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ATD 2011 Draft Thread VI

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Old
02-26-2011, 10:34 AM
  #151
MadArcand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boy Wonder View Post
This guy is someone who should be selected in the mid 200's at least.

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02-26-2011, 11:07 AM
  #152
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Originally Posted by MadArcand View Post
Why are you laughing? Can you name me another Hart Trophy winner who has this?

Assists
2006-07 NHL 71 (4)
2007-08 NHL 61 (4)
2008-09 NHL 60 (8)
2009-10 NHL 83 (1)
2010-11 NHL 59 (1)

That's approaching Joe Thornton territory. And Sedin is way better in the playoffs than him.

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Old
02-26-2011, 11:21 AM
  #153
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boy Wonder View Post
Why are you laughing? Can you name me another Hart Trophy winner who has this?

Assists
2006-07 NHL 71 (4)
2007-08 NHL 61 (4)
2008-09 NHL 60 (8)
2009-10 NHL 83 (1)
2010-11 NHL 59 (1)

That's approaching Joe Thornton territory. And Sedin is way better in the playoffs than him.
Whats the ruling on this seasons finishes? I have been curious ever since the Zetterberg selection.

Also 44 points in 65 gp in the playoffs is not that spectacular.

Thornton also led the league in assists 3 times, 2nd two other times and 5 top 10's in points. Excluding this season Sedin only has the one top 10 in points.

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Old
02-26-2011, 11:24 AM
  #154
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boy Wonder View Post
Why are you laughing? Can you name me another Hart Trophy winner who has this?

Assists
2006-07 NHL 71 (4)
2007-08 NHL 61 (4)
2008-09 NHL 60 (8)
2009-10 NHL 83 (1)
2010-11 NHL 59 (1)

That's approaching Joe Thornton territory. And Sedin is way better in the playoffs than him.
Thornton is on a different level than Mr. One Year Wonder.

Martin St.Louis was drafted 248th. He has Hart, also 4 top-10 assists finishes, much better accomplishments across the board and is without a doubt far superior player to Sedin. You think Sedin should be picked in same territory as Marty? Really?

There's a center who isn't even drafted yet who has those accomplishments and more as Sedin. And two more Hart winners with fewer top-10s in assists but better overall resumes.

It's astounding how far can one underserved Hart propel an already overrated player.

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02-26-2011, 11:37 AM
  #155
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadArcand View Post
Thornton is on a different level than Mr. One Year Wonder.

Martin St.Louis was drafted 248th. He has Hart, also 4 top-10 assists finishes, much better accomplishments across the board and is without a doubt far superior player to Sedin. You think Sedin should be picked in same territory as Marty? Really?

There's a center who isn't even drafted yet who has those accomplishments and more as Sedin. And two more Hart winners with fewer top-10s in assists but better overall resumes.

It's astounding how far can one underserved Hart propel an already overrated player.
St. Louis should have been drafted in the 130-200 range though, I personally don't see why he's any less useful to a team than Syd Howe.

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Old
02-26-2011, 11:41 AM
  #156
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boy Wonder View Post
Nice picks guys.

If Jimmy Shoemakerfields was the BDA a few picks back, this guy certainly wasn't that far behind. In fact, I'm not sure if there's a whole hell of a lot of difference between Terry Harper and Shoemakerfields.

Lester Patrick - Terry Harper. Looks good to me! PM'ing next.
Jim was a 2nd Team All Star once.

Terry Harper is an absolute excellent penalty killer and solid defensive defenseman, but I'm pretty sure he's one of those guys who can accurately be described as an "offensive black hole."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boy Wonder View Post
and on top of that, he's a right handed shot.
I guess that's nice and makes a tiny positive difference when it comes to clearing the zone. But I really don't think it matters much, when he's going to provide approximately zero offense at this level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vecens24 View Post
With the 339th pick, the Inglewood Jacks will be selecting the only Art Ross Trophy winner left and the only Hart Trophy winner left from 1955-present: Henrik Sedin. Sedin will fit in nicely with our squad as a decent two-way center, but really where he will provide his spark is on the offensive end with his superior playmaking ability. More of a bio coming later on because I'm still a little drunk from last night and don't feel like writing one now.

(Hedberg and vancityluongo have been PMed)
He took quite the jump. I was actually kind of hoping to have him as a center of a third scoring line (his puck possession would definitely be helpful on a lower line).

I pretty much gave up all hope of getting him, when I realized how much modern players are valued this time around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boy Wonder View Post
EXCELLENT pick. I knew that he would fall, and unfairly so, into the 300's. This guy is someone who should be selected in the mid 200's at least. Not only does he have a very strong playmaking record, but his intangibles game has improved tremendously over time. Not only that, but he's on his way this season to another assists crown, probably top-5 in points and a case for the Hart trophy as well. I was planning on stealing him myself, but I don't think Sedin and Martinec would work very well, because Henrik isn't a super fast skater.

I guess I shouldn't be surprised though, arrbez took him last draft too.
He's solid value now, but I think he would be a reach in the mid 200s. The guy is just finishing up his 2nd season as a historically noteworthy player. Before then, he was a solid scoring line center in the NHL, nothing more.

