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Old
04-03-2011, 08:32 PM
  #201
Velociraptor
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Pete Peeters, G

Position: Goaltender
HT/WT: 6'0", 185 lbs
Catches: Left
Nickname: "Grumpy", "Grouchy"



- 1 acknowledgment for the First NHL All-Star Team (1983)
- 1-time Vezina Trophy Winner (1983)
- Won Canada Cup (1984)
- 246 wins, 155 losses, 51 ties and 21 shutouts in 489 regular season games played.
- 35 wins, 35 losses and 2 shutouts in 71 playoff games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
With a porous defense in front of him, Pete Peeters was peppered with pucks. But this pickle that Peeters picked turned out to be a perfect training ground. The huge workload and respectable showing earned him high praise from scouts. In 1977 he was selected 135th overall by the Philadelphia Flyers in the NHL Amateur draft.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The Flyers must have thought they had the second coming of Bernie Parent based on the way Peeters started that year. He went 22-0-5 before losing his first game of the season on February 19th! Peeters finished the year with a record of 29-5-5 with a 2.73 GAA, earning him an All Star game nod. He was the Flyers go to guy in the playoffs as well, leading the Flyers all the way to Stanley Cup finals, only to lose on an over time goal courtesy of the New York Islanders' Bob Nystrom.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Peeters was a tough guy to warm up to as well. Known as a grouchy guy, he was nicknamed Grumpy. He did not like the Philadelphia system of rotating goalies and at times carrying three netminders. A bit of a sore loser, he was not easy to talk to after games, especially in games that he loses.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
When Peeters was traded to Boston for defenseman Brad McCrimmon, both teams fared well in the trade, especially Boston in that first season. Peeters had perhaps his best year, playing in a career high 62 games, posting an amazing record of 40-11-9 with 8 shutouts and a NHL best-of-the-decade 2.36 GAA. At one stretch he went 31 games without a loss. Not surprisingly Peeters was awarded the Vezina Trophy as top goalie and named to the NHL's First All Star Team. Almost as impressive was the fact that Peeters finished 2nd in the entire league in Hart Trophy voting as league MVP in a time when the award was basically owned by the great Wayne Gretzky.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
He was invited to Team Canada for the 1984 Canada Cup, one of his greatest honours, but sprained his ankle. Still he was able to play in the final game against Sweden and clinch the championship. He was also the goalie in the dramatic 3-2 OT win against the Soviets. The game, considered by many to be one of the greatest of all time, wasthe highlight of his career.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
If you take the highlights of Pete Peeters career, you could mistake him as one of the greatest goaltenders of all time. He had some great highs, such as 1979-80 in Philadelphia, 1982-83 in Boston and the 1984 Canada Cup. But because of his team's frequent failures in the playoffs and the fact he rarely played 2/3rds of the schedule like most top goalies, Peeters isn't really remembered as one of the top goalies of the 1980s that he actually was.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
To hear Pete Peeters speak is to hear the voice of a laid-back man who appreciated the sport of hockey but didn't always like the idea of it completely taking over his life.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
His first showing in Flyer-land was adequate at best. He returned to Maine to complete the season and his career in the minors. From then on, Peeters would emerge as one of the top NHL goalies of his day.

In 1979-80, the Flyers and their goaltender got so hot that they set a league record unbeaten streak of 35 games. By season's end Peeters and his mates went toe-to-toe with the powerful New York Islanders in the Cup finals only to lose out four games to two.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
In Beantown, Peeters got all the ice time he could handle. He found the atmosphere to be sufficiently relaxed to bring out the best in his game. By season's end, he corralled the most wins (40) and a Vezina trophy as the league's top stopper. He was voted the second-most valuable player behind Wayne Gretzky and came within one game of tying his coach, Gerry Cheever's, record of 32 straight appearances without a loss.

After such a momentous season, it became difficult for Peeters to have any hope of topping his own standard. He performed for parts of three more seasons with the Bruins but gradually lost the razor-sharp edge he'd originally brought to town.

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Old
04-04-2011, 06:52 AM
  #202
Dreakmur
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Paul Haynes !!!

Awards and Achievements:
Allan Cup (1929)

2 x NHL All-Star (1937, 1939)

Regular Season Scoring:
Points – 4th(1933), 9th(1939), 12th(1938)
Goals –12th(1933)
Assists – 2nd(1939), 3rd(1933), 7th(1936), 7th(1938), 13th(1937)

Point Percentages – 93, 86, 70, 60, 58
Goal Percentages – 59, 56
Assist Percentages – 100, 93, 81, 73, 67


From 1933 to 1939:
17th in Points, 73% of 2nd place
5th in Assists, 91% of 2nd place

From 1936 to 1939:
10th in Points, 80% of 2nd place
4th in Assists, 95% of 2nd place


Play-off Scoring:
Play-off Points – 6th(1937)
Play-off Goals – 8th(1937)
Play-off Assists – 2nd(1938), 5th(1937)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Paul Haynes first earned athletic honours not in hockey, but as a junior boxing champion in Montreal. He also quarterbacked Loyola's Canadian Intermediate Intercollegiate football championship team. He was a member of the 1929-30 Montreal AAA Allan Cup winning team and the following year moved into the NHL with the Montreal Maroons. He spent the next four seasons dividing his time between the Maroons and the Windsor Bulldogs of the IHL, before being traded to Boston for cash in December 1934.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The name Paul Haynes does not really resonate in Montreal sporting history quite like Rocket Richard or Jean Beliveau or Guy Lafleur. But Paul Haynes, too, was a great Montreal athlete. He was a junior boxing champion and star quarterback at Loyola College.
Playmaking Abilities:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star – November 4th, 1932
Paul Haynes will be retained here for while at least. Haynes is proving a shifty play-maker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – January 1st, 1933
Northcott and Haynes sent a double pass to Hooley Smith in a close skirmish and Hooley scored to put the Maroons one up.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star – November 25th, 1933
While reports had the Senators seeking the services of Dave Trottier, it is believed the local club is more interested in Paul Haynes, smart play-making centre ice player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – March 4th, 1936
Leroy Goldsworthy drifted down an open right lane in time to pick up a delayed pass from Paul Haynes. Worters dropped, but not in time to smother the puck, the goal clicking in 5:45.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – February 17th, 1937
A fine passing advance by Paul Haynes and George Mantha set the puck up for the veteran Siebert near the Americans' penalty shot circle. Siebert's long drive put them in the lead.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – March 28th, 1937
****** scored his first goal in the third minute on a brilliant passing play with Paul Haynes and Aurel Joliat - a play that was almost duplicated for the third Canadien counter.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – December 12th, 1937
Haynes handed ****** the puck in front of the net, and ****** found a corner promptly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – January 15th, 1939
A tricky passing play between Haynes and Cain sent the Canadiens ahead, 1-0.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – November 17th, 1939
Sands also figured I the next Blake goal, but it was Paul Haynes who made all the play this time. Advancing slowly over the blueline, he sucked the entire Boston defence over to him, and his clean pass to the left let Blake in on Brimsek with all the time in the world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – December 4th, 1939
****** ****** converted on a double relay from Paul Haynes and ****** *******.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – December 31st, 1940
Some might say that Toe misses Paul Haynes, his erstwhile centre companion, but that is not exactly the truth. Admitting that Paul was one of the smartest centre men in the business, that his passes accounted to a great degree for Blake’s fine showing, it is nevertheless a fact that Toe is playing with a pretty fair centre right now in the person of young Johnny Quilty.
Defensive Abilities:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – October 28, 1933
Paul Haynes, slim young Montreal boy, who began to find his stride late last season, provides Gerard with another topnotch center man. Haynes has been developing that devastating hook check.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – December 28, 1934
Haynes combines the defensive skill of Pete Lepine and the playmaking prowess of Joe Primeau, and is rated as one of the headiest players in the league.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – October 21st, 1939
Paul Haynes, a pretty cagy codger himself as a pivot-man, has always rated Barry the smartest player in the league.
Skating Abilities:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The History of the Rules of Hockey
This drastic measure wasn't used often, but it did come into play in a game between Montreal and Chicago on February 10, 1938. The Hawks and Habs were entangled in a close-checking 1-1 tie when speedy Canadien center Paul Haynes broke free from his shadow 6 minutes into the second period. Haynes was about to unleash a drive at goalkeeper Mike Karakas when a Chicago LW threw his stick across the ice, knocking the puck off his stick...Micky Ion awarded a goal to Haynes and the Canadiens.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Maroons
The Maroons' strength was speedy players like Paul Haynes...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Chronicles
Slick Montreal center Paul Haynes was 2nd in assists.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times - 1935
The victory proved costly for the Bruins, for during the final session, Paul Haynes, speedy third line center, suffered a deep gash on his left instep...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Meriden Daily Journal – December 29th, 1938
…Johnny Gagnon, Stew Evans, Paul Haynes, and Herbie Lewis, four of the fastest skaters and classiest forwards I the game.
Toughness and Grittiness:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The New York Times – January 23rd, 1933
Haynes wrestled the rubber from Ching Johnson and transferred it to **** ********, who, with a clear path to the goal, skated up on ********** and sent the puck into the cords.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald – March 25th, 1938
Paul Haynes, of Canadiens, and Jack Shil, of Hawks, were handed majors for fighting just after the period closed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – February 3rd, 1941
Trouble broke out in the closing minutes when Paul Haynes, of New Haven, and Johnny Polich, of Philadelphia, belted each other’s heads with their sticks. Later they renewed hostilities in a fist fight. Haynes drew a match penalty and Polich received two majors, putting then off for 20 and 15 minutes respectively.


Last edited by Dreakmur: 08-08-2012 at 03:21 AM.
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Old
04-04-2011, 03:36 PM
  #203
EagleBelfour
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With our 20th selection, the 797th overall pick in this year All-Time Draft, the Detroit Falcons are very please to select center Alexander Davletovich Almetov



Russian Name: Александр Альметов
Height: 5'10''
Weight: 185 lbs
Position: Center / Defence
Shoots: Right
Date of Birth: January 18, 1940
Place of Birth: Kiev , Ukraine, USSR
Date of Death: January 18, 1992 (Age: 52)

Soviet League Champion (1959, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966)
Olympic Bronze Medalist (1960)
Olympic Gold Medalist (1964)
IIHF WEC-A Gold Medalist (1963, 1965, 1966, 1967)
IIHF WEC-A Bronze Medalist (1961)
European Championships Gold Medalist (1960, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966 ,1967)
European Championships Silver Medalist (1961)
Soviet First All-Star Team (1961, 1962, 1963)
Soviet Second All-Star Team (1966)
Soviet Third All-Star Team (1967)
IIHF WEC-A All Star Team (1965, 1967)
Russian Hockey Hall of Fame (1963)


Domestic League:

SeasonsGPGAPTSPIM
9220212xxxxxxxxx

Top-10 Goalscoring (1st, 2nd, 2nd, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 7th)


International Games:

(Exhibition Game, Olympics & World Championship)
Games by Opposing Countries
----CountryGPG
Sweden2617
Czechoslovakia199
Canada197
United States118
East Germany1011
West Germany911
Finland95
Norway13
Hungary12
Poland10
Switzerland10


World Championship:

# ParticipationGPGAPTSPIM
53530285814

Years in Detail:

YearsGPG#A#PTS#PIM
1960-617414th312th712th6
1962-63765th57th116th8
1964-65772nd52nd122nd0
1965-66755th82nd132nd0
1966-67783rd73rd152nd0


Olympics:

In the 1960's, no professional hockey player from North America were playing in the Olympics. Therefore, the World Championship and the Olympics should be viewed as equal tournaments in term of quality.

# ParticipationGPGAPTSPIM
21577142

Years in Detail:

YearGPG#A#PTS#PIM
19607248th335th548th2
19648522nd47th911th0

Quote:
Originally Posted by A to Z Encyclopedia of Ice Hockey
A very constructive player with a good shot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Visualrian
Alexander Almetov, one of the best Soviet ice hockey attackers, dribbling virtuoso.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier's Greatest Hockey Legend
Another early Soviet hockey star that is long forgotten is Alexander Almetov.

One of the reasons he is long forgotten is very few North Americans knew much of him when he actually played. Some Europeans may remember better, but his contributions in Russia will always be remembered.

Almetov, like most Russians, was a well trained forward when it came to skating, puckhandling and passing, though he was never an elite scoring threat. Part of that was because Almetov was a superior defensive forward. In fact he was a mainstay on the Russian penalty killing units perhaps the best PK man of his generation.

Tarasov had identified Almetov as a top hockey prospect when Almetov was 14 years old and a student at Central Red Army hockey school. He was an effortless skater but more impressively he was incredibly efficient and intelligent on the ice, a true master of the game.

Almetov was a regular linemate of Konstantin Loktev and Venjamin Alexandrov. Those three formed the second great troika in Soviet hockey history as they followed the threesome of Babich, Shuvalov and Bobrov. All three are Merited Masters of Sport in Russia (the equivalent of a Hall of Fame). Almetov and Loktev meshed together especially well, with the brooding Alexandrov playing the role of trigger man.Together the three earned their country a neck-full of World and European championship gold medals.

Almetov was the center of the unit. When first paired with his two mates, Loktev and Alexandrov were said to have pleaded with their coach for a different center, as they were weary of his level of play. While Almetov's skill level may not have been on par with the other two, he complimented the line very well with his positioning and passing.

