich isn't." … While Esposito and Orr were capturing the ink and climbed to second place in 1969, Bucyk was unobtrusively going about getting the job done. Despite threats of a back operation he showed up at camp and skated in uke line form. "From what I've seen," enthused Sinden, "he couldn't be playing any better. He skating hard, he's checking, he digging the puck out of the corners. He's doing everything a coach could ask of a man sometimes a lot more."
Autobiography:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey In My Blood - Intro By Bobby Orr
John Bucyk: One of the Reasons for My Success

You don't feel nervous around chief. He makes you feel like you're one of the guys right away and it doesn't matter who you are. Rich or poor, great or not great, he's like that with everybody.

Chief won the Lady Byng trophy after the 1971 season and I'm sure a lot of people, when you say Lady Byng, think it's a sissy trophy, which is wrong. It's a trophy that given to the player who shows sportsmanship play, without taking penalties, and combines it with great ability. He deserved it. In fact I thought chief should've won it long before he did. It doesn't mean that Johnny Bucyk is tough. I've seen a lot of guys get hit by chief who probably thought they'd been run over by a truck. I don't think I've ever seen anybody who can hit guys with his back or his Like chief does. For anybody who's ever watched him, you know what I mean. I've seen hit players and they just don't get up, or they crawl to the bench, and it's always a clean check.

He isn't a spectacular player but he still fantastic. We joke with him a lot of the dressing room about his style of play. We tell him right to his face: "chief, rather than give you a breakaway we'd rather see you on the one on two or one on three any time." Don't laugh. I've seen chief go through places that are just unbelievable!

The way Johnny Bucyk shoots the puck is something else. Chief will never hurt anybody with shot. But in their close to the net, chief is deadly. During the 1971 season he had the most accurate shot, percentage-wise of shots taken in goals scored, in the entire NHL. On the power play he's always in there waiting for the right moment around the net. You always know where chief is going to be so you don't have to look up before shooting or passing. He plays positional hockey and still he's up-and-down his wing getting the job done.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey In My Blood – Preface by Russ Conway
when the Bruins win, and even on that rare but well remembered time when they lose, number nine somehow always sticks out in your mind. Without being spectacular, without the controversial, Johnny Bucyk gets the job done, and that's what counts.

Johnny Bucyk's play on the ice is consistently superb. He's not a fancy skater like Bobby Orr. He's not dazzling stick. He's not a rough, tough fighter like Keith Magnuson, but when you see use all of his 215 pounds crunching an opponent with an awesome hip or body check, you know he's solid.

Bucyk is a very important part of what has become the greatest power play team in the history of the NHL. He's the option player at left wing. Once the puck is worked up into the opponents and, the Bruins try to arrange it so the chief is open. Then he's got the option. He can either pass the puck behind the net to Johnny McKenzie on the right wing, passout Esposito in the slot, or to the left point. Many times he'll slide it out to Orr on the right point, a dangerous move, but Bucyk maneuvers it perfectly. The final option is to take the shot himself and he often does it 50 others are covered.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey In My Blood
some players just don't get along with others, but I can say as long as I've been in the NHL there isn't one player who might dislike or don't get along with. I don't hold any grudges. I feel that a lot of players who play cheap, dirty, rough type of hockey have to be that way. This is how they get the respect on the ice and this is why they make the various clubs. Take John Ferguson now retired, of the Montréal Canadiens. He was a good hockey player and a rough one. I didn't hold any grudges against him because I think he was an honest player. By that I mean he did his best to help Montréal. He didn't go out looking for trouble but when it came his way he would back away. I know I hit him a lot of times I got clean and fair and he never retaliated. He's that type of player. If you hit him hard but clean he wouldn't come after you, but if you gave him a butt end or speared him you're going to be in the middle of a fight.

I don't play cheap hockey. I've never played a dirty hockeygame. I know if somebody gives me cheap shots they are going to get back and they know it. Once in a while I won't do it legally, most of the time I'll be able to get back at somebody who has nailed me by catching him with his head down or something like that. You can give it back to somebody just as well equally as you can illegally. It may take a little longer but it's worth it. This is the way I've always played and this is why I think I've stayed out of a lot of trouble. Nobody's ever scored from the penalty box.

Of course, one of the biggest thrills of my career has just been playing hockey for the Boston Bruins organization. Being a captain on the Bruins gives you little something extra to be proud of and it means a lot to me. It also gives you added responsibilities. Sometimes a player isn't quite up for a game or things aren't going quite right so usually go over and give him a little tap on the behind. I say something like "come on now, you got to pick up a little because you're not checking", and that usually gives little boost to get them thinking more about the game. The players respect me on the Bruins. They know I've seen a little bit of hockey throughout my career.

... The opening game of the season came, and we were playing for keeps. I was like a new man. One of my first shifts out I drew a 5 min. major penalty. I had been hitting everybody in sight. It was against the Chicago Blackhawks and I really caught Gus Mortson and drove him into the boards. I saw him coming around the neck, he was a defenseman, and I hit him so hard that he literally bounced off the boards like a basketball. He accidentally cut his head on the board so I ended up going off for 5 min. for drawing blood.

... I was never a big fighter but I'll always remember my first battle as a Bruin. It was one of those out and out fist flying Pier 7 brawls. It was a Saturday afternoon game in Boston, televised nationally. I had the fight, a real beauty, with Claude Laforge of the Detroit Red Wings. Don Simmons was playing for us as goalie and it all started over him. He went down and made a save near our net. He was holding the puck, waiting for whistle, and Laforge came in. He was trying to break the puck loosened belt Donnie hard on the back. I moved in and bent down to see if Don was all right and all of a sudden I was belted with a stick over the back of my shoulders. I quickly spun around and there was Laforge. The idea of hitting me with a stick when my back was turned really set me off. I grabbed him and really socked him. I was much heavier and stronger than he was so there wasn't much he could do. I just kept swinging.

Bronco Horvath gave me the nickname chief when we were playing together and Edmonton because I used to dig the puck out of the corner so well and feed it back to him at center. We used to call bronco "the Col." because he parked himself in front of the net and hollered at me to go in the corner and dig the puck. So one day somebody mentioned to the Bronco and he acted like a chief bossing the two Indians around on his line. Bronco told the fellow Johnny Bucyk was the chief because I was the guy who used to sneak into the corners and lead the attack to get the puck. Bronco said I use my stick like a Tomahawk to steal the puck. Of course I've got high cheekbones and I do resemble an Indian in that way I'm also dark complexioned. This worked into the nickname that stuck ever since.

A captain has a lot of off the ice responsibilities. If a relative of a player or friend of the team passed away or there is a special function connected with the team, the captain orders the flowers and make sure they get there. Another job with the Capt. is to help out the rookies. It takes quite a bit of time, especially at training camp. When a rookie comes up it is the captain's responsibility to help them find a house and get settled. It is the captain's job to make sure the rookies have transportation and this usually means setting up some deal. You've got to make sure rookie player, or a veteran was introduced into town, gets to know his way around. It's also the Capt.'s duty to make sure the new player develops a good attitude... By finishing in the top 10 or top 15 in getting the goals I got, I don't think I took as much abuse from the fans are some of the others did during the dark days. I always gave my best even though we didn't win that often.

... My type of hockey isn't the mister nice guy style either. I believe in the rough style of hockey but at the same time try everything that's possible to stay out of that penalty box. I'm out on the ice with the feeling that if I go to the penalty box it had better be for good reason. I remember one time during the 1971 season when one of my teammates, suddenly stopped chasing the puck and went after a player on the other team. He helped him and ended up fighting. The two went off for 5 min. apiece. My teammate ended up with a 10 min. misconduct and we ended up a man short for the hooking plus the fact that we didn't have his services for most of the period. After the game I asked him why he took the hooking penalty. "Because he drove me into the boards of the body check," he said. I asked him why he got into the fight. "Because he said something I didn't like." Why the misconduct? "I swore at the referee." I just shook my head. Three great answers which took as much brains to come up with of the five-year-old. His temper got away from him and it ended up with everybody on the team paying for it, skating in checking harder on the ice while he was in the penalty box.

There are number of times during the season when a player would give me a hard check, or hook me, or cross checked me but I don't turn around and belt him. I play a rugged game, too. I wait and wait and eventually I get my chance to get back at the player who uses a little dirty stuff. That one time comes up, maybe it's in the same game or maybe it's in another game a month or two later, when that same player will have his head down just for a split second. That's all it takes. I love catching opposing players with their heads down and those body checks that I throw are perfectly legal. In keeping my temper in doing it this way I stay on the ice, don't put the team shorthanded situation, and have the chance of helping out and even scoring the winning goal.

By taking that extra stride into a player who has fired you up, it makes all the difference in the world. He knows he's been hit, you get your revenge, and 99/100 times there's no whistle from the referee. When you're over 200 pounds like I am, you can get the job done without fighting. A body checker will help the team in the long run a lot more than a fist fighter. A body checker continuously takes more out of the opposition. He give the opposition a constant physical beating but does it in a rough style of legal hockey. I won the Lady Byng trophy for the 1971 season but I was no kitten on the ice. I body checked every time I had the opportunity.
Scouting Reports:

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
Like Old Man River, he just keeps rolling along... "He's an amazing athlete," says Bobby Orr... Big left wing excels in corners.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976
Harry Sinden, managing director of the Bruins, calls him "The greatest left winger of the past 15 years, after Bobby Hull."
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1978
In spite of back problem last year which affected a leg, he scored no diminutive scoring touch with 20 goals in 49 gams... Has reputation as Canadien-killer because, during career, has enjoyed some of his best nights against Habs... well-liked and tremendously respected on and off the ice.
Interesting Newspaper Clippings:

seems Bucyk had a different nickname before he was The Chief:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eugene register guard, March 18, 1957
John "The Beast" Bucyk…
It's unclear what made him unique, but Milt Schmidt seemed to think Bucyk could play either side just as well:

Quote:
Originally Posted by the telegraph, March 22, 1958
Schmidt is toying with the idea of putting Bucyk on right wing… With an eye toward improving the lines scoring punch… "I I think Bucyk can play right wing because his style is a little different from that of the average wing."
There was never any doubt who the star of the Uke Line was - although he was not as consistent as some other stars:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montréal Gazette, February 8, 1960
somebody ventured the opinion that the key to the line is Vic Stasiuk. He seems to be the guy who goes into the corners and digs the puck out for bronco Horvath. "You're wrong there," broke in Lynn Patrick. "The key man on the line is Bucyk. When he's playing well the line plays well. But he doesn't always play well."

"What's the matter with him? Is he the moody type?"