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Old
02-26-2011, 11:43 AM
  #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markrander87 View Post
Whats the ruling on this seasons finishes? I have been curious ever since the Zetterberg selection
By the time we are done drafting players, this regular season will probably be over, so the finishes will be "official" by the time things matter.

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02-26-2011, 11:44 AM
  #158
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And Reen, telling someone they have to draft a certain undrafted player is the reason the rule exists in the first place.

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Old
02-26-2011, 11:44 AM
  #159
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boy Wonder View Post
Why are you laughing? Can you name me another Hart Trophy winner who has this?

Assists
2006-07 NHL 71 (4)
2007-08 NHL 61 (4)
2008-09 NHL 60 (8)
2009-10 NHL 83 (1)
2010-11 NHL 59 (1)

That's approaching Joe Thornton territory. And Sedin is way better in the playoffs than him.
Eh there are guys available with better resumes. And no, he is nowhere near Joe Thornton territory. Thornton has three first place finishes and two second place finishes in assists. On top of that, Thornton has been top-3 in points on three occasions and I would argue that not only is Sedin no better in the playoffs, but is not as complete when considering many of the intangibles. Sedin is just now blossoming into a star...Thornton has been one for years. I could see him around 200-300 in three to five seasons if he keeps it up though. However...really Sedin has only had one and a half elite years.

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Old
02-26-2011, 11:47 AM
  #160
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Originally Posted by advantage2006 View Post
Sorry, was having internet complications.

LW: Marty Pavelich
There the other player I wanted to select when I chose Tod Sloan. Obviously, Pavelich would of been a luxury on my team, as I only had 4, top-6 forwards. I really wanted to research him, because he gets SO much mileage (aka ALL his credential) for his retro-Selke, that I was wondering if Pavelich should be viewed in the Claude Provost tier or below. Was it a shallow era for defensive defenceman. He definitely was one of the best defensive forward of his generation, but we know about nothing on him. Oh well, maybe another time!


Quote:
Originally Posted by hungryhungryhippy View Post
St. Louis should have been drafted in the 130-200 range though, I personally don't see why he's any less useful to a team than Syd Howe.
Would love to see an argument on that. But I'm a big fan of St-Louis, so I'm all ear.


I'm still uncertain about the Henrik Sedin selection. I'll be waiting to hear the discussion on this. My own eyes tells me that he has 1 1/2 elite seasons under his belt, and another couple solid season.

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Old
02-26-2011, 12:03 PM
  #161
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Tidewater selects D Craig Hartsburg



1987 Canada Cup Champion

Minnesota North Star Legends:
Quote:
Craig Hartsburg was an elite NHL defenseman who had his career derailed by injuries.

Before the injuries riddled him, Hartsburg was a wonderful rushing defenseman. He was an excellent skater, extremely mobile laterally in particular. He would often rush the puck out of the zone, sometimes recklessly and leading to injury susceptibility.

As his career progressed he reigned in his rushing game and proved to be a fantastic passing defenseman, clearing the zone with proficiency but starting the transition offense expertly as well. He also knew how to quarterback a power play. His vision and creativity allowed him to move the puck into the slimmest of passing lanes, and he naturally knew when to pinch to keep the zone.

But his low, hard shot was his real weapon. He wasn't the hardest shooting point man, but always got the puck through traffic and on the net. His shot was also always perfect for tipping and rebounds.

Despite what his penalty minutes may suggest, Hartsburg was not known as a physical defenseman. He was strong and big, and used that to his advantage to defend. He was not a big splashy hitter, instead relying more on muscles and angles to steer opponents to the boards where he would pin them.

Hartsburg was very sound defensively, playing his defensive angles well and reading the rush well back into his own zone. His active stick broke up a lot of oncoming breaks.
Legends of Hockey
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In his first professional season, Hartsburg scored nine goals and totaled 40 assists. Minnesota drafted him with their first pick, sixth overall, in the 1979 Entry Draft. He was quick out of the gate with North Stars, earning two assists in his first NHL game, and his first NHL goal came just a few nights later. He continued to impress the coaching staff with his poise and steady point production and so played in 79 games in his debut season. He played the next three full seasons with the North Stars, recording a career-high 17 goals and 60 assists in 1981-82. He also found time that season to represent Canada in the Canada Cup and the World and European Championships.

He played in the NHL All-Star game in 1980,1982, and 1983. During the 1983-84 and 1984-85 seasons, he was sidelined with recurring knee problems and managed to play only a few dozen games in each year. Hartsburg was back in good form for 1985-86 and 1986-87, once again playing in almost every game and hitting double digits in goals and assists. He again represented Canada in international tournaments, earning accolades for his performance in both the WEC and Canada Cup tournaments. He missed part of each of the next two seasons due to recurring injuries.

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Old
02-26-2011, 12:06 PM
  #162
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Honestly I'm not surprised that there is a total across the board reaction to Sedin. I wanted another playmaker at center and thought he has the best peak for assists left. Plus he's a very solid defensive guy, if not spectacular. Personally when I suggested him to arrbez I wasn't sure if I was overrating him or if he was a great value. We both liked the selection and kinda went for it.