Almetov's strong point, according to coach Tarasov, was much like that of Wayne Gretzky. Gretzky wasn't even born when Almetov joined the Russian national team mind you, but the two shared an uncanny knack of always being at the right place at the right time. Tarasov actually compared him to a chess player, who plans out an attack before the play even begins. This is why Almetov almost always led an attack.

Despite his penalty killing forte and the fact that he occasionally played defense when there was injury to a blueliner in the middle of the game, many critics suggested Almetov was a poor defensive forward 5 on 5. He was slow to comeback and help out defensively, even lazy they said. Tarasov seemed unconcerned however.

''Is this a drawback? Relatively speaking - yes. But if we take into consideration the peculiarities of this master's game, the tactics of the whole line - no. That is the Almetov style of playing hockey, that is his manner and if he changed it, Soviet hockey would doubtlessly lose of one of its best forwards.''


Interestingly, Almetov ended his career prematurely at the age of 27. In Soviet sports in those days the age of 33 years represented the maximum age an athlete would reach, and it was strictly enforced by Tarasov in the world of hockey. When Konstantin Loktev turned 33 and retired, so did Almetov even though he was 6 years his junior. It was said that Almetov left the ice believing that without Loktev the game could never be the same for him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chidlovski
Veniamin Alexandrov-Alexander Almetov-Konstantin Loktev
Team USSR and CSKA, 1960s

In terms of line chemistry and look-and-feel, this was probably the strongest line in the Soviet hockey.


Vladimir Krutov-Igor Larionov-Sergei Makarov
Team USSR and CSKA, 1980s.

They continued the golden run by their predecessors. They knew no compromise - only forward, only attack, who cares about defense! "Somehow they reminded me Almetov's line" (Bochinin)
- ''Perhaps sports fans who have seen our national team in action have noticed that whenever we have one man short, Alexander Almetov is sure to appear on the ice. When it comes to individual play, a question of holding on to the puck and beating off a superior force, Almetov is in a class by himself! He is not a solist, he is a star in the good sense of the word.'' - Anatoli Tarasov

- ''In my opinion, Almetov played practically flawless hockey all the time.'' - Viacheslav Starshinov


Fun & Interesting Facts:

- It is said that Almetov had difficulty tolerating the Russian system
- After his playing career, Almetov became a grave digger


Youtube:

#9
At 1:05 - Breakaway
At 2:35 - Stickhandling in the neutral and offensive zone
At 4:35 - Scoring from the offensive circle


Internet Sites:
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...r-almetov.html
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...TOKEN=46058421
http://www.chidlovski.net/1954/54_pl....asp?p_id=a005
http://www.1972summitseries.com/otheralmetov.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Almetov
http://www.azhockey.com/Al.htm#Alexander%20Almetov
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...ers/segold.htm
http://www.chidlovski.net/1954/54_tr...fo.asp?tr_id=6
http://visualrian.com/images/item/136396

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Old
04-04-2011, 05:30 PM
  #204
Leafs Forever
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Credit to TDMM for the basis of this bio:

Quote:
After healing from a broken jaw early in his tenure, he gradually established himself as a good, rushing-type defenseman. He was never a prolific scorer, but he managed to play a well-balanced game with effective coverage in his own zone. - Legends of Hockey
Quote:
A solid defensive defenseman who was mostly overlooked during his days with the Montreal Canadiens, Brian Engblom didn't enjoy the limelight until after he retired to become an active television analyst. Engblom incauspiciously began his career with the Habs during the 1976 season, playing six years in Montreal, and he got in on three Stanley Cup victories before his career swerved into the trade winds.- Who's Who in Hockey
Quote:
Being consistently good at dealing with 2-on-1's against you, can be a great source of pride for you as an individual, espacially if you have limited offensive skills. They don't show up on the score sheet, but the coach and your goalie will know. - Brian Engblom
Quote:
An outstanding defenseman for the Canadiens, Brian scored a power play goal in 1980-81. He had 4 assists in the 1980 playoffs.- Back of 1981-82 Hockey Card
The Toronto St. Pats are pleaded to select...



BRIAN ENGBLOM!

Awards and Achievements
-“Honoured Member” of the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame

-AHL First All-Star Team (1977)
-Eddie Shore Award (AHL Most Outstanding Defenceman) (1977)
-Stanley Cup championships (1977, 1978, and 1979)
-NHL Second Team All-Star (1982)
-Represented Canada in the 1982 Canada Cup and 1983 World Championships

-Led the NHL in +/- in 1980-81
-2nd in +/- in 81-82
-8th in Norris voting in 1981
-6th in Norris voting in 1982


Last edited by Leafs Forever: 04-04-2011 at 05:40 PM.
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Old
04-05-2011, 05:10 PM
  #205
Velociraptor
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Patrick Kane, RW

Position: Right Wing
HT/WT: 5'10", 178 lbs
Shoots: Right
Nickname(s): "Kaner" "20 Cent"



- Won the Calder Trophy (2008)
- 1-time Stanley Cup Champion (2010)
- 1 acknowledgement for NHL All-Star Team (2010)
- 1 acknowledgement for NHL All-Rookie Team (2008)
- 103 goals, 303 regular season points in 317 games played.
- 19 goals, 42 playoff points in 39 games played.

Hockey's Future

Quote:
Kane may not be the largest player in the game, but he’s got good leg strength, tremendous vision and playmaking instincts, prodigious puck-handling skills, and a nose for the net. All of this made him the first overall selection in the 2007 NHL Entry Draft.
Hockey News:

Quote:
Has exceptional hockey sense. Is as good as it gets in the playmaking department from a wing position. Makes his teammates around him better. Is supremely confident in his abilities.

Career Potential - Elite playmaking winger.
Greg Wyshynski, Yahoo! Sports

Quote:
Brian Leetch's name came up during our "players we wish could have played past 40" conversation on today's Puck Daddy Radio. He ended his career as a Boston Bruins defenseman, but earned his fame with the New York Rangers. He is, without question, one of the greatest U.S.-born players in NHL history.

In 2009, John Grigg of The Hockey News ranked Leetch second among U.S.-born players, behind Chris Chelios and ahead of Pat LaFontaine. Three years earlier, Tom Layberger of SI.com had LaFontaine over Leetch and Joe Mullen.

Current Detroit Red Wings center Mike Modano was fourth on the THN list and fifth on the SI list; John Beattie of NESN considered him a might bit better, seeing Modano as the type of American star the magnitude of "Canada's Sidney Crosby, Russia's Alex Ovechkin, Sweden's Nicklas Lidstrom or Finland's Teemu Selanne."

As Modano's career nears its sunset, Beattie makes the case today that Patrick Kane of the Chicago Blackhawks is the next American hockey hero.

Kane has the "goals, assists, mischief and partying" that should endear him to fans, along with other intangibles:
Quote:
Beattie also makes the case that Kane is dangerously on pace with Modano, who had 309 points in his first 317 games while Kane has 297 in 310 — the argument being that Modano had the benefit of starting his career in the offensively buoyant early 1990s. Which is to say that the "best American player" debate goes beyond the stat sheet. Modano was a leader and a winner, along with being a good-looking chap who married a pop pinup girl. Kane has that swagger; Parise doesn't, at least yet.
Jon Greenberg, ESPN Chicago

Quote:
The Blackhawks' 7-4 win put them a game away from winning the Stanley Cup -- think about that for the next two days -- and it was Kane, the jazzy improviser, who hit the right notes.
Quote:
He scored the Blackhawks' fourth goal as he and Andrew Ladd all but embarrassed Hawks' bogeyman Chris Pronger and assisted on their sixth. Basically, he played like himself, a freewheeling scoring machine who racked up 88 points this season, the most by any American.

It was only Kane's second goal of this series, but unlike the first, this time it was in a win. Kane stepped up like he did late in the Olympics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undrafted 2010 Cup Champion
Kaner has been great for us all year and that's why he's one of the most special players in the world. His game has become more well-rounded. Last year you never quite knew if he was going to get his butt back, but he definitely does it now. He knows what it takes to be good at both ends.
SI Vault, June 17, 2010

Quote:
But for Kane, the cheeky first-liner who maneuvers over the ice like a Maserati, "business in the front, party in the back" doesn't describe just his hair; it's always been his head-to-toe style. Kane is as determined a scorer as there is in the NHL. He's also one of the flashiest. He led Chicago with 30 goals and 88 points this season and finished second on the team to captain Jonathan Toews in postseason-point scoring. Since Kane arrived as the first pick in the 2007 draft, the Buffalo native has won over the city with his skills and approachability. He is the razzle-dazzle counterpoint to the gritty, earnest leadership of Toews, forming a pair that not only led the way to the Blackhawks' first Stanley Cup in 49 years but also should be the foundation for years to come. In December, Kane and Toews were signed to identical five-year, $31.5 million contract extensions that could keep them in Chicago through the 2014-15 season.

The 5' 10" Kane may still be a child at heart—he is as playful as he is self-confident—but seeing how easily he shakes off defensemen, Fast and nifty, he's known to his teammates as the Doctor for his precision with a hockey stick. In Chicago's clinching 5-1 win over the Canucks in Game 6 of the second round, he took a cross-ice pass from Toews on his right skate just outside the offensive zone and in one move kicked the puck onto his stick and cut inside, blowing past befuddled Vancouver blueliner Kevin Bieksa and wristing a shot past goaltender Roberto Luongo.
Quote:
The new and improved Kane enjoyed a breakout performance at the Olympics in February, where he was the youngest member of Team USA. He skated confidently into Vancouver, scored two goals in the 6-1 semifinal win over Finland and assisted on Zach Parise's tying goal in the waning seconds of the gold medal match against Canada.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undrafted member of the Philadelphia Flyers
He's a tough guy to [check] or make a good play against, just because when the puck's on his stick, he can do a lot of great things with it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Burke
"He's greasy, even when he's in the corner, he manages to sidestep most of the impact when guys go to hit him. I think his biggest gift is that he has no panic threshold at all with the puck. Most guys, when a player from the opposing team gets close to him, they think, O.K., I've got to do something now. This kid waits until he can feel their breath on his neck, and then he makes a move
Patrick Kane's Stanley Cup clinching goal scored in Game 6 against the Flyers in 2010. The first Stanley Cup for the Blackhawks since 1961.



Patrick Kane scores a hat trick in a series deciding game against the Canucks in 2009.



Last edited by Velociraptor: 04-10-2011 at 05:42 PM.
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Old
04-06-2011, 02:30 AM
  #206
Dreakmur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
When hockey fans think of the famous Bobrov forward line, they usually first remember Bobrov and Babich, and then recall the equally outstanding Viktor Shuvalov. Bobrov and Babich had made a name for themselves in hockey well before Shuvalov came along. But it was when Shuvalov joined the Bobrov line that it achieved the status it holds to this day. Shuvalov became the driving force behind Bobrov's troika.

Shuvalov was a leader, had strong character... Their relationship wasn't always smooth because Bobrov always demanded that the game be focused on him... Once Shuvalov understood that it was Bobrov who always drew at least two opposing players to the center line, he reconciled himself to the fact that Bobrov was the dominant member of the line.

..his style of play changed acordingly. At the beginning of an attack, Shuvalov would get Bobrov and Babich to the opposing team's goal with a series of strategic passes. If the attack folded up, Shuvalov could be counted on to back up his partners, and he frequently functioned as an offensive defenseman. he had quickly become a skillful and versatile player. Shuvalov also varied his game in front of the goal. He would position himself not right in front of the goal itself but farther back, giving the opportunity to attack and if need be, fall back and take up a defense position.

The fact that opposing teams beefed up their efforts to guard Babich and Bobrov meant Shuvalov was often left unguarded, and he lost no time taking advantage of that situation. He would fire the puck on the fly without bothering to set it up. His stability on ice was a great boon to him... with bowed legs spread wide in a low crouch he could avoid sudden bodychecks.

A hockey master is remembered by fans because of his unique abilities and individuality. This can take many forms - superb stickhandling, shots on goal, speed, and superior strategy. Viktor Shuvalov had a number of original techniques, among them his famous slapshot that flew four to six inches above the ice...Despite Bobrov's dominance, Shuvalov was a very valuable member of the famous forward line. His often dazzling and original playing style was backed up by high-scoring performances. When Shuvalov played alongside Bobrov at the WC, their scoring performances were virtually equal... He was a man who had his own views on the game, which is perhaps why he quit so early to take up coaching...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
Shuvalov, who had the stereotyped, cold faced Communist look, was a strong physical force centering the line, besides being a marvelous scorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Shuvalov sacrificed his own offensive desires to allow his less-than-defensive-conscious linemates to exploit napping defenses. Shuvalov, like all classic Russian centermen, always came back deep in the defensive zone, helping out the dmen. He then would spring his wingmen with breakout passes, trailing behind them almost like a defenseman jumping into the rush nowadays. He would often stay high for defensive purposes, but at other times he would park himself in the slot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Babich, who could probably be compared to a Sergei Fedorov, and Shuvalov did the "hard labour" while Bobrov finished plays off with a scoring chance
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon Star-Phoenix – February 3, 1956
Viktor Shuvalov, usually the playmaker on the first-string Soviet line, got three goals, two of them on neatly executed from behind the losers’ net.


Viktor Shuvalov !!!


Domestic Awards and Achievemets:
5 x Soviet League Champion (1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956)

5 x Soviet League All-Star (1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954)

Domestic Scoring:
Points – 1st(1950), 1st(1953), 2nd(1951), 2nd(1952), 4th(1954)

4 of his 5 top-5 seasons were not with Bobrov and Babich

International Awards and Achievements:
Olympic Gold (1956)
World Championship Gold (1954)
World Championship Silver (1955)

IIHF All-Star (1954)

Finished 2nd, 2nd, 3rd on Russia in his three Int'l tournaments - only ever finished behind Guryshev and Bobrov

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04-06-2011, 05:19 AM
  #207
Dreakmur
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Kent Douglas !!!