"No, I wouldn't call him moody," replied Lynn. "It's just that he appears to be distracted at times and doesn't always concentrate on hockey. Sometimes it looks as if he's thinking about some movie he saw that of the game he's playing in."
A clipping about Bucyk's new found goalscoring prowess, his chemistry with his 2nd (but least-famous) longtime line, and some constructive criticism from his coach:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Star, February 1, 1963
unlike the guy in the cigarette commercial, big, mild-mannered Johnny Bucyk of the Boston Bruins is shooting more now and enjoying it more. Once the target of scornful calls of quote shoot, shoot," from Boston fans, the 27-year-old left winger suddenly has become the big man for the Bruins.… "I'm making a more concerted effort to shoot more this season," says Bucyk. "And it's paying off. I've got to give a lot of credit to Murray Oliver and Tom Williams on my line. We work well together and they're always hollering at me to shoot when I'm in a good position."

"John is greatly improved this year," says Bruins coach Milt Schmidt. "He's working a lot harder, he's on a line that fits in with each other like a jigsaw puzzle. He has a good knack of being in scoring position a lot, he strong and he has a good shot." If the likable, 203 pound Edmonton native has any weaknesses they are a tendency to be a bit below par on defensive play and failure to utilize his strength as much as he might, says Schmidt. "But offensively, I couldn't ask anymore from John," he said. "His biggest improvement has been, I think, overcoming a tendency towards laziness in practice. Before, he never went all out in a practice session now he puts out 100% and this is carrying over to his game performances."
Imlach was very interested in Bucyk in 1965 but couldn't get him. Then the next season he no longer wanted him. Too old.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Star, November 16, 1965
Imlach Monday mentioned a three-year building program for the Maple leafs. "I'm not interested in a player over 27 years old," he said. "Maybe I would have won the cup last season if I could've got Johnny Bucyk from Boston. But I don't want Bucyk anymore. It's going to take three or four seasons for our kids to develop and by that time when we're ready to move, a fellow like Bucyk will be finished."
A quote about Bucyk's low profile:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal, February 28, 1968
the sporting public, generally speaking, doesn't recognize Bucyk because he is colorless. He is a fine hockey player; coldly efficient around the opponents nets, but he isn't a crowd-rouser.
A testament to his longevity. This is a full 5 years before Bucyk retired:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal, March 23, 1973
the years have stopped for John Bucyk. Now 38, the kid who grew up on the corner ranks of Edmonton, can still score goals. He is not on his last legs.
MOST TIMES TOP-15 IN ASSISTS:

Gordie Howe - 23
Wayne Gretzky - 19
Alex Delvecchio - 14
Johnny Bucyk - 13
Jean Beliveau - 13
Stan Mikita - 13
Adam Oates - 13
Ron Francis - 13

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Old
03-06-2011, 07:08 PM
  #111
overpass
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Gary Bergman, D


Legends of Hockey Bio:
Quote:
Gary Bergman was a solid all-around defenseman in his 12-year NHL tenure. A fine skater with a knack for making smart decisions on offense, he also took a physical approach to the game when guarding his end of the ice. Known primarily for his decade long service in Detroit, Bergman also impressed as a member of Team Canada during the 1972 Summit Series.
Quote:
His well-rounded play made him useful on both the power-play and penalty-killing units for the Wings. Although he incurred his share of penalties, Bergman wasn't considered a surly opponent on the ice. He rarely looked for trouble but also never backed down from an onrushing opponent, whether he was a fancy scorer or a power forward.
Quote:
Bergman's consistent play often went unnoticed in the early 1970s. All eyes were on young superstars like Bobby Orr and Brad Park.
Bergman played a lot of minutes during his prime in the NHL. While time on ice was not recorded at the time, we can estimate it from the number of goals the player was on the ice for, starting in 1967-68.

Here are the leaders among defenceman in estimated time on ice per game over the six years from 67-68 to 72-73.

1. Bobby Orr, 30.3
2. JC Tremblay, 28.7
3. Pat Stapleton, 28.6
4. Gary Bergman, 28.2
5. Jacques Laperriere, 27.9

The leaders in estimated even strength ice time per game over the same period.

1. Gary Bergman, 22.9
2. Pat Stapleton, 22.8
3. Jacques Laperriere, 22.6
4. Bill White, 22.3
5. Bobby Orr, 22.2

Bergman had some offensive skills. Over the period 1966-67 to 1971-72, he had 206 points, 4th among defencemen over that time (Orr, Stapleton, Tremblay). 154 of those points came at even strength, 3rd among defencemen (Orr, Stapleton).

Gary Bergman played in all 8 games for Canada in the 1972 Summit Series. From Joe Pelletier's profile of Bergman, here are some quotes about his play there.
Quote:
"I'm so happy when I look back on that series that we picked him,'' Sinden said 28 years later. " We thought he had the character, integrity and type of personality that would add to our team, and we were exactly right in our assessment.

"He was one of the biggest surprises in terms of contribution that we had. We felt he could be a regular member of the team but his contribution exceeded that. He was a terrific member of the team, and well respected.''

"Team Canada was loaded with offensive talent and I believe I did what the situation dictated. I decided I could be more useful by bumping into the opposition and keeping my own end of the rink clean.", Gary said a few years after the series.
Quote:
Paul Henderson, the hero of the 1972 series and a former teammate of Gary in Detroit. "From my perspective, he was one of the great unsung heroes of that series,. He just played incredible hockey.''

"He was an above-average player in the NHL at that time and he proved that during the series,'' Bill White, one of the 1972 team's other defencemen, said. " Bergie gave a great account of himself in that whole series. The steadiness of his play is what I remember most.''

"He was a rock,'' said Bobby Orr who didn't play in the series due to a knee injury but who travelled with the team and was impressed with Gary's steady play.

"We hit it off really good for guys who didn't know each other very well,'' said his defensive partner Brad Park. " I was more of an offensive guy so we jelled very well together.

"Right away I realized what a classy guy he was in how he handled himself on and off the ice, and what a great competitor he was. He had a lot of confidence in his ability and wasn't worried about how he was going to play. He just went out and played. He was as solid a defenceman as has ever played the game.''
Pat McLean of the blog Black Dog Hates Skunks rewatched the 1972 Summit Series on DVD and tracked shots at net and scoring chances for both teams, recording the Canadian players who were on the ice for each event.

Game 1
Game 2
Game 3
Game 4
Game 5
Game 6
Game 7
Game 8

Here are his numbers for Bergman, along with his observations.

Game 1: Scoring chances with Bergman on - 9-5 ES, 3-0 PP, 0-1 SH.
Quote:
Bergman and Park are quite strong and end up a plus in both metrics, they do get dinged late in the third a bit. Park is terrific and Bergman, an unheralded defensive defenceman, is solid, breaking up a two on one easily, angling his men just fine. In other words although he benefits from playing with Park he holds his own and never looks out of place.

On the other hand the second pair gets smoked right from the start. Basically when Park and Bergman are on the ice the puck is in the right end and when XXXXX and XXXXX are on the ice its the opposite.
Game 2. Scoring chances with Bergman on - 4-2 ES, 2-0 PP, 0-2 SH.
Quote:
The D pairings are fairly reasonable. Park and Bergman take on the majority of the defensive draws in the first two periods while Stapleton and White are sheltered, they get all neutral or offensive zone faceoffs up until the third. Savard and Lapointe only get a couple of defensive draws in the first two periods. Truth is though, the Russians get very few draws in Canada's zone in periods one and two so while I do think Sinden runs out Park and Bergman as much as he can I also think he is able to do so because Canada has the advantage. In the third the Russians come on a little and get more draws in the Canadian zone. I think Sinden goes to a regular rotation at this point for a few reasons. He can't run Park and Bergman out over and over again. Also while they have been good they have not been great. And finally I think that the other two pairs have been fine and thus have gained the coach's confidence.
Game 3. Scoring chances with Bergman on - 10-4 ES, 0-0 PP, 0-3 SH.
Quote:
On the blueline Sinden runs three pairs again. For the most part he rolls them. It looks to my eye like Bergman and Park tend to get the Kharlamov line quite a bit but overall there isn't much going on.

Park and Bergman end up with terrific numbers again and its easy to see why. Park was considered the second best defenceman of that generation, behind only Orr. He is a tremendous skater, closes to his man immediately, moves the puck swiftly. He's not a gambler at all though. Makes the safe play. Does tend to leave his feet and sprawl at times though. Bergman, who I barely had heard of (I certainly did not know the role he played in this series), is the prototypical defensive defenceman. Just plain solid. Makes his reads, reacts quickly. Active stick. Good decisionmaking. Never leaves his feet.

For the third straight game they are either even or in the black. Just as in game one their numbers are extraordinary.
Game 4. Scoring chances with Bergman on - 10-10 ES, 0-0 PP, 0-0 SH.
Quote:
Park and Bergman are not as good as they have been but their numbers are either in the black or even.
Game 5. Scoring chances with Bergman on - 3-9 ES, 2-0 PP, 0-0 SH.
Quote:
The carnage is widespread. The normally reliable Park and Bergman are bloodied.
Game 6. Scoring chances with Bergman on - 3-0 ES, 1-0 PP, 1-2 SH.
Quote:
On the blueline all three pairs contribute but its a sign of the Canadian strength that the pair that he leaned on early in the Series, Park and Bergman, are now relied on a little less. They do get the five on three duty but its Savard and Lapointe who get the PK minutes in the third, including at the end of the game.

For all three pairs the game is fantastic really. Its a tribute to their work and that of the forwards as well that while the Russians spend plenty of time in the Canadian zone (Savard and Lapointe's Corsis are in the red, Bergman and Park barely in the black) they don't generate anything in the way of scoring chances. Bergman and Park are not on for one chance against at evens. The Soviets can't break down the Canadian defence and are left to lobbing pucks at Dryden from the perimeter (sometimes not a bad idea - the first goal is a long shot which I did not rate as a chance).
Game 7. Scoring chances with Bergman on - 1-1 ES, 0-0 PP, 0-1 SH.
Quote:
The score is close in this game but almost across the board the Canadians own the Russians at even strength. Sinden basically runs out five man units although not exclusively. The Clarke line goes out with Savard and Lapointe and generally get the tough matchup. Ratelle goes out with Stapleton and White. Esposito with Park and Bergman
Game 8. Scoring chances with Bergman on - 11-2 ES, 0-0 PP, 0-3 SH.
Quote:
On the back end Park and Bergman are excellent, only two SC against at ES, although one ends up in the net when Park blows his coverage on a draw. Still, an outstanding night.
Overall numbers for Bergman - 51 scoring chances for and 33 against at even strength. 8 for and 0 against on the power play, 1 for and 12 against while shorthanded.

Total Canada numbers - 171 scoring chances for and 125 against at even strength, 30 for and 6 against on the power play, 7 for and 27 against while shorthanded.