And of course there's a big jump for Sedin this year, he won the ****ing Hart and Art Ross last year, shouldn't that precipitate a major jump?

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Old
02-26-2011, 12:07 PM
  #163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hungryhungryhippy View Post
St. Louis should have been drafted in the 130-200 range though, I personally don't see why he's any less useful to a team than Syd Howe.
Wow. First Sedin in the mid-200's and now this, and from veteran GMs, no less. I never thought I'd see the day when modern players became profoundly overrated in the ATD. Martin St. Louis in the top 150?! I am a huge fan of his, but this is just insane. I can actually understand an argument for St. Louis in the top-200, although I think any such argument would have to overstate his defensive value in an ATD where his size is a major hindrance, but at pick #130 he'd be one of the bigger reaches of the draft.

I guess I can see how you reached the conclusion you did by comparing St. Louis to Syd Howe, but that ignores the fact that Howe has become pretty overrated, himself. Syd only has one season of note before the bottom fell out of the league's talent pool.

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Old
02-26-2011, 12:08 PM
  #164
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Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
And Reen, telling someone they have to draft a certain undrafted player is the reason the rule exists in the first place.
To be fair, in a scenario like that there is no chance that I haven't considered that factor. I agree that he shouldn't be telling me who to draft but it's not a major deal in this scenario (which might be totally unique to the ATD this year).

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Old
02-26-2011, 12:14 PM
  #165
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sturminator View Post
Wow. First Sedin in the mid-200's and now this, and from veteran GMs, no less. I never thought I'd see the day when modern players became profoundly overrated in the ATD. Martin St. Louis in the top 150?! I am a huge fan of his, but this is just insane. I can actually understand an argument for St. Louis in the top-200, although I think any such argument would have to overstate his defensive value in an ATD where his size is a major hindrance, but at pick #130 he'd be one of the bigger reaches of the draft.

I guess I can see how you reached the conclusion you did by comparing St. Louis to Syd Howe, but that ignores the fact that Howe has become pretty overrated, himself. Syd only has one season of note before the bottom fell out of the league's talent pool.
Just so we are all on the same pagem what is the time period you are refering to?


Also i'd like to know your opinion on Davydov.

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Old
02-26-2011, 12:15 PM
  #166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sturminator View Post
Wow. First Sedin in the mid-200's and now this, and from veteran GMs, no less. I never thought I'd see the day when modern players became profoundly overrated in the ATD. Martin St. Louis in the top 150?! I am a huge fan of his, but this is just insane. I can actually understand an argument for St. Louis in the top-200, although I think any such argument would have to overstate his defensive value in an ATD where his size is a major hindrance, but at pick #130 he'd be one of the bigger reaches of the draft.

I guess I can see how you reached the conclusion you did by comparing St. Louis to Syd Howe, but that ignores the fact that Howe has become pretty overrated, himself. Syd only has one season of note before the bottom fell out of the league's talent pool.
We're a lot closer on this than it probably seems. I wouldn't pick St. Louis at 130 either, you were exactly right when you guessed that I picked that number based on comparison to Syd Howe (who goes in that range). I even thought to myself that Howe gets overrated and said (in my head), "both of them should go around 170/180.

St. Louis has an identical amount of point and assist finishes to Howe, with slightly better placements, in an era where top-10 scoring finishes are more competitive. St. Louis also has 3x as many All-Star team selections. I'm also a huge fan of his game, his versatility, well-roundedness, and character, and I haven't really seen anything that makes me think Howe has better intangibles or is more noteworthy from a legacy/history standpoint.

I'm hardly a veteran GM, btw.


Last edited by hungryhungryhippy: 02-26-2011 at 12:20 PM.
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Old
02-26-2011, 12:16 PM
  #167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedberg View Post
Tidewater selects D Craig Hartsburg


1987 Canada Cup Champion

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Legends of Hockey
Great pick! It was between him and Davydov for me. Had Hartsburgh last year, I feel he gets underrated around here. Very useful skill set.

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Old
02-26-2011, 12:17 PM
  #168
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Would love to see an argument on that. But I'm a big fan of St-Louis, so I'm all ear.
.
Well, Martin St.Louis is a rather unique player as a playmaking RW, for starters. His offensive record his definitely top-200 at this point, and in the regular season at least, quite a bit better than a number of guys drafted ahead of him. As far as the Syd Howe comparison goes, it's 1, 4*, 5, 6 vs 2, 2, 8, 10 in top-10 points comparisons(basic, but still). Martin St.Louis also does bring a couple of other quite solid offensive seasons in the top-20 in points besides his excellent top-10 seasons.
If you compare his record to a lot of the RW's who went in the top-200, Martin St. Louis stacks up very well or comes out pretty well ahead. His 4 AST's, assuming he continues what he's doing this year he should get a 4th, is also going to rank very well up there.

For another example, Martin St.Louis has produced a rather close 93.6% of Jarome Iginla in the regular season since 01-02 (which is a nicer comparison for Iginla), and Jarome was taken way ahead. Jarome does bring the power forward game, though I think St. Louis has a better defensive one.