NHL Awards and Achievelents:
Stanley Cup Champion (1963)

3 x NHL All-Star (1962, 1963, 1964)
Calder Trophy Winner (1963)

Points among Defensemen – 3rd(1965), 9th(1966), 9th(1968), 11th(1963), 11th(1969), 20th(1967)
Goals among Defensemen – 1st(1966), 2nd(1963), 3rd(1968), 5th(1965), 18th(1967)
Assists among Defensemen – 3rd(1965), 7th(1969), 14th(1968), 15th(1963), 16th(1966), 16th(1967)


AHL Awards and Achievements:
Calder Cup Winner (1960, 1961, 1962)

Eddie Shore Award Winner (1962)
AHL First Team All-Star (1962)
AHL Second Team All-Star (1971)

AHL Points among Defensemen – 1st(1962), 1st(1971), 4th(1970), 5th(1961), 5th(1976), 6th(1974), 8th(1972), 10th(1960)
AHL Goals among Defensemen – 1st(1960), 1st(1962), 4th(1971), 5th(1961), 7th(1970)

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Old
04-06-2011, 05:42 PM
  #208
Velociraptor
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Cully Dahlstrom, C/LW

Position: Center/Left Wing
HT/WT: 5'10", 172 lbs
Catches: Left
Nickname: "Cully"



- 1-time Stanley Cup Champion (1938)
- Won Calder Trophy (1938)
- Original Member of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame (1973)
- 88 goals, 216 regular season points in 342 games played.
- 6 goals, 14 playoff points in 71 games played.

Greatest Hockey Legends

Quote:
A couple of years before his NHL debut he was invited to the Boston Bruins training camp. Cully soon discovered that he wasn't ready for the big league.

" After the first couple of days I realized that I wasn't ready to jump to the NHL yet," he recalled. " Those guys just skated circles around me. It was as though I was going in slow motion the way those players played. That's why it really didn't bother me when I went back to the minors."

It was a wise choice by Cully because he took the experience back with him and knew how to make himself a better player. When he returned to the NHL with Chicago, he would win the Calder Trophy as the "rookie of the year" in 1937-38.

That first year was Cully's high point of his playing career. Not only did he win the Calder but he also won the Stanley Cup.
Quote:
Cully himself played a vital role in the playoffs as he scored some key goals. In game two of the semi-final against NY Americans Cully scored the only goal of the game, an overtime goal after 33:01 of OT to tie the series which saved Chicago from elimination. He also scored the first goal against Toronto in the 4-1 win that brought the Stanley Cup to Chicago.

Cully's best season point wise in the NHL came in 1943-44 when he scored 42 points, including 20 goals, in 50 games. He played one more season before retiring from hockey. He was best known as a two-way center and a regular penalty killer. He was one of USA's pioneers in the NHL and was inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame in 1973.

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04-06-2011, 05:58 PM
  #209
Leafs Forever
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Quote:
Lethbridge, Alberta's Doug Barkley was a big and physical defenseman who started his NHL career at a late age and had it end far too early.

He could have become one of the most dominant defensemen of his time if it was not for a career ending eye injury.- Joe Pelletier
Quote:
Tall, tough and tenacious, Barkley was a Larry Robinson before the latter arrived on the scene to redefine defensemen's play for the Montreal Canadiens," -Stan Fischler
Quote:
Barkley followed his rookie season with a promising second NHL campaign. Known for his size (6'2" 185lbs) and aggressiveness (he had 382 PIM in only 253 games), Doug added a bit of an offensive element to his game that he had previously shown in the WHL. Doug scored 11 times and assisted on 21 others.-Joe Pelletier
Quote:
Handling offense as well as defense with consummate ease, Barkley was quickly touted as the find of the year.- Detroit Red Wings Greatest Moments and Players
Quote:
Losing Doug Barkley was a real blow to the team. He was developing into an all-star defenseman.-Gordie Howe after Barklay career ending injury
The Toronto St. Pats are happy to select...



DOUG BARKLEY!

Awards and Achievements
All-Star Voting: 7th(1966)
Norris Voting: 5th(1966)

Note: Voting does not extent far in most years during era

Scoring
Points Amongst Defensemen: 3rd(1964), 4th(1963), 8th(1965), 9th(1966),

% of #2 Scoring defensemen(Rounder to nearest whole number): 90, 89, 71, 57 Total: 307

Playoff Points Amongst Defensemen: 3rd(71% of 2nd)(1963), 6th(43% of 2nd)(1964)

Long Term Scoring
Over the course of his significant career (1963-1966) Barkley is:
4th in points amongst defensemen, behind Pilote, Howell, and Horton, playing less games than all of them, with 90% of 2nd place Howell.


Last edited by Leafs Forever: 04-07-2011 at 06:52 PM.
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04-06-2011, 06:18 PM
  #210
Stoneberg
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Brad Park, D

<--See avatar for pic

(Stats from jarek's bio at leafscentral)

Scoring finishes

Assists
1973-74 NHL 57 (7)
1976-77 NHL 55 (10)
1977-78 NHL 57 (10)

Points
1973-74 NHL 82 (9)

*Asterisked ones are runner-ups to Orr or Potvin.

Points among D: 2*, 2*, 2*, 3, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 8, 10

Playoff goals: 2
Playoff assists: 2, 5, 7, 8, 9
Playoff points: 3, 7

Playoff points among D: 2*, 2, 2, 4, 4, 5, 7 (3 in 5 GP), 8, 11 (5 in 11 GP), 12 (5 in 3 GP)

-During Park's playoff peak (1972-1978) he was 1st among D in points (153% of 2nd).
-During Park's entire playoff career, (1972-1983, removing first 3 years and last 2), he was 2nd in points among D (79% of Potvin).

-During Park's prime (1970-1978), he was 2nd in points among D (71% of Orr).
-During Park's entire career (1970-1984, removing 1st and last seasons), he was 2nd in points among D (99% of Potvin).


Honors
1969-70 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1970-71 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)
1971-72 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1972-73 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)
1973-74 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1975-76 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)
1977-78 NHL NHL All-Star Team (1st)

Awards
Hart: 5th (1970, 1976, 1978), 8th (1974), 9th (1972)
Norris: 2nd* (1970, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1978), 3rd (1973), 8th (1979), 9th (1981)

Quotes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
Brad Park was a highly efficient defender, combining size and clean but dogged tenacity with an uncanny awareness of the game. A noted hip-checker, Park was brash and unintimidated. But with the puck he became a natural chessmaster on the ice. more-than-likely make a perfect pinpoint pass to clear the puck out of the zone and start the attack. With a short burst of speed he would often jump to join the rush as a fourth attacker, and was a true power play quarterback. Park, not unlike Ray Bourque years later, was a consistently steady defender with often brilliant offensive instincts.
...
In almost any other time period Brad Park would have been considered the best defenseman of his time. But Park played in the enormous shadows of Bobby Orr in Boston and Denis Potvin on Long Island.
...
Park went from unbridled prodigy to popular sensation in New York, ranking him as perhaps the greatest defenseman in the long history of the Blueshirts.
...
"Park reminds me of Pierre Pilote," once said Chicago coach Bill Reay. "Both were relatively compact men who could accelerate better than most forwards."
...
But Park's cerebral play would quickly win over the fans. But the Bruins got a different, more mature Park than the one who so often dominated games against them. Park's play in Boston tamed down somewhat, mostly due to necessity. By the time he was 28 he had undergone five major knee surgeries and four arthroscopic surgeries. But his play remained sterling, in some ways better than ever under the Bruins tight checking system.
...
"My wheels aren't as good, but my brain is better," Park said at the time. "When I was younger and quicker I was capable of controlling a whole game over the whole rink. Now I've got to be content to control our zone. Basically I'm prepared to do less and do it well rather than try doing what I used to do and do it badly."
Quote:
Originally Posted by loh
In just about any other era, Brad Park would have been considered the best defenseman of his generation. He had size and played aggressively, taking care of business in his own zone. Offensively, he was a pinpoint passer and a deceptive stickhandler, abilities which made him a natural and potent power-play threat. He had the skating speed and the instincts to join the rush, providing his team with a fourth attacker.
...
After a solid rookie season, Park established himself as one of the top defensemen in the league in his second year. He earned the respect of his teammates and the fans in New York, and soon the whole league was talking about his savvy and poised play. Park was named to the NHL's First All-Star Team alongside Orr and placed second to the Bruins star in voting for the Norris Trophy. He was the youngest Ranger ever to earn a place on the league's first team.

Park's offensive numbers improved in each of his first four years with the Rangers. He was chosen to play for Canada in the Summit Series in 1972 and was impressive on the blue line for the embattled Canadians, finishing with five points in eight games. For the next several seasons, Park, whose Rangers had redeveloped into one of the league's better teams, was regularly compared to Orr, who was struggling with knee problems but still revolutionizing the position with his outstanding play.

Park was an expert at taking forwards out of the play and away from the middle of the rink. Opponents would feel as though they'd beaten the defender to open ice, only to find they no longer had a good view of the net.
...
In Boston, Park was a natural fit, his offensive skills meshing perfectly with the team's style of play. He enjoyed some his finest individual seasons with the Bruins and brought the club to the Stanley Cup finals in two consecutive seasons, 1977 and 1978, though the team failed to capture the title either time.


Will add more, just getting one done for my best player


Last edited by Stoneberg: 04-06-2011 at 06:24 PM.
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Old
04-07-2011, 12:01 AM
  #211
seventieslord
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With the 267th pick in ATD2011, The Regina Pats are pleased to select:

Wayne Cashman, LW/RW



- 6'1", 208 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1970, 1972)
- Summit Series Champion (1972)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1974, 1977, 1978)
- NHL 2nd All-Star Team (1974)
- NHL "3rd" All-Star Team (1971)
- Top-20 in Assists Twice (5th, 5th) - 3 more times top-40
- Top-20 in Points Twice (4th, 7th) - 3 more times top-40
- Top-20 in Playoff Points 5 Times (7th, 14th, 14th, 16th, 17th)

ONLINE SOURCES

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey.net
When he retired at the end of the 1982-83 season, Cashman was the last survivor of the Original Six. Cashman played junior in Oshawa with Bobby Orr, but he was a winger with not much speed or skill. But, he was the best in the league in the corners, and it was his superb work that got the puck to centre Phil Esposito in the slot time and again so that Espo could break all goal-scoring records (their linemate was Ken Hodge, part Cash, part Espo).

His first game came in 1964-65 as an emergency recall when the Bruins were short of forwards. Two years later he earned a full-time job in Beantown, and he became known as a scrapper and player both. He played on the historic Summit Series Team Canada team in 1972, but his career was jeopardized in 1972-73 when he slid into a goal post and hurt his back. Undaunted, he continued to play. In fact, it was easier for him to skate than either walk or sleep. But by seasons end he could barely move.

After a serious operation, he recovered, and in 1977 was made the Bruins captain. He returned to play aggressively and maintain his ability to score 20 goals a season, though the team's playoff runs were always both consistent and not particularly lengthy. Six years later, he retired.

Winner of two Stanley Cups, Cashman played (17 years, 1,027 games) with the Boston and is still one of the most loved Bruins of the modern era.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
When Wayne Cashman dies, it would be only too fitting that he be buried in the corner of the cemetary.

"Cash" was a fierce cornerman for 18 NHL seasons, all with the Boston Bruins. Often playing on a line with Ken Hodge and Phil Esposito, his job was to go into the corners and battle for the loose pucks. Using his size and feared reputation, more often than not he would come out of the corner with the puck and set up either Hodge or Espo with a good scoring opportunity. Though he put up decent offensive numbers himself, Cash's performance over the years could never be measured by statistics.

Opponents thought twice about getting into the corners with Wayne.

Wayne's teammate Derek Sanderson remembered the battles in the corners.

"You could see a guy go into a corner after the puck, and just before he got to it, he stopped and flinched a bit when he saw Cash. That's when you knew you got him on the ropes," Sanderson said.

The Cashman-Hodge-Esposito line scored an incredible 140 goals and 336 points in 1969-70. That was an NHL record at that time. Combined they weighed well over 600 pounds together, which made them tough to play against.

A veteran Boston hockey writer observed:

"Early in the game, the other side is bouncy and fresh. But by the second and third periods they're so tired of trying to wrestle these fellows around that they just don't have the strength to hold them off. Which is one big reason the line came up with 336 points in 1969-70."

A good playmaker, Wayne also served as the Bruins policeman. In the age of "Big Bad Bruins," Wayne was the biggest and baddest. If the opposition even looked at Esposito or Bobby Orr the wrong way, "Cash" would be the first to intervene.

After Espo and Orr left Boston it was Wayne who took over the role of a leader.

"Back in the days of Orr and Esposito," said Bruins GM Harry Sinden late in Cashman's career, "Cash was a follower. Now he's a helluva leader on the ice and back in the room."

Goalie Ron Grahame agreed with Sinden.

"Cash is a real team player. On the ice he's leading by example and off the ice he's more vocal than anyone else, yapping at us to keep it going."

While he is best known for his physical dominance in the corners and in fights, Wayne was also a very good player. He scored 20 or more goals on eight occasions. His tenacious forechecking was an integral part of the Boston offense and it's safe to say that the scoring exploits of Espo or Orr wouldn't have been as impressive if they didn't have a guy named "Cash" doing their dirty work for them.