Overpass scouting report

I couldn't find much on Bergman's style of offense. But I watched him in the 1972 Summit Series. Here's what I saw of his play there, particularly his play with the puck.

Moves quickly and confidently with the puck, but isn't particularly creative. Makes the safe play with the puck when pressured, either up the boards or to his partner - he doesn't dangle forwards like his partner Park. He's a fast straight-ahead skater, and when he gets some space in front of him he doesn't hesitate to take that space and rush the puck. He also jumps up to join the rush as a fourth trailing skater when he has room - he doesn't hang back. Not a stay-at-home guy but not a creative offensive player.

Plays the power play sometimes. Nothing fancy - holds the point well, moves the puck quickly or throws it at the net. He played the power play less as the Series went on and Sinden figured out he had better options.


Last edited by overpass: 03-07-2011 at 01:05 PM.
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Old
03-07-2011, 02:53 PM
  #112
Velociraptor
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Barry Beck, D

Position: Defenseman
HT/WT: 6'3", 216 lbs
Shoots: Left
Nickname(s): "Bubba"



- Captain of the New York Rangers from 1980-1986
- 104 goals, 355 regular season points in 615 games played.
- 10 goals, 33 playoff points in 51 games played.

From the HOH board, intangibles resource gathered from surveys answered by NHL coaches.

BARRY BECK

Hardest hitter 1st 1981
Hardest shot 4th 1979
Toughest player 3rd 1979

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Chadwick
"Shoot the puck, Barry!
Beck's rocket of a shot would often find the back of the net on an offensive rush, whenever the Rangers needed an offensive surge and Beck was on the ice, the famous broadcaster would scream "Shoot the puck, Barry!". A shot that earned him 22 goals in his rookie season, only to lose out to Mike Bossy, an eventual 573-goal scorer and 1100+ point player.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
A huge defenceman who could shoot and handle the puck, Barry Beck was dominant at times in the NHL but was often slowed by injuries. He was able to join the rush and use his heavy shot from the point but his strength was playing the body in his own zone.

He scored 22 goals and often carried his team in 1977-78 as a rookie, but finished second in the Calder trophy voting to the Islanders' Mike Bossy. The burly youngster's totals set a record for rookie defencemen that was not bettered until Brian Leetch came along more than a decade later. He continued to anchor the club's defense in 1978-79 and was chosen to the NHL All-Star team that squared off against their Soviet counterparts in the Challenge Cup.

Ten games into the 1979-80 season, Beck was traded to the New York Rangers for a package of five players headed by Pat Hickey, Mike McEwen, and Lucien Deblois. The Big Apple agreed with him as he scored 59 points in 61 games but the club was eliminated in the second round of the post-season. The next year he was a key factor in the Blueshirts' march to the semi-finals. Beck also served as the club's captain for parts of six seasons beginning in 1980-81.

Beck was chosen to represent his country in the 1981 Canada Cup and was an important cog on the New York blueline when healthy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The big, aggressive bruiser burst on to the NHL scene with the Colorado Rockies in 1977 with a bang. Though never known really for his offensive upside, he broke Denis Potvin's record for most goals by a rookie defenseman with 22 goals, and tying the point record with 60. More importantly he led the Rockies to their first playoff berth.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The man they called "Bubba" retired with 104 goals, 251 assists and 355 points in 615 NHL games, plus 1016 penalty minutes. He was an upper-echelon defenseman as suggested by his 5 NHL all star game appearances, his 1979 Challenge Cup inclusion, and his 1981 Canada Cup showing.
Additional quotes & information.

Quote:
They were outshot 28-15 by the New York Rangers, They were outhit by Barry Beck, and outplayed for most of the game
The Evening News, Dec. 2nd, 1980


Last edited by Velociraptor: 03-25-2011 at 10:26 AM.
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Old
03-08-2011, 09:20 AM
  #113
BraveCanadian
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With their ninth round pick (335) in the 2011 ATD, the Guelph Platers have selected: Rick Macleish, C






Quote:
Rick MacLeish was the flashy centreman with the golden touch. He scored the Cup-winning goal in 1974 to give Philadelphia their first championships and twice led the league in playoff scoring with 22 in 1974 and 20 in 1975. MacLeish also became the 1st player from an NHL expansion team to score 50 goals in a season when he accomplished the feat in 1972-73.
- Legends of Hockey


Career Highlights:
Scored the Stanley Cup winning goal 1974.
Stanley Cup Chamption 1974,1975.
Stanley Cup Finalist 1976,1980.
Lead the playoffs in scoring twice.
Top 5 in regular season goals two times (3rd and 4th).
Top 5 in regular season points two times (4th and 4th).
100 point scorer.
Played the NHL All-star game 1976, 1977, 1980.



Vitals:
Born: January 3, 1950.
Position: C
Height: 5-11
Weight: 185 lbs
Shoots: Left.



Regular Season:
First player from an expansion club to hit the 50 goal mark (1972-73).
Top 5 in goals twice (72-73, 76-77).
Top 5 in points twice (72-73, 76-77).
100 point scorer.
Played three allstar games.




Playoffs:
Stanley Cup champion in 1974, 1975.
Stanley Cup Finalist in 1976, 1980.
Led the playoffs in scoring both times the Flyers won the cup (1974,1974) with 22 points and 20 points.
Top 10 in playoff goals 4 times (1st, 2nd, 5th, 7th).
Top 10 in playoff assists 4 times (5th, 6th, 8th, 8th).
Top 10 in playoff points 4 times (1st, 1st, 6th, 9th).



Quotations and Perspective:

Quote:
The Flyers opted to start MacLeish in the AHL in 1971-72 before recalling him late in the year. The next season he broke through with 50 goals while playing the power play and taking a regular shift with Gary Dornhoefer and Ross Lonsberry. Over the next two seasons he continued to produce on offense but was asked to take on penalty killing and defensive responsibility. MacLeish's excellence was a key component on the Flyers' consecutive Stanley Cup wins in 1974 and 1975. During the first title run he led all playoff goal scorers with 13 goals and 22 points. Overall, MacLeish was named to play in the 1976, 1977 and 1980 NHL all-star games.

During the late 70s, MacLeish was a top two-way player for Philly. In 1979-80 he scored 31 goals while teaming with Bob Kelly and Dennis Vervegaert. The trio helped the Flyers set an NHL record by going undefeated in 35 straight games and later reach the 1980 Stanley Cup final. In July 1981, the veteran pivot joined the youthful Hartford Whalers. During his last three NHL seasons MacLeish also played in Pittsburgh, did a second tour in Philly and dressed for the Detroit Red Wings before retiring in 1984.
- Legends of Hockey

Quote:
Rick MacLeish scored 328 goals in a Philadelphia Flyers history, many of them in clutch situations. He added 54 more goals in the playoffs, including 10 game winners.
- Greatest Hockey Legends

Quote:
"Ricky's only weakness is a lack of concentration, and that disappears during the playoffs," explained his former linemate. "You have to put something on the line to bring to the best in Ricky, and the playoff pressure does that. A midseason game against Kansas City, you might sit on the bench, mumbling because he looks so lackadasical. But put the Stanley Cup in sight and he'll skate through six guys, and put the puck in the net, and you'll want to run up and kiss him."
- The Evening Bulletin, May 2, 1975

Quote:
At the beginning of the 1971-72 season, he scored only one goal in 17 games and was dispatched to Richmond of the American Hockey League. The superstar in waiting had to go down and work on his defense and checking game. To his credit he did everything that was asked of him, hoping that one day he would be given a chance to succeed in the NHL.
- Greatest Hockey Legends

Quote:
"And Rick MacLeish, he sure handled their big guy, Perreault. MacLeish can skate with Perreault all night," said Shero.
- Chicago Tribune, May 29, 1975

Quote:
And MacLeish carried his production into the post-season, too. He thrived on the pressure of the Stanley Cup playoffs. In both of the Flyers’ Stanley Cup championship seasons, MacLeish was the NHL’s leading point scorer, tallying 22 points in 1974 and 20 in 1975.
- Greatest Hockey Legends

Quote:
A forward who specializes in scoring as well as checking... Fast, powerful skater with a lightning shot that explodes on goal... possesses breakaway speed that makes defenders look as though they are moving in slow motion... Regarded as one of the league's best short and long-range wrist shooters... Always a great playoff scorer... Describes his game as a "free-style form of hockey"... "I don't know if there's a more natural shooter and skater anywhere," says coach Fred Shero.
- The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1978

Quote:
Though he was primarily a skill player, MacLeish was prepared to take the physical beating necessary to win.
- Greatest Hockey Legends

(some of these quotes shamelessly copied from seventies previous bio)


Last edited by BraveCanadian: 03-11-2011 at 08:13 AM.
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03-09-2011, 12:19 AM
  #114
TheDevilMadeMe
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FOLLOWING IS A CUT AND PASTE FROM THE DRAFT THREAD

Dan Boyle, D

After I lost out on all the elite PP QBs (they were all gone before my 2nd pick even came around), this pick here was marked for the guy who would QB my PP. The three guys in mind were Rafalski, Boyle, and an undrafted. Ultimately decided on Boyle over the undrafted for the same reason he was picked for the Olympics - the other guy might have been slightly better on the PP, but Boyle is more solid overall.

Boyle is solidly in the range of "second tier" powerplay quarterbacks, and like I said, all the first tier guys were picked before I even got to make my second selection (except perhaps Gonchar who isn't as good as the true 1st tier guys but is better than the 2nd tiers).

Boyle is a solid-enough all-round player to make a very credible #4 at even strength if need be. I don't see why guys like Reinhart and Persson go over Boyle anymore. I think he's comparable to them on the PP, and more effective at even strength.

And most importantly, recent history has shown - Dan Boyle just helps teams win games.

The Resume

-Norris voting record: 4th (2007), 5th (2009), 6th (2010), ? (2011)
-Second Team All Star in 2007, 2009
-All Star Games in 2009, 2011
-Right handed shot on the PP

Since Boyle's breakout season in 2002-03, these are the top scorers among defensemen:

1. Lidstrom 474
2. Gonchar 408
3. Boyle 385
4. XXX 375
5. Rafalski 373
6. Niedermayer 357

Brief Synopsis of his Career

-Boyle emerged as a legit offensive threat from the blueline in 2002-03, scoring 53 points in 77 games, good enough for 5th among defensemen, behind MacInnis, Gonchar, Lidstrom, and Zubov.

-In 2003-04, Boyle's offense took a step back, but he improved defensively quite a bit. He was the primary puck mover on Tampa Bay's Cup winning team. Joe Pelletier felt that Boyle was "the straw that stirred Tampa Bay's drink."