Now, a number of RW's do have that power game as well as playoffs going for them. (St. Louis had one excellent run at 2nd in playoff points, but has done rather good in playoff games since then, but hasn't been able to go deep enough to get more good finishes) Yet, I think that's well or overcome by St. Louis's dominant regular seasons.

Martin St.Louis also brings all this as well as being a rather good two-way player (peaking at a 4th in selke voting)


Last edited by seventieslord: 02-26-2011 at 03:06 PM.
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Old
02-26-2011, 12:26 PM
  #169
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A bio I did on St. Louis last year:

Quote:
Originally Posted by hungryhungryhippy View Post


Martin St. Louis
, RW, LHS, 5'9'', 180 lbs

"I've played with some good players, but he's doing it every night... it inspires us all." - XXXXXX

"All I've ever wanted is a chance." Martin St. Louis



From jockbio.com:


Does size matter in professional hockey? Not to Martin St. Louis. The diminutive winger is listed at 5-9, but thatís probably with his skates on. Once he hops over the boards, however, Martin is a monster, as he employs a devastating combination of speed, smarts and spunk to terrorize bigger opponents.

No one, however, was more important to the fortunes of the Lightning that Martin. He sharpened his all-around game so completely that ******* felt comfortable using him in any situation. The winger was often at his best on the penalty kill. He was such an offensive threat that opponents sometimes forced themselves into mistakes. In a 4-2 win over Boston, Martin set a team record with two goals and an assistóall short-handed.

Early in the year, ******* gathered his players and asked for more offensive output. Martin stepped up and accepted the responsibility. His leadership was just what the Lightning needed. Tampa Bay played with spirit and confidence all year long, and actually got stronger as the season wore on.

In the playoffs, Martin ratcheted up his intensity and his production once again. Tampa Bay beat the Islanders on his blistering slapshot in overtime of Game Five, then dumped his beloved Canadiens as the Lightning advanced into previously uncharted post-season territory.

Martinís greatest asset is his speed. A dedicated and fearless worker, he also isnít afraid to bang around in the corners or take his lumps in front of the net. Not that Martin hangs around one place too long. His ability to dart into the slightest opening forces teams to be ever vigilant, and this in turn creates opportunities for his teammates.

Martin is one of the better conditioned athletes in the NHL.... Bigger opponents try to wear him down with physical play. Of course, they have to be able to catch him to do soóand thatís no easy trick.

From the April 16, 2003 edition of USA Today:

Built as sturdy as a jersey wall and with thighs the size of mountain stream boulders, St. Louis relies on durability and speed.

One of the NHL's shortest players, St. Louis is also one of the best, earning a spot on this year's All-Star team.

St. Louis never used size as an excuse and never wanted to prove anyone wrong. He just wanted to prove to himself he could play in the NHL.

From The Hockey News:

Has great speed and shiftiness. Is extremely durable and versatile. Likes to create plays from the wing position. Is a dangerous penalty-killer and possesses the heart of a lion.

From the June 10, 2004 edition of The Sporting News, via NBC Sports:

St. Louis is fast and skilled. He can create plays and finish them. He can change a game with one rush down the ice. For most of last season, he was portrayed unfairly as a human-interest story more than a hockey story by those who wouldn't take the Lightning seriously. St. Louis was never drafted and is listed generously at 5-9. Doubters said he couldn't consistently compete in the league, adding that it would be a a good story while it lasted.

Well, the story continues -- and it's getting better. St. Louis was the best player in the league most nights this season and the best on a team that won its first Stanley Cup. For that, he should win the Hart Memorial Trophy as the player most valuable to his team. On a team on which controversy crops up regularly, mainly because of goaltenders Nikolai Khabibulin and John Grahame and center XXXXX, St. Louis was the rock. When the team slumped in December, St. Louis asked coach XXXXXX to give him and the other top players more ice time. They would get it done then, St. Louis said.

XXXXXXX gave St. Louis what he wanted, and St. Louis met XXXXXXX's challenge to rise to the occasion. St. Louis averaged more ice time than any other forward on his team and was the league's leading scorer.

St. Louis had played went without a point in as many as four straight games only once. Other than that, he never went more than two.
He led the league in shorthanded goals, making Tampa Bay's penalty-killing unit dangerous offensively while keeping the opposition's power play handcuffed.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS


First All-Star Team Right Wing x1 (2004)
Second All-Star Team Right Wing x2 (2007, 2010)
All-Star Game x5 (2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009)

Hart Memorial Trophy (2004)
Ted Lindsay Award (2004)
Art Ross Trophy (2004)

Top-10 Selke Nomination (4th)

STATS

Top-10 Scoring x3 (1st, 5th, 6th)
Top-10 Goalscoring x2 (4th, 5th)
Top-10 Assists x4 (1st, 5th, 7th, 9th)

Top-10 Plus/Minus x1 (1st)
Top-10 SHG x4 (1st, 2nd, 7th, 10th)

PLAYOFFS

Stanley Cup (2004)

Top-10 Playoff Scoring x1 (2nd)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring x2 (4th, 4th)
Top-10 Playoff Assists x1 (1st)

3 career playoff OT goals


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Old
02-26-2011, 12:30 PM
  #170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hungryhungryhippy View Post
A bio I did on St. Louis last year:
Undrafteds in that bio.....