Wayne played all 1,027 games with Boston between 1964 and 1983. He never changed his game - playing every one of his 1,027 games with tremendous desire. Wayne had injuries which would have sidelined most players for weeks and even months. For most of his NHL career Wayne was bothered by a bad back. He once played almost an entire season with a ruptured disc in his back.

Some players even tried to take advantage of that and go for Wayne's back.

"A few guys went overboard. I don't mind them taking good, legitimate shots at me, but I didn't appreciate the ones who went for my back. There's no point in naming them. They know who they are anyway, and some day their time will come," Cash said in 1973 when the cheap shots at him were at an all time high.

And Wayne usually got even with those players.

He was actually the Last player from the "original six" era to retire. He was a member of two Stanley Cup champions in 1970 and 1972, and was in the finals five times.

Wayne also played in the classic Summit Series 1972, even if it only was for two games. Before one of the games, he made a little impromptu speech in the locker room.

"Tonight you guys just concentrate on playing your own games," he said, "and I'll play the Big, Bad Bruin."

"When someone clobbered Clarke, I clobbered him right back," Cash said. "When someone speared Henderson, I speared him right back - even though I didn't like the idea of spearing. I didn't know if these people understood English or not, but I'm sure they got the message. I just let them know if they were going to play that way, I was going to dish it back."

Classic Wayne Cashman.

Following his playing career, Wayne turned to coaching. He served as an assistant coach for a long time before finally getting a chance to be a head coach in 1997 (Philadelphia). However only 61 games into his rookie season he was replaced by Roger Neilson. Always the team man, Wayne agreed to stay on as an assistant coach in order to help Neilson prepare for the playoff run.

Wayne's humility after being fired by the Flyers sums up Cashman the man - a great person who would do anything it takes to help out his team. Wayne did that for 18 NHL seasons and he continued to do that long after his playing days.
PUBLISHED SOURCES

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings of the Ice
Wayne Cashman made a living in the corners of rinks around the NHL, always wearing the black and yellow of the Boston Bruins. He was a courageous battler, big and tough and also rather nasty, the kind of player who is loved by teammates and fans but hated by his opponents.[Though he was considered a threat with his fists, he was more than an enforcer. He had eight seasons with more than 20 goals and was a vital part of one of hockey's most productive lines when he teamed with Phil Esposito and Ken Hodge.

"Cash is a player. He is the kind of player every coach wants. He is a worker, a hitter and absolutely unselfish," Boston coach Don Cherry said of his rugged charge in 1975. "He sacrifices himself for his teammates and his team. He plays hurt when he has to. He suffered serious injuries and battles back. He is an amazing man."

Harry Sinden, Boston coach at the time, needed a replacement for Ron Murphy, the veteran left-winger, who was injured. Sinden decided to move Cashman from his post on the right wing to fill the gap, an experiment that worked immediately. While Cashman used his physical prowess to dig the puck in the corners, Esposito staved off defenders in front of the net, ready to snap any pass past the goalie. "When Cashman went into the corner, nine times out of 10 he came out of it with the puck," Esposito said. "We worked on it a lot. I know by the position he took when he went into the corner where he would get the puck to me."

With Cashman's help, Esposito set a record for scoring in 1971 with 76 goals – a number the top league until Wayne Gretzky came along – and also have three other seasons with more than 60 goals. Though the line had a simple formula for success, it wasn't always easy. One night in Buffalo, Esposito was waiting in front of the net as Cashman battled with two Sabres in the corner. Espo thought he saw the puck popped loose and went in to find. "Cash did come up with the puck and got it out to the slot, but I wasn't there. Buffalo picked it up and went down the ice to score. When we got back to the bench, I apologize to him for not being where I was supposed to be." Cashman told Esposito, his friend and roommate of seven years, that he would beat him up if he found him in a corner again!

Cashman was a surprise selection to the Canadian roster in the summit series against the Soviet Union in 1972 Harry Sinden new Cashman well and said after the series that it was Cashman's play when he was inserted into the series second game to turn things around for Canada. "We want people who can do great things with the puck, but we also need guys like Cashman will get it for them."

For a man who played such a physical game, who sustain such a beating night after night, Cashman's career lasted a remarkably long time… Cashman was a fit player with stamina, but he also had the ability to play hurt. Early in his career he had a devastating pain in his back. When doctors operated, they found and removed a bone chip that had been embedded in a nerve. "But before they operated, he was coming to the dressing room on his hands and knees, literally, and somehow getting in the whirlpool and getting loosened up enough to play," Sinden recalled. "He played three or four games that way."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey's Glory Days
the zaniest – if not the meanest and toughest – number of those Boston teams they called the big bad Bruins was Wayne Cashman. "I knew I'd never be a 50 goal scorer, so I spent my career doing what had to be done."

He was counted on to do the dirty work in the corners and get the puck, by fair means or foul, to Espo in the slot. Goaltender Gerry Cheevers says," cache was the greatest of all the guys from our era when it came to dating in the corners and along the boards. And if someone gave or or Espo a cheap shot, Cashman would be there in an instant, throwing punches, exacting revenge.

Manager Harry Sinden would later say, "I don't think I could've dreamed of Cashman becoming such a leader."

A great player? Yes. A different kind of guy? You bet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey All-Stars
Wayne Cashman personified the big bad Bruins… The Bruins were determined to establish a bigger, tougher physical presence, and Cashman fit the bill perfectly… Cashman's greatest contribution was made in the corners. His rough and fearless approach forced enumerable turnovers, and he could handle the puck when he got it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Game We Knew: Hockey in the 70s
Cashman and linemates Phil Esposito and Ken Hodge terrorized the NHL with size, skill and aggressiveness.… Cashman enjoyed consistent seasons patrolling the wing for the Bruins, willing to perform all the necessary corner work… His willingness for body checking and to dig pucks of the corners was recognized with an appointment play for team Canada in 1972...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shooting Stars
the Esposito trade worked, in part, for the Bruins as they finished first in the Adams division the next four years. For Phil the great, the story wasn't so happy. The Rangers finished dead last the next three seasons and second last in 1979 in the Patrick division. Now, instead of having remarkable passing wingers such as Wayne Cashman and Ken Hodge, Esposito found himself in the middle of Rod Gilbert and Steve Vickers, scorers in their own right who wanted to receive, not give, the passes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
Wayne Cashman comes as close to being THE big, bad Bruins as anyone else on the Boston roster. No one pushes him around. What's more, no one pushes the other Bruins around whenever Wayne is on the ice. Wayne's temperament often resembles that of an aroused loanshark, but he insists the rough stuff was strategy, not a vendetta. "If you can get a guy to alter his game by half a step, then you created an advantage for your team," he said.

During the second half of the 1973 season, a back injury prohibited him from playing his customary hard-hitting brand of hockey. Before each game and practice he was taped "like a mummy". But he never considered sitting it out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston Bruins Greatest Moments and Players
"I would sit on the bench," said O'Reilly, "and watch the way Schmautz and Hodge shot the puck. I would watch Bobby Orr skate and the way Cashman went into the corner..."

One could simply not find a more team-oriented player than Wayne Cashman... to say that Wayne would do anything to win would not be an understatement, considering some of his real life antics... his pugilism tended to obscure his hockey talents... cashman worked those trenches through the 1983 season and was one of the club's most distinguished captains. His teammates finger the Esposito trade as the event that had the most profound effect on the Cashman psyche, if not the team as a whole. "The guys who got the headlines were gone or injured," said Cheevers, "and everybody on the team had to learn to be a worker like Cashman."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Game Of My Life
"When I got to Boston, I found out they were great guys," Park says three decades after the trade. "I got to play with Wayne Cashman, who was a wonderful, wonderful teammate."
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Third Best Hull
One of the main characters on the team was Wayne Cashman. Cashman lived hard. He'd party all night and he'd hit the ice and still be the best player. I was amazed. I had seen Mikita and Esposito, but this guy was a wildman and he'd still be the best player the next day. We used to play guilty - Bobby used to say he played best when he was playing guilty for what he'd done the night before - but nothing like Cash. Wayne never actually played in Moscow because of what had happened in Sweden. The problem was that Cash embraced the European style of play and became known as the "Butcher of Barcelona." He could spear and slash anyone. Ulf Sterner took a run at Cash during the first game. Cash went to spear him and Ulf raised his stick and hit Cash right in the mouth, splitting his tongue down the middle... it swelled up and looked like a tennis ball.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remembering Phil Esposito
Through much of his time with the Bruins, Esposito played at centre on a line with Wingers Wayne Cashman and Ken Hodge, two large - and in Cashman's case, belligerent - wingers. They were masters of the corners. Hodge often carried the puck deep, holding it until Esposito was "at the desk in his office,: then placed it on his stick for a quick shot. Cashman was the prototype for the classic "corner man," a strong, abrasive forechecker, all elbows and stick, gaining control of the puck with persistent digging. Often, when Cash made the pass to Esposito in the slot he would head for the front of the net to engage a defender in a diversion-creating, screen-building tussle.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Picture History of the Boston Bruins
the Stanley Cup winning Bruins received a thunderous ovation as they were introduced by Fred Cusick, the Bruins TV voice. The biggest cheers were reserved for Bobby Orr, Wayne Cashman and Gerry Cheevers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by We Love You, Bruins
playing on the left side wouldn't seem easy for Cashman, since he is a right-handed shot. But he doesn't mind
Quote:
Originally Posted by As the Puck Turns
some people had wondered why Jean-Paul Parise and Wayne Cashman were selected for team Canada. The only knew one style of play, rough and tough, grinding and mocking along the boards and in the corners, whacking and hacking at every opportunity with reckless abandon. This style of play reduced the game to its most base elements. It wasn't pretty, but it seemed to be the only way to throw the Soviets from their patented indiscipline style of play. The Soviets thought they had seen typically rugged Canadian style hockey in international competition over the years, and they thought they were rock hard for it. But they had never experienced the aggressiveness of the likes of Cashman, Parise, Bobby Clarke and Company.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic Hadfield's Diary
Ken Hodge and Wayne Cashman work hard for Phil. They're like foot soldiers. They barge into corners, fight for the puck, and then they set up Phil in front. Phil gets the goals and the credit, but don't overlook the work of Hodge and Cashman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunder and Lightning
I don't know why Harry put him there. Wayne was a right-handed shot, and he played right wing in Junior. But Cash was so good in the corners and so good in that offspring that he could play either side. Wayne would say to me, "throw it in my corner and get the **** in front of the net." With Wayne on one side and Hodge on the other, my job was to skate to the hashmark area in front of the net. They would get me the puck, and I would snap it into the net.

Off the ice and sober, cash was a *****cat, but on the ice he could be downright mean. Cash was a very sensitive guy, but when he was drinking he became a little bit crazy. When he drank, his inhibitions left him. Whatever his most deep-seated demons were, that's what he became. Cash had a great career, but if he had stayed away from the craziness a little more, he would've been a Hall of Famer. Of our group of crazies, Wayne was the Most Valuable Crazy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black and Gold – Four Decades of the Boston Bruins and Photographs
"Hodge was the guy who could just force himself in front of the net, probably the strongest guy on our team," says Esposito. "He was in front of the net, I was 10 or 15 feet out, and Cashman was the best corner man in the game, without a doubt."

"Craziest guy?" Responds Bucyk when asked. "Probably Bobby Schmautz, he was a bit wacky, and Cashman, he wasn't crazy but he was a team player and he would protect you."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold War
into the lineup go Wayne Cashman and Jean-Paul Parise as new wing mates for Esposito: Cashman has set up many of Esposito 66 goals during the preceding season in Boston.

... In the eighth minute of the second period, Cashman's relentless digging pays off. Phil Esposito is dumped just to the right of the Soviet met by his shadow, Vladimir Petrov. With the referee's arm up to signal a penalty... Phil unhurriedly rises from his knees as if he has all day. Meanwhile Cashman is controlling the puck and, eyeing Phil heading for the goalmouth, flick surpassed him through some Soviet skates. Suddenly animated, Esposito in one swift gesture pulls the puck across the top of the crease, right past Tretiak's hungry eyes and lunging stick, and fires it high into the left corner… A patented "Cashman-to-Esposito-in-the-slot" number.

... In the second period, Parise and Cashman combined on a different kind of goal – a textbook example of Bruins style tactics in the Soviet end. Both bodyslam the Soviet defenseman up against the boards, mucking for the puck in the left corner. They just keep scrabbling until Cashman gets possession and flips a centering pass to Esposito in the high slot. One timing a pass, he drilled it into the upper right-hand corner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Boston Bruins – Celebrating 75 Years
two years later, their trek ended in New York. They had pounded to rather weak teams, the Maple leafs and the blues, to get to the finals while the Rangers were being the much tougher Canadiens and Blackhawks. But along the way, New York superb center Jean Ratelle had broken his ankle, leaving all of the burden of Ranger leadership on sloping shoulders of Brad Park. They were again mean games, and I have the particular memory of Park clawing like an alley cat with the Bruins Wayne Cashman, who was superb in that series.