-In 2005-06 and 2006-07 were two more solid seasons for Boyle in Tampa Bay, as he continued to be excellent offensively, while playing decently well defensively. Tampa Bay as a team was fairly mediocre in these years though.

-In 2007-08, Boyle had a freak injury, cutting his arm badly with a skate blade. Tampa Bay went from mediocre to horrendous, and Boyle struggled to get his defensive game back when he returned.

-Tampa Bay traded Boyle to San Jose before 08-09. Boyle made a huge impact on the team, immediately after joining. San Jose went from one of the better teams in the league, to a team that for all intents and purposes clinched the President's Trophy with months left in the season. Media reports widely credited the acquisition of Boyle with making San Jose just that much better. I really hope I don't need to post sources for something that recent do I?

-San Jose failed in the playoffs, but I don't think you can blame Boyle, who has 18 points in 21 playoff games with San Jose over 2 seasons.

-Boyle was selected by Steve Yzerman to QB Canada's PP in the 2010 Olympics, mainly because he was better defensively than the other guy (and thus not a liability at even strength).

This is what Joe Pelleter said about Boyle when he picked his Team Canada prior to the 2009-10 season:

Quote:
4. Dan Boyle - I just love Dan Boyle's game. He's almost a Niedermayer clone. I am not seeing the down side. I always felt he was the straw that stirred the drink in Tampa, and he can be counted on to be an impact player for Team Canada.
Decent longevity as an impact player by now

Sure, Boyle has his 2 2nd Team All-Star selections. I think we all know that AS teams are less reliable post-expansion as writers rely more on stats and less on watching guys play (because there are too many teams to watch everyone a lot). But I think we all see that Boyle developed into a solid all-round impact player.

Anyway, the final question about Boyle (and any active player): Did he play long enough to be worthy of his spot (in this case, a #4 defenseman)? I think he has.

-Leo Reise, Jr. and Glen Harmon were the last 2 defensemen with 2 2nd Team All Star nods to be selected before Boyle.

-Not including Reise's 6 games played in 45-46, he has 8 full seasons as an NHL defenseman.

-Glen Harmon basically has 8 1/2 seasons as an NHL defenseman.

-Dan Boyle is working on his 10th season as an full time NHL defenseman (not including 2 seasons with a handful of games for Florida at the beginning of his career).

-Boyle is working on his 8th full season since his breakout year in 2002-03.

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03-09-2011, 08:45 AM
  #115
BraveCanadian
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With their tenth round pick (386) in the 2011 ATD, the Guelph Platers have selected: Dave Poulin, C






Quote:
Dave Poulin was one of the best hockey players of the 1980s. Problem was not many people knew it then, and few remember that now.
- Greatest Hockey Legends


Career Highlights:
Stanley Cup Finalist 1985, 1987, 1990
1986-87 Frank Selke Trophy winner
1992-93 King Clancy Memorial Trophy winner
6th in career shorthanded goals with 39
Played the NHL All Star game 1986, 1988.
Captain of the Philadelphia Flyers 1984-1989.
Member of NHL All Stars for Rendez-vous '87.


Vitals:
Born: December 17, 1958.
Position: C
Height: 5-11
Weight: 190 lbs
Shoots: Left.



Regular Season:
Two time 30 goal scorer and 3 time 70+ point scorer.
1986-87 Selke Trophy Winner.
Played two allstar games.



Playoffs:
Stanley Cup Finalist in 1985, 1987 & 1990. 1985 & 1987 with the Flyers and 1990 with the Bruins.
Lost each finals appearance to the dynasty Edmonton Oilers.
Captain of the 85 and 87 Flyers teams.


Quotations and Perspective:

Quote:
"I took a great deal of pride in my defence. And defence to me is like cleaning. It’s hard work. If you have a willingness to learn and a willingness to do it, you can do it. And I took a great deal of pride in that. Some nights, driving to the rink, knowing the next three hours every time Gretzky stepped on the ice you were out there. The last year in my division, I had Eric Lindros eight times, I had Mario Lemieux eight times, I had Mark Messier in New York eight times and then I had Adam Oates on my nights off. But I took a great deal of pride in being out there when they were out there."
- Dave Poulin (source Greatest Hockey Legends)

Quote:
Poulin was a great hockey player. He didn't score many goals and when he did they weren't pretty. He was an unheralded defensive center who was always shadowing the opposition's top gun. He was always on the ice when the game was on the line, taking key faceoffs and blocking point shots. He was the ultimate team player who was never fully appreciated by the fans or media when he played, and will likely be forgotten about over time.
- Legends of Hockey

Quote:
The NHL thought that the sheer talent on its forward lines, great puck-handlers like Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux and Mark Messier, would generate the necessary offense. In addition, because the Soviets dictate that a great portion of the game be played without the puck, the league formed a checking line of Dave Poulin, Kevin Dineen and Dale Hawerchuk to stop the Soviets' big guns: Sergei Makarov, Vladimir Krutov and Igor Larionov, a unit that has been among the best in the world since 1981. Team NHL was fervently hoping to escape the first period of Wednesday night's game in a scoreless tie so that the players could get their feet under them.

From the theatrical opening ceremonies—the Red Army Choir, the Harvard Glee Club and a choir from Quebec City engaged in dueling anthems (the Red Army Choir won)—to Poulin's game-winning goal with 1:15 left, this game was a classic, everything that hockey can be.
- Sivault E.M. Swift Feb 23, 1987.

Quote:
It was probably during the 1985 playoffs that the Flyers realized that as good as Poulin was offensively, his true value was as a defensive specialist. The Ontario native's hockey sense and smarts allowed him to anticipate plays excellently, both in the offensive and defensive zones. His speed and good hands helped mold him into one of the league's finest penalty killers. Though not an overly imposing figure, Poulin played a physical game, initiating contact intelligently. He was also strong in the faceoff circle and a willing shot blocker. In short, there was nothing that this one time captain would (not) do to win. Though he was quiet in execution, his intensity and heart made him a leader both on and off the ice.

Although his offensive production slipped slightly because of his role as the third line center, Poulin actually gained more acclaim. He was named to the NHL all star games in both 1986 and 1988 and played for the NHL all stars against the Soviets in Rendez'vous 87. He also won the Frank J Selke trophy in 1987 as a reward for his defensive excellence.

1987 may have been Poulin's best year. He scored 25 goals and 70 points and as mentioned play in Rendez'vous and won the Selke. He also helped Philadelphia reach the Finals in 1987 where the Flyers took the heavily favored Edmonton Oilers to 7 games in one of the best Stanley Cup finals in memory. Poulin's job was to cover Gretzky or Messier, which ever guy he was out against at that time. The Flyers very well might have won that series if they had two Dave Poulins - one to cover Gretz and one to cover Mess!

"People call ’87 one of the greatest Cup Finals of all time. We lost to a team that may have had nine Hall of Famers. We were missing our top scorer in Tim Kerr, we were missing top players all along the way and we kept battling. A 3-1 game … Glenn Anderson scores in the last minute to make it 3-1." Poulin recollects painfully. "We were as close to a Stanley Cup as you can get without winning one."

Midway through the 1989-90 campaign, Poulin was traded to the Boston Bruins in exchange for Kenny LInseman.. Again his solid two-way play helped his team reach the Cup Finals but the Bruins eventually fell short to the Edmonton Oilers. It was Dave's third trip to the Finals, and the third time he came up short. He never would win the Cup.
- Greatest Hockey Legends



Last edited by BraveCanadian: 03-09-2011 at 08:51 AM.
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Old
03-10-2011, 03:22 PM
  #116
Velociraptor
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Brenden Morrow, LW

Position: Left Wing
HT/WT: 6'0", 210 lbs
Shoots: Left



- Captain of the Dallas Stars (2006-present)
- Won Olympic Gold with Canada in 2010.
- 219 goals, 480 regular season points in 734 games played. (Still active)
- 17 goals, 42 playoff points in 78 games played. " "

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
On the international stage, Morrow was a member of Canada's World Junior silver medal team in 1999, is a four-time member of its World Championship team (2001, 2002, 2004 and 2005) and was part of the Canadian team that captured gold on home soil at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey News
ASSETS: Knows how to handle the physical game and is a natural leader. Will pay the price to score goals and also has sound defensive qualities.

CAREER POTENTIAL: Excellent complementary winger and leader.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre LeBrun
The hope in these Olympic tournaments is your team improves with each and every game.

Brenden Morrow is fitting that bill to a tee.

The Dallas Stars captain began the tourney as almost a spare part on Team Canada. But as the games have gotten bigger, he has gradually seen his role increase, throwing his weight around with great effectiveness against Russia in the quarterfinals and Slovakia on Friday night on a line with Anaheim Ducks stars XXXX XXXXXX and XXXXX XXXXX, it just so happens those two Ducks have played their best hockey with Morrow, who scored Canada's second goal Friday night in the 3-2 semifinal win over Slovakia.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Babcock
He's one of those guys that's got real good hockey sense, but he's satisfied to be a grinder on this team
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Babcock, after Canada's semi-final win over Slovakia
I thought he played real strong tonight... He's added energy. And XXXXXXX and XXXXX have been way better since he got there. He got the energy level up for them. He's an important player. He's been great. Everybody has had a way to make a contribution, but I think he's different than a lot of the skill guys we brought, and that's why we brought him, because of the grit."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas Morning News, May 6, 2008
Now you should fully understand why the Stars put the captain's C on Brenden Morrow's sweater.

See, it was never really about anything Mike Modano wasn't doing, though management certainly bungled the transition. Instead, it had everything to do with what Morrow could potentially do when placed in the ultimate leadership position.

He proved that during the Stars' 4-2 series win over San Jose, which ended in the wee hours of the night.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean-Jacques Taylor, Dallas Morning News
Brenden Morrow has played in the NHL's Western Conference finals.

He's won important playoff games and series and huge regular-season games.

None of those victories came remotely close to matching the joy - his word, not mine - he experienced after Sidney Crosby's goal gave Canada a 3-2 win over the United States and an Olympic gold medal.

Morrow played an important role in Canada winning the goal medal. He scored goals in each of the first two medal-round games by creating space for himself in front of the net and deflecting shots into the goal.

Morrow, the Stars' captain, helped give this star-studded team grit. It's among the reasons Canada didn't panic after giving up the tying goal with just 24.4 seconds left in regulation.

Once it did, Morrow became a part of Canadian hockey history.