Edit: You just edited out the name on that first quote as I posted this.

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02-26-2011, 12:32 PM
  #171
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My Cecil Dillon is now completed. I think it paint a pretty good picture of Dillon in general, from the top:

- Cecil Dillon was an excellent goalscorer. I definitely underrated him in that regard. He had one of the best shot of his generation. 6-time Top-6 in goalscoring is quite impressive for a 10 year veteran. Moreover, he played his first 4-5 years in New York behind the famous Bread Line and more particularly Bill Cook, so you have to think Cook was getting more minutes at ES and on the PP, and well, Cook definitely had the better linemate! Dillon's two linemate were no scrubs by any means, as both will be selected at a certain point in this draft, but the LW was a definite defensive winger, while the other was an MLD center. I don't remember the results, but it's not like he piled up his stats between 1936-to-1938 and did nothing outside of it (although those were his peak years), I was actually impress of his outside peak results.

- He seemed to have been nothing special as a playmaker. You read quotes that he was not a selfish player and that he was a complete hockey player, but I don't remember anyone raving on his passing ability. But then again, he always was the best offensive player on his line, so his linemate might have preferred passing to him and letting him use his deadly shot. He has one statistical anomaly, where he finish 3rd in assist and as double his # of goals (couldn't find why) but afterwards he was racking up more goals than assists. He was probably average in that area.

- One concern about Dillon is that some were questioning if he was able to sustain his defensive abilities while performing his best statistical years offensively. What I found his pretty conclusive in the fact that Dillon was a great defensive player even in his offensive prime. He was consider one of the best back-checker of the 1930's, always played on the 1st PK unit, and was acclaim as a defensive forward all his career. He definitely was a very complete hockey player, more than I would have given him credit for.

- He was a speedster, a great skater. He probably was not 'elite' in that regard 'ala Cournoyer or others', but he was more than 'above average'. All the newspaper I've read on him call him a fast skater, which in my book makes him between a great and an excellent skater.

- I havn't read anything conclusive on how physical he was. Again, I play the card of the 'complete hockey player'. He was also called husky. Again, no one was raving on his physical attribute, but I didn't read anything negative either. He probably was able to hold in own, but he definitely was a skillful player first. You probably didn't saw him throw his body around during a hockey game. Anatoli Firsov and Elmer Lach almost surely were more physical than him.

All in all, I was very impress by what I've found. I think you could definitely make a case for him in the Top-200, albeit in the very lower 100's. For me, although he was a better offensive player by a fair margin, I see few reasons to select Gordie Drillon ahead of him. What you lose at one place, but you win it almost in every other aspect of the game. I'm not trying to trash Drillon: I owned him on my team more time than anybody here, but I felt he is a good comparison as they played pretty much at the same time (their peak touch for one season) EDIT: Actually, they finished dead even in AS Voting in 1938 (FAST) while Drillon scored 5 more goals and 13 more points than Dillon. If Dillon was giving first line minute with Frank Boucher in his get go in New York, my feeling is that Dillon would undoubtfully won one or two goalscoring race. Although he never came that close to win an Art Ross, he definitely would of had a chance with better teammate. Also, Cecil Dillon would be an Hall of Famer today.


The complete, unmarked bio can be found here:

http://hfboards.com/showpost.php?p=3...4&postcount=85


Last edited by EagleBelfour: 02-26-2011 at 12:53 PM.
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02-26-2011, 12:34 PM
  #172
TheDevilMadeMe
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On an "all-time" list, I would have Syd Howe and Martin St. Louis quite close to each other.

But there are two valid reasons why Howe goes so early in the ATD:

1) He can play left wing
2) He's a better "glue guy" due to the fact that he isn't a midget.

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02-26-2011, 12:35 PM
  #173
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Cecil Graham Dillon



Nickname: Ceece, Diny
Height: 5'11''
Weight: 173 lbs
Position: Right Wing / Left Wing
Shoots: Left
Date of Birth: April 26, 1908
Place of Birth: Toledo , Ohio, United States
Date of Death: November 13, 1969

Stanley Cup Champion (1933)
Stanley Cup Finalist (1932, 1937)
NHL First All-Star Team (1938)
NHL Second All-Star Team (1936, 1937)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1937)
Conn Smythe Trophy (1933*)

- Ranked #33 on the all-time list of New York Rangers in the book 100 Ranger Greats


SeasonsGPGAPTSPIM
10453167131298105

Top-10 Scoring (4th, 5th, 11th)
Top-10 Goalscoring (2nd, 4th, 6th, 6th, 6th, 6th)
Top-10 Assist (3rd)

PlayoffsGPGAPTSPIM
9431492314

Top-10 Playoff Scoring (1st, 8th)
Top-10 Playoff Goalscoring (1st, 4th, 9th)
Top-10 Playoff Assist (5th, 6th)


Awards Nomination:

Lady Bing Trophy:
1934-35: 5th position (Frank Boucher) (-66.9%)
1935-36: 3rd position (Doc Romnes) (-32.3%)
1937-38: 3rd position (Gordie Drillon) (-44.2%)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Dillon was a model of consistency, not missing a single game in eight years.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier's Greatest Hockey Legends
Playing in the shadows of the likes of Frank Boucher and Cook brothers, Bill and Bun, it is easy to understand how a player like Cecil Dillon was one of the most underrated players of his day.