...When Wayne got really mad, his eyes tilted. Ranking the all-time scariest Bruins, terrible Ted Green is third, Bob Schmautz is second, and Cashman wins the prize.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Rangers, the Bruins, and the End of an Era – A Tribute to a Great Rivalry
Jack Egers: "they had their certain guys that would protect their big boys. Esposito would get into some jackpots where he liked to throw a little elbow every once in a while but if you wanted to go after him, you know that Ken Hodge or Cashman would be there. That's the way it was back then. "
This one emphasizes just how crazy and fearsome Cash could be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger – a Hockey Story
on Thursday in Boston, they dropped the puck and almost before it hit the ice O'Reilly and I were at it. We got into a series of fights, and in between these battles with O'Reilly I was running at all the Bruins. The way I saw it, I had nothing to lose. Eventually, O'Reilly had me down on the ice and Wayne Cashman was trying to kick me in the head with his skates. He got one into my helmet, leaving a deep cut which required six stitches. But it was obvious he wasn't going to leave it at that. It was then that O'Reilly said, low enough to escape Cashman's hearing, "put your head under my body, I'll shield you. " I guess he believed that Cashman was capable of kicking my eyes out. After that incident, I always played O'Reilly even Stephen; I would never elbow him, or cheap shot. It would be hard but clean. O'Reilly had protected me, put his arms over me, but he wouldn't of said, "hey, cash, don't do that!" Because it would've involved some loss of face. That's how it works within the game. Cashman might've gone into the dressing room and said something like, "hey, you wimp O'Reilly, what's going on between you and Williams?"
Dave Schultz's description of his most famous encounter with Cashman:

Quote:
Originally Posted by the hammer: Confessions of a Hockey Enforcer
Cashman, a tall blonde forward with the perpetual look of innocence going over the top of the trenches, used every device to throw us off our game and, occasionally, would use his henchmen to help out. I would be in the penalty box and Cashman's bigmouth center Phil Esposito would skate over to me and, in threatening tones, say: "hammer. The boys are gonna get you. Or watch out, hammer, the boys are gonna get you. Unlike Esposito, Cashman preferred pantomime, pretending to be a surgeon ready to cut my eyes out. Instead of waving a scalpel, Cashman would use his stick, brushing up against me, pushing his stick against majors the same, "you want any? You want to get me? You'll have to go through my stick first."

... Another thing that absolutely petrified – and enraged – meaning was stick swinging. Dennis Hextall, one of the worst offenders, gave me great respect for the injury potential of wood when he nearly put the blade of his stick through my neck. Of the players still around, Dave Hutchison, Cashman, and Bobby Schmautz are the leading lumberjacks.

... When Shero finally gave me the signal I knew I was to go over the boards to restore order; more specifically, to stop Cashman and, if possible, beat his head it. In no time at all we were facing each other in the classic high noon meeting. My adrenaline was pumping as he moved his index finger under his eyes as if to tell me he would cut my eye out. I remembered how he had once stuck me in the throat with his stick and I knew that if I didn't move fast I would be in trouble. With my gloves off I longed for Cashman's jersey with my left hand. I got a piece of it just to the left of the crest but Cashman, and old gunfighter, knew what was coming and while I reached he punched. He taught me with two blows but he never stunned me and that was crucial. If he had dulled my senses I would have been finished, but I withstood his first shots and that enabled me to bring my artillery and fire away. I came back with my right and caught him square in the modern. He turned red before I could smash them with the second and third right. Cashman realized he was in trouble but he couldn't cope with my onslaught. He ducked, but I nailed him with an upper cut. He tried to wrestle me but I got free and went to the uppercut again. I was tiring but I could tell he was fading faster. I felt giddy as I put all I had behind another uppercut lifted him right off his skates. He reminded me of a mortally wounded ship that had just been torpedoed. He fell back off balance and I helped him by dumping him on his side. My body was drained of strength. I didn't resist when the lines and pulled me off the beaten Cashman. I had scored a TKO.
Cashman was respected by his teammates, but not by some others:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Hood: Calling The Shots
I had about as much respect for Wayne Cashman the hockey player as I did for Chris Nilan - close to nil. They were the same type of player. But at least Nilan would drop his gloves and fight. Cashman would make sure his stick was in position to ward off any takers. He was one of the big bad Bruins and nobody played the intimidation role better. He would give the guy a little shove in the face after the play was over and then sneer at him. He made sure everyone knew that if you messed with him, you messed with all the Bruins. He liket that power and took advantage of it. When a guy was down, Cashman always looked ready to kick him.

Wayne Cashman was a hell of a hockey player in his own right and could dig that puck out of the corner with the best of them, but I'm sure he was a lot more effective knowing that the opposing players were worrying about him and his teammates as they were about the puck. His intimidation tactics worked so well on his opponents that he tried them out on referees as well. Or maybe he just did it because he enjoyed it. He'd stand about three feet away from me and hold his stick upside down, studying the blade. Then he'd say something like, "I'd like to gouge somebody's eyes out with this stick." Meaning my eyes, of course. He knew I couldn't call a misconduct penalty for that.
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated, February 13, 1969
The young players called up during the injury crisis, particularly Don Marcotte, Wayne Cashman, Rick Smith and Jim Harrison, have performed like hardened Bruins. They have been rough and mean and not afraid to pick up penalties. Cashman started Boston to one victory when he smashed New York's Reggie Fleming with an elbow thrust.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated, March 29, 1971
Indeed, Cashman-Esposito-Hodge have already become the highest-scoring line in history, breaking a record set by Esposito, Hodge and Ron Murphy. It is a beefy line, more than 600 pounds and 18 feet in total height—behemoth by hockey standards. "We try to go at 'em in waves," Esposito says. "Hodgey and Cash go into those corners like tigers to dig that puck out of there, and I help out. If the other team wants to pay too much attention to me, the others will score. And it doesn't hurt when Bobby Orr's out there firing those cannon shots of his from the point."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated, May 8, 1972
. Park, the league's No. 2 defenseman after Orr and scorer of 24 goals, had been ineffective against the Bruins because players like McKenzie and Wayne Cashman kept getting him into fights.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated, November 19, 1973
Esposito, Hodge and Cashman have scored more points than any other NHL line since Harry Sinden, then the Boston coach, first tried them together in 1969. Hodge, a 6'2", 210-pound right wing, is a combination corner man and goal scorer, while Cashman, one of the three best punchers in the NHL, confines most of his activity to the corner boards. The pugnacious Cashman usually starts his fights with a decided advantage; he is a southpaw, something his opponents forget until his left hand has connected half a dozen times. "Without Cashman and Hodge," says Esposito, "I wouldn't score half as many goals."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated, May 2nd, 1977
Cashman probably saved Boston's 4-3 victory with a superior defensive maneuver in the closing seconds. Inexplicably, the Bruins' two defensemen were caught up ice as Butch Goring and Marcel Dionne, the most dangerous L.A. attackers, crossed the Boston blue line. Goring tried to slide the puck to the streaking Dionne, who was in the clear, but Cashman deflected it into the corner—and time ran out. "God Bless Wayne Cashman," sang Boston Coach Don Cherry.

...For Cashman, that assist was all part of a week's work. Rough-tough describes L.A.'s Schultz, Toronto's Tiger Williams, St. Louis' Bob Gassoff and Philadelphia's Bob Kelly, Paul Holmgren and Moose Dupont, but Cashman was the "most hated player" in the NHL before any of them ever came into the league. Thoughts of Cashman bring to mind the swashbuckling beat-em-up Bruins of the late '60s and early '70s. Cashman was the meanest and toughest player on a team that ruthlessly bullied opponents. He played left wing on a line with Center Phil Esposito and Right Wing Ken Hodge, and it was Cashman who always did the dirty work in the corners to get the puck out in front of the net to his high-scoring and highly publicized linemates.

...On the ice Cashman was the NHL's premier policeman. Let someone cheap-shot Bobby Orr or Esposito, and Cashman would show up to exact revenge. A left-handed puncher, he was rated the best fighter to come out of the Boston area since Rocky Marciano. Actually, Cashman is from Harrowsmith, Ontario, a small town outside Kingston. " Cashman's town seems like something out of Deliverance"' says Cherry. "A tough town?" Cashman says. "Yeah, I guess so. There were nine Cashman boys in it."

...Nevertheless, Cashman always has had his admirers. "He's really one of the best wings ever to play the game," says Boston Goaltender Gerry Cheevers. "At the Team Canada training camp last summer we were picking our alltime NHL team, and I insisted that we had to have Cashman as one of the five left wings. O.K., he doesn't have the flair of a Bobby Hull, but championships aren't won only by the flashy guys. They're won in the corners and along the boards, and Cashman is the best of our era when it comes to playing in the corners and along the boards."

Over the last two seasons, though, a new Cashman has emerged. Oh, the new Cashman still plies his trade in the corners, and he provides protection for Center Jean Ratelle, but he has tempered the viciousness that once characterized his play and has become the unquestioned leader of the Bruins. He is Captain Cash of the Lunchpail A.C. now, a grizzled veteran of 31 with thinned-out hair and a face full of scars. "I don't think I ever could have dreamed of Cashman becoming such a leader," says Boston General Manager Harry Sinden, who was Cashman's first coach at Oklahoma City in 1966 and later coached him in Boston.

...Cashman has exhibited almost perfect control this season, engaging in only one fight. "Who'd ever have thought they'd see the day when Cashman would turn the other cheek?" says one NHL coach. High-sticked by L.A.'s Hutchison Thursday night, Cashman refused Hutchison's offer to engage in immediate fisticuffs, thus giving Boston a man advantage. "A couple of years ago," Cashman says, "I never could have kept myself from going after the guy."

...Cashman assumed the Bruins' captaincy on March 3, when Defenseman Dallas Smith, who was wearing the "C" in the absence of the injured Johnny Bucyk, suddenly retired. When Bucyk returned to the Boston lineup for one game last week, he refused to wear the "C" on his shirt and insisted that Cashman keep it permanently.

"Cash never used to say a thing," Cheevers says. "Then he became captain, and now he's always talking with the young players—sometimes cheerleading, sometimes being brutally blunt. Cash becoming captain is the most important thing that has happened to this team."
SCOUTING REPORTS

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1972
had 100 penalty minutes, much of that the result of the best left hook in hockey
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1973
the quickest left hook in hockey belongs to this rough and tough left winger... started out as a RW but changed sides when the Bruins needs a replacement for Ron Murphy three years ago... the switch obviously didn't bother him...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
third member of the Bruins' top line with Phil Esposito and Ken Hodge... specializes in heavy-duty work in corners and along the boards... fearless player who has reputation among rival players for having a mean streak and fist-fighting ability... backs down from no one and has a low boiling point... had subpar playoff but was hampered by back ailment...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1975
responded to offseason back surgery with an 89-point campaign, his best ever... during the days of the Big Bad Bruins, he was one of the baddest... still has his moments, as his bitter exchanges with Dave Schultz in the finals indicate... rated among hockey's best cornermen.

Top ten all-time bad guys:

7. Wayne Cashman

Top-ten modern bad guys:

3. Wayne Cashman
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976
One of hockey's top cornermen... has tamed down from days of Big Bad Bruins when he was one of the meanest... a natural right winger, his digging as LW on Phil Esposito's line has helped make it one of hockey's most effective groupings... was called up by the Bruins for his first NHL game to check Gordie Howe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1977
bothered by back problems recently but still finished second in NHL Goal Magazine poll rating league's best cornerman. Easy to talk with off the ice, but during game displays the mean streak coaches crave... Cash is a natural right winger who's spent most of his career working on the left side.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1978
May have slowed down a step after turning 30 but still ranked as a mean and fierce competitior with whom few opponents take liberties... always ranked one of the best and toughest cornermen in the league... still effective despite back ailments...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1980
still effective in the corners, relying more on skill and experience than on the intimidation tactics that made him a feared player in the 1970s... was the guts of the famous Hodge-Esposito-Cashman line...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1982
like Old Man River, Captain Crunch just keeps rolling along... still a fiery, competitive team leader... doesn't fight as much as he used to, but still commands respect as a two-fisted enforcer... a relentless backchecker... one of the best cornermen in the business...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1983
hits hard, gets hit hard, never quits... someday he'll get tired... a leader on and off the ice... has lost some scoring touch but is still valuable... does terrific work in the corners... doesn't fight like he used to, but doesn't have to.
POLLS

Quote:
Originally Posted by The World Almanac Guide To Pro Hockey 1974-75
HARDEST WORKER
1. Bobby Clarke
2. Walt Tkaczuk
3. Wayne Cashman


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04-07-2011, 02:27 AM
  #212
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Joe Nieuwendyk

Joe Nieuwendyk, C



Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
In 1985, after his freshman year, the Calgary Flames were sufficiently impressed to draft him in the second round, 27th overall. In his first full season as a Flame, 1987-88, the young center scored 51 goals and 92 points, becoming only the second NHL player after Mike Bossy to score 50 goals in his rookie season. His totals also included eye-popping 31 power-play goals and 8 game-winners, and he was rewarded with the Calder Trophy as the league's top rookie.

Nieuwendyk's second season with the Flames was just as impressive as his first. He was the leader of a team that won the Stanley Cup, again scoring 51 goals. In 1991 he was named captain of the Flames.

Besides being an exceptional hockey player, Nieuwendyk was also considered to be the best lacrosse player in Canada, and at one point he even played on a team that won the Minto Cup, the country's top award in that sport.

Known as an aggressive player in front of the net as well as a good passer, Nieuwendyk's style of play has caused him a number of health problems, he missed most of the 1998 playoff due to a knee injury. However, in 1999, his health and luck returned as Nieuwendyk scored 6 game-winning goals in the playoffs to lead the Stars to victory over Buffalo in the Stanley Cup finals.