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Old
03-10-2011, 04:47 PM
  #117
BillyShoe1721
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LW Fred "Smokey" Harris



4x PCHA 1st-Team All Star(1913, 1916, 1919, 1920
1x PCHA 2nd-Team All Star(1922)
4x PCHA Champion
2x 1st in PCHL in Playoff Scoring(1916, 1921)
1.63PIM/game in combined top pro leagues
156 goals, 90 assists in 252 career PCHA games
3 goals, 1 assist in 6 career NHL games

Quote:
To illustrate this, I will turn to seventies Consistency in Goalscoring and playmaking studies. The reason being is that these studies DO account for the split-league era Harris played in. If you place 4th in PCHA assists, for example, it will likely show up as a top-10 under the playmaking category in seventies studies, and not a top-5. It allows for a rather level playing field when comparing players like Harris to more modern players.

Now, Harris's numbers in these studies:

Top 2's-Top 5's-Top 10's- Top 15's- Top 20's

Playmaking- 2-3-4-6-7

Goal Scoring-0-0-1-3-7

Total: 2-3-5-9-14
http://hfboards.com/showpost.php?p=2...3&postcount=76

Quote:
Wilfred "Smokey" Harris played six games for the Boston Bruins in 1924-25. He spent the bulk of his long pro career in the PCHA and the California Pro circuit.

The native of Port Arthur, Ontario spent his first 13 pro seasons in the PCHA, mostly with the Vancouver Millionaires. He was a member of four PCHA champions, three in Vancouver and one in Portland. In 1916 he was the top scorer in the post-season when he helped the Portland Rosebuds capture the PCHA crown and repeated this performance five years later for the champion Vancouver Millionaires.

Harris split the 1924-25 season between the Bruins and the WCHL's Vancouver Maroons. He played his first California League season with Richfield Oil in 1925-26 then spent a year in the Prairie League with the Edmonton Eskimos. He then returned to the California loop for five years before retiring in 1932.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=12866

Quote:
The Trail says he was a good skater and stickhandler
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t...harris&page=11

Quote:
Fred "Smokey" Harris and xxx led the Millionaires, who "showed wonderful stamina and skated at a terrific pace.
http://books.google.com/books?id=vxP...ed=0CDEQ6AEwAQ

Quote:
The Adams brothers probably would have been starters on any other team in the west coast league or the NHL, but the Millionaires boasted a lineup that made rival coaches drool in envy. Skinner, Smokey Harris, the master hook-checker...
http://books.google.com/books?id=84D...ed=0CDcQ6AEwAw

Quote:
Smokey Harris played only six games in his NHL career, toward the end of a very successful pro career.
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ca0a448a12a938

Quote:
Fred Harris, the roughest and toughest boy in the league
http://books.google.com/books?id=P4x...harris&f=false

Quote:
The highest-salaried hockey players in the world will show their skill to New York hockey fans at St... Fred Harris, xxx, and xxx. ...
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ad8e1c4fcfb156

Quote:
Fred Harris, veteran of the old Pacific Coast League.played his first game of the season hereand was given a cordial hand by admirers
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ad8e1c4fcfb156

Quote:
Frank Boucher, Mickey MacKay, and Smokey Harris, three tricky performers, rank high in the esteem of the coast admirers...

Boucher is turning in a big year with the Patricks and Harris as usual has been driving ahead with his regular speed and usual fighting form.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Hollywood at present is in second place in the California Hockey League, ... including those two high scorers, xxx and "Smokey" Harris
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ad8e1c4fcfb156

Quote:
Local hockey fans are expecting "Smoky" Harris and Austin Cresawell to resume their bitter feud and to- morrow night their every move will be watched
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ad8e1c4fcfb156

Quote:
Time after time, Benedict saved in remarkable style terrific shots from the sticks of Mickey MacKay, Alf Skinner, Smokey Harris, Lloyd Cook, and others.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Smokey Harris is the most notable in the Hollywood lineup
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ad8e1c4fcfb156

Quote:
A lineup consisting of Smokey Harris veteran of many campaigns
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ad8e1c4fcfb156

Quote:
Smoky Harris star forward of the Maroons and formerly with the Regina ...
http://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks...ad8e1c4fcfb156

Quote:
Harris went on for Frank Boucher, his heavy body checking was immediately felt by Ottawa forwards.

Harris, MacKay, and Parkes held the puck in centre area for a considerable time and worked through at intervals for 3 hard drives on Benedict.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...r+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
This will give the Maroons Cooks, Duncan, Harris and Patrick to choose from in building their defense.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+hockey&hl=en


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 03-11-2011 at 07:19 PM.
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Old
03-10-2011, 11:22 PM
  #118
overpass
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Dan Bain, C


Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
the muscular Bain provided scoring, playmaking and a physical presence to two Stanley Cup championship squads. Along with his great skills on ice, he was blessed with natural leadership qualities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
He first played top-level hockey with the Victorias of the Manitoba Hockey League in 1895, quickly establishing himself as an outstanding center and valuable team leader.
...
Bain proved to be the overtime hero in the second match. In the process the skillful forward made history by registering the first-ever extra-time Cup-winning goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbc.ca: Hockey: A people's history
One of Canada's first great athletes, Donald H. (Dan) Bain went on to become hockey's original overtime hero.
...
Considered one of the finest playmakers of the pre-NHL era, the muscular Bain scored the Stanley Cup-winning goal in Winnipeg's stunning upset of the mighty Montreal Victorias in 1896 – the first time a team from outside Montreal won hockey's most coveted prize.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultimate Hockey
Besides being a fabulous skater, the muscular, mustachioed Bain was a sure stickhandler who possessed a superb, heavy shot and a knack for setting up goals. He excelled in the physical aspects of the game and was known throughout Canada as a brilliant all-around "hockeyist." The only quality he seemed to lack was patience with those unable to keep up with him in a game. In the early 1960s, he was interviewed at his country cottage, and he had a few choice words regarding the modern game of hockey: "They can't stick-handle or pass in today's game. I can't stand to watch it! When we passed in my day on the ice, the puck never left the ice and if a wing-man wasn't there to receive the pass, it was because he had a broken leg."
-Inaugural member of the HHOF in 1945
-6'0", 185 lbs in the 1890s was very big.
- Named the toughest player and finest athlete of the 1890's by the Ultimate Hockey book

-Won the Stanley Cup in 1896, 1901.
-Captain of the Winnipeg Victorias
-Bain scored the Cup winning goal in 1896 to make the Victorias the first non-Montreal team to win the Cup. Before this victory, hockey was largely considered an eastern Canadian game.
- Bain also scored the Cup winning goal in 1901, this time in overtime, making him “hockey’s original overtime hero.”

-10 goals in 11 Cup challenge games
-66 goals in 27 Manitoba league games / 3 times the scoring leader

-Voted Canada's athlete of the second half of the 19th century
- “Honoured Member” of the Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
- excelled at multiple sports and won his last figure skating title at age 56, a testament to his skating ability (thanks MadArcand)
-Arguably the best mustache in hockey history

-in 1944 before the inaugural class was announced, the following players were considered “nearly certain” to be in the first class: Georges Vezina, Hod Stuart, Howie Morenz, Tommy Phillips, Cyclone Taylor, Russell Bowie, Dan Bain, Frank McGee. Source = http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...winnipeg&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun, 1932
WHOSE THE GREATEST HOCKEY STAR? (Summary of first 3 paragraphs: Everyone in the East things Howie Morenz is the greatest player ever. But how could he be as good as the guys who played back in the good old days of seven man hockey when players had to play the full 60 minutes? The old timers prefer Tommy Phillips, who could do everything).

Coast fans, who didn't get an opportunity to see the old-time easterners in action, find it hard to believe that anyone could be better than Fred "Cyclone" Taylor or Mickey MacKay were in their day. They were wonderful players too. Then there was Frank McGee of the famous Ottawa Silver Seven, and we can go right back as far as Dan Bain, a rushing, hard-shooting, forward of the Winnipeg Victorias and (description of undrafted player removed), both prominent in the early days of Stanley Cup history.
Thanks to MadArcand - most of this material was shamelessly copied from his excellent bio.
Thanks to TheDevilMadeMe - I scooped Bain from him, and he sent me the bio material that he had prepared, some of which was from MadArcand's bio and some of which was new.

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Old
03-11-2011, 08:29 AM
  #119
BraveCanadian
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With their eleventh round pick (415) in the 2011 ATD, the Guelph Platers have selected: Rene Robert, RW






Quote:
Robert would hustle into the corners and more often than not come out with the puck. He was skilled enough to be able to do something with that puck too, often setting up his two marksmen linemates. His constant hustle and try not only made Perreault and Martin better players, but also made the Sabres into a true contender.
- Greatest Hockey Legends


Career Highlights:
Stanley Cup Finalist 1975.
2nd Team All Star (Post Season) 1975.
2 time 40 goal scorer.
100 point scorer.
Played the NHL All Star game 1973, 1975.


Vitals:
Born: December 31, 1948.
Position: RW
Height: 5-10
Weight: 184 lbs
Shoots: Right.



Regular Season:
Two time 40 goal scorer and reached a peak of 100 points.
2nd Team All Star 1975.
Played two allstar games.




Playoffs:
Stanley Cup Finalist in 1975.
22 Goals and 41 Points in 50 career playoff games.


Quotations and Perspective:

Quote:
The knock against Robert had always been that he was moody and difficult to handle at times. Some even suggested he rode on the coattails of Perreault and Martin. Robert's quick adjustment to new teams and situations during his career dispelled this opinion.
- Legends of Hockey

Quote:
"After I got Robert, and looked at some of the guys he had to work with, I'd feel sorry for the guy,” added Cherry. "He blocked shots, threw his weight around and fought. He even played though he had a broken thumb, a separated shoulder and a pulled groin! Considering our collection of players, I wouldn't have blamed Robert if he had just thrown in the towel, but he wouldn't quit."
- Don Cherry (source Greatest Hockey Legends)

Quote:
Rene Robert was an important offensive weapon. The right wing on the French Connection Line with Gilbert Perreault and Richard Martin, Robert reached the 20-goal mark eight straight years between 1972-73 and 1979-80. Possessing blinding speed and a lethal shot, Robert was a fine complement to the slick playmaking of Gilbert Perreault.
- Legends of Hockey

Quote:
Quit was the one thing Robert would never do. He never forgot how hard he had to work to make the NHL, and to work twice as hard to reach the dizzying heights that he achieved. As long as Robert laced up the skates, no one on the ice could out hustle him. Hard work and a little luck were Robert's trademarks.
- Greatest Hockey Legends


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Old
03-11-2011, 09:12 PM
  #120
EagleBelfour
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With our 12th selection, the 477th overall selection in this year All-Time draft, the Detroit Falcons are extremely please to select RW/C Vladimir Ivanovich Vikulov



Russian Name: Владимир Викулов
Nickname: Slalom Racer
Height: 5'9''
Weight: 176 lbs
Position: Right Wing / Centre
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: July 20, 1946
Place of Birth: Moscow , USSR