A right winger with a left handed shot, Dillon made a name for himself early playing on a line with Butch Keeling and Murray Murdoch. The trio were instrumental in the Rangers' 1933 Stanley Cup championship, especially Dillon. In 8 games he scored 8 goals and 10 points in 8 games, leading all NHLers in scoring. Had there been a playoff MVP award back then, Cecil Dillon was sure to have won it that spring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey; Conn Smythe Trophy Vote
Winger from the checking line was the dominant player in the playoffs. He had goals in his first five playoff games including the winner in the opener of the finals against Toronto, then picked up the first goal in a 3-2 loss to the Leafs and was selected one of the games stars in a 1-0 overtime winner for his work in holding the Primeau-Conacher-Jackson line to no goals in the final.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bee Hive Hockey
As a right-winger with a scoring knack, "Ceece" lasted 10 seasons in the NHL with the Rangers New York Rangers (1930-39) and Red Wings Detroit Red Wings (1939-40). Five times he topped the 20-goal mark. He led the Rangers in goals 3 times and points 3 times. By the end of the 1930's he had become one of the top scorers in Rangers history.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1933-1934 V357 Ice Kings Hockey Cecil Dillon
The husky Rangers left wing player is recognized to have one of the deadliest shot in the National Hockey League.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star;Rangers Slip Into Third Place as Falcons Lose 5-4 (02/06/1931)
In addition to these scoring feats, Dillon played a great defensive game and his clever checking helped the Blue Shirts on many occasion when penalties left them a man short.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun; Dillon is Rangers Star (12/28/1931)
Trailing 1-0 with less than six minutes remaining in the second period, Cecil Dillon, recruit winger from Springfield Indians, gave the Rangers the needed scoring punch when he terminated a four-man combination thrust with a hard shot, which clearly beat Gardiner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Times Magazine (03/17/1933)
Dillon's two goals against Toronto, bringing his total to seven in the play-off series, set a record which was the more unusual in that he is a member of a second-string forward line that was supposed to be weak. In the preliminary series against the Montreal Canadiens and the Detroit Red Wings, he had helped eclipse the Rangers famed first-string forwards (Frank Boucher and the Cook brothers. Bill & Bun)
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette; Rangers En Route to Series Final (03/06/1933)
Added to all this is the strong possibility play-off scoring records will be shattered by Cecil Dillon, black-thatched checking pest of Rangers.

It was little more than three years ago when Patrick decided Rangers needed the peppery, black haired youngster. [...] Dillon hasn't any apparent weaknesses on the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Lewiston Daily Sun; New York Wins handily Score 5-1; Big Crowd (04/05/1933)
Tall, black-haired young Cecil Dillon, again was the spear-head of the Ranger attack [...] Dillon scored two goals, his sixth and seventh of the play-offs, assisted Murdoch in another and fairly ran the Leafs ragged with his back-checking when penalties left his team shorthanded.

Dillon's individual skill brought the fourth goal and showed the Leafs how badly beaten they were. [...] Ching Johnson finally got the puck and drove it far down the ice where Dillon and Happy Day racing for it. Day got there first, but as he circled the net and circled down the ice again, Dillon caught up with him and hooked the puck nearly off his stick. The young Ranger feinted three times before the veteran Chabot finally plunged out of the goal mouth, then he swung neatly past the cage guardin and poked the disc home.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald; Detroit Pulls Up With Chicago as Toronto Climb (02/05/1936)
Dillon, who seldom the rise and fall of Ranger fortunes to affect his consistant scoring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Windsor Daily Star; Three Bruins make First Team in NHL All-Star Poll (03/21/1936)
In only two cases the voting was close for the first team. Conacher beat out speedy Cecil Dillon of the New York Rangers for right wing by a narrow margin.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen; Dillon First-Period Tally Wins it for Rangers over Wings (11/19/1936)
Cecil Dillon, speedy Rangers wingman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette; Canadiens Score Twice in Overtime to Defeat Rangers (11/23/1936)
In the fourth minute, dangerous Cecil Dillon slapped home the tying goal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette; Maroons succumb to 3rd whitewash (11/22/1937)
Then Cecil Dillon, Rangers' dangerous left hand shooting right winger, broke up the game with what proved to be the game winning goal. He did it all alone, swinging down the right side with two mates accompanying him as decoys on left wing. Dillon, known as an unselfish player, crossed up the Maroons defence by not passing, and stepped around Stew Evans to walk right in on Beveridge and score.
Quote:
Originally Posted by XXX; Cowley Climbing High in Scoring (01/25/1938)
Cecil Dillon, speedy, sleek-haired wingman of the New York Rangers, who has been rated one of the National Hockey League's best back-checkers ever since his debut in 1930, is coming to the front as a contender for the scoring title.
Quote:
Originally Posted by New York Times; Rangers Start Training; Dillon, 30, Is Oldest Player on Hockey Squad at Winnipeg (10/13/1938)
Only one member of the squad, the fast-skating Cecil Dillon, was 30 years old. The others were between 29 and 22.
Quote:
Originally Posted by New York Times; Dead-Shot Dillon, the Hawkeye of Hockey (01-18-1938)
ONE reason why the Rangers are doing a little better than all right for themselves on ice this season is that the Two-Gun Terror from Thornbury, Ont., Cecil Dillon, has his eye on the target again. Gordon Drillon of the whirling Maple Leafs is topping the league in scoring points, but Sharpshooter Cecil is tied for second place
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Vancouver Sun; Les Patrick Sells Three Rangers (05/18/1939)
Manager Jack Adams of Detroit Red Wings announced his club have bought the veteran Cecil Dillon from Rangers, giving his wing one of the game's highest scorer.