Joe Niewendyk left the game of hockey as one of the most respected players of his time while recording 564 goals, 562 assists for a total of 1,126 points throughout his career.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Joe Nieuwendyk was a winner. He won three Stanley Cup championships with three different teams - Calgary, Dallas and New Jersey. Plus he won an Olympic gold medal with Team Canada in 2002.

In 1999 he was so important to Dallas' Stanley Cup championship that he was named as the Conn Smythe trophy winner - about as prestigious of an individual award a hockey player can earn.

That was not his only major award either. In 1988 he won the Calder trophy as best NHL rookie, and in 1995 he won the King Clancy award for his leadership on and off the ice.

Injuries really slowed him, although he always remained a clutch player.

Knowledgeable hockey fans know that Nieuwendyk was one of those guys who brought more to the rink than any statistic can quantify. That might seem odd to say given Nieuwy spent much of his career primarily as a top marksman, but he was a complete player. Aside from chronic back injuries, he had no real weakness in his game. And he brought a lot to the organization off the ice, both in terms of dressing room leadership and community involvement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Mirtle, The Globe and Mail
Internationally, he was a key defensive cog as part of Canada's Olympic entries in 1998 and 2002 (as seen above), and he won a silver medal with the 1986 world junior tournament.
Awards
1987-88 NHL Calder Memorial Trophy
1994-95 NHL King Clancy Memorial Trophy
1998-99 NHL Conn Smythe Trophy
1987-88 NHL NHL All-Rookie Team (1st)

Top 10 goals:
1987-88 NHL 51 (5)
1988-89 NHL 51 (5)
1989-90 NHL 45 (9)
1990-91 NHL 45 (7)
1997-98 NHL 39 (7)


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04-07-2011, 02:38 AM
  #213
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Bill Mosienko

Bill Mosienko, RW



Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
Mosienko will always be remembered for his record three goals in 21 seconds scored against goalie Lorne Anderson of the New York Rangers on March 23, 1952. Linemate Gus Bodnar assisted on all three, and all of the goals were scored while the teams were at even strength.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
"The crowd of 3,254 cheered Mosienko with a volume that seemed to come from twice that number when the record breaking accomplishment was announced," and that "Anderson might have stopped Mosienko on the Hawk star's first shot, an open thrust from the center alley. But the second and third shots were neatly executed, and could have fooled any goalie in the league."

"That record will never be broken. Never," suggested Hall of Fame teammate Bill Gadsby. "It was just fantastic, it was damn near the same play off the face-off each one. He could really skate. he could really fly and he scored those three goals. I mean, it was unbelievable just to watch it!"

His achievements have been overshadowed, for better or worse, by that amazing performance, but he was much more than just the answer of an excellent trivia question. A Hall of Fame player, Mosienko was a talented and solid right winger on the "Pony Line" with the brothers Bentley, Max and Doug. Together they were one of the greatest lines in hockey history.

In his 14 year career spent exclusively with the Chicago Blackhawks, Mosienko tallied 258 goals and 282 assists. He was the recipient of the Lady Byng Trophy in 1945 as the most sportsmanlike player. Although he and the "Pony Line" made Chicago a true Stanley Cup contender for many seasons, the two time All Star never did have his named engraved on the Stanley Cup.
Awards
1944-45 NHL Lady Byng Memorial Trophy
1944-45 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)
1945-46 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)

Top 10s:
Goals
1943-44 NHL 32 (6)
1944-45 NHL 28 (5)
1946-47 NHL 25 (10)
1950-51 NHL 21 (10)
1951-52 NHL 31 (2)

Assists
1943-44 NHL 38 (10)
1944-45 NHL 26 (9)
1945-46 NHL 30 (2)
1946-47 NHL 27 (10)
1948-49 NHL 25 (7)

Points
1943-44 NHL 70 (8)
1944-45 NHL 54 (5)
1945-46 NHL 48 (5)
1946-47 NHL 52 (9)
1951-52 NHL 53 (7)

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04-07-2011, 02:47 AM
  #214
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J.P. Parise, LW



Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
For most of his career in hockey, J.P Parise was an underrated player who took pride in the aspects of the game that had less to do with the score sheet and everything to do with digging pucks out of the corners. He was a smallish winger who made up for his shortness with a deceptive strength that he channeled, in its full force, onto the bodies of his opponents as he consistently out-dueled them for loose pucks.

Parise first gained fame with the Niagara Falls Flyers of the OHA in 1961-62. Under the strict and disciplined guise of coach Hap Emms, he learned to play the NHL way, up and down his wing in solid, two-way fashion.

During those days, the robust winger entertained little hope of cracking the NHL's tiny echelon of players at the top. Nonetheless, he remained steadfastly committed to his game of bulling, pushing, forcing mistakes, and outworking his opponents.

While toiling with the Rochester Americans in December 1967, the big-league doors swung wide open as his rights were secured by the Minnesota North Stars. In Minneapolis, Parise found the perfect venue for his defensively sound, two-way game. He became known as the four-wheeled drive of the Stars' attack. He joined Jude Drouin and Bill Goldsworthy on a line that brought credibility to the club's attack up front.

Over the next seven-and-a-half years, Parise hustled as a popular but unsung type who carried his pick, shovel and lunch pail to work each night to dig for pucks and to score clutch goals from time to time.

His working-class anonymity quickly dissolved, however, when he was selected as a checking specialist for Team Canada during the Summit Series of 1972. He joined Wayne Cashman and Phil Esposito as the designated corner man assigned to feed pucks to goal-crease resident Esposito.
Top 10s:
Assists
1969-70 NHL 48 (6)

Points
1969-70 NHL 72 (7)


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04-07-2011, 03:03 AM
  #215
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Paul Reinhart, D



Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
As a Flame, Reinhart made a leap directly to the pro ranks, quickly establishing himself as a superior two-way defender with versatility to boot.

But nonetheless, as a rearguard he showed plenty of offensive spark, especially setting up goals. He was also a very strong playoff performer, netting 77 points in 83 contests over the course of his eleven-year career.

The following season, the Flames got their Cup while Reinhart surmounted his back troubles to again establish himself as a solid defender for the Canucks. He kept up his performance until 1990 when he finally decided to give his back and his career a permanent rest.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Paul Reinhart was a tremendous cerebral player who could have been a Hall of Famer had his body held up. A serious back problem really limited him throughout his short career, but you could just tell how intelligent and special this player was despite the pain.

Paul was a very versatile player. He was primarily a defenseman but could also play any forward position. Even as a junior with his hometown team the Kitchener Rangers, he split time between center and defense.

"I've seen the other draft choices (from the deep 1979 Entry Draft) around the league and Paul doesn't have to take a back seat to any of them" Russell said. That's quite a compliment considering other first round draft picks that year included long time NHLers like Ray Bourque, Mike Gartner, Rob Ramage, Rick Vaive, Craig Hartsburg, Mike Ramsey, Tom McCarthy, Brad McCrimmon, Brian Propp, Michel Goulet and Kevin Lowe!

Paul was very strong with the puck. Once he got the puck it was very hard to get it away from him.


Paul was one of the first people asked to try out for the Canada Cup team in 1984 but had to turn down the invitation because of the bad back. He already had a Canada Cup behind him in 1981 where he made the team ahead of such players like Paul Coffey, Doug Wilson and Randy Carlyle (all subsequent Norris trophy winners). Unfortunately he twisted his ankle after only two games and had to watch the rest of the tournament from the stands. Paul also starred for Canada in the 1982 and 1983 World Championships, making the All-Star team. He also played in the 1985 and 1989 NHL All-Star games.

Although Paul never won the Norris trophy he was always one of the top scoring defensemen when healthy. For a couple of years he formed maybe the best offensive pairing amongst defensemen together with a young Al MacInnis, also a Kitchener Rangers graduate.


During the 1984 playoffs the Flames lost in the 7th and deciding game against the Oilers who went on to win the Stanley Cup that year. After the series Paul Reinhart was the leading playoff scorer with his 17 pts in 11 games and his partner on the blue line Al MacInnis was the second highest defenseman in the playoffs to that point (14 pts in 11 games). Paul was a very good playoff performer who got 77 pts (23 goals and 54 assists) in 83 career playoff games.

Despite playing in just two pain-filled years in Vancouver, Paul was named to the the team's 25th anniversary "All Canuck" team by the media. The accolade all but named #23 as the best d-man in Canucks history despite only playing 2 seasons, neither of which he played at 100%.

Paul had four or five good years left in him but his bad back won the battle. Paul goes down to history as one of the games most underrated skilled defensemen.

"In terms of all around talent, I don't believe there are many defensemen better than Reinhart," said his coach Bob Johnson during the 1986 season. "He's a capable defender in his own zone, first of all. Moreover, he's got the mobility and the offensive skills to make an important contribution to our attack. He's the big reason we've got one of the strongest power plays in the NHL."

An interesting side story about the man they call "Rhino" - As a kid he once played against Wayne Gretzky's peewee team. Paul tied The Little One against the boards in a rink with no glass to stop the puck from going out of play. Paul tied him up in the wrong spot as Wayne's grandmother was right there. She grabbed her purse and clubbed Reinhart over the head and told him to "leave my Wayne alone!" Gretzky later joked that the Oilers were looking to sign Grandma Gretzky if Dave Semenko ever got injured.
- 77 points in 83 playoff games, for 0.93 PPG
- had playoff where he scored 17 pts in 11 games, 18 in 21 and 15 in 16, plus two more PPG playoffs beyond first round


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04-07-2011, 03:59 AM
  #216
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Ott Heller, D



Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Though the red-haired Heller was said to be a very personable character off the ice, on the ice he was a quiet, steady defenseman who excelled at keeping opposition forwards outside of the slot and towards the perimeter. He was said to have incredible upper body strength, allowing him to quickly pin his opponent and by doing so avoiding many penalties. He was tough too, often training with local boxers at a local gym.

Heller was a great skater, and not afraid to join or even lead the rush from time to time. His most famous goal came in a playoff game against Montreal very early in his career. He dashed from one end of the rink to the other to score the game's only goal.


Heller, who captained the Rangers in his final three seasons, played in 646 career games, once a team record. He scored 55 goals and 231 points in an era when defensemen really were there for defense only. He added 6 goals and 14 points in 61 Stanley Cup playoff games.

"Ott was a hockey player, simple as that," recalled Emile Francis, in the book 100 Rangers Greats. "He was as tough as nails, and not an ounce of fat on him. What an athlete. It seemed like the guy played forever, and at such a high level. He was amazing."
Awards
1940-41 NHL NHL All-Star Team (2nd)

Top 10s:
Assists
1938-39 NHL 23 (7)

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04-07-2011, 01:02 PM
  #217
Velociraptor
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Oleg Tverdovsky, D

Position: Defenseman
HT/WT: 6'0", 211 lbs
Shoots: Left
Nickname(s): "Oleg Orr", "Double O"



- 2-time Stanley Cup Champion (2003, 2006)
- 77 goals, 317 regular season points in 713 games played.
- 0 goals, 14 playoff points in 45 games played.
Legends of Hockey

Quote:
Since making his NHL debut in 1994-95, Oleg Tverdovsky has developed into a dangerous offensive force. His skating, puck handling, and lethal shot have made him a dangerous foe on the power play as well as five-on-five.
Quote:
Two-thirds of the way through the 1995-96 season he was part of the package sent to the Winnipeg Jets for star forward Teemu Selanne. Tverdovsky remained with the franchise when it relocated to Phoenix in 1996-97 and scored a career high 55 points. His development was curtailed after a contract holdout in 1997-98, but he bounced back to play the best defensive hockey of his career in 1998-99. Prior to the 1999-00 season, the talented blueliner returned to Anaheim in exchange for Travis Green and a first round draft pick. Tverdovsky topped the 50-point mark in 2000 and 2001 and injected life into the club's power play. He also ignored a series of nagging injuries to lead the Ducks with an average of nearly 25 minutes of ice time per game in 2000-01.
The smooth skating defenceman went on to play one more season with the Ducks before he was acquired by the New Jersey Devils in the summer of 2002. Injuries plagued Tverdovsky in his first season with the Devils, limiting him to a mere 50 regular season games before helping the Devils capture their third Stanley Cup in nine years in a hard fought seven game series against the Anaheim Mighty Ducks.

On the international stage, Tverdovsky has represented Russia at the 1994 World Junior Championships, the 1996 World Cup, the 2002 Winter Olympics and the 1996 and 2004 World Championships.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor Dmitriyev
When I saw him for the first time I was amazed by his skating ability, he carried the puck so well, he had so much confidence that I decided to give him a chance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by USATODAY, 1996
In trading for defenseman Oleg Tverdovsky, the Winnipeg Jets get a player who's occasionally hard-hitting and hard-headed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Hartsburg
Oleg is still learning, he's a highly skilled player. Sometimes it's harder for someone like that to find his boundaries. A grinder or a role player knows early in life what they're capable of doing

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04-07-2011, 01:47 PM
  #218
Stoneberg
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Mike Ricci, C
Selke Record: 3, 4, 4, 12*

*1 second place vote, 3 third. Not very significant but at least recognized by a handful voters.
-He saw a couple votes in one other season.


He has a 30 goal season and a total of 6 seasons of 20+ goals. He had a few great playoffs, won a cup as a significant role player scoring 17 points in 22 games (he was an alternate captain on that team, for what it's worth).

I don't expect much offensively from him, maybe an odd goal here or there with two above average checking line wingers, especially offensively.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh
With the Nordiques, Ricci finally settled in as a true NHL character. An offensively gifted player, Ricci established a career high 78 points in his first seasaon with Nordiques and quickly became a fan favorite.