Soviet League Champion (1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1979)
Soviet League Finalist (1967, 1969)
Soviet First All-Star Team (1970, 1971, 1972)
Soviet Second All-Star Team (1967, 1968, 1969)
Soviet Third All-Star Team (1966)
Best Sniper Award (1972)
Trud Daily Award (Best Line) (1972)
Olympics Gold Medalist (1968, 1972)
IIHF WEC-A Gold Medalist (1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1975)
IIHF WEC-A Silver Medalist (1972)
IIHF WEC-A Bronze Medalist (1976)
IIHF WEC-A All Star Team1 (1971, 1972)
Russian Hockey Hall of Fame (1967)
1- The best 3 forwards were selected on the team, independently of their respective position

Domestic League:

SeasonsGPGAPTSPIM
16444283149421134
No Data:
Game Played: 1965-1967
Assists: 1965-1971
Penalty minutes: 1965-71


Top-10 Scoring (2th, 2th, 4th, 6th, 6th, 7th, 9th, 9th, 10th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (1st, 3rd, 4th, 8th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 10th, 10th)
Top-10 Assists (2nd, 3rd, 3rd, 5th, 8th)

- His scoring finishes are affected negatively due to not having his assists record from the 1964-65 season to the 1970-71 season


International Games:

(Exhibition Game, Olympics & World Championship)
Games by Opposing Countries
----CountryGPG
Canada4014
Sweden3814
Finland3524
Czechoslovakia347
United States1512
West Germany1414
Poland99
East Germany65
Switzerland24
Italy13
Japan12


World Championship:

# ParticipationGPGAPTSPIM
75845267110
No Data:
Assists: 1975


Years in Detail:

YearsGPG#A#PTS#PIM
1965-66748th221st617th2
1966-67765th66th125th6
1968-699238th410th1021st0
1969-701093rd57th145th0
1970-711064th58th115th0
1971-7210121st (+8.3%)417th162nd0
1974-755614thX X 0


Olympics:

In the 1960's and 1970's, no professional hockey player from North America were playing in the Olympics. Therefore, the World Championship and the Olympics should be viewed as equal tournaments in term of quality.

# ParticipationGPGAPTSPIM
212714212

Years in Detail:

YearGPG#A#PTS#PIM
19687232nd101st (+30%)122nd2
1972554th45th96th0


Other Tournament:

1972 Summit Series
YearGPG#A#PTS#PIM
1972629th125th319th0

1974 Summit Series
YearGPG#A#PTS#PIM
197440X44th46th0
- Results versus his own teammate only

1976 Canada Cup
YearGPG#A#PTS#PIM
1977444th317th77th0


Awards Nomination:

Most Valuable Player

SeasonsRanking
1969-704th
1970-712nd
1971-723rd
1973-7411th
1974-7511th
1975-7610th
1976-779th
1977-7815th
- The award was first presented in the 1967-68 season
- Outside the top-5, no information was available for the 1967-68 and 1968-69 season



Top-10 MVP of the 1970s
#Player
1Valeri Kharlamov
2Vladislav Tretiak
3Alexander Maltsev
4Boris Mikhailov
5Vladimir Vikulov
6Vladimir Petrov
7Valery Vasiliev
8Alexander Yakushev
9Helmut Balderis
10Vladimir Shadrin

Quote:
Originally Posted by chidlovski.com
Vladimir Vikulov was an extremely skillful and creative forward with slick stick handling, impressive 1-on-1 techniques, rapid and accurate shots on goal and well-catered assists on goals scored by his partners.

Many famous players enjoyed the opportunity to play in one line with Vikulov considered one of the best Soviet playmakers in the 1960's and 1970's. The list of his career linemates included such world class individuals as Anatoly Firsov and Victor Polupanov, Valery Kharlamov and Alexander Maltsev, Boris Alexandrov and Victor Zhluktov.

Overall, Vikulov was arguably one of the classiest Soviet forwards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur Chidlovski
5. Valery Kharlamov - Anatoly Firsov - Vladimir Vikulov
Team USSR and CSKA
Early 1970s

They didn't play very long together. One of the top offensive lines of the late 1960s, Firsov-Polupanov-Vikulov lost its center. Legendary Tarasov tried various players to replace Polupanov. Finally, he added Kharlamov to the famous linemates. "We didn't have to explain much to Valery," remembered Firsov. "It just clicked." Born out of Tarasov's experiments and attempts to extend hockey career of aging Red Army stars, the line is mostly remembered for its performance at the '72 Olympics. With Tarasov's retirement, Firsov left Team USSR and the Kharlamov-Maltsev-Vikulov line at the '72 Summit Series was a quick fixer-upper for a promising line.

6. Boris Alexandrov - Victor Zhluktov - Vladimir Vikulov
Team USSR and CSKA
Mid 1970s

They were the second line with the Red Army club and, briefly, with Team USSR in the 1970s. Small and speedy, Alexandrov had a promising scoring touch. Never mind his small size - no giant defenseman was an authority to Alexandrov when he was free-wheeling to the net. Vikulov had great soft hands and incredible playmaking talent. Zhluktov was not a magnificent player but served as a very solid and reliable backbone of the line.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
During the Summit Series of 1972 that pitted Canadian professionals against Russian counterparts, the most dangerous Soviet line was comprised of Vladimir Vikulov, Alexander Matsev and Valeri Kharlamov.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chidlovski.com
One of the best Russian playmakers of the 1970s, slick stick-handler and tactician, accurate passer and sniper, mastered European style hockey, not as impressive vs. hard-hitting Canadian style hockey and not as fast as most of his teammates.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier's Greatest Hockey Legend
This allowed Tarasov to experiment with what was known as "the System." Instead of two conventional defenders backing up three forwards, Tarasov created a five man unit with only one true defender, the great Alexander Ragulin. Vladimir Vikulov and Anatoli Firsov were the explosive forwards, while Viktor Polupanov and Ivanov served as "semi-defensemen," almost like a mid-fielder in soccer. They would roam both ends of the ice, creating odd man situations in both the offensive and defensive zones. Ivanov's ability in both ends led to this revolutionary though still uncommon strategy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by peoples.ru
[Vikulov] demonstrated the ability to be an excellent passer at any speed, had a very precise shot with a quick release and had great dangling ability (it's hard to translate "obvodka" - it means not only stickhandling ability, but ability to skate by his opponent, also a combination of stickhandling and skating ability), because of which was known as "slalom racer" since his juniors days

During his time with CSKA he was known as most tricky soviet forward. His moves were always a surprise for his opponents. *
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1972SummitSeries.com A September to Remember
Later in the period Vladimir Vikulov capitalized from the slot while Team Canada's defenders were hopelessly out of position.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers Alumni: Bobby Clarke
The series was looking more and more like an embarrassment for Team Canada. The Canadians arrived in Moscow one game down on their opponents. After the first game at the Luzhniki Sports Palace, the gap doubled. A mistake by Clarke in the final minutes of the game cost the Canadians a tie. He was trying to control the puck near the boards and shot a pass to his partner, Rod Seiling. But Valeri Kharlamov intercepted the pass and flipped the puck to Vladimir Vikulov, who beat Tony Esposito at the net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sun (09/10/1976)
Vladimir Vikulov fired a strong wrist shot from the top Of the right face-Off circle that went, over Curran's shoulder at 2.41 of the second period.
Quotes:

''Vladimir Vikulov's winning goal in the first game in Moscow should have been historic. His goal almost guaranteed victory in the series. Everybody thought the same, including the Soviet players. Unfortunately, the Canadian players did not feel this way. They showed us that it's too early to celebrate victory.'' - Oleg Spassky, Russian Soviet coach

- ''I remember the opening faceoff. I knew this faceoff was symbolic. I didn't know why, but I really wanted to win it. At the last second, I decided not to fight for the puck. I thought it would look strange.'' - Vladimir Vikulov, remembering the 1974 Summit Series opening faceoff

- ''On the other hand - well, I was now playing side by side with Anatoly Firsov and Vladimir Vikulov, teammates who ruled out the possibility of playing badly right out. I have learned a lot and benefited greatly from playing in a new group.'' - Valeri Kharlamov

- ''In virtually every match Vikulov and Firsov demonstrate their creativity, improvise, and confound the opponent with one riddle after another - they were also doing a great deal of work, and very eagerly so, pulling back whenever they would lose the puck. So if I had played more offensively with my former partners (Petrov and Mikhailov), caring little about defence, now that I was on ice alongside such eminent players, it would be embarrassing to carry on playing instead of going back and helping them. To play any different from how they played or to work any less on the rink would be tantamount to disrespecting them.'' - Valeri Kharlamov


Fun and Interesting Facts:

- Vladimir Vikulov was an assistant captain in the 1976 Canada Cup
- In the 1972 Summit Series, Vladmir Vikulov and Phil Esposito took the ceremonial faceoff in Montreal
- In the 1972 Summit Series, Vikulov two goals of the series, in game four and game five, were both game winning goals
- Although it is unknown how many games Vikulov played at the centre position, he did played at that position at some point in 1974, alongside left winger Sergei Kapustin and right winger Vyacheslav Anisin


Abbreviation:
IIHF: International Ice Hockey Federation
WEC-A: World & European Championship Pool A


YouTube Videos:


(At 7:40)

Internet Sites:
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...layer_id=45700
http://www.chidlovski.net/1954/54_pl....asp?p_id=v004
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...oster/ru18.htm
http://www.1972summitseries.com/vikulov.html
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...ners/index.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Vikulov
http://www.flyersalumni.org/clarke.htm
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t=593025
http://www.bmsi.ru/doc/ca5414a6-4810...79ac3752/print
http://english.ruvr.ru/2008/07/02/201174.html
http://www.1972summitseries.com/game4recap.html
http://www.bmsi.ru/doc/ca5414a6-4810...79ac3752/print
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/html/ind05kharlamov.htm
http://www.peoples.ru/sport/hockey/vikulov/
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...y/sumvp70s.htm

*Translation from Russian by DoMakc

Special Thank You: DoMakc, Triffy, Sturminator, VanIslander, VMBM


Last edited by EagleBelfour: 03-26-2011 at 11:51 PM.
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Old
03-13-2011, 06:00 AM
  #121
Nalyd Psycho
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Lloyd Cook


PCHA First Team All-Star: 1920, 1921, 1923
PCHA Second Team All-Star: 1916, 1918, 1919

Quotes on his overall game:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Nov 9, 1921
Lloyd Cooke, one of the world's most practical puck-chasers and master technician in the great sport, will lead the Vancouver team on the ice this winter.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Nov 7, 1920
Lloyd Cook will again be found at his old stand on the defence, knocking 'em cuckoo as they tear down the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Nov 12, 1922
No extravagant claims have been made for the team, but fans can depend upon Lloyd Cook to instill a spirit of "never-say-die" into its ranks which will carry the club a long way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Nov 27, 1922
Lloyd Cook has been doing all the heavy work for Vancouver to date. He has been the big defensive and offensive star of the locals.
Individual game quotes:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spokane Daily Chronicle - Jan 6, 1917
Lloyd Cooke and Sibby Nichols were on top of their games and skated like demons through-out the contest, covering, checking and shooting with great accuracy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Spokesman-Review - Jan 9, 1917
The contest was not without its fight, big Lloyd Cook and Riley staging a little sparring match of their own 10 minutes before the close. Cook was sent to the bench for the rest of the game and fined $5.