Quotes:

- ''Beat that record Dil!'' - Rangers fans screaming at Dillon during the 1933 playoffs

- ''Dillon and Patrick are skating faster than ever before.'' - Bill Cook, before the opening of the 1936-37 season

- ''He always was a natural and all I could do his develop his knowledge of inside hockey. It's the same, you see, in this game as it is in baseball or any other sports. The difference between the minor league and the major league, often, his from the neck up. All Dillon needed was finish and he has been a perfect pupil. He knows now exactly what to do. Three time in this year's play-offs alone he's done the most spectacular of hockey's scoring plays - stealing a puck down deep in the enemy's defence, sweeping it on the goalie alone, feinting him out of position, then beating him clearly for the goal. Like a big league pitcher, he's learned to mix is stuff. He's going to be the greatest player in hockey.'' - Lester Patrick, raving on Cecil Dillon during the 1933 playoffs

- ''There is the perfect hockey player.'' - Lester Patrick, pointing at Cecil Dillon in his first appearance at the Madison Square Garden. (That glowing phrase has been reiterated by Patrick many time since (The Montreal Gazette (03/06/1933))


Biography & Personal Life:

Cecil ''Ceese'' Dillon was one of the very few American born players in the early days of the NHL. Dillon was born in Toledo, Ohio on April 26th, 1908. In 1914, at the age of six years old, Dillon moved to Thornbury, a small town in southwestern Ontario, where he took up hockey.

His ascension into the professional hockey world started in 1927, when he played senior hockey for the Owen Sound Greys of the Senior Ontario Hockey Association. The next season, the skinny teenager asked the Sprinfield Indians coach Frank Caroll, of the CAHL, a tryout with his club. A two time Allan Cup winner in the 1920's, Caroll accepted the request, gave him a pair of skates and a hockey stick, and Dillon impressed enough to play under Caroll's team for the next two and a half season. In his second and last complete season with the Indians, Dillon finished second in scoring, only behind Gene Carrigan, who would play part of three season in the NHL.

Midway through the 1930Ė31 season, coach Lester Patrick, a big supporter of Dillon's play since he first wore the blue-and-white jersey, inserted him in his lineup for the first time. For the next eight and a half season, the husky Dillon would play an intricate part his team success. That same year, it has been reported that Dillon played part time as a center, mainly alternating with Frank Boucher, one of Rangers most acclaim player.

For the first few season with the club, ''Ceese'' had to play mostly second violin to Bill Cook and the notorious ''Bread Line''. Indeed, Frank Boucher, flanked by the Cook brothers, Bun and Bill on both side, were the most electrifying trio of forward in the 1930's. Thus far, having played all his career on the left wing, the left shooting Dillon found his niche playing on the right side, playing second shift on most night with Murray Murdoch, another very resilient forward who played more than 500 consecutive games, all with the Rangers, and center Butch Keeling. It was Patrick idea to try Dillon on his off-wing, as they were too much left winger on his team, and the move paid out. Dillon is one of the first left handed shooter playing on the right side.

Dillon probably played his best hockey during the 1933 playoff, where he lead the league in goals and points. Playing a beautiful two-way game, it was reported in various newspaper of the time that Dillon outright outplayed the famous New York Rangers first line and was the most significant contributor of his team in both of his series, against the Montreal Canadiens in the semi final and the Toronto Maple Leafs in the final. If a trophy rewarding the most brilliant playoff performer existed at that time, there is no doubt that Cecil Dillon would of been the recipiency.

In his time with the Rangers, Dillon was known to love Frank Boucher's stories, most of them completely fabricated, about his days in the RCMP. He was also a superstitious player. Indeed, one time in 1939, Dillon was so superstitious that he refused a new pair of skating boots after he had been badly cut. Figuring that a new pair of skates in the middle of the year might jinx him, he ordered the old one to be patched up.

He also had a humorous side, as Clint ''Snuffy'' Smith recall: ''Cecil Dillon never read the sports page. Everytime he picked up a newspaper all he read was the funny pages. One of his favourite comic strips starred Barney Google and an ornery hillbilly named Snuffy Smith. As soon as I scored, Dillon went over to the announcer, and said: ''Tell Ďem Snuffy Smith scored that goal!'' Well, damn if he didnít say it over the loudspeaker!''