Over the years, Ricci's game has evolved away from the finesse style of his junior days towards a more defensive approach although he still spots his share of goals and assists
...
The former OHL star continued to play a game replete with leadership, character, and dogged defense for the club surpassing the 1000 games played mark during the 2003-04
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Great Book of San Francisco/Bay Area Sports Lists - Page 58
Damon Bruce - 2009
From 1997 through 2004, Ricci was the heart and face of the San Jose Sharks. He holds the team record with 228 consecutive games played. Captain Ricci became one of the best defensive centremen in the NHL. Without frontg teeth, and with a great mullet, Ricci was a rock on the first-and-only Sharks team to reach the Western Conference Finals in 2004...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The leadership challenge - Page 252 - James M. Kouzes, Barry Z. Posner - 2003
Mike Ricci is the alternate captain of the San Jose Sharks...An experienced player with the distionction of being on a Staley Cup winning team, and a leader on all the teams on which he's played, Mike knows a thing or two about teamwork...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denver Post - Jun 5, 1996
Mike Ricci, the guts and the grind of the Colorado Avalanche, was all over the ice...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocky Mountain News - May 10, 1996
After an injury-plagued regular season he would rather forget, Colorado Avalanche forward Mike Ricci has turned in a memorable performance in the playoffs...
Quote:
Originally Posted by San Diego Union - Tribune - Jan 7, 1997
Among its tenacious checkers are Claude Lemieux, Mike Ricci, xxx and xxx
-Played Elmer Lach in the movie The Rocket

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04-07-2011, 07:06 PM
  #219
Leafs Forever
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Quote:
John Ross Roach was one of the smallest and most exciting goaltenders ever to backstop in the NHL. He played junior hockey for the Toronto Aura Lee team in 1919-20 and then switched to the seniors the following year with the Toronto Granites.

In 1921-22, he turned pro with the Toronto St. Pats. During his rookie season, he was hard pressed to finish the regular season above .500. When he entered the playoffs, however, he just kept getting stronger and more exciting between the pipes as he led his club past the Vancouver Millionaires in a close battle to claim the Stanley Cup.

His rookie season marked the beginning of a 14-year run in the NHL, a lengthy career by the standards of his day. And during many of those seasons, he was a league leader in games played by a goaltender.

In all, Roach played his feisty brand of acrobatics for the St. Pats and later, the Maple Leafs for seven seasons. In 1928-29, he was traded to the New York Rangers where he led the league in games played for each of his four years on Broadway. All went well until the playoffs of 1932. While facing the Leafs in the finals, the little netminder gave up six goals in each of his three appearances. Toronto took the Cup while Roach was ushered out of town in a cash deal that sent him to Detroit.

In the Motor City, he played solidly and by season's end missed winning the Vezina Trophy by only a fraction of a percentage point. To ease his sorrow, however, he was selected to the All-Star team.-Legends of Hockey
Quote:
Roach was a nervous rookie, but his team did well enough to make the playoffs in 1921-22 and the St. Patricks pulled off a shocking upset of the powerful defending Stanley Cup champion Ottawa Senators in the two game, total goal NHL playoff. They then went on to beat Vancouver to win the Stanley Cup in Roach's very first year. It would be the only Stanley Cup champion Roach would ever play on, though he would achieve all-star status later on.

..After 1921-22 he was the regular goaler for the St.Pats but with mixed success. In 1924-25 he led the NHL in wins as the team captain, only to revert back to his indifferent play and when the St. Pats became the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Feeling it was time for another change, the newly named Leafs traded Roach to the New York Rangers for goaltender Lorne Chabot for the 1928-29 season.

In his very first year with the Rangers he set still-standing team records with a 1.48 average and 13 shutouts. He also led the Rangers to the Stanley Cup final, only to come up short against the Boston Bruins and their sensational rookie goaltender Tiny Thompson.-Joe Pelletier
The Toronto St. Pats are happy to select, the "Little Napolean" himself...



JOHN ROSS ROACH!
Awards and Achievements
1 x Stanley Cup Champion (1922)
1 x First Team All-Star (1933)
Hart Voting: 3rd(1924), 3rd(1933),

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04-07-2011, 07:26 PM
  #220
Leafs Forever
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Quote:
He could do it all. He was as quick as a cat and very strong for his size. And he could play all night!- Gordie Howe
Quote:
Not man guys could skate like Rogers.- Dave Keon
Quote:
But the promise of immediate ice time with the WHA's Edmonton Oilers lured Rogers away from the NHL. He skated for the club for just over a season and a half until he was dealt to the New England Whalers. In New England, he found a real home. His numbers began to increase on the strength of his emerging confidence and skill. His success was based on his quick skating, good shot, which he could release off-stride, and his ability to dart and spin into the corners against bigger wingers while emerging with the puck. Of course, having Gordie and Mark Howe on his line helped as well.- Legends of Hockey
Quote:
Herb Brooks liked players who could skate and shoot. Mike Rogers fit the bill perfectly. At 5-8, and 175 pounds, Rogers wasn't going to outmuscle too many people. But he was fast on his feet and averaged nearly a point per game in five seasons with Edmonton and New England in the World Hockey Association.

When the Whalers joined the NHL in 1979, Rogers showed he was good enough to play with the big boys, too. He rang up 44 goals and 105 points in 1979-80, and followed with a 40-goal, 105-point effort in 1980-81. Despite the guady offensie numbers, the Whalers weren't happy about Rogers defensive play. They made him available and GM Craig Patrick landed the slick centre on the eve of the 1981-82 season...-The New York Rangers: Broadway's Longest Running Hit
Quote:
Mike can be described as having a combination of speed and finesse, being an excellent playmaker and a good face-off man. He has a quick burst from his own zone and the exceptional ability to beat defensemen on the wide side.- Back of 1977-78 hockey card
The Toronto St. Pats are pleaded to select a slick scoring centre who can fill in on both special teams units...


MIKE ROGERS!

Awards and Achievements

Scoring
Rankings:
Goals: 13th(1980), 17th(1981), 27th(1982),
Assists: 6th(1980), 9th(1981), 12th(1982), 39th(1983),
Points: 5th(1980), 7th(1981), 12th(1982), 36th(1983), 65th(1985), 82nd(1984)

SH Goals: 2nd(1983), 6th(1981), 9th(1980)*
*With only 2 SH goals

Percentages of #2 Scorer (Rounder to Nearest Whole Number)(Removing Gretzky and Lemieux)
Goals: 79% (of 3-way tie for 1st), 71%, 63% Total: 213
Assists: 84%, 81%, 75%, 61% Total: 301
Points: 84%, 80%, 74%, 63%, 50%, 49% Total: 400
Long-Term:
In his 3-year Peak (1980-1982), Rogers was:
5th in Points(87% of the 2nd place-removing Gretzky scorer, Bossy), 12th in PPG
4th in Assists (90% of 2nd place-removing Gretzky scorer, Trottier), 11th in APG
10th in Goals(76% of 2nd place removing Gretzky scorer, Dionne) 22nd in GPG

In his scoring Prime (1980-1985), Rogers was:
22nd in Points(64% of 2nd place removing Gretzky Scorer, Dionne), 27th in PPG
19th in Assists (69% of 2nd place removing Gretzky scorer, Stastny), 20th in APG
32nd in Goals(60% of 2nd place removing Gretzky scorer, Dionne), 45th in GPG


Last edited by Leafs Forever: 04-07-2011 at 08:06 PM.
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04-07-2011, 07:40 PM
  #221
Hawkey Town 18
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Viktor Shalimov




Shoots: Left
Height: 5’11”
Weight: 170lbs
Born: 4/20/1951

USSR League
Spartak Moscow: 1969-85, 572GP-293G
Point Scoring Finishes: 1, 3, 4, 6, 6, 7, 7
MVP Voitng Top 5 Finishes: 3, 4,
All-Star Team: 76, 82
Best Line: 76, 80

Soviet National Team: 8 seasons, 126GP-66G
USSR Hall of Fame: 1975


World Championships
Gold - 75, 81, 82
Silver - 76
Bronze – 77
Point Scoring Leader: 1975
Goal Scoring Leader: 75, 82
Best Forward: 1982

1974 Summit

4GP-2G-0A-2Pts

Canada Cup
Gold - 1981
Bronze – 1976

Superseries
75-76, 76-77, 78-79, 82-83

Shalimov was the Top Scorer on his team in the 75-76 Superseries
The Journal – Jan. 13, 1976
“Victor Shalimov, the Wings’ top scorer in the series with four goals and four assists…”

Known as a goal scorer with a good shot

The Leader-Post – Nov. 26, 1976
“Big Shooters like Boris Mikhailova, Viktor Shalimov and Aleksandr Yakushev and defenceman Yuri Liapkin have been returned to favor under Kulagin for the coast-to-coast North American tour…”

The Morning Record and Journal – Jan. 11, 1978
Among the more prominent players on the Soviet roster are goaltender Vladislav Tretiak, forwards Victor Shalimov, Valeri Kharlamov, Boris Alexandrov and Boris Mikhailov…”

Shalimov finished second(tied) in scoring to Wayne Gretzky in scoring in the 1982 World Championships
Ottawa Citizen – April 30, 1982
“The five-point performance enabled Gretzky, who rewrote a bookful of NHL scoring records this past season, to capture the scoring title with 14 points on six goals and eight assists, followed by Victor Shalimov and Sergei Makarov fo the Soviet Union, who were tied at 13.”

Shalimov was named captain of the Soviet All-Star squad that played Team Canada in 1983
The Calgary Herald – Dec. 29, 1983
“A Soviet select team of any rank always prepares thoroughly for any kind of international tournament,” said Viktor Shalimov, captain of the Soviet all-star squad facing Team Canada tonight at the Saddledome.

Quote from http://www.passionhockey.com/Archives.html using google translate...
The red and white based on a unique line at the height of his career. The center Vladmir Shadrin, also gifted in that attack for defensive duties, and the rangy offensive talent Aleksandr Yakushev evolve together for many years at Spartak and the national team, backed by Yaroslavtsev then Zimin. For two years they have as right winger Viktor Shalimov, who knows how to use space to reveal its qualities as a great goalscorer.

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04-07-2011, 08:32 PM
  #222
Leafs Forever
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Quote:
The talented Swede became a key element in the rapid transition game and explosive power play on the Jets. A member of Sweden's World Championship team in 1989, Olausson spent over seven seasons in the Manitoba capital and set a personal high with 20 goals in 1991-92. The team was successful and entertaining but always played in the shadow of the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames.

Olausson was traded to the Oilers when they were rebuilding in 1993-94. By this time, he was a savvy veteran who made crisp passes and smart plays. He later played for Anaheim and Pittsburgh spending the 2000-01 season with the Swiss club SC Bern. The veteran returned to the NHL in 2001-02 after signing as a free agent with Detroit Red Wings following his sabbatical overseas and went on to capture his first Stanley Cup in a five game series win against the upstart Carolina Hurricanes and was earlier in the year a member of Sweden's Olympic Team.-Legends of Hockey
The Toronto St. Pats are happy to select a brilliant PP specialist and offensive D-man...


FREDRIK OLAUSSON!

Awards and Achievements
1 x Stanley Cup Champion (2002)
Norris Voting: 9th(1999)
AST Voting: 9th(1999)

Scoring
Points Amongst Defensemen: 4th(1999), 8th(1992), 10th(1989), 14th(1990), 16th(1993), 20th(1997), 24th(1991), 29th(2000), 34th(1998),

% of #2 scoring defensemen(Removing Coffey): 98%, 84%, 72%, 67%, 65%, 58%, 56%, 55%. Total: 555


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04-08-2011, 03:18 PM
  #223
BillyShoe1721
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RW Murray Balfour



1x Stanley Cup Champion
1x Top 6 PIM
2x Top 25 Goals (14, 25)
1x 24th in Assists
1x 22nd in Points
1x 2nd in Playoff Goals
1x 4th in Playoff Assists
1x 5th in Playoff Points

Quote:
Murray Balfour was a member of the famed "Million Dollar Line" for Chicago and a playoff hero, but his life was tragically cut short by cancer when he was only 28. After Balfour was traded to Chicago from Montreal for cash in 1959, he was put on a line with two stars earning sizable salaries, Bobby Hull and Billy Hay, and the troika was dubbed the Million Dollar Line.

It was Balfour who paid back the Habs in the 1960-61 Stanley Cup playoffs, scoring in triple overtime in the third game of the semifinal series. The Hawks won the Stanley Cup that year, although Balfour, who outscored his flashier linemates in the playoffs, had to watch the final game from the hospital after crashing into the Detroit net and breaking his arm in the fifth game.

The next year he had an eight-inch steel rod inserted from his wrist to his elbow to support the arm, though it didn't slow down the rugged winger. Balfour was traded to the Boston Bruins in 1964 but complained of constant fatigue. He was sent down to the minors and continued to have health problems. Exploratory surgery in 1965 revealed a tumor in his lung that was inoperable. He died less than eight weeks later.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=11908

Quote:
A gritty, hard nosed left winger named Murray Balfour...
http://books.google.com/books?id=lBS...hockey&f=false

Quote:
In 1959, two Montreal castoffs, Bill Hay and Murray Balfour, were installed on a line in Chicago with Bobby Hull. They were an instant hit and soon became known as the Million Dollar Line.
http://www.google.com/search?q=murra...8adc9e2b250eaf

Quote:
Stan Mikita, Bobby Hull, Red Hay, Murray Balfour, Ken Wharram, and team captain Ed Litzenberger were the team's top scorers.
http://books.google.com/books?id=quh...hockey&f=false

Quote:
Chicago lost their leading clutch goal getter Murray Balfour
http://books.google.com/books?id=2rb...hockey&f=false

Quote:
Murray Balfour was Chicago's hero. The hefty winger from Regina scored both Chicago goals.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+balfour&hl=en

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04-08-2011, 03:58 PM
  #224
BillyShoe1721
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Father David Bauer, assistant coach



Hockey Hall of Fame Member
IIHF Hockey Hall of Fame Member

Quote:
A short list of the most significant contributors to Canadian amateur and international hockey would include Father David Bauer. His devotion to the ideals of sportsmanship and fair play was equalled only by his belief in individual nurturing through self-discipline and teamwork on the ice.