That there was not more stick battles was the wonder, for the game was featered all the way through by sharp checking, slashing and bumping, Genge and Cook being the principal offenders.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Dec 30, 1922
Vancouver got off to a lead in the first period when Cook beat Fowler with his famous backhand flip from the right.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald - Mar 21, 1918
They showed they were a two-man team--MacKay and Cook... Cook was steady as a rock on defensive and his rushes were conspicuous during the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Spokesman-Review - Jan 6, 1917
Lloyd Cook played his customary consistent game, holding up his end in flawless style.
Quotes about Cook and Duncan's overall game:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Dec 17, 1920
With the best defence in the league still intact and ready for the openning game at the Arena on Monday night, local fans are picking the home team to win the first struggle. Cook and Duncan are stopping onrushes of their team mates in a manner that forebodes ill for any other opposition.

Art Duncan is going good: so is his co-defence, Lloyd Cook. The pair stack up as a formidable barrier right from the jump.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - Mar 16, 1922
They will find the Vancouvers dangerous opponents in every particular, and they will see a defense that is particularly hard to fathom in Art Duncan, Lloyd Cook and Hugh Lehman.
Individual game quotes of Cooks and Duncan:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Mar 4, 1922
The five-man defense of the Millionaires was always up there, always intact and always properly set. Once in a while they'd let Mickey Mackay or Cook or Duncan go down with the puck, but always two men would drop back to take his place and the break the Mets sought for was impossible.

Seldom do hockey fans get such an exhibition of defensive brilliancy as the Millionaires showed them tonight and the big house rocked with shrieks as the Mets piled in time after time trying to break down that board wall.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Mar 7, 1922
Over 8000 raving fans saw Lloyd Cook and his huskies present a five-man bulwark over which the Mets could not hurdle.

Vancouver's five-man defence arrayed against the three-man rushes of the Mets was effective as the French defence at Verdun.

During the closing minutes of play Cook's men did everything they knew to keep the puck away from their net.

Cook and Duncan had the Mets talking to themselves before the first period was halfway through.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Mar 13, 1922
Duncan and Cook teamed up in wonderful style, checked and rushed like fiends and were easily the pick of both teams.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun - Dec 30, 1922
Cook and Duncan played hard all night but none of the others seemed to be up to the scratch.
Separating this last one for additional comment:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette - Mar 27, 1922
Duncan and Cook were only fair and the St. pats penetrated them more on Saturday night than they had in any of the other games.
This was from a game report of 6-0 shellacking. Everyone has bad games, but it's telling that poor defence from Duncan and Cook was noteworthy and a change of pace.

Overall Impressions:
First off, some quotes probably refer to Cook the coach. More was written about him as a coach then as a player, so I did my best.

Reading lots of game reports two things stand out. (I can provide links if needed.)
1. Lots of specific mentions of Cook breaking up defensive plays. Very few mentions of being burned. Only one or two mentions of him rushing per game.
2. Enough to be noteworthy mentions of his shots taking weird bounces and scoring. I can't tell if he was a lucky player or a master of the knuckle puck.

The cannon impression of Cook as a rushing d-man with limited defence is just flat out wrong. If anything, he was a stay at home defenceman who would pinch whenever he saw the chance. But that sets up discussion about the Millionaires' system. I apologize for not getting quotes for this. But the Millionaires seemed to ignore traditional positions. Cook and Duncan were given free reign to rush and play like wingers. While Vancouver's wingers and centers would fall back and play like defencemen. There was always two players playing the role of the defenceman, it just wasn't necessarily their defencemen. I think of this as being sort of like the triangle offence in basketball. It can be super effective if you have a tight group who play together a long time and know how to make it work. But adjustments in personnel create periods of difficult adjustment. The type of thing that would work when players often played 60 minutes a game, not in an era of 20 player teams. But more importantly, I believe the Vancouver Millionaire's system inflated Cook and Duncan's scoring totals. They could score like that if they played like Coffey or Housley, but they didn't, they always made sure that someone had their back. And the system encouraged that happening, thus allowing them to play like an all offence defenceman without actually being one. Given all the quotes about them being key defensive players, I believe they would sacrifice offence for defence without the safety net of players like Mickey MacKay. I also think having both Duncan and Cook together increased both of their production because it made it harder to defend against when opponents didn't know who would rush and how much they'd commit to it. The most logical assessment of Lloyd Cook is that of a gritty defensive defenceman who is not an elite shutdown guy, but is a deceptively effective puck rusher whenever an opening arises.

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Old
03-13-2011, 10:27 AM
  #122
Velociraptor
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Ian Turnbull, D

Position: Defenseman
HT/WT: 6'0", 200 lbs
Shoots: Left
Nickname(s): "Bull"



- Turnbull is the only defenseman to ever score 5 goals in one game, against Detroit on February 2nd, 1977
- 123 goals, 440 regular season points in 628 games played.
- 13 goals, 45 playoff points in 55 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Ian Turnbull was a talented NHL defenseman. He had a flare for offense though at times was an adventure in his own zone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Also having had cup of teas with Los Angeles and Pittsburgh, Turnbull is best remembered for scoring goals, often in spectacular bunches.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Bobby Orr he certainly was not, even though there were some unreasonable expectations of such placed upon him by some when he first broke into the league. After two years of learning the ropes Ian found his niche in his 3rd NHL season, 1975-76. Ian exploded for 20 goals and 56 points. Turnbull, the 15th overall draft choice in 1973, was finally putting up good numbers. His production was a tremendous help for Borje Salming, the Leafs undisputed number one defenseman. Now the opposition teams had another pointman to worry about.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The following season Turnbull stepped it up another notch, scoring a career high 22 goals, 57 points and 79 points, as well as recording a fine +47 defensive rating. Five of Turnbull's 22 goals came on the memorable night of February 2, 1977. Turnbull became the first and so far only defenseman to score 5 goals in a game, as the Leafs beat Detroit 9-1. However "Bull" was a big part of the Maple Leafs playoff success in 1978 as the Leafs upset the heavily favored New York Islanders. In 13 post season games Turnbull scored 6 times and added 10 assists! To make his post season even more impressive was the fact that Salming, the Leafs blueline stud, missed most of the playoff run with an injury. Turnbull really upped his game that spring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Throughout his career in hockey, Ian Turnbull was a natural, rushing defenseman and puck-handler who knew what to do in the other guy's end of the rink. He started out in the youth hockey programs of Montreal where he quickly discovered that he was naturally better at the sport than most of the other kids around the neighborhood.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
After a year of healing from torn knee ligaments, he bounced back, establishing himself as a premiere offensively capable rearguard. In 1977, however, he slipped into a lengthy scoring drought. He waited until a match against the Detroit Red Wings on the night of February 2 to break free from his malaise. He became the first blueliner to score five goals in one game en route to a 9-1 pasting of the Wings. The record still stands today.

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Old
03-13-2011, 01:39 PM
  #123
BillyShoe1721
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To start their bottom pairing, the Philadelphia Firebirds are happy to select D Frantisek Tikal



IIHF Hockey Hall of Fame Member
2x Best Defenseman in World Championships(1964, 1965)[Both over Alexander Ragulin(drafted 179) and Eduard Ivanov(drafted 392)]
1x World Championships All Star Team(1965)
4x World Championships Bronze Medalist
5x European Championships Bronze Medalist
1x Olympic Bronze Medalist
2x World Championships Silver Medalist
4x European Championships Silver Medalist
Captain of Slovakian National Team 1964-1967

Quote:
A native of the South was one of the best defensemen not only in Czechoslovakia but also the world in the late 50s and 60s. He was known as a great fighter, a tough and dedicated player, very strong, but always fair.

This uncompromising defender, nicknamed Mrkavka, played a total of 15 seasons in the Czechslovak First Ice Hockey League, mostly in a Sparta jersey. In this league, he played around 370 games and scored 80 goals, 146 other games and 30 goals scored for the national team.

He brought a number of silver and bronze medals, and was named the best defender in two World Championships. The defenseman was for many years a great compliment to partner xxx, on the national team and for Sparta.

In 2004, Tikal was inducted into the IIHF Hockey Hall of Fame, as well as being named to the All-Time Sparta team.
http://translate.google.com/translat...%26prmd%3Divns

Quote:
Frantisek, pictured, was a stalwart defenseman for the Czechs in a career that spanned 17 years. He was especially dominant in the early 1960s, helps Czechoslovakia capture the bronze medal in 1964. He was a regular player on the national team from 1957 through 1966. He was even named the best defenseman at both the 1964 and 1965 World Championships, and was inducted into the IIHF Hall of Fame in 2004. xxx, the legendary Canadian national team coach of the 1960s, considered Tikal the best defensman in Europe in the 1960s.

His brother Zdenek was nowhere near as good. In fact, while Frantisek is somewhat legendary in the Czech hockey scene, Zdenek was once considered a great traitor by everyone in his country. In 1948 he opted to defect from the new communist-controlled Czechoslovakia, a definite no-no.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...sek-tikal.html

Quote:
Although one of the best defenders already in twenty years, into a representation with regard to the political uncertainty to nomination in the 1955/56 season and was limited to interstate matches at home.

Many were chanting his Spartan prestige and cooperation with xxx..."I was more on the defensive, and xxx to attack."
http://translate.google.com/translat...-tikal&act=url

Quote:
It hurt them most on defense where they dropped two men, including Frantisek Tikal, top rated in Europe.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ek+tikal&hl=en

Quote:
xxx and Frantisek Tikal also rank with the best.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ek+tikal&hl=en

Quote:
Czechoslovakia's most experienced player Frantisek Tikal
http://www.google.com/search?q=trans...77d3ad80cfa687

Quote:
But their best looking players were still the veterans xxx, who scored twice and was their fastest man, left winger xxx, who scored once, team captain xxx, and defenseman Frantisek Tikal, the best in Europe.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ek+tikal&hl=en

Quote:
Possibly the outstanding performer for the visitors, however, is Frantisek Tikal, 31, who was voted top defenseman at the Olympic Games in Innsburck, Austria.