As veteran Bill Cook was ageing, it should come as know surprise that Dillon took more place on the New York Rangers and soon enough, became the main trigger-man for the team. In 1935, after finishing second in goals scored, only behind the excellent Charlie Conacher, Dillon received a second all-star berth the next season, as he was narrowly beaten by Charlie Conacher in the voting 16-11 to 12-11.

After receiving his second all-star selection in 1937, Dillon receive his only first all-star selection of his career in 1938. In a feat that only happen once in the history of the National Hockey League, both Dillon and Gordie Drillon of the Toronto Maple Leafs received exactly the same number of first and second vote position, thus making them the only duo to receive a first all-star selection on the same year.

From 1936 to 1938, as Dillon took the reign as the offensive cataclyst of his team, he led the Rangers in scoring in those three consecutive years, joining an exclusive club formed by Frank Boucher, Bill Cook, Andy Bathgate, Phil Esposito and Wayne Gretzky as the only players to do so. Of those six players, only Dillon is not enriched in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

The 1938-39 season was the last season in a Rangers uniform for Dillon. The ageing veteran was sold to the Detroit Red Wings by Lester Patrick, who decided that his team needed some young blood. it was the end of an incredible sequence for Cecil. Indeed, Dillon never missed a single regular season game in his nine season with the club. In 409 consecutive games, he scored 160 goals and 281 points with the club.

After an uneventful season with the Red Wings, Dillon played another two years of professional hockey before retiring. In 1940-41, he played 49 games with Indianapolis of the AHL and 51 games with the Pittsburgh Hornet in 1941-42, collecting 13 goals and 23 assists.

Dillon returned to Thornbury after his hockey career and worked for the local phone company. He was a fisherman born and he could sit for hours listening to cowboy songs with a great yearning. No one remember ever seeing him on a horse, though. He also admitted being an expert at making palatable home brew. He died in Meaford, Ontario on November 13, 1969, at the age of 61. He left behind him his wife, his two children and numerous Rangers supporter remembering him as one of the winger in New York Rangers' history.


Fun & Interesting Facts:

- Dillon scored at least 20 goals in five of his ten NHL seasons
- In 1938, both Cecil Dillon and Gordie Drillon received the same amount of first and second vote position for the all-star selection
- His 8 goals in the 1933 playoffs was at the time an NHL record. It took 10 years for Don Grosso to equal it and two more to be beaten by Maurice Richard, with 12 goals


Signing &Trades:
- On January 1, 1931, he was traded to the New York Rangers by the Springfield Indians for cash (NHL)
- On May 17, 1939 he was traded to the Detroit Red Wings by the New York Rangers for cash (NHL)
- On December 15, 1940, he was traded to the Providence Reds by the Detroit Red Wings with Eddie Bush for Harold Jackson (AHL)


Abbreviation:
CAHL: Canadian-American Hockey Lague
AHL: American Hockey League
NHL: National Hockey League
RCMP: Royal Canadian Mounted Police
SOHA: Senior Ontario Hockey Association


Internet Sites:
http://www.sihrhockey.org/member_pla...id=6770&mode=0
http://nyrangerslegends.blogspot.com...il-dillon.html
http://www.beehivehockey.com/profiles_03.htm
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...847306,00.html
http://tomhawthorn.blogspot.com/2009...ayer-1913.html
http://www.hhof.com/html/newsconn.shtml
http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstra...8AD85F4C8385F9




Last edited by EagleBelfour: 02-26-2011 at 12:44 PM.
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02-26-2011, 12:37 PM
  #174
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sturminator View Post
Wow. First Sedin in the mid-200's and now this, and from veteran GMs, no less. I never thought I'd see the day when modern players became profoundly overrated in the ATD. Martin St. Louis in the top 150?! I am a huge fan of his, but this is just insane. I can actually understand an argument for St. Louis in the top-200, although I think any such argument would have to overstate his defensive value in an ATD where his size is a major hindrance, but at pick #130 he'd be one of the bigger reaches of the draft.

I guess I can see how you reached the conclusion you did by comparing St. Louis to Syd Howe, but that ignores the fact that Howe has become pretty overrated, himself. Syd only has one season of note before the bottom fell out of the league's talent pool.
At the conclusion of this season, Henrik Sedin will almost certainly have another assists crown and another top-5 in points, as well as another top-5 Hart finish most likely and another season to add to his intangibles as well. Also, on top of his top-10 assists finishes, he also has a 13th in assists in 05-06, putting his overall resume (including this year) at 1, 1, 4, 4, 8, 13.

4 top-4s and 6 top-20s in assists is elite playmaking and he absolutely deserves to be in the top-250 to 300. Don't discount his intangibles game either, he started his career as pretty soft, but he's become extremely hard to knock off the puck these days. As long as you don't count on goal scoring from your 2nd line center, this guy is solid.

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02-26-2011, 12:38 PM
  #175
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I'm going to re-iterate the idea that you guys should stop posting bios in the draft thread, just post a link to them. The people that want to read them will read them anyways, and the people who wouldn't read them anyways will just be annoyed.

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