One incident stood out as measure of the Canadian coach's character. During a game versus Sweden, one of the opposing players cross-checked a Canadian skater, broke his stick and threw the handle at the bench, striking Father Bauer in the forehead. The enraged Canadian players were about to jump over the bench when they were stopped by one sharp command from their coach. The next evening, Bauer invited the Swedish player to watch a hockey game with him. Following the competition, the Canadian coach was presented a gold medal for exemplary leadership.

Bauer was on hand at the 1968 games as manager when xxx coached the Canadian entry to the bronze medal in Grenoble, France. Despite having such future NHL regulars as xxx, xxx, and xxx Canada was overmatched against the Soviets and Czechoslovaks who were able to ice their best players.

Between 1969 and 1979, when Canada withdrew from international hockey because it was not allowed to use its best NHL players, Bauer shared his knowledge with lesser hockey playing nations. He avoided the national team program at this time because he vehemently opposed the use of professionals at the Olympics. During this period he travelled to Japan twice a year for six weeks of instruction. His on-ice expertise and outlook on personal growth through sports was readily accepted in the disciplined Japanese culture. In 1973 he went to Austria for a year at the request of the Austrian Ice Hockey Federation, which feared that its national team would be demoted from "B" to "C" pool. He led the Austrians to a fifth place finish at the "B" pool championships that year which allowed them to keep their place in that level of competition.

When Canada returned to the Olympics at Lake Placid in 1980, Bauer worked as the squad's managing director. The team finished a disappointing sixth but sent Glenn Anderson, Paul MacLean and Randy Gregg to the NHL. A steadying influence on the young defense corps was xxx, a veteran of the first national team in 1964.

Between 1963 and 1969 Bauer worked to implement a national junior team. Canada's withdrawal from international hockey damaged the program for much of the 1970's. However, Canada's re-emergence at the 1977 World Championships and the 1980 Olympics, Father Bauer was able to persuade Hockey Canada to approve a training camp a few months before the world junior championship.

In 1981 Bauer was appointed the vice-president of Hockey Canada and the chairman of Canada's Olympic program. He also continued to teach at St. Mark's and help out with the UBC hockey program.

In the years just before his passing in 1988, Father Bauer was accorded a multitude of honours reflecting his importance to the game. These included the Order of Canada (1967), having an arena named after him in Calgary to serve as the home base of the national team (1986) and a bursary in his name at St. Michael's College (1987).

Father Bauer was elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1989.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...t=ByName#photo

Quote:
Father David Bauer has been described as an inspirational coach, a caring educator, a master motivator and a dreamer. He was devoted to the concept that education and hockey could mix. He viewed hockey as a means to develop a better person. He believed that building men came before building hockey players.

"We try to give our players a well-rounded education, not merely ice skills but mental and moral conditioning as well," he told reporters in 1961. "We can't help but be better off in the long run."

"Dave Bauer was a class act all the way," states John McCormack, a teammate with the Majors. "He could've been a good one. He had more determination than (his brother) Bobby. I played against Bobby, he was finesse. Dave was more grinding, He had all kinds of talent, and when it came to determination, no one was better. He would've made it to the NHL easily if he had wanted to."

But Bauer had a vision for hockey in Canada. While attending the World Championship at Colorado Springs in 1962, he conceived of a permanent national hockey team. Canadian Amateur Hockey Association president Jack Roxborough encouraged Bauer to present his idea at the CAHA's annual meeting in Toronto that year.

Father Bauer patterned the National Team after what he had observed at St. Michael's College in the late 1950s and early 1960s. By taking players with some natural ability and instilling good discipline and a strong comprehension of the fundamentals of the game, he felt you could mould a team into a unit that was collectively much stronger than any one of its individual parts. "This was what Father Bauer did with the St. Michael's team when he coached it, and thus gained my respect, not only as a knowledgeable and capable teacher of hockey, but also as an astute, perceptive, and sensitive man," says Brian Conacher.

In addition, Father Bauer studied the European teams of the late 1950s that had developed into strong contenders for the World Championship. He found that three nations in particular -- Czechoslovakia, Sweden, and especially the Soviet Union -- had progressed rapidly in the hockey world, while Canada was beginning to lose its grip on hockey supremacy. In 1959, the Belleville McFarlands represented Canada and won the gold medal. In 1960, the Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen, coached by Father Bauer's brother Bobby, represented Canada at the Olympic Winter Games, but the United States stunned the hockey world by working their first 'Miracle on Ice.' Canada took the silver medal.

"(Father Bauer) was enough of a hockey man to know that you do not build a team overnight," says Conacher. "His goals were to bring the World Championship back to Canada and to show that good hockey players can be good students, and that hockey can grow in conjunction with a continuing education. He saw hockey as an experience that could teach and develop men of character and fibre. Hockey as a game could help teach one how to play the game of life."

"The thing that appealed to me the most about Father Bauer when I came in contact with him was that he was a teacher, and that's what I thought a coach should be," says Conacher, a passionate devotee of Bauer's instructional methods. "I know that had I not played for Father Bauer, I would never have made it to the NHL. He taught me the discipline and the skills that were lacking."

The 'Nats' represented Canada at the 1964 Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria. The Soviet Union won all seven of their games while Canada, Czechoslovakia and Sweden each finished with records of 5 wins and 2 losses. "Every player played his guts out and no one will ever be able to say that the 1964 Canadian Olympic Hockey team quit under pressure," maintains Conacher. "The hard fact was that we just didn't have the horses to do the job. The Russians were older, more experienced and had more depth. And when you combined their situation with our inexperience, our youth and our lack of depth, it was a tribute to the excellent coaching abilities of Father Bauer that we were as good a team as we were."

Canada returned to the Olympics in 1980, and Father Bauer served as the team's managing director for the tournament in Lake Placid, New York. "I travelled with Father Bauer and the National Team to Europe and Japan prior to the 1980 Olympic Games in Lake Placid, New York," wrote George Gross in the Toronto Sun. "Bauer instilled dignity in any discussion, whether it was sports, politics or religion."

On November 9, 1988, just a week after his 64th birthday, Father David Bauer succumbed to cancer in Goderich, Ontario. "Canada has lost a man who was extremely loyal to the ideals of amateur hockey," said Terry O'Malley.

In the years before his death, a multitude of honours had been bestowed on Bauer, acknowledging his importance to the game of hockey. He received the Order of Canada in 1967; had an arena in Calgary, which serves as the home base of Hockey Canada, named in his honour in 1986; and scholarships in his name are awarded at both St. Michael's College and at the University of British Columbia. In 1989, Father Bauer was posthumously inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in the Builder category, and he was added to the IIHF Wall of Honour in 1997.

But there can be no greater honour than the respect earned from the players whose lives he touched. "Father Bauer was very involved in the mental, physical and spiritual well-being of all his players," recalls Brian Conacher. "He truly was like a father to this whole group of guys. He was a very inspirational kind of coach. He left an indelible mark on every young man that he came in contact with."

Rod Seiling reflects on his coach with both St. Mike's and the National Team. "He was well-versed in hockey and well-versed as a person. He had very strong views on how to play the game. Bauer had the ability to take the elements -- checking, skating, shooting -- and mold a team. It didn't have to be the most talented team to be very competitive because of his ability to take a team that worked very well together using those basics."

The accolades to an outstanding individual conclude with Jim Gregory. "Father Bauer put me on the hockey path and I am truly indebted to him. My dream was to be involved with Junior hockey and I never imagined that I would get to work in the NHL, much less be an Honoured Member of the Hockey Hall of Fame."

To Father David Bauer, it all came down to one sentence: "If you can improve the boy as a person, you will improve him as a hockey player."
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/html/...oneb198901.htm

Quote:
He also had the quaint notion that a player could be rugged without being dirty, and mental discipline and development of the mind were as important as physical development and hockey skills. Even more galling to old style hockey men was that much of the time his teams could beat their teams.
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1972/story/bauer.htm

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04-09-2011, 12:06 AM
  #225
Stoneberg
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Bob Dailey, D


-6'5, 220-230lbs
-Spent significant time on both the pp and pk
-1978 & 1981 NHL ASG participant
-1975: Named Vancouver Canucks' top defenceman (Team was 9th in the league)
-1979: Named Philadelphia Flyers' top defenceman (Team was 4th in the league)
-1981: Named Philadelphia Flyers' top defenceman (Team was 6th in the league)


-Scoring finishes among D: 9, 11, 17, 20, 22, 26
-D scoring on team: 4th, 1st, 2nd*, 2nd**, 1st, 2nd, 1st, 2nd***
*67 games
**Was traded, his total production would have been good for 2nd on each team
***53 games

-He raised his game in the playoffs going from .58ppg to .73 ppg
-4 times over 100 PIMS

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Bob Dailey was selected 9th overall by the Vancouver Canucks in the 1973 NHL Amateur Draft after a successful junior career with the Toronto Marlboros. At 6'5" Dailey had the size and strength to patrol the defense with a remarkable amount of agility for a man of his size...

In his rookie season with the Canucks in 1973-74, Dailey suited up for all 76 games, scoring seven goals and 17 assists for 24 points while spending 143 minutes in the penalty box. The following year, Dailey played in 70 games, improving his statistics to 12 goals and 36 assists for 48 points as the Canucks advanced to the Stanley Cup playoffs for the first time in their short history.

Midway through the 1976-77 season Dailey was traded to the Philadelphia Flyers, who continued to look for more size and strength for their famed Broad Street Bullies' lineup. The Flyers felt they had lost some of their edginess after having lost in the 1976 Stanley Cup finals to the Montreal Canadiens both on the scoresheet and in the trenches. Reports say the Philadelphia organization was extremely impressed by the Canadiens' 6'4" Larry Robinson, who not only contributed points to Montreal's Cup victory, but also handed the likes of the Flyers' xxx and xxx a humbling lesson in fighting. Looking to obtain their own large, tough, offensive defenseman, the Flyers focused their attention on Dailey. The Flyers sent defensemen xxx and xxx to the West Coast in the deal.

In 1977-78, his first full year in Philadelphia, Dailey did not disappoint. He scored 21 goals and 36 assists for 57 points, career bests in all three categories. However, the playoffs were deemed a failure for the Flyers, who had expected to return to the Stanley Cup finals after an early exit the previous year.

Dailey played one more complete season with the Flyers before a freak injury early in the 1981-82 season ultimately forced his retirement. In November 1981, Dailey fractured his ankle in a game against the Buffalo Sabres when he caught his skate in a rut while being checked.
Quote:
Originally Posted by philadelphiaflyers.com
Years before the likes of Al MacInnis and Rob Blake gained fame and fortune with their blistering right-handed slap shots, Philadelphia Flyers defenseman Bob “The Count” Dailey terrorized NHL goaltenders with deadly accurate 100 mile-per-hour blasts from the point. A two-time winner of the Barry Ashbee Trophy as the Flyers’ best defenseman, Dailey possessed a rare combination of imposing size (6’5’’, 220 pounds), remarkable agility and an occasional mean streak that also carried him to a pair of NHL All-Star Game selections and a Vancouver Premier’s Trophy as the Canucks’ best defenseman.

With the sole exception of U.S. and Flyers Hall of Fame inductee Mark Howe, Dailey was arguably the best offensive defenseman in franchise history. During his Flyers career, Dailey averaged two points for every three games played and recorded a 21-goal season during his first full year in the orange and black.

Unfortunately, a series of injuries, including major shoulder and knee injuries, curtailed Dailey’s effectiveness. When reasonably healthy, Dailey was a heavy body checker as well as an offensive force. But he often played at far less than 100-percent, which made his career seem sporadic and inconsistent to those who were unaware of his physical struggles. Even in his All-Star seasons, Dailey was subject to such lofty expectations that he was sometimes branded an underachiever.

Dailey’s injury woes culminated with a shattered ankle suffered in November of 1981. The injury ended the Count’s NHL career at the age of 28 – an age most defensemen are hitting the prime of their careers.

“It’s not often as a coach that you have a defenseman who can change a game by himself. At his best, Bob Dailey could do that,” former Flyers head coach Pat Quinn said in 1994. “If Dailey would have stayed healthier when he was a young player, I think he might have been reached the same type of level in his career as players like Larry Robinson or Denis Potvin. He had that kind of talent, although he wasn’t as consistent."
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghl
The Flyers, looking for a mobile yet rugged defenseman, traded Larry Goodenough and Jack McIlhargey to Vancouver part way through the 1976-77 season.

Daily had an incredible first full year in Philadelphia - scoring 21 goals and 57 points in 76 games. That was strong enough to get him a nod in his first NHL all star game appearance. And while he never came close to putting up such strong numbers again, he remained among the top defensemen in the league. He returned to the NHL All Star game in 1981.

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