"I think he could play pro after a short period of training," xxx said.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ek+tikal&hl=en

Quote:
Right Winger Venjamin Alexandrov of Russia was sent sprawling yesterday by a collision with defenseman Frantisek Tikal of Czechoslovakia in a rough-and-tumble hockey game.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ek+tikal&hl=en

Quote:
The former excellent defender for Sparta Prague and the Czechslovak national team was defeated Sunday by a serious illness.

The two played together on the same defense for 200 games. In Sparta and even on the national team, xxx was the close aid of Tikal. "We understood each other admirably. As our styles complimented each other over time, we played better and better."

Frantisek was an excellent defender born in South Bohemia - in the Czech Vcelna Budejovice.

Due to the emigration of his father and brother, threatened was Frantisek's career on the threshold of brilliance to be spent on military service.
http://translate.google.com/translat...%26prmd%3Divns

Quote:
He didn't play another match in the series, but under cover of darkness was reunited with his estranged brother, Czech hockey star Frantisek Tikal, after the Czech secret police had tried to keep them apart.
http://www.theage.com.au/national/th...0220-oms6.html

Quote:
Frantisek Tikal, meanwhile, was a well-respected Czechoslovak in the late 1950s and throughout the ‘60s, but his brother, Zdenek, played for Australia at the 1960 Olympics.
http://www.iihf.com/channels1011/wm2...html?tx_ttnews[backPid]=4272&cHash=0de2739b40

Quote:
At the turn of the 50s to the 60s in the last century, Frantisek Tikal was one of the best hockey players in the world.
http://translate.google.com/translat...%26prmd%3Divns

Quote:
The legendary, great defender of Sparta Prague and Czechslovak team Frantisek Tikal.
http://translate.google.com/translat...%26prmd%3Divns

Quote:
The giant Frantisek Tikal in the defensive position is handicapped by an old injury
http://www.google.com/search?q=1963+...d35f689f495207

Quote:
He spent 11 season with that team and at one point formed a defensive duo with Frantisek Tikal. "When I went on the attack, he covered my back."
http://books.google.com/books?id=wAM...ed=0CDcQ6AEwAw

Quote:
Gorde Hunter, the sports editor of the Calgary Herald, was so impressed by his play during a pre-Olympic tour of Canada in 1963 that he wrote the blueliner could be a National Hockey League star. Others compared his style to that of perennial NHL all-star Doug Harvey.
http://hfboards.com/showthread.php?t...+tikal&page=33

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Old
03-13-2011, 03:05 PM
  #124
Nalyd Psycho
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Georges Vezina


This isn't a traditional biography. There is simply one misconception I want cleared up. That Vezina benefited from "Kurt Cobain syndrome" where in, because of his death, he is viewed as better than he actually was. So I have collected a series of quotes, everyone before his death, and everyone from English publications. (French publications would potentially bias towards him.) This should get rid of any doubt of how he was perceived while he played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - Mar 8, 1919
Georges Vezina, goalkeeper of the Montreal Canadiens, who is conceded to be the best net guardian in the game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star - Nov 25, 1921
Another development at Ottawa was the signing of Clint Benedict to occupy the nets for the Ottawa team during the forthcoming season Clint is generally regarded as the second best to George Vezina of the Flying Frenchmen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Daily Mail - Mar 17, 1916
George Vezina, the brilliant goal-keeper of the Canadiens, often said to be as good as two men, jumped into prominence when he joined the Habitants in 1911. Born in Chicoutimi twenty-eight years ago, Vezina started playing goals when a youngster. Manager George Kennedy witnessed a game in which he was playing in 1910, and immediately signed him up. Ever since he has played in front of the nets for the Flying Frenchmen, and today is one of the highest payed goal-tenders in the business.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Toronto World - Apr 5, 1916
Vezina, George: Goalkeeper, 28 years old, and from Chicoutimi. Joined the Canadiens in 1910 and made good on the jump. The most consistent goalkeeper in the N.H.A. and as clean a player as the game knows. His success is largely consequent upon the fact that he attends stricktly to business all the time, and never tries to pull any funny stuff.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald - Oct 30, 1914
There ???(I assume "is a") strong possibility that the National Hockey assiciation will this year be without the services of its most brilliant goalkeeper, Vezina of the Canadiens.
This paper was poorly scanned, but it was about a proposed deal that when Lalonde was playing out West, Vezina would be traded straight up for him to bring Lalonde back to Montreal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - Feb 26, 1919
...the goaltenders, who have demonstrated that they can stop the hard shots a la George Vezina and Hugh Lehman.
From a Regina paper, infers that Lehman is the class of the West and Vezina of the East.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Daily Mail - Dec 13, 1915
During the intermission he hustled George Vezina, recognized as the best goal-keeper in the NHA, into one of the Guards uniforms.
This was from an a game where NHA all-stars played an army team. For the third period, the coach of the army team (Vezina's coach on the Habs.) snuck Vezina into the army teams goal. Here is the scoring per period:
1st: 4-1 NHA
2nd: 5-1 NHA
3rd: 3-1 Army

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader - Mar 17, 1925
Number One Team- Goal, Georges Vezina; defence, Sprague Cleghorn and Hod Stuart (deceased); center, Frank Nighbor; right wing, undrafted; left wing, Tommy Phillips (deceased)
This was from a MacLeans article about the best Canadian hockey players. The article I'm quoting was critical of the list for East coast bias. And there were many things on the three teams that raised my eyebrows. But it is still useful to see how some regarded Vezina while he was alive.

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Old
03-14-2011, 09:32 AM
  #125
Dreakmur
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Arkady Chernyshev !!!


Awards and Achievements:
USSR Hockey Hall of Fame (1957)
IIHF Hockey Hall of Fame (1999)

4 x Olympic Gold Medalist (1956, 1964, 1968, 1972)
11 x World Championship Gold Medalist (1954, 1956, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971)

2 x Soviet League Championship (1947, 1954)


Soviet League Coaching Record:
Head Coach of Moscow Dynamo (1946 to 1975)
Head Coach of Dynamo Rig (1971 to 1977)

539 Wins, 223 Losses, 81 Ties


IIHF Coaching Record:
Head Coach of Soviet National Team (1954 to 1957, 1961 to 1972, 1977 to 1992)

240 Wins, 37 Losses, 17 Ties





Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
The most prestigious titles in world hockey are Olympic champion; world champion, holder of the Canada Cup, the World Cup and the Stanley Cup. The man who tops the list of those who have won the most honors among Russian players and coaches is Arkady Chernyshev.

….

In the legendary Cernyshev-Tarasov tandem, Anatoli Tarasov was frequently the center of attention, but the last word always went to the head coach and that was Chernyshev. Calm, reserved and intelligent, Chernyshev held great sway with the players and was an authority figure to them. An incomparable strategist and tactician, Chernyshev smoothly controlled the game. He had an uncanny sixth sense and was able to assess a situation quickly and make a decision that in the end would benefit the team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
…Moscow Dynamo won the championship under the coaching of a quiet, pensive man, Arkady Chernyshev.

….

On the Soviet team, the mercurial Tarasov ruffled the feathers while the clam, professional Chernyshev, who would sit down and talk quietly with the players before each game, smoothed them over.

….

But the team was usually more noted for its defense and always played more guarded style that the army club. This was the abiding difference between the Tarasov and Chernyshev schools.
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Russian Hockey Encyclopedia
An outstanding hockey specialist who molded scores of hockey masters. A brilliant game strategist and tactician. One of the first to elaborate the principles of an attack by two forwards along one flank and introduce active defense at the blue line; distinguished by an unexcelled ability to spot and develop a player’s potential. Besides his superb coaching capabilities, he is known as a teacher possessing rare tact and an ability to approach a wide range of people.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chidlovski
The 1972 Summit Series was a major break-through for the Russian hockey school on the international arena. The first face-to-face encounter with the elite NHL talent showed the world the strength and mastery of the game that the Soviets were able to achieve through a relatively short period of time. Although 1972 Team USSR was prepared for the Series by Bobrov, most of innovations and hockey achievements that the Soviets demonstrated in September 1972 still reflected the results of successful work by Bobrov's predecessors, Tarasov and Chernyshev.

Arkady CHERNYSHEV is a legend of Soviet hockey and one of the founders of the Russian hockey school. Most of the time, his name is mentioned in association with the other Russian legend, Anatoly Tarasov. Tarasov and Chernyshev coached the Soviet squad to the 9 consecutive world titles in 1963-1971. In North America, Chernyshev's coaching successes are quiet often overshadowed in favor of his partner of many years, Hall-of-Famer Anatoly Tarasov.

Needless to say, it was Chernyshev who was the "official" head coach of the Soviet national team during the Tarasov-Chernyshev's era. If the gold medal count can become any measurement of coaches' success, Chrenyshev should be called the all-time most successful Soviet coach on the international arena. With 4 gold Olympic medals and 11 world titles, Chernyshev leads the list leaving behind such coaching legends as Tarasov and Tikhonov.

Being two completely different personalities, Chernyshev and Tarasov created one of the most successful and well-ballanced coaching combinations in the history of hockey. Tarasov was emotional and explosive, prone to lose his temper in many situations. On the contrary, Chernyshev impressed people with his diplomatic skills, superb communications and rationalism.

Tarasov was at his best on the ice rink, working face-to-face with the players, guiding the team directly from the bench during the game. Chernyshev very seldom spent time with the national team players on the ice, mostly overseeing the practice or game in the stands. Due to Chernyshev's obvious educational and motivational talent, the Soviet players preferred to have one-on-one conversations with Chernyshev than with Tarasov.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkady Chernyshev: ONE of THE Founding Fathers of Soviet Hockey
Arkady Chernyshev was a highly rational man. He was strategically apt and tactically sound. His approach to hockey was an off-shoot of his personality.



Chernyshev’s most profound talents were superb communication and diplomatic skills. Once he had come up with a new series of offensive formations, his ability to explain the value of it all to each of the Soviet players was truly incredible. Often times, they would actually come to him and seek out his advice on how to better improve themselves, and raise their level of play out on the ice. Chernyshev gained their trust and admiration.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Golden Era of Soviet Hockey
Tarasov and Chernyshev was the perfect couple´. Unlike the impulsive, flamboyant Tarasov, Chernyshev was restrained, rational and diplomatic. With his analytical skills, he would scout the other teams to pinpoint their weaknesses, and with his diplomatic skills he was the perfect balance to Tarasov vis-a-vis the players. Where Tarasov was the bad cop, Chernyshev was the good cop.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valeri Vasiliev
When I came to the national squad, it was sometimes difficult for us newcomers to find acceptance on the team. We always went to Chernyshev, knowing he woul help us and never allow anyone to mistreat us.



Last edited by Dreakmur: 03-15-2013 at 04:01 PM.